The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00060

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewish Fleri'dlia ki
Volume 3 Number 6
and SIIOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
noliywood, Florida -- Friday, February 2. 1973
Price 20 cents
jy/F Apartment Division
Moving Towards Goal
t
Same $1,250 has become the
magic number for the members
of the apartments division of
Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wel-
fare Federation. It is the
.amount of money needed to
bring one Soviet Jew out of
Russia, and buildings through-
out Hollywood and Hallandale
are now competing to see how
many units of $1,250 they can
raise and thus, how many Jews
they can bring to Israel from
Russia.
Still working on the organiza-
'tion of the apartment division
, campaign structure as well as
netting up initial building meet-
lings, Mclvin H. Baer. cochair-
frcan of the 1973 UJA-JWF cam-
nign and chairman of the apart-
ment division, has announced
vo appointments to his commit-
tee. Dr. Larry Fisch and Reu-
ben Lefkowitz have been ap-
pointed vice chairmen and will
be in charge of the Golden Isles
district.
This is considered a most im-
portant area for the campaign
this year because of the many
new apartment buildings built
since last year's campaign. These
buildings will add new contribu-
tors to the campaign and new
workers for the Jewish commu-
nity of Hollywood and Hallan-
dale. Dr. Fisch and Mr. Lefko-
witz complete the list of vice
chairmen working in the area.
Other names previously an-
nounced are Meyer Kaplan, Je-
rome Gevirman. Sydney Holtz-
man, Nathan Pribcher, Alvin
Hess, Oscar Rozansky and Leo
Marder.
Planned as the first building
meeting of the 1973 campaign
season is an evening event plan-
ned by David Sehwartzman and
Continued on Page 10
No Shift In Attitude Toward
Israel In Inaugural Address
Meir-Pope Meeting Expected To Open
Dialogue Between Israel Vatican
JERUSALEM (JTAi Pre-
mier Golda Meir's : with
Pope Paul VI In the Vatican Jan.
115 is expected to ^pen a contmil-
ling dialogue between Israel and
Bhe Vatican shortly which wiH
concentrate on finding ways and
means to grant special legal sta-
ble to Christian holy places in
Jerusalem, informed sources said
here today.
The Pope is understood to
have expressed to Mrs. Meir his
interest in proposals for legal
formulas that would accord spe-
cial status to Christian holy
places. However, the Pontiff is
not believed to-have suggested
- "extra-territorial status" for the
Christian shrines. He is believed
to be interested in finding an-
other formula that would con-
fer special status on the sites.
Mrs. Meir, in her public state-
ment last week on her Vatican
meeting, stressed that Israel has-
no desire to administer the holy
- df other faiths.
Polity bservers here, mean-
while, have expressed astonish-
ment over criticism voiced by
Vatican sources of Mrs. Meir's
press statem nta on her meet-
ing with the Pope. They ex-
pressed particular surprise at
Italian pn'ss reports claiming
that the Vatican was annoyed
by the premature announce-
ment in Israel of tin meeting.
The news of the meeting was
announced in coordination with
the Vatican, sources here pointed
ed out.
The sources said that there
was nothing in Mrs. Meir's sub-
sequent press Interviews that
could be interpreted as an af-
front to the Pope. The inter-
views published in Israeli news-
papers and on television were
aimed at clarifying the nature
of the meeting and the develop-
ments that brought rt about, the
sources said.
WASHINGTON (WNS) No
indication of change in President
Nixon's policy toward Israel or
the Middle East was contained
in his inaugural address. Four
statements in the address were
seen as bearing on the Middle
East. They included: "We shall
support vigorously the principle
that no country has the right to
impose its will or its rule on
another by force," preserving
the long-standing U.S. principle,
opposed by the Soviet Union,
that the major powers should
not force a settlement on the
Middle East: and. "We shall do
our share in defending peace and
freedom rn the world but we
shall expect others to do their
share."
The President's philosophy, as
expressed in his inaugural ad-
dress, seemed a restatement of
the Guam doctrine of Ju)y 25,
1969, that America's allies should
take more responsibility for their
own survival within the reach
of American military power. Is-
rael had developed this concept
long before Nixon enunciated it.
A Conservative and a Reform
rabbi supplied the formal pav-
i.'-
Abba Eban To Visit
Several African States
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Foreign Minister Abba Eban
will visit several African
states in the near future in !
. an effort to strengthen Is-
rael's position on that conti-
nent following a string of
diplomatic setbacks there re- i
cently. It was disclosed here.
No dates have been set for
the tour. The foreign min- ;
istry said to be considering
which countries Eban should j
| visit. No itinerary has been j
announced. The foreign min- j
ister wJD go to Belgium Jan. I
30 to sign a common market
protocol. %
ticipation of the American Jew-
ish community during the inaug-
ural ceremonies. Rabbi Seymour
Siegel, professor of theology at
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America in New York deliv-
ered the invocation before the
.swearing in of the President for
his second term. Rabbi Siegel
invoked a blessing using Hebrew
interspersed with English trans-
lations, saying, "Blessed are you,
King of the universe, who shares
a portion of his glory with mor-
tal man."
Rabbi Siegel is believed to be
the first non-Reform rabbi to
particrpate in the inauguration
ceremonies. Rabbi Edgar F.
Magnin, of the Wilshire Boule-
vard Temple in Los Angeles,
who spoke at President Nixon's
first inaugural, spoke at the
worship service Sunday which
formally concluded the four-day
inauguration ceremonies. He
called Nixon "a modern Joseph"
and praised him as "a great
leader a beautiful human be-
ing."
Rogers Appeals To
Israelis And Arabs
NEW YORK (WNS) Sec-
retary of State William P. Rog-
ers appealed to Israelis and
Arabs to enter into some kind
of "a genuine, meaningful nego-
tiating process, direct or Indi-
rect," to achl ve peace In the
Mild' East. Addressing a fare-
well dinner for Israe'i Ambassa-
dor Yitzhak Rabin, Roue-- sal I
the United States regarded ne-
gotiations for an interim Suez
Canal agreement to be the "most
realistic approach" to an over-
all settlement. He said a final
settlement mast take into con-
sideration the rights of Israel,
the Arab states and the Pales-
tinians.
In Jerusalem, Israel official
said Rogers' speech contained
nothing new. Foreign Minister
Abba Eban said, 'There was not
a single phrase or expression
. that was not made in a
similar or identical way during
the last year." A State Depart-
ment spokesman said in Wash-
ington that Rogers' address was
"an Important restatement of
our position and an assessment
of where we stand."
Rabin praised Rogers for his
Initiative which brought about
the present Middle East cease-
fire, which he termed the "cen-
tral factor that has domiri
the Middle East in a p i Itlve
way since Augu I 1970." i rb
chairman of the Coi
of Presidents of Major
Ami;:.'-. n Jewish Organizat
sponsor of the dinner, called for
a crash program to develop al-
t< rnative sources of energy bo
the United States would not he-
come dependent on Middle East
oil producing countries.
A STREET was dedicated in
Tel Aviv recently in honor of
Yitzhak Gruenbaum, Israel's
first Interior Ambassador and
leader of Polish Jewry in the
1920> and early 19S0'. The new
street connects the south end
of ReJiov Iler/.y with the Abu
Kabir housing estate, and will
later be extended toward Bat
Yam to form the southern ap-
proach to the Tel Avlv-Ashdod
Highway.
-
1
Soviet Jewry Arrives In Israel
By MARION NEVINS
EDITOR'S NOTE: Marion Nevine wi
of group of 26 Jewieh American
urnatiata who toured throuah larael
recently under the eponaorenip of Ola
American Zloniat federation.
The heavy set woman marched
down the steps of the plane with
a purposeful air. Her fur hat, heavy
boots, stocky build labeled her
"Russian." Her arrival in Tel Aviv
as one of a group of 107 immi-
grants labeled her as a Soviet Jew.
The group was a small portion of
the more than 28,000 Jews who
had arrived during 1972 and an
even smaller portion of the 60,000
expected in 1973.
As the woman reached the bot-
tom of the stairs, a slim graying
middle aged man pushed through
the group gathered to greet the
newcomers. "Reva," he shouted
and then grabbed her in a bearlike
hug. Kisses and tears intermingled
as they embraced and then he
turned to the tall man at her
side and the two girls shyly stand-
ing by. More kisses, more hugs and
more tears followed as they walk-
ed towards the airline terminal
and the reception area set aside
for this planeload of new arrivals.
I followed them in and was able
to speak to them and to some of
their fellow passengers. Just a
few days before I had met David
Markish. son of the famed poet,
Peretz Markish. He had arrived in
Israel just a few weeks earlier and
he had told the story of his im-
prisonment and of his struggle
to leave Russia to a group of
press people at a gathering ar-
ranged for us by the Israeli Press
Assn. Now I was anxious to hear
the stories of some of these peo-
ple, these members of the Jewish
community who had not been fam-
ous and had not had the attention
of world Jewry.
Sitting quietly now in a straight
chair in a corner of the lounge,
the heavy set woman, whose ar-
rival I had just watched, was talk-
ing to her two girls. I walked
over and greeted them hoping that
somehow or other we would be
able to communicate. The lovely
17-year-old gave a broad grin and
reoDondcd with a very American
"Hi!" And so in excellent English,
which she had learned through a
private tutor, she was able to tell
me that her father had applied for
exit visas for them almost three
years ago. From then until the
day he finally secured the prized
visas he had been without work.
Through those years they had
sold everything of value they had
had and at the end, some of the
family had helped with money to
pay the ransom demanded of their
engineer father. Neither her 11-
yean-old sister or her parents
spoke English, and none of them
spoke Hebrew. Now the girls would
go to school and hopefully, the
father would find a position suit-
able to his capabilities.
Another family consisting of a
23-year-old husband and his 19-
year-old wife also told the story
of the difficulties encountered in
finding a means of livelihood once
they had applied for exit visas.
The young man, long-haired and
with wire rim glasses, was carry-
ing a guitar and hoped to make
a life for himself as a folk singer.
Confirm**! en Page 11
Israel Finance Minister Pinhas Sapir welcomes Marion Nev-
ins, news coordinator, The Jewish Floridian and Shoiar of
Greater Hollywood, to Israel.

>


Page 2
+Je*ist> flcrkfiann nd shofr Hollywood
Friday, February 2. 1973
Hallandale Hadassah Units
Slate Speakers, Luncheons
The Hallandale Chapter of Ha-
rlassah will hold a Youth Aliyah j
luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 14. i
a! the.' Americana Hotel at noon, j
Guest speaker will be Mrs. Ber-
nard Msndlcr, vice president of
the Miami Chapter. Entertainment'
\vW be provided by Ruth Raffo:
and Stave l>ubov. Chalnnan <>f the!
eveiM is Mrs. Mikon Kaufman.
Mm. Manny Kose is program stair
man.
Next nteotinx ot the Hallandale1
("K.'icr Dtactwdon Croup will be
N-'.l on Thursday. Feb. 15 at 10:30!
a.m.. in tfcfc pfttta/ l>>radp B!u;
Room. Nlrs. Harry Zeigcr, chap-
ter vice pi-esidi'iit of education, will
lead the discussion.
Group* of Hadassah have an
nounccd thr following meetings
Oh:ii i.roup meeting. Tuesday.
Feb. 20. 1 p.m. at the Home Fed-
eral nuts.. Hallandale. Harry Ros-
PtUMHdft lecturer, will speak on
the 'History of the Jewish Peo-
ik>." Mrs. <"asner A'man. nccsi-
dent, will preside. Mrs. Manny
lif.se is program chairman. On
Broward JFS Affiliates
With National Agencies
Dr. ShaUon Willing prosul -nt
nl the Jewish Family Service .>'
Broward County, announced this
week that the JFS board of direc-
tory has Riven approval to the
agency's ininin'.- the National As-
sociation of Jewish Family and
Children's Agencies. The affilia-
tion Ls planned as a step towards |
relating the activities of the local
agency to the programs and sen-!
iees of similar Jewish Family and I
Children's Agencies throughout the
country.
The national organization is ex-,
pected t" serve as a centra! bur-
eau for information, exchange of
ideal and a source of professional
standards and values for the lo-
cd Jewish Family Service. Jewish'
Family and children agencies, hta-
toncal'y. have been among the;
first organization* s;>t dp by the
Jewish communities in North
AJnvrica to mtn-t the needs of |
Jewish families or individual.-.
The origin of these services goe>!
hack to one of the basic traditions
of Jtrlaism. its concern for thi :
strens^h and wnU being of the
ftunf.y. Judaism has alwa\s placed '
emphasis on a strong and healths
iannly as Contributing to the wef ,
tiafnr, <>' the individual nir.i\b.TS er:
I He family thus insuring a healthy
well fimrtioniiK? Jf-wish rnm.ntt- (
nily. Tlie. iiimilv has been ac-
Copied in Jewish tradition as the!
n-ajiv instrument for the continu-
ity of Jtidnism. It is (trough the
i and A tliat the major cultural, so
einl and re'igious teachings and
traditions have b en transmitted
from generation to goncratlon.
The Jewish community rtsponds ]
on the JcwMi family and children
services' not only to provide a i
number of supportive services but
also to be a viable iirtmmen'
which contributes to the survival
and continuity of Judaism. That
the agencies have historically car-;
rii effective manner i< evidenced by |
the growth and d velopmenl ol
such agencies over the years. The
CSrr.ineil of Jewih Federation and!
Welfare Funds Indi ates that there
aie now 7(1 famtlv agencin re-
portmg to its statistical units.
in the 1970s, we have seen in-
creasing problems in Jewish fam-
ily lie', increasing rates ol divorce,
ItKerotarrages, Increasing evi-i
dene of rtrita abuse among our
youth, evidence of school drop-
outs, runaways. AH o! this reflects
1he growing instability of Jewish
family life in America. More fam-
try services will lx- needed to as- j
si.st families in order to insure the
Continuity Of JowMl life. Jewish
apencie*. must turn to thamselvc*
for the discussion tif common fam- j
ilv and ehildnns problems and the
services designed to meet them, j
Our agencies need a Jewish vehicle
for the exchange of ideas, knowl-
edge, information, methods and
new sen-ice developments.
Jewish life is facing a series of
crises in many parts of the world.
The unified effort of lay and pro-i
fessiona! leaders in the broad I
range of Jewi.-h communal serv-
ices is called for to help deal with j
those problems. The Jewish familv ;
and child care agencies need a
national organization of their own ,
so that they too can play a part
in the discussions of the problems
and an opportunity to contribute j
their knowledge and their exper-
tise to the solution of these prob- ;
lems.
In the context of tliese develop-
meats, it bnoame clear that the
Jewish Fa-.HiJy and Children serv-
ices could not effectively deal
with the pressures being brought j
upon them and could not mike j
'heir nwsst effective contrihutien
in the Jewish community, to
strcogthen Jewish family life antl
t( the solution of the many prob- :
lems rag/renting them, through,
'ndividual efforts of a single agency i
or through the non-sectarian na-1
tional agencies to which they be- !
long. To accomiJLsh their objec-
tives requires the unifi ation of |
efforts through a national associa-
tion of Jewish agencies which enn
relate itself to the unique need"
which are Jewish and which wii!
best serve the Jewish community
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County is now among those
agencies whose professional rtaf'
ind the programs it has deve'oped
lias met the standard, for aim's
ion into this national organize-
ion. Membership wl'l continue to
nererve and enhance th i agen y's
commitment of providing adequate
irograme to meet the asca'atinsj
social service needs of the rapidly
crowing local Jewish community.
Wednesday, tub. 28, a luncheon
1T.01 ihs-I'1-1 l, v\j,; veiTTiiiii
and card party will he held at
I he Reef Restaurant. Chairmen
are Mrs. Henry Gofberg and Mrs.
Arthur Schwartz.
Fairways Group bazaar and
white elephant sale on Wednesday,
Feb. 7, at the Home Federal BIdg..
Hallandale at 12:30 p.m. Chairmen
are Mrs, Abraham Halpciin and
Mrs. Philip Berkowit/.
Hemisphere* Croup next meet-
ing will be on Tuesduy. Feb. 20.
it i p.m. in the Ocian Terrace
room to honor Gi>!da Meir's bit th-1
day and Israel's 25th anniversary.,
Marcelle Kingsley of North Miam:
Beach will present a fashion show.
Mrs. Lawrence Dank will preside.
Program vice president Ls Mrs.
Ann Cohn.
Imperial Towers Group wil1 hold
its next regular meeting on Tues-
day, Feb. 20, at 12:30 p.m. in the
west card room. Mrs. Harry Zeiger
will review Herman Wouk's book.
"The Winds of War." Mrs. Sol
Cooper will preside. Program vi e
president is Mrs. Sydney Kpstein.
Plaza Towers will hold its
ing on Tuesday, Feb. 13, at noon,
followed by a card jiarty at the
Parker Towers. Mrs. Zachary Bee*
sin will preside. Program vice
president is Mrs. Harry Zeiger.
Parker Towers will hold its
next meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 20.
at 12:30 p.m. in the Plaza Towers
social hall. A skit entitled "A Cer-
tain Kind of Woman." will be pre-
sented by members. Program vice
president is Mis. Sid Sisholce. Mis.
Helen Fromm. president, will pre-
side.
Bass Opening Office
State Rep. Dan Bass (R-Holiy-
woodi has announced the opening
of his district office on Friday.
The office will be located at 192>
Hollywood Blvd. in the Hannan
Realty Building. The office will be
located in Hollywood, because
"that is the largest city in the
district and it is centrally located.'
according to Bass. The. office will
be o|en from 9 until 4.30 p.m.
In'.'y Monday through Friday.
4
OLD PHOTO SAVED
A
fatuity A mn a>li^KHul !y tern ini mi iiurfia witk who! was >o hn
f near IraarsY An oM ptictografh htr Bitiils wi beqinninj to fiV
She >> otroid n iuM Ma away canialattty.
She waniea la knaw whai irnri H tni .1 aayttwif loola k< 4mt la uaa
tki f o*
I aialaWMa il ai l.d-,, W<1 il ,1 tkaraiUnilii at patalaaraaks
that pwM. I laid ktr ika aMy ctiiay w.i W ioay kar aidar* ui.no
aawar aa4 mare aaHattta' nrikoa't aaa1 >k> waaM ban akaiayaak
tha-t wavM bt jail n f4 as Iba orioinal wai ikt aay il mi m%4>.
tha hVtd Ik* Mac aad ih.uihi $ 14 5 o> imaH ariia la aoy Tti* tikr
aoy n tka caaw m la aaj kat crtlarad cafy ika wai la ik-aiea' ika
afdaraa1 Iwa avplicatrt made far kar iwi brarkars.
II yaa kaaa a Iraataraa' akalafraak lhal il Wjrnnaij la laa> krl ui caay
il lai yaa kalair il il laa laH. H wa da M *i araak yaa w tmut itM.
tkat't ti|ki. rl yaa knna il ia btlart FEB. th mm mak, r a
beautiful capy, and aal katm Ikt arta>aal, tar aaty $7.^5.
Oar addrtx it SI3 N 31>! Ava. in Hollywood
and we art open from 9:30 to 5:30.
the nan an the a,Wina -el> TIM BAKU PHOTOGRAPHY
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4
r
FREDERICK S. HER0LD, M.D.
INTERNAL MEDICINE RENAJ. DISEASE
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF HIS OFFICE
WHERE HE WILL SE ASSOCIATED WITH
SANFORD D. SCHWARTZ, M.D., P.A.
INTERNAL MEDICINE
HOME FEDERAL BUILDING, GOLDEN ISLES BRANCH
SUITE 302
2100 E. HALLANDALE BEACH BOULEVARD
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA 33009
TELEPHONE
920-204i
OFFICE HOURS BY
APPOINTMENT
NOW OPEN
SILF SERVICE PRIME HEATS
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4128 N.W. 21st Street, Lauderhill
on 21st Street off 441 Across from Undsley Lumber
TELEPHONE 739-0535
-


Friday, February 2. 1973
t'Jen'isli fkjridHkmn mf Shofar of Hoiiywood
Page S

: ..

Dr. Jaffe To Speak
On 'Arab Refugees'
The Browanl Zionist District
will hold Ms next meetinn
at Temple Sinai on Tuesday, Feb.
13 at 8 p.m. Guest speaker will be
Dr, S.amuel. Z. Jaffe, spiritual
. leader of Temple Beth Kl, Holly-
wood,
- -4
IV
Dr. Jaffa's topic will be "Tho
Myth and Reality of the Arab
. Jtefueees." Dr. Jaffe is celebrating
liis l5th anniversary with Temple
. Beth >'.l and his 25th anniversary
in th> rabbinate. He was ordained
at the Hebrew Union College
. wher- h received his MHL da-
Xree, He earned his MA degree
f ii)m Teachims College' of Colum-
bia: Uniueoity. and holds a D.
Theot", from Burton University.
, He was Hie founder and president
' of the- Greater Hollywood Clergy-
mim's Krilowwitu> and was pnem-
' dent of the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami. He U presently
serving, for. a. third, term as presi-
dent of the Browanl Board of
Ratftfr.,
Dr. Jaffo has written a number
of articles dealing with religious
education and appears frequently
on television. He was the JewUh
Chatauqua Society lecturer at Mi-
ami Dade College and was recently
appointed to tho faculty of Brow-
ard Community College where he
is currently giving a course.
Also as part of the Broward
Zionist meeting there will be a
musical, program by Mrs. Belle
Millmnn of Temple Sinai of Holly-
wood She will be accompanied by
Dorothy Kowitt They will feature
songs in Hebrew Yiddish and
English.
The public is. invited to the
meeting. There will he no admis-
sion charge and no solicitation of
funds. Sam J. Perry, president of
the Broward Zionist District, will
be presiding officer.
Hadasmh Groups
Schedule Annual.
Education Forum
The Hollywood Chapter of Ha-
lassah and affiliated groups: Mt.
Scopus, Beach, H'Atid Henrietta
Szold, Hillcrest. and Shalom, will
hold, their annual education forum
Tuesday, Feb. 20 at Temple Beth
El. Hollywood. Time of the forum
will be from 10:30 until 2:30 p.m.
Topic of the day will be "Jewish
Youth in America and the Future
of Judaism." Among guests will be
Dr. Abraham Fischler, president
of Nova University, and Rabbi
Robert Frazin, spiritual leader of
Temple Soiel. Chairman of the
day is Sophia Pressman, with Mrs.
Samuel Scheinbaum as cochair-
man. o
Brunch will be served. Reserva-
tions can be made with the follow-
ing luncheon chairmen; Hillcrest,
Esther Goldberg; Beach, Miriam
Eisenberg: H'Atid, Kathy Koltun-
ovaky; Mt. Scopus. Phyllis Gold-
berg; Shalom, Zephira Kaplan and
Henrietta SzoU Lillian Packer.
JWF Women
First Meeting
Otli7$ Season
Board of directors of the Wom-
en>- PiviMon f Greater Holly-
wood's Jewish Welfare Federation
wi hoW*its.fU*t meeting of the
season on Thursday, Feb. 15. at 10
n.m. at the home of Mi's. Gerald
Siogel, 4404 PtWee St., Hollywood.
The meeting-will mark the first
tii^e that the 1973 board has met.
anfl apprize the members of the
board as- to the activities of Fed-
eration in regard to the current
campaign and. also of the many
cofiimunily wide activities in which
Federation is taking a part.
The mooting-is a'so planned so
thfi the mcnibe.CS of the board
o;iO work out Women's Division
caBipaign activ [tics.
Direct Spanish
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Spanish colonial furni-
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imported I domestic
china t porcelain
tme crystal
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Pag4
*"J&*isti flcrkMBHn "** $*'*'' f Haft/wood
Friday, February 2, 1973
wJewisti Ftcridiari
MM AM Uil K\ II UUIIHI
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.B. 6th tbbt Tblswiows $7* 4405
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephonb 920-J92
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
FED r. SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHBT SELMA M. THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Assistant to Pvbli&tr
MARION NETVINS. News Coordinator
The Jewish Florldian Does Net Guarantee The KsshrtrHi
Of The Merchandise Advertised-*!* Its Column*. *-
Published Be-Weekly by the Jcwith Flondian
Second-Claw Postage Paid at Miami, Fix.
Jewish Welfare Federation op Greater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Willens, Chairman; Ross Beckennan, Ben
Salter, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atkin,
The Jewish FloridLan has sbsorbed the Jswish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
worldwide News Servrce, National Editorisl Association, American Association
sf English-Jewish Newspapers, end the Florids Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 12.00
Out of Town Upsn Request
Volume 3
Friday, February 2, 1973
Number 6
30 SHEVAT 5733 ,

1
MATTER OF FACT mmum
i
A Negative Approach To Poverty
The bureaucratic mind often boggles the imagination.
The executive director of the Association of Jewish Anti-
Poverty Workers in New York has come up with a sugges-
tion that his organization sponsor a program to move some
of New York's poor, elderly Jews to Israel.
While the condition of a number of these Jews is ad-
mittedly difficult, particularly in slum areas which have
been taken over by other ethnic groups, the recommenda-
tion to add to Israel's problems with its own poor, not to
say the absorption of immigrants from all parts of the
world, has many uncomfortable overtones. To suggest
that the United States government share in the costs of
such an operation has implications which will become
cleor to racists and anti-Semites, if not to some Jewish
bureaucrats.
That Jewish poverty and the living conditions of many
are a matter of concern goes without saying. It is some-
thing that has been neglected for too long but, for that
matter the whole guestion of our American poor is a prob-
lem we continue to avoid. The answer, however, would
not seem to be shipping people "back where they came
from."
Golda Has Her Say With Pope
The interview in which the woman Premier of Israel
described her meeting with the head of the Catholic Church
contained nothing surprising, for no one would expect
anything less than blunt, yet polite, talk from Golda Meir.
If the historic meeting did nothing else, it reminded
the world that Christianity has played a major role in the
millenial persecution of Jews and that we have learned
our lesson only too well so that there is determination that
that sad history will not be repeated in our time. The fact
that the Vatican is, in effect, giving de facto recognition to
Israel which it has failed to do since the establishment of
the Jewish state, is an important step forward in Jewish-
Christian relations.
Another Try For Genocide Bill
It is almost a quarter-century since a bill to ratify the
United Nations convention on the prevention and punish-
ment of the crime of genocide was first introduced in the
U.S. Senate. The fact that a new bill has been offered in
this latest session of our Congress only underlines the
tragic failure to ratify similar measures for more than 23
years.
Sen. William Proxmire, who has continued to press
his fight for ratification, points out that genocide did not
disappear with the Nazis but remains a threat as ethnic,
racial, religious and nationalistic hatred have shown their
ugly faces in different parts of the world in recent years.
The Democratic leadership in the Senate has promised
to bring the ratification issue before that body early in the
session. This is a measure which should demand the sup-
port of both parties as well as religious and civic groups.
WASHINGTON, D.C. China
is now briskly preparing to de-
ploy a first group of about 10
nualear missiles with sufficient
range to reach Moscow, Lenin-
grad and other Soviet heartland
targets. The Chinese prepara-
tions, only recently observed by
the United States, are both novel
and ingenious; for the missile
sites are literally being carved
into the sides of mountains, out
of living rock.
Just when the missiles them-
selves will be married to the
sites is of course anyone's guess.
But it is certain that the Chi-
nese have already successfully
tested a new missile with inter-
mediate range of a few thou-
sand miles.
IX SOVIET eyes, as anyone
can figure out, Chinese deploy-
ment of these new missiles will
surely mean that a new phase
has opened. For the missiles in
their rough-carved sites musi
appear altogether different from
the earlier Chinese deployment,
in completely soft sites, of about
50 missiles with just enough
range to reach targets in Siberia.
In previous phase, there was
very little to deter a Soviet pre-
ventive attack upon China
provided the Soviets were ready
to use nuclear missiles of their
own to take out the short-range
Chinese missiles in soft sites. In
the new phase, such an attack
would be entirely possible
even a rock-carved missile site
cannot give full protection
against one of the huge war-
heads of the Soviet SS-9s
but it will be considerably more
risky.
THE NEW phase now visibly
ahead will obviously look for-
ward, furthermore, to the final
phase. This will come when the
Chinese add an adequate anti-
missile warning system to their
nuclear panoply. If they then
adopt a policy of "launch-on-
warning"' (as is highly likely),
the risks of a Soviet preventive
attack will finally become al-
most unbearably great.
These are the background
facts, obtained here against
which one must judge all sorts
of facts in China. They moan,
to begin with, that the Chinese
have not yet reached their long-
fought point of no return when
the Soviets must discard al!
thov'it of the attack on China
they nave been bo expensively
preparing.
Instead, the period of maxi-
mum danger still lies ahead, but
it is now getting fairly close.
For the Soviets must certain!)
mak their decision about at-
tacking or not attacking China
at one of two points in time:
either when missiles that ran
reach Moscow and Leningrad ac-
tually begin to be deployed; Or
when the Chinese begin to com-
plete the design, with a work-
able antimissile warning system.
Meanwhile, as noted in the
last report in th's space, the
danger of a Soviet preventive
attark is the true mainspring of
Chinese policy. Among other
tilings, this mainspring in fact
produced the new relationship
between China and this country.
Most in i y Prime Min-
ister Chou En-!ai told me flatly
that the first overture came
from the United States. Beyond
doubt that was in 1969 when
President Nixon violently re-
jected a rather direct Soviet re-
quest for tacit American sup-
port in immediate action against
China.
A long period was then con-
sumed by the complex minuet
that culmina'cd in Dr. Henry
A. Kissinger's first visit to Pe-
king. Prime Minister Chou men-
tioned Vietnam as a complicating
factor. But it seems clear that
an even much greater compli-
cating factor was Chinese in-
ternal politics; for the prime
minister wanted the new Amer-
ican link whereas Lin Piao and
his group quite bitterly opposed
it.
THIS WAS why Marshal Yeh
Chien-ying was the soldier who
talked with Kissinger along with
Prime Minister Chou. And since
the first Kissinger visit preced-
ed Lin Piao's flight and death,
this is also why the Chinese were
then so passionately insistent
1 that no one should learn about
Kissinger's Chinese interlocutor,
Chou's military ally against Lin,
old Marshal Yeh.
Yet it is far more important
for Americans to understand the
real basis of the new Sino-
American relationship. The basis
was none of the things that vir-
tuous people have supposed in
this country. It was. instead, the
danger of Soviet preventive at-
tack on China, acknowledged
by both sides.
For both sides, too, the new
relationship was and is founded
on hard interests. For if a So-
viet preventive attack on China
finally materializes, we in the
United States will find ourselves
living in another Hitler-time al-
beit with no Hitler.
SF.ATTLE, Washington The fiefdom of the Boeing indus-
trial complex has been battered so badly by the vagaries of war
and peace production that it is more concerned about what hap-
pens after the Paris talks than it is with President Nixon's
Phase 3. Yet wages and prices remain gut issues here. Asked
what he would do if he were President, Sen. Henry Jackson said
he would toughen the controls and make them more equal for
business and labor alike before he started to relax them.
If we needed any reminder of the role of government in the
economy President Nixon has provided the prod, clouting us
over the head with his Phase 3 decision with the same sharp
drama he had used on the earlier phases. The reactions were
contradictory, which shows that while economics may not be
a dismal science, it is a murky one Place all the economists end
to end and they won't reach an agreement.
The Wall Street market, for whatever its judgment is
worth, did a double take: first elated, with an upward price arc,
then depressed, with a downward one. At the start, the gnomes
of Wall Street thought it meant higher profits, then they took a
second look and saw it would mean tighter monetary controls,
to keep inflation in check.
6 -Cr -Cr
THE FACT IS THAT WE accommodate ourselves constantly
to new realities, which come from every direction,.including the
government. And in reacting we make choices which become part
of the reality. This applies to corporate managers, labor leaders,
farmers, traders, middlemen, consumers. That's why I prefer to
call what we have not a free economy or a managed one but an
accommodation economy.
The Nixon drcision was the first fruits of the new super-
Cabinet setup in economics with Treasury Secretary George
Shultz at the head working closely with Herbert Stein. Outside
the government the crucial voice was that of George Meany. who
was dramati ally neutral in Mr. Nixon's favor during the presi-
dential campaign.
Two of thi m are professional economists, the third a labor
er. All three are centrist moderates leaning toward a con-
servative economic, \ ,-, in time or dire stress. All are tough-
minded and believe in dials, bargaining, pressures, acc-ommoda-
Thi applies to the fourth man who will now run the op-
eration John Dunlop Harvard pi fessor, mediator, individ-
ualist. Of such is the kingdom of control in the American
economy.
Except for food, health and construction, the controls are
gone, although there are heavy hints of a "stick in the closet''
for malefactors. Conceivably it may work. The corporate and
money managers, who are supposed to care about a free economy,
are strangely skeptical of it. The liberal economists like Walter
Heller and Arthur Okun who are supposed to care about con-
trols, are Btrangely hospitable to it. All they ask is for Dunlop
to show that he means business and that he will reach for that
stick in the closet when necessary and wield it as a big stick.
WHICH SERVES TO snow how strange a science econom-
; "' !1, ""' '" > math, matfcal wizardry H boasts, actually
it isn't a science at all. Much of it is political maneuver between
interest grou] in a pluralist society, and more of it is psychology.
Mr. Nixon lacks the taste or experience for it and leaves the
technical side to his advisers. He doesn't read the fine print with
Shultz as he does with Kissinger in the area of diplomacy.
Yet Mr, Nixon retains the overall tactical role. He switched
and called himself a Keyneston when he had to strike tho note of
reassurance which only controls could give the people at the
time of Phase 1. But the Phase 2 controls have worn thin, and
besides they bore too heavily on labor. Mr. Nixon doesn't mind
paying his election debt to Meany. Also, his heart still belong- to
a less rigid, more spontaneous economy, and his hope is that
with Dunlop riding herd and with monetary controls as a
standby it may work.
But if tin essence of economics is psychological, the stick
in tho closet and the herd-riding may not prove enough of a
deterrent against blind greed and mindless price-wage escalation.
The overt stick didn't work largely because the maxima set by
tho price and pay boards became minima constantly demanded
by both sides. But will the covert stick escape that danger? I
doubt it.
One thing is clear. Mr. Nixon enters his second term with a
gesture toward a freer economy, along with a firmer political
alliance with labor. If he gets a measure of peace in Vietnam,
the war expenditures wont heat up the economy as they have
done. As for labor, Mr. Nixon needs it to support his foreign
policy in the long struggle ahead, and he hopes to coax it into
the "new majority" that he counts on bequeathing to his party.


-

Friday, February 2, 1973
Jewlstt FtrrHlir and Shofw of Hollywood
Page 5
=
^^MMWW^M^^^y^WWWVWWW>l

scene around
y Mni Ner%
Ordinarily when you return from a trip people ask whether
you had a good time but I notice that the questions are different
when you've made a trip to Israel. People don't ask whether it
was fun. In fact I don't think people categorize a trip to Israel
under the headinp of fun. It seems to me from the questioning
that they want to know what the country is really like if
they've never been there. If they have been there, they want to
know what's changed. They ask about the economic conditions,
the political situation, the military situation, the new immigrants,
the housing conditions and a million other concerns that interest
them. A few weeks in Israel is supposed to make you an authority.
On the other sido and perhaps because they are aware of the
world interest, the people of Israel treat every visitor to an in-
tensive course in the history of the mid-East democracy plus
excursions to every possible development town, kibbutz, military
installation, government office, hospital, memorial site, etc. In
the case of news media groups of which I was a member and of
groups of Jewish community leadership, there are sessions of
briefing with Israeli leadership. Tour guides themselves are so
imbued with the spirit of Israel that they evidently continually
get along on the four or fewer hours of sleep that they allow
visiting groups. During my recent trip I learned that most of us
started to share these Israeli's enthusiasm after a day or two.
Offered the opportunity to skip a tpur or a meeting with an
official, whether it was slated at 6 a.m. or midnight, most of us
showed up.
Now that I'm back home and still not feeling too qualified
to answer many questions, I have tried to sort out my impres-
sions. Thinking of all that touring, all the speeches and all the
stacks of printed matter which we were given to absorb, I come
up with 6ne thought.
What I remember are the people. No longer will I think of
Soviet Jewry as a number but rather I'll see that lovely young
girl with her beautiful eyes and straight white teeth. I'll wonJ >r
how she's getting along with her studies anil how her family Is
ad.nis'iiv;. Did her father get a job and are they learning He-
brew? I wonder. Not numbers of Soviet Jewish Immigrants bin
people.
Now I find that when I read about the problems of absorb-
ing the newcomers. I don't see a problem. I see three- and four-
year-o'ds singing nursery rhymes in a sunny room in a new
absorption center. I see their young teachers dressed in shirts
and jeans hugging and kissing their little charges as they teach
them Hebrew songs. I see their parents struggling to learn He-
brew and the native Israeli ways. I don't sec problems, I see
people.
Now when I read Israeli government communications, I
think of the many officials we met. I think of the humorous ones
who tempered their remarks with jokes. I think of the serious
ones or somber ones with their statistically laden statements. I
remember their answers to questions relating to their political
ambitions. I see the 'mother' of them all, Golda Meir being shep-
herded through a jam-packed room at an Israeli version of a
cocktail party. I sec Ben-Gurion, frail but still sharp, sitting
in the living room of his Tel Aviv home amid wall-to-wall books.
And the country has come to life for me. People Jewish
people tall thin and fat shy and bold sharp
and dull newcomers and old-timers young and old I
remember them all. _______________

a?
Mayor Weinkle
Inducted Into
JWV Post 613
"Let My People Go" was the
tiUe-of-fi movie'ShowiT'to Hwmem-
bers of the Victor B. Freedman
Past JWV 613 recently. It was
presented by Etan Gnmwald, co-
ordinator of theSouth Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry. The film
includes segments smuggled out
of Russia and gives a pictorial
background of the situation of
Jews in the U.S.S.R. at the pres-
ent time.
At the last social meeting of the
post, the "Traveling Gavel" was
presented to the members. The
gavel signifies "comradeship" be-
tween JWV posts throughout the
district.
Present at the meeting were de-
partment of Florida staff officers:
Herbert L. Gopman, commander;
M. Jay Berliner, senior vice com-
mander, William Schoenfeld. judge
advocate, and Arthur Sherry, chief
of staff. Also officiating was Jack
Berman, JWV national officer and
member of Post 613.
Milton Weinkle. mayor of the
city of Hallandale, was inducted
as a new member of the post.
ISCJW To Honor
'Brotherhood9
The National Council of Jewish
Women Hollvwood Section, will
honor "Brotherhood Week" at the
"cxt meeting on Mondav. Feb. 5 at
12:30 p.m. at Temple Sinai in
Hollywood. Guest sneaker will be
Rev. T.uther C Pier"e. na'-tor nf
the Union Congregational Church
in Hallandale.
Rev. Pierce will speak on the
subject of "A Brotherhood for the
21st Century." Rev. Pierce has vis-
ited Europe. Russia, the Middle
Rasl and the Orient during the
past five years. Last fall he was
in India and is currently interpret-
ing Indian Christianity to local
churches.
Mrs. Alan Jacobs is program
chairman for the "Brotherhood
Week" program.
New Men's Club
Names Officers
The newlv formed Men's Club
"r the Hil'el Community Day
School has announced a new
offl v. for the coming yea'-.
William Siegel was elected presi-
''"tit Viee presidents include Irving
Cirulnick, Ben Genad and Isadore
Goldman. Morton 7.--.no\ secretary
and Dr. Arnold Sheir, treasurer.
Mr. Siegel served as pro-tem
president during the organization
period of the club. He has been
lent ol B'nal B'rith Brandeis
Lo Igc for two years.
The new organization attracted
41 members to i' first meeting.
Vnyone Intereste I In joining can
do -" by contacting Mr. Siegel or
the school office.
LUNCHEON DINNERS
11:30 A.M. 11:00 P.M.
SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS
1:00 P.M. 11:00 P.M.
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O08 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY, DANIA
PHONE 920-7077
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DON'T FUSSOR MUSS FOR M00 & UP
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will take care of all'
your sewing problems
Residence Phone 1-920-2690 Parker Plaza
Ph 925-4382 Same Day Service
In 1963, Truman presented to the Kansas City, Mo., Jewish
Community Center, a JWB member agency, a plaque honor-
ing the memory of his one-time haberdashery partner, Eddie
Jacobson, who arranged the White House meeting between
President Truman and Dr. Chaim Weizman, president, Jew-
ish Agency for Palestine, which ultimately led to U.S. rec-
ognition of Israel. From left to right are Mr. Truman, who
was honorary chairman of the Eddie Jacobson Memorial
Foundation; Louis A. Cumonow, a former center vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Eddie Jacobson; Hyman Brand, center honorary
vice president and memorial plaque committee chairman,
and Sol E. Margolin, center executive director.
T J'S
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1801 So. IBM Drive 922-0564
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CSEDiT I LAYAWAY PLANS
BLANCA'S BOUTIQUE
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Dade 949-8120-Broward 920-8631


.-
.
Page 6
+Jcisl ffrriaF/rir? "' Shofar of Hollywood
Fridey, February 2, 1973 H
Silver
Galahad North And South
Host Brunches Feb.
Lee Baer, ehairmm of the Gala-
had North 1978 Campaign Commit-
tee Cor I'JA-JWF. has announced
J. D. GtlltR
that Ihere i!l h> a brunch for
tenants of the building on Sunday.
Fib. 11 at 10 a.m. in the recrea-
nt Working with Mr. Bi-er
en of the committee
".i tin Hasp an I S<
f I i .1 >n is the h noi ary
M nl ers of thi ..'..;. c n-

B Estein, Wi
Cohen, Jb K Co*
i Farr Ma ;. Fe S im
FeW nan, M I, Ma -A-
Gold, Caroline Hoiieyman, .'
Kra ten, Banuail Kraaton, Ida
-l_ii\m, lieli.- Mosheim, Hani
Gipatein, Jovph p rlsteii Edward
Shapiro. Max Shapiro. Paul Siev-
i/. Ralph Sosnowitz, Louis Wolf-
berg and JuHua Zimmerman.
A Sunday brunch wi'.l be held
al Galahad South on Fob, 11 at
10 am. in the rwnation room of
the building. The gathering will
be under the sponsorship of thr.
apartment division of uja-.jwk
Chairman of the Galahad South
1973 committee is Arthur Rubin ;
who will preside at the mectln :
CochaJrmen ar? J. D. GeBer, Rob-j
ert Hoffman and Jack Solot.
SnaaMng at the meeting wi'" |
be David Zdhar, fi-st secretary
JYDA In First
Annual Confab
On Monday, Jan. 22. Tuesday,
and Wednesday Jewish Youth T)i-
rectora of America held its Brat
anniMl convention at the Dunes
Motel in Miami Beach. Mrs. Shir-
ley M. Cohen, national secretary,
plnnned the event. Mrs. Roz Seidel.
youth director of Temple Sinai,
Bollywood, assisted in the plans.
A banquet was held Monday
Evening at Temple Beth Shalom.
catered by Louli Farber.
Dr. Alien I. Rutchik. PhD. for-
merly regional director of yoifth
of the Cnited Synagogue of Amer-
ica. as Rue*! aoeaker. Marshal*
Ba'tu-h. regional director of L'SY
xtended greetincEB.
CAMP REPRESENTATIVE
Far Excellent FIFTY YEAR 01D Pri-
vate Resie'eat Summer Comp Ex-
cellent Proposition. Write FYO, lex
3973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
of the
Mrs. J. Shapiro
To Be Honored
At a luncheon
The Sisterhood of Temrale Beth
Shalom will hold its annual sweet-
heart luncheon on Wednesday. Feb.
14 at 11:30 a.m. in the new ball-
room of the temple.
Mrs. Jack Shapiro, wife of the
temple's praafdent, and an active
suppnrtei and worker for the tem-
ple and for the Sisterhood, vvi'l be
luncheon honoree. Mr. and Mrs.
Shapiro are the benefactors of the
new Beth Shalom Religious
School.
The Habimah Players, familiar
to Hollywood, will entertain.
Mrs. Peter Bouer is chairman
Israeli Kmbassy in Wash-,of ,he lunchPon and wi arran.,,.
Haspef
Gordon
Zohnr has served in
for table reservations. Reservations
ington. Mr.
the Israeli foreign service since i aUo c mig a, tne |(
l%o and has held positions in! 0ffiPl,
Nepal, and Bombay, India, and I _i_______________________
has served in his present position! lT'^x,,.^,..',. /aRT
since September of 1972. rP Olltt'll S \JI\1
Working on the committee 1973
campaign for I'.TA-JWF are Paul
Barnett
lei, jgjuen ri'.-i-iiiii, neiie nuiu-l
man. Benjamin London. Sydney, The Sheridan Heights Chapter
Holt/man Jack Nelson. Max Pri- of Women's American ORT wii'
makov, Sam Ratner. William | hold an auction on Saturday. Feb
Schulman, Sylvia Shapiro and
Plans Auction
ernett, Batelle Beron. Ethel End-: ^rtfunlfix- Nitrht
r. Albert Freeman, Irene Holu.\^aT"r"a} >'"'
Samuel 5' ">'-' Residents of Gala-
had South will be welcome at the
m ling Reservations can be made
by contacting any member of the
committee or by calling the L'JA-
JWF offici -
'' at Chaminade High School be-
-inning at 8 p.m. Admission wil'
be free.
Brand name merchandise has
been donated by local businessmen
and merchants especially for thi
sale. Proceeds will lie used by ORT
for its rehabilitation and educa-
tional program for disadvantage)
youth.
In charge of the event is Mrs.
Barry Roth, and Mesdames Sandv
Balber, Sheldon Klaff, Richard
Knee, Joel Liss, Bruce Moidel. Me!
Tallievt and Marin Wasserman.
(Left to right) Roz Seidel, youth director of Temple Sinai,
and Shirley Cohen, of Temple Beth Shalom and national
secretary of the Youth Directois of America.
Hamburg Speeds Trials of War Criminals
Fairways Hadassah Plans
White Elephant Sale
The Fairways Group of Hadas-
e'ephanl sale Wednesday. Feb. 7
at 12:30 p.m. at the Home Federal
Bidg. on HaUandal Blvd.
Mrs Charles Ancle, fund-raising
vice president, has announced that
the following women will be in
charge: Mis. Abraham Halperin.
chairman; Mrs. Herman Levitt, co-
chairman: Mrs. Jacob Bernstein.
hospitality chanrman, and Mrs.
Philip Berkowrtz, cochainman.
CHI CHI'S
PIZZA
WE DELIVER
PHONE 922-4244
1206 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, Hollywood
AUTO PAINTING
FOREIGN
DOMESTIC
TERRACE PAINT AND BODY
"YOU WRECK 'tat""WI FIX" 'EM"
COMPLETE BODY & PAINTING SHOP
TERRACE AUTO FRAME SHOP
-YOU BEND EM" WE MEND 'INI
ALL TYPE OF AUTO FRAME REPAIR
2301 S.W. S9
T E KB CI
966 0349
N. HOLLYWOOD
MMI lllK\si'ii:i
ART'S FURNITURE CLINIC
Specializing in all wood furniture repairs
REFINISHING STRIPPING ANTIQUING
Nothing too small but large quality of workmanship
Call for any information
930-7122
Reasonable Professional
420 S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood

BONN (.TTA^ A judicial
source in Hamburg last week
said that the city intends to
speed up its trials of Nazi war
criminals. Justice Hans-Joachim
Seeles said that seven courts will
be assigned 1o deal exclusivi ly
with Nazi criminals during the
next few years.
He said that 28 years after the
war. "This chapter must be
closed as quiikly as possible,
for lotjal and political reasons."
The move follows protests in
Hamburg over the long time re-
quided for justice to be done. It
also followed a letter from Nazi
hunter Simon Wiesenthal in Vi-
enna to Chancellor Willy Brandt
which pointed out that 68 trials
involving 2.000 alleged Nazi
war criminals are still pending.
HRIFTY
RENT-A-CAR
In Hollywood & Hallandale
NEIGHBORHOOD & AIRPORT SERVICES
Weekdays 927-1761 3000 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Evenings & Weekends 525-4355
FULL TIME SEAMSTRESS, SHIRTS, ALTERATIONS
REPAIR WORK ALL DONE ON PREMISES
One hour
"mimm:
THE MOST IN DRV CLEANINO
ACROSS FROM BROWARD HIGH SCHOOL.
1910 N. FEDERAL WY. 923-1133 HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
HERZFELD & STERN
Established 1880
mimiki aanryamt arocic cxchambc
3906 B. OCEAN DRIVE,
HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
HIWrMK PHILADELPHIA PALM BEACH MIAMI ICACH
CNCVA AMSTERDAM
JOHN R EATON, Manager
SHELDON D. BERMAN, Co-Manager
STUARTS RESTAURANT
and COFFEE SHOP
1841 N. YOUNG CIRCLE, HOLLYWOOD
SPECIALIZING IN PARTIES FOR ALL OCCASSIOMS
"Too Provide Guests We Do All The Hut"
OPEN 5 A.M. TO 8 P.M.
BREAKFAST LUNCH DNNER
TAKE OUT AND DELIVERY SERVICE
CALL 925-9090


I

Friday. February 2, 1973
* letVist) FlkiriicHain *nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
Women Are Acquiring 'Full Citizenship'
By BORIS SMOI.AR
(Kdilor-iu-Chld Emerlbw. .ITA)
(c), Jim Jewish Tplegraplilo Agency)
Women are comin.K more and
inorcjo ih^fo-cl'ioru in organized
AniPrWRn Jewish corrirnuimy life,
both as contributors for Jew lah
causes and as leaders. Their par-
ticipation in all major Jewish or-
ganizations is becoming mor.' no-
ticeable. Without advancing Wom-
en's Lib theories, they are acquir-
ing "full citizenship" in every
phase of Jewish organizational
activity.
Today you have women in the
ranks of the top" leader.Jhip of the
Council of Jewish Federations and
WYllare Funds, in UJA. in the
Joint Distribution Committee and
in other national Jewish groups.
About 13'.; of the members of
I he Iviard of directors of the Jew-
ish Federations in the top 10 cities
are women. Their percentage is
even higher in the middle popula-
tion communities: and in the
smaller communities they consti-
tute about 22%.
Over the last seven years the
number of women serving on
boards of Jewish Federations has
increased by BOO*. A similar in-
crease is seen also in the number
of women serving on Federation
committees as officers. The ambi-
tion of leaden of the Women's Di-
visions and some of them say
so openly is to join the male
leadership cadre as equal partners
in top policy-making bodies. They
want to make their views known
and their opinions felt. They do
not want to spend their time mere-
ly as volunteers on fund-racing.
WOMKX IX FUND-RAISING
There was a time not very
long before the Si\-Dav War of
1967 when the UJA raised about
S45 million a year from all its
Bourses. This year, the UJA's
Women's Division alone raised S40
million. This was money secured
from women, independent of the
contributions their husbands made
to UJA.
The $40 million is not the only
large sinn raised this year by
women for Jewish causes. Millions
of dollars have been collected in
1972 by Jewish women's groups
other tnan the UJA Women's Di-
vision.
Iladassah. with its 3"0.000 mem-
bers, is raising about SIS million
a year. The Women's American
ORT. with its 100,000 members,
has raised this year about $3 mil-
lion. Substantial sums of money
have been raised in the course of
the year by National Counril of
Jewish Women which lias 1(10.0 0
members. Also by the Women's
Division of the American Jewish
Congress, by the Pioneer Women
which raises fund- for HLstadrut
institutions in Israel, and by nu-
merous other Jewish women's
groups.
The contributions made this
year by women for UJA total
about 15'; of the entire UJA in-
come for the year. In this connec-
tion, it is worth noting that in ad-
dition to New York, six communi-
ties have reached over ?1 million
ach in women's gifts t;> UJA. They
are ChilagO, Cleveland. Detroit. Ix>s
Angeles, Philadelphia and San
Francisco.
New York's UJA Women's Di-
vision has raised over S8 million
in addition to about S4 million
raised by the women's division of
the New York Federation. Balti-
more. Newark ar.d Miami raised
ever S750.000 each, while Boston.
Pittsburgh. Washington. Houston
Milwaukee and Montreal have
each raised more than S300.000.
The gifts of $5,000 and over pre
-cited by women accounted for
almost 10'; of the total raised by
women's divi ions in KB cities. Th-
rifts o' $1,000 and over accounted
"or 43r; in these cities. Altogether
he $40 million raised for UJA hy
Question Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
What la the origin of the vir-
tue of visiting the sick?
- The Jewisn cot'e of law (Shu!
char; Aruk-Yore Dea 3351 cite
this requirement as a religiou
law. The Talmud iNedarim 3913'
cites this practice as a great virtu'
and explains that..visiting the sic''
helps relieve him of part of hi'
illness.
Some moralists explain there is
no fperifi? law in-the Bib'e com-
manding a man to visit the sick
the practice comes under the gen
oral requirement of emulating thr
Almighty who is often projected
as a God of concern.
Man, being the Image of Cod
must likewise be concerned. Th<
'rabbis explain that the Almighty's
visit to Abraham was for the pur-
pose of visiting a sick man. since
Abraham had just undergone cir-
cumcision. The Almighty, there-
fore, -bowed the example for
gone circumcision. The Almighty
therefore, showed the example for
at] humanity to follow. The Tal-
mud |e, lai i such nobl deeds to
be matters of boon U -s virtu.'.
Why :!n many lews hnlst OB
eating 1it f"'d Q Sattbttfji
when ii is possfrfe tA slmpl; <
only cold looeT o-i the Sabbath?
Generally "" ''"'' '" '
luxurious ol all
poi d (' be tli Sabbath n
l8 a means dec^arfi "' '
ba* daj as a "delight. W
food I ;
luxurious than col I.
However, there > ed o a histo i-
eal featura involved here Ap
ntiy. many ei ntories ago,
jewi-i. seats like the Karaites in-
terpreted the scriptures to mean
the women came from 13r>,130|
donors.
The Sisterhoods of the Reform
temples and of the Conservative
synagogues seem to be the only
wotheHV group, expressing dffifart'
isfaction with their status. At the
national convention of Temple Sis.
lei hoods last month, speakers
barged that women active in
American Reform Judaism are b -
ing "relegated to serving tea and
cookies." They (k nanded an "equal
partnership" in the policy-making!
deiisions ol the Reform movement.
Similar complaints were voiced I
by Sisterhoods of the Conservative!
movement. At the present time,1
there are only two yvomen on the
tXO-member hoard of trustees of!
the Union of American Hebrew I
Congregations.
INFLUENCE AT HOME
The active participation of the
nany thousands of Jewish women
in the fund-raising campaigns for
the Federations. UJA. ORT. Ha- !
jassah and other groups need not
he evaluated merely from the
point of view of securing more
funds. The activities of the women
In fund-raising have also another
value of great Importance per- i
laps ol even greater imjiortanec:
than raising funds. They help also
to strengthen Jewish identity in I
the entire family.
Through their activities, the
Jewish women bring fresh Jewish
interest into their homes. Th-v
share their interest at home in
conversations with their husbands
and children. The husbands may
be busy with their daily problem*,
and the children may even be in-
different to Jewish life, yet .1
good deal of Ihc discussions initi-
ated by the women in the family
leave a mark. 'Die husband is Im-
pressed and his direct interest in !
Jewish matter- Increases. The chil-1
dren are impressed and are be-
ginning to give a second thought
to what their mother relates. The ;
atmosphere at home thus becomes
more and more Jewish.
Tt is a mistake to think that
Sisterhood Plans
Interfaith Mr<>t
"Reflections of Jewish Women"
will be the robjed for discussion
nt ihc Intrafaith luncheon meel h i
a -y lc Beth B! Sisterhood.
Tuesday. Feb. 13. Affair starts at
t' :30 am. m
to one should keep any fire burn-
-ig in his home on the Sabbath,
"his would mean that there would
c no way of keeping the food
varm.
The rabbis interpreted the verse
n question (Exodus 35:3) to mean
hat one cannot kindle the fire on
he Sabbath but one can allow the
ire to keep burning once it has
>een lit before the Sabbath. In
rder to demonstrate that the
Canutes were wrong in their in-
rpretation of this verse, the rah- j
Ms insisted that j>eoplc eat warm i
ood on the Sabbath.
As a matter of fact, the author
of the Jewish Code of Law iShul-
ehafl Aruk, Orach''Chayyim 257:8)
said that "the one who does not
accept the words of the rabbis and
lOrbids hot food from being con-
sumed on the Sabbath is suspected
of being a heretic."
The same sect also does not al-
low any lights to be on in their
homes on the Sabbath. Then fore.
the rabbis made it a requln menl
to hm- I- in tiic house on the
ath.
II is Tor this reason thai the
are 111 at least a hall ho ir
m on Friday
nedi over tl
itance or liav-
house on the Sab
j] ,i. ad tting In the da k,
like the
Israeli Furniture Here
Harry Rid lent of the
,.| Chamber ol
Comroi :l thai the
ring an exhibit
, Israeli furnltun and acces
... paii ol tin- a leteation of
Israeli's 25th anniversary. The ex-
hibit will lai thi Genera]
Mica Corp., 3898 NE 2nd Ave.,
from Feb. 14 to 23, 9 to 5 p.m.
UJA serves only the purpose of
collecting funds for Israel and for
the relief and reconstruction work
done by the Joint Distribution
Committee ovei seas, Although not
established for this iris-ion. UJA
also serves indirectly to strengthen
Jewish consciousness among Jew?
in this country. It thu- Influenc
them to hi aware of their Judaism
and of their obligations to Jew i I
mat tcrs.
Implanting this feeling is the
emir, system on which UJA Is
built, however the distinctive role
in which thousands of women of
many talents and temperaments
mostly homemakers play, is be-
ing appreciated more and more
with every year. The women ac-
tive in UJA are certainly not being
"estricted to serving tea and
'"lobies.
Participants representing
three branches of Judaism, Orth >-
do\. Conservative und Reform,
will he Mrs Arthur Rosean, Tem-
I pie Both Shalom: Mrs. Bret I.u--
skin. Tl mple Sinai; Mrs. Marvin
Lee, Temple Israel; Mrs, Me'.vin
Spencer, Temple So'el; Mrs. Mor-
tal Cole, Ten ,;, Beth El. Mrs.
Morton L. Abram, Temple Beth
, j.;i m'!' be moderator
Airs. Joseph Shme!zer, chairman
j of int. rfaith I r Temple Beth El
Sisti rhood, will Introduce 'he pan-
I ili-is. A question and ans\\ t
] riod will iollow the discussion,
\ Temple Sinai Men's (Huh
To Hoar Book Review
The Men's Club of Temple Sinai
is holding a luncheon on Wednes-
day, at noun, in the temple. Occa-
sion for the luncheon will be th
celebration of the anniversaries of
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Feinberg and
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Gerson.
A liook review by Shirley Smith
will be featured on the program.
The book to he disbursed 's en-
titled "Listen My Children."
Reservations ran 'v mad,' by
calling the temple office.
SUNSWEET
APRICOT
APPLE
PRUNE r
JUICE
Bring home
a bunch of
Family Winners
Keep a tempting variety on your
pantry shelf and serve them often-
pure fruits, pure fruit juices and
creamy puddings. Unexcelled for
quality and valueand for winning
family cheers.
From
MOTTS' & SUNSWEET
K ALL CERTIFIED KOSHER
NOW
1 ^v-' ww Motls'and Sunsweet Juices are
also available in handy elusler paks ol o
individual servings.
NOW
' '^-' Cro-amy puddings from
Motts' in cluster paks of 6 individual servings.
Choice of flavors for meal time and nosh lime,
at home, work or school.
V
-..

I


Page 8
+Je*istincrkBan Shof* of Hollywood
Friday, February 2. 1973

Women's Leadership Training Institute
The Women's Leadership Train-i
ing Institute of Jewish Welfare
Federation of Greater Hollywood!
will hold another in its series of I
educational programs on Thursday, j
Feb. 15, at S p.m. at the home of ]
Mr?. Louis Kurland, 3791 N. 41st'
Ct., Hollywood. The program a re-
view on the book "Forged In Fury"
by Michael E!kin, the story of
some of the survivors of the holo-
caust and their continuing fight
for justice.
The Ltark:.ship Training Insti-
.xi'
Rachel Abramowi'.z and Marly Jacobson, program chairman
I
1
1
Sue Mllier, Gail Cohen, Audrey Meline

Bea Langel, Elaine Fleisher

tute has been planned as an educa-
tional program for women of the
Jewish community. Meetings are
planned on a monthly basis with
each program offering some new
fields of interest to the women.
During the year guest speakers,
experts in their fields, give the
women the benefit of their exper-
tise in presenting their subject to
the group. The sessions have cov-
ered such subjects as "Jewish His-
tory," 'Keeping a Jewish Home,"
and "Jewish Song."
Copies of th" book "Forged in
Fury" have been distributed to
the women of the institute so that
they may take part in the discus-
sion following the review. Those
wishing to attend who have not re-
ceived the book can git one by
Doming to the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration office at 1909 Harrison St.
American Music
On Parade For
Feb. 13 Meeting
Tuosdav Morning Musicale or
Hollywood will meet Tuesday. Feb.
18, at 10:30 a.m. in the St. James
Eoiscoppl Church Social Hall 3329
Wilson St.. Hollvwood. Tuesday
Morninc Musiralo is a member of
Florida State and the Nationn'
Federation of Music Clubs. Th-
meeting is to be a narade of
\" icin rri v 't: rial Federation of Mu ic
Clubs.
Mrs Robt-rl TV Ma?or is chair-
man of the fifth annual co*nno
contest and will presenl awards to
the winner* who will present their
compositions,
Mrs, Allen Barr is hostc*-; chair-
man, with assistant hostesses Mrs.
Herbert Engwald, Mrs. d. a
Drucker, Mrs. M. C. Fecte&U, Mrs.
Sylvester Gervais, Mrs. Louis X.
Garfunkl, Mr\ Edward Mead.
Mrs. John Hardekopf, Mrs. Rus-
sell Spahr, Mrs. William Veale.
Mrs. Robert H. Feldman, Mrs.
Harry F. Rodman and Mrs. David
Robblns.
NEED
A
HOBBY?
LEARN GEM CUTTING
and FACETING
MAKE YOUR OWN
JEWELRY IN OUR SHOP
WE TEACH YOU.
JACK'S GEM SHOP
414 S.DIXIE HIGHWAY
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA
Phone 927-9592
SUZANAj
*
Mary Gather, Phyllis Cesler, Nan Schwarzenfeld.
? PRINCESS 1
professional f
priental j/
.Dancer
*- Alt*:
* HM>MwiMS,
"Ttii t Matrons1
J leorn IKt I
J Popular Art
I *
* My
Denting
fxmem
KM
HEALTH,
WOT POSTIW, ENTKTAINAI.NT
PRIVATE < GtOUP CLASSES
Hhmmgt. Afternoon. Ittnir.qs
U AIo Availobie for Partt*i,Club *
Outts A Union Enlerloinmtnt ..
W 966-0032 J
*
i
USY At Beth Shalom To Present Program
Tembers of the United Syna-
gogue Youth of Temple Beth Sha-
lom will take over the next meet-
ing of the temple's Sisterhood on
Monday at 8 p.m. Conducting the
program, young people will tell
some of their purposeful activities
in drama and song presentations.
Mrs. Shirley Cohen is youth su-
pervisor of the temple. Refresh-
ments and a social hour will fol-
low the presentations.
BBB
fXPIRT
PAINT JOBS
COUISION*
REPAIRS
*WOfAINTmi BODIES?,
EXPERT*
BODY WORK*
FREE
ESTIMATES*
INSURANCE CLAIMS _____________
2245 PEMBROKE RD. fO O *5 jCQ^O
2 BLOCKS WEST OF DIJPIE |/A<3'V/Ha1
10% Discount with this Ad
ytuAio* @CeUte>t&, Ikc.
CLEANERS OF FINE WEARING APPAREL
NOW SERVING
Hollywood Hallandale .
Pick up & Delivery
PLANT AND OFFICE
2427 W. BROWAR0 BOULEVARD
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA
CALL
PLANT
513-8225
iidit
Gild it? Lilies?
Nope! Life!
Sowhy not add a little glitter to-life?
Gild it! Life!
Move Aheadthat's what banking's all
about.
nnTionRL
BnnMS
P'RST nRTionaL brrw of hollvujooo
CORNtB HOUVWOOD BOU11VHD 1 Min AVENU6 HOUVWOOO SK77 M0 457
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IWO EAST HAUANOALE BEACH BOULEVARD MAllANOAlf 3300B M0- sccono nnTonRL brdh of uiest hollvujooo
MOLirWOOO FASHION CtNtfB US 4I ANO HOUVWOOD BIVO HOUVWOOO M0J1 N4HH


. Friday February 2. 1973
+3cwls*florkBcHl and Shofar of Hollywood
Page %
Parker Plaza Hosts
Israel's David Zohar
Graduate Student Study Program Open in Israel
David Zohar, first secretary of
Israel's Embassy in Washington,
will be guest speaker at a meeting
8 meeting are Morris Altman, Bar-
bara Brown, Lcala Feinson, Al
Field. I.on Holland. Martin Ilar-
nick, Abe Horwitz, Charles Mele-
med, Bernice Radio, Betty Nel
Dr. Al Rosenfeld, Sam Redder,
and Samue! Schnttzer.
The Parker Plaza meeting is
open to tenants of the building.
There is no chnrse for adml' ;"".
1-18-3 GRADUATE STUDENT S
A number of openings for grad-
uate students to study in Israel
I under the auspices of the World
j Union of Jewish Students are still
ivailable. according to Aryeh Roe-
j kach. director of the Israel Pro-
Crams office at the YM-YWHA.
Students accepted for study in
\ Israel will follow a one year
work-study program conducted by
*he World Union of .Tew sh Stu-
dents Institute in the newly cstab-
llshed town of AradL
The first six months of the year-
Vvvg T"-o" a'i wi'l '' oVvot1"!! to
learning Hebrew, studying a va-
riety of Jewish subjects, touring
the country and working 10 days
on a kibbutz or moshav. The sec-
ond half of the program will be
devoted to work in Israel.
Subjects offered include Intro-
duction to Israel Policies. Mysti-
cism, Hassidism, Arab National-
ism, Kibbutz Ideology and Anti-
Semitism.
Apartments at the institute have
I one or two bedrooms, kitchen. v-
i ing room and balcony. All meals
are served In the Institute's dining
room and there is a library and
club room. Shabbat and holidays
are celebrated in ia traditional
vein.
At the completion of the year
students may return home or set-
tle permanently in Israel. '
Applicants must be 30 years
old or younger and arc usually un-
married.
Further information may he ob-
tained from Aryeh Ro'.kach at
the YM-YWHA, or by writing di-
rectly to the WUJS Institute.
DAVID ZOHAR m
at the Parker Plaza Gold Room
on Feb. 8 at 7:30 p.m. The meet
Walt orcanized by Max I.ieberman,
chairman for U.TA-JWF, in the
Parker Plaza building.
Mr. Zohar i a g late o
brew University in Je md
also has a master's degree from
Bombay University in India. He
served hi the Israeli Army and
was a participant in the Six-Day
War. He has been a newscaster in
the Israel Overseas D pa tmcnl
and a member of the Israeli For-
eign Servici inc 19 "V
During h!s foreign service, he
served as second secretary In the
Israeli Embassy in Kathmandu
Nepal; a vice consul in the Is-
raeli Consu'ate in Bombay, India,
and has been in his present posi-
I tion in Washington since Sep-
tember 1972.
Committee members working
with Mr. Lieberman on the 1973
UJA-.TWF campaign and the Feb.
6iULA GIIL
Singer Geula Gill
To Appear At
Beth Shalom
Geula GiM. i
singing star, w
fnnance at T
i--m Arthur St
22 at 8:30 p.m
ance is one of
bv the temple's
mittee.
nternational Israe'i
,-ill aooear in a ner-
rmoie Beth Sha'nm.
;. on Ttvrsiav. Feh.
Miss Gi'l's annear-
the events n'anned
cultural series corn-
Miss QH1 has nnD^nred \i i">n-
ce-t tours throi"ho"t the T'";t '
States Canada, Cent**! and So"*h
America, Euro"". Africa a"d So-
viet J'nion. Sh^ has cut records for
<' bis an"1 FMi" anl ha ap-
peared on television nhows with
Merv Griffin KH Stf'ivan. Stw
A'len Johnny Carson and Mike
Douglas.
Reservations can he made bv
cal'ins t^e tenrol" o'ffice or ticket
chairman, Jack Kleiner.
I
Hollywood Federal's Save By Mail service saves travel time, saves
effort, saves money, and we save you more money by supplying
the postage ^t both ways. <^^ See a Hollywood Federal
Savings counselor for full details.
1
\s
I
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Ben Kaplan, Manager, Hallandale Office.
DANIA WEST HOLLYWOOD DAVIE HALLANDALE
I ...
Phone:925-8111 Phone: 923-8241
EMERALD HILLS
19H0L|LrStreet 140S. FeT"l Hwy. -,950 Washington Si. G100 Gi.H.n Rd. 2401 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd. Sunday,St.
*?.09.!y!frc,!',,, T;. qm.kmi Phone: 98L-2000 Phone:584-5000 Phone: 920-1616 Phone:966-9900


Page 10
*Je*isti norldUan nd Shofsr of Hollywood
Friday, February 2, 1973
Golda Meir To Meet With Jewish j Att. Gen. Robert Shevin
Leaders On Israel's Economic Needs Speaks At Police Institute
Plans tor dealing with Isra "-
Immediate and long-range ecq-
nomic problems will bo consid-
ered at an extraordinary con-
ference of 50 Jewish leaders in-
vited by Prime Minister Golda
Meir to neel in Jerusalem from
Sunday, Jan. 28 through Wednes-
day, Jap. '!.
The conference participants,
from communities in the United
States and Canada, will depart
for Israel from New York's
John F. Kennedy Airport on Sat-
Uruguayan President
Reassures Jewry
By JOSi: JEROZOLIMSKI
(Oopyriuht by the Jewish
Chrome).- NeWS A Feature Service)
MONTCVIDEO For a Ion*
time in the late summer of 1972.
after the Uruguayan Army had
finally broken the Tupamaros -
the terrorist group which commit-
ted many murvt-rs. kidnappings
and other crimes in the country
the Jewish community of 50.000
was fearful that anti-Semitism
would begin to take hold in Uru-
guay.
People began making remarks
such as. "Now that the Tupamaros
have been dealt with it is your
turn." and allegations were voiced
that the problems facing Uruguay
were due to illegal economic ac-
tivities by Jews. When the Army
detained a number of Jews at mili-
tary centers and interrogated
them about their possible involve-
ment in illegal economic activities
fear began to grow among Uru-
guayan Jewry,
Mi\ed with this fear was a
certain puzzlement, because nei-
ther officials nor the armed forces
have ever shown any signs of be-
ing anti-Semitic, and the ordi-
nary Uruguayan has never re-
sponded to tho occasional anti-
J'-wish speech or declaration made
by some politically obscure indi-
vidual*
However, before the situation \
could glow any more strained
President Bordaberry called the j
leaders of the community together
find rcassuied them. There would j
be no anti-Semitic pressures of any ]
X'.nd, he declared.
The President's remarks were
I followed by the gradual release of
nearly all Jews detained by the
! Army when they had been later*
' rogated. without any charges being
i preferred against them so far. Uru-
' guayan Jewry's fear has subsided
j and all is calm today.
But the future is not unclouded.
The Tupamaros have affected the
'iberal and democratic spirit of
the Uruguayan |>eople and opened
the way for right-wing newspapers
such as the weekly Azul y Blanco
which despise the Constitution
iemncratlc elections and public
opinion.
It is the left-wing press. Com-
munist and others, which pub-
lishes articles and reports about
"Jewish world conspiracies to ex-
'enninate non-Jews" or the exist-
ence of "mysterious and blood-;
stained Jewish funds."
Just (he same, two Jews were;
recently appointed to Important
*>sts. Moises Cohen has become
Uruguay's first Jewish minister.
He now holds the Finance and
Kconomy portfolio, while Samuel
I.ichtensztein has been elected
president of the University of the
Republic in Montevideo. Both jobs-
are sensitive ones.
Economic questions loom large
on the Uruguayan horizon, mak-
ing Mr. Cohen's ministry even
more important than it would nor-
mally be. As far as Mr. I.ichten-
sztein is concerned, the university-
he now heads has been in disagree-
ment with the authorities and has
been accused of extreme left-wing
political activities.
JWF Apartment Division
Moving Towards Goal
Continued from Page 1-
William Littman. chairmen of
the Hemispheres complex. The
gathering will feature the Habi-
mah Players and will be held in
1he Hemispheres auditorium or.
Monday at 8 p.m.
Next on the list of gatherings
planned by the apartment divi-
sion for individual buildings is
an evening at the Parker Pla/a
on Thursday, Feb. 8. Plans for
this meeting were coordinated
bj Max Ueberjnan, chairman of
the Parker Plaza building for
the UJA-JWF campal pi commit-
tee. The meeting w ill take place
at 7 30 p.m. in the gold room of
the apartment house and will
fi a< re David Zol
retary of the bra li Embassy
in Washington. Mr, Zohai
been a mem!
i I, e 1965 an
, | in Ni in India
i .it.
Was! ir,';-'-
Mr
a mo
Sunday Feb 11 at H
i planned
i, chaii '' m ol
South and
r, Rob 11 Hoffman an I
Jack Soiot. It will ha held In the
,ition i oom o[ Galahad
South.
On the same morning. Leo
Beer, chairman of Galahad
North with cochaarmen. Martin
Haspel and- Sol Singer, have
planned a brunch at 10 a.m. in
the recreation room of Ga'afrad
North. George Gordon is the
honorary chairman of the UJA-
JWF committee in the building.
Now Aiiti-Srniitism
Subject of Talk
Arthur N. Teitalbeum, regional
director, Florida Regional Office,
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
Tiith. will speak Sunday at Tem-
th El, I'n ing e I i akfasl at
m., in the 'JV:
Hi-, i v ill be
The m."
Ut be.
otherl
;., to the Youth Sell lat shi '
In his i
i
1
i Bit
his direction the KDL

lation complaii em-
public ac-
commodations.
Urday evening, Jan. 27.
Participants in the' four-day
conference will concentrate their
deliberations on ways to expand
and strengthen Israel's economic
development in 1973. Special at-
tention will be devoted to the
needs of development in indus-
try and agriculture which have
been financed in large measure
by the proceeds from the sale of
State Of Israel Bonds.
In sessions with Prime Minis-
ter Meir. Deputy Prime Minister
Vigal A'Ion, Finance Minister
Pinchas Sapir. Foreign Minister
Abba Uban and Defense Minis-
ter Mnshe Dayan and other
members of the government, the
conferees will discuss how
American Jewry' can extend the
most effective aid to promote
the economic dcvclojjment of Is-
rael as a basis for strengthen-
ing its efforts for peace, and its
ability to provide jobs for the
increasing numbers of new im-
migrants f-oni Soviet Russia and
elsewhere.
The 12th Annual" Tam;ia Bay
Area Institute on Police and Com-
rnun ty Relations, held on Jan 22
at the University of Tampa, fea-
! tured Attorney General Robert
! Shevin as the keynote speaker.
The Institute was planned to
offer all segments of the com-
munity and law enforcement agen-
cies an opportunity to work to-
gether to further understanding
and cooperation to Improve law
. nforcement and decrease the
potential for disorder.
Among topics discussed were
Youth Police Conflicts. Problem
Areas in the Criminal Justice Sys-
tem, News Media and the Criminal
Justice System, and Exploring
Ways Education, Law and Rehabil-
itation Can Work to Prevent Drag
Abuse.
Sponsored by the National Con-
ference of Christ ians and Jews,
the Office of Continuing Educa-
tion of the University of Tampa.
and the City of Tampa MDA Of-
fice of Community Relations, the
Institute opened with the
b, Attorney General Shev
The day-long meeting
with a .summarization
Harold Lett, Community B
Consultant to NCCJ.
address
in.
closed
by Dr. 1 '
elations 1 M
1
1 ''
1 fl
1 n
it
1>
ATTY. GfN. ROBERT SMtVIN
For over thirty-five years, families
have been relying on Planters Oil for
all their Kosher cooking. All the year
through. Because it's pure, light* and
polyunsaturatcd. So the true taste of
food comes through. Whether it's
kugci. chopped liver, matzoh balls or
just plain American fried chicken.
Cook it with Kosher and Parve Planters
Oil. (You'll see what we mean.)
CHICKEN MOO-TOO-GAN ?
Makes 4 servings
V-i cup Planters Peanut On
1 3-pound frying chicken, cut in serving piece?
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup orange juice
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon grated orange peel I
'/fi teaspoon pepper
1 Vi cups orange sections
Vi cup slivered
Planters Blanched Raw Almonds
Heat Planters Peanut Oil in large heavy
skillet over medium heat. Add chicken
and brown on both sides; then add onion
and cook until onion is tender. Stir in
orange juice, salt, orange peel, and pepper.
Cover skillet tightly and cook over low
heat about 30 minutes, or until tender.
Add orange sections and slivered Planters
Almonds; cover and cook 5 to 10
minutes longer. Serve. "*
A Kosher
Recipe
from the
Kosher Oil


J
Priday, February 2,i$73

+Jewisti ntrSd/rJir nd Shorter of Hollywood
Page 11
Soviet Jewry Arrives In Israel
Continued from Page 1- j in a band.
I looked around tlio room. Ther
was a tiny baby held in his young
mother's arms, an old woman with
he;- head and shouldcis wrapix-d
in heavy szarves a'though the
room was quite warm. There were
probably as many stories as there
were people, but all happy to have
reached Israel and all able to tell
He had learned his perfect Eng-
Hah ihrouRh textbooks and lis-1
tening to the word*, of American;
folk songs on records. His wait i
for an exit visa had been on'.y six |
month.-- and no ransom money was j
involved, but the six months hail \
been difficult after he lust his job
their tale oj the trials and tribu-
lations involved in their coming.
From here they would be set
up in absorption centers or in
apartments. The task of resettle-
ment was monumental. Many of
them had been pre-conditioned to
accept only certain centers or lo-
cations. As housing is scarce, this
made the tn-k of the Jewish
S e en more difficult for the
a ;ency has assumed the responsi-
DilitJ of placing them in living{
quarters.
Now wa could watch the head=|
of famules diacuasitlg their future;
with representatives of the agency, j
Over long tables, paners were I
scanned, interpreters explained,
and de-isions made. They would
a'l be settled. In dollars, Finance
Minister Pinhas Saptr had told
our group of journalists that set-
tling nil the Soviet Jews would
eventually cost some K to 9 billion
dollars. In time and effort no
one can count,
GiveThat GreatVQTaste-
Seagram's^ The First Canadian.
Reva is grabbed in a beailike hug as she deplanes
Free
New Kosher Recipe
Booklet from Quaker
otri.y BSFS MM JUBJ JaWMlM qu. w HI susm* oistiuus turn, 0Jfi:iwfiO u no am chmge..

Here's a brand new recipe booklet, free from Quake
Barley, the choicest barley grown. Fourteen pages of
delicious kosher barley recipes soups, main d shes
s.de dWte. and desserts that w.ll make mealtime a
little different, a little better. Send for your copy today.
It's free from Quaker.
I
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NAME-
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What would your
bubba say if she knew
you were eating
Flcischmann's Margarine?
So good foi you, she'd probably say.
Enjoy yourself. Flcischmann's is
kosher. And becoming quite tradi-
tional. Because so many people arc
using it in recipes instead of butter. It s
made from 100',' com oil. High in
liquid eorn oil, SO it's low in saturated
fats One very delicious way to start
the family on a low saturated fat diet,
so it's one very delicious way to help
lower the cholesterol in your system.
FlcischmannV" Margarine. Delicious
on bread. Or hot vegetables. A very
good way to cat for the entire family.
And il grandma doesn't know what's
good for the family, who docs?
Flcischmann's Margarine.
It makes sensible eating delicious.




Page 12
+Jenistl ncridkitl *** &>ot of Hollywood
Friday, February 2. 1973 .
I

Hollywood Hadassah Groups
Plan A Variety Of Programs
Groups belon^int; to the Holly-1
wood Chapter of Hadassah have)
planned varied programs during
the next two weeks.
The B*aeh Group will hold its
next regular meeting on Feb. 21,
12:30 p.m. at Galahad South, 3801
S. Ocean Dr. Dessert and coffee
will be served, and the program
will be an appeal for Hadassah
supplies and HMO. On Feb. 14.
the group will hold its annual
card party and luncheon for Ha-
dassah's Community College, and
its board meeting on Feb. 2. at
Pat Peristein's home.
Habimah Players Appear
At UJA-JWF Meeting
The Habimah Players will ap-
pear at a UJA-JWF meeting on
Monday, Feb. 5, at the Hemi-
.-phiies Auditorium at 8 p.m. The
evening meeting and entertain-
ment was planned by David
Schwartzman and William Litt-
man. cochairmen of the Hemi-
spheres complex for the apart-
ments division of UJA-JWF.
Title of the Habimah Player's
presentation will be "Passport to
Promise." Bunny Goldstein is the
author and Telsa Balick the direc-
tor. Singers are Sylvia Berman,
Evelyn Blumenthal and Elaine
Ruda. Dceva Solove is the accom-
panist. Mrs. Balick and Mrs. Goid-
Btel wi : do the narrating.
Committee members are Marvin
' C. nan. Janet Adelson. Herman
Aeronson. Mannv Ap;*.]. Albert
Askin, Sam Barrack, Martin Ber-
ber, Cymie Bierman, George Bur-
rison, Harry Cohen. Shirley Cole.
Louis Cone. Jack Epstein, Fran
Goldberg, Etnel Gould, Herman
Green, Jack Guttman, Irving Hoff-
man, Isaac Kadis. Leah Kandell,
Alex Krupnick, Lou Levitan,
Hasse Lichenstein.
Also Arthur Lichtenstein. Mary
Lipshutz, Meyer Lrpton. Frances
Littman, Jack Masket. Irvin Mas-
sell. Joe Muskin, Nat Nove-ck, Leon
Oser, Al Prober. Henry Reiner,
Irving Reiss, Theresa Schwartz-
man. Marvin Shocket, Harry Sla-
vitt, Sara Wedner, Milton Wein-
stein. Bi.'l Weiss. Goidie Winaker,
Ethel Wolf and Irving Zack.
Admssion to the meeting and
entertainment are free and open
to tenants of the Hemispheres.
UJA-JWF Apartment Division Meetings
Hemispheres Feb. 5, 8 p.m., hi Hemispheres auditorium. Co-
David schwartzman and Bin Littman. Entertainment,
Habimah Players.
Parker Plan Feb. 8. 7:30 p.m.. Chairman. Max Lieberman.
iker, David Zohar, Israeli Embassy, Washington.
Galahad South Feb. 11. 10 a.m. recreation room, brunch.
( nairman, Arthur Rubin, cochairmen. Jacob Geller, Robert Hoff-
man, Jack Solot. Speaker, David Zohar, Israeli Embassv. Wal-
ton.
Galahad North Feb. 11. 10 a.m. recreation room, brunch
C hail-man, Leo Boer, cochairmen. Martin Haspel, Sol Singer,
honorary chairman. George Gordon.
La Mar Feb. 18, 10 a.m. La Mer Restaurant, brunch. Co-
chairmen, Otto Stieber, Julius Bernstein. Speaker, Yosef Ben
Aharon, consul Israeli Embassy.
Diplomat Towers Feb. 18, 10 a.m. recreation room, brunch
Cochairmen. Arthur Margolis and Jerome Herbert
Orthodox Congregation Planned For Hollywood
Progress was reported al a re-1 The next meeting is schedu'ed
cent meeting tor the formation of for Feb. 13, at 7:30 p.m in the
a Jewish Orthodox Congregation
in the Hallandale-HoHywood
Beach area.
You^ Israel of Greater Miami
proposed eon
tion.
Home Federal Savings Buildin
1720 Harrison St.. Hollywood. In-
ter* tend. Refreshments will follow the
meetlnz.
LEARN TO DRIVE
SPECIAL ATTENTION
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State Certified For Driver Ed.
Open 7 Days a Week
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FOR YOU"
ABC AUTO DRSViNG SCHOOL
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GRAND OPENING!
KOSHER HOT DOC
Delicious Subs Oiant Puzo. Shakes Ice Cream

CPiNJUG SOCIAL .
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WITH EVMtY SANDWICH OilOtR
Gifts To All Our Customers
HAPPY'S HER0S & PIZZA
918 SOUTH 56 AVENUE
(I MOCKS iAST Of 441 Between Washington t Dewey)
Next regular meeting of Mt.
Scopus will be held on Feb. 6, at
10:30 a.m. at the Home Federal
Bldg. in Hollywood. The program
will feature a Hadassah film, 'To
Learn How Your Money is Work-
ing for Israel."
it -fr
Next regular meeting of Hill-
crest will be held on Feb. 13, 12:30
p.m. at Hillerest Recreation Hall
1, and a board meeting on Feb.
4 at 10:30 a.m.
-Ct -Cr a
Next regular meeting of Shalom
will be held on Feb. 13, at the
Home Federal Bldg. in Hollywood
at 12:30 p.m. for refreshments.
Meeting starts at 1 p.m. Film
strip entitled. "Hadassah is What's
Happening," will be shown. A
board meeting will be held Feb. 28.
at Lillian Hutter's home at 10:30
a.m.
Or
Next regular meeting of H'Atid
will be held on Feb. 8. 8 p.m. at
Temple Israel of Miramar. The
board meeting will be held Feb. 22.
* -tr tr
Next regular meeting of Hen-
rietta Szold will be held on Feb.
15, 12:30 p.m. at the Miramar
Recreation Center. 6700 Miramar
Parkway. Councilman Frank
Firpo and Miramar Chief of Police
Sam Ramputti will give a dem-
onstration with K-9 dogs on
'Safety.'' Board meeting will be
held on Feb. 8, at the home of
Mrs. Herman Shane.
i^ininj


UUJL
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Friday. February 2. 1973
+ k*irh#in -nd Shof.r of Hollywood
Page 13
PMS0NAU7Y PROFILE
Donald Powell
In the growing town of Miramar,
Donald F. Powell, president of
Temple Israel, hopes that his tem-
Young Judea and attends services
regularly. The younger members
of the family, Suzanne. Wendy and
pie will grow too. "Our .niembjjr- JioWn.jte also active in Young
ship consists mainly of working
people. We don't have any tre-
mendously wealthy group of mem-
bers so we feel that our temple's
future growth must come in num-
bers of members. With the growth
in the town now they are even
building high rises there we
hope to get many new members.
' This last six months we've had 40
new families join the temple."
Mr. Powell came to Hollywood
latout four years ago after n
period in West Palm Beach and
five years in Miami. Now he feels
that he has found his real niche
in Miramar. Mr. Powell had come
to Florida originally as a student
at Florida Slate University. Hav-
ing served in the Air Force as a
meteorological assistant. he
thought he might make meterol-
ogy his career and so matriculated
in the Florida university for its
courses in that field. However,
after sampling some of those
" courses, he decided that account-
ing was more to his liking and
graduated from FSU as an ac-
countant.
The good-looking young temple
president has been active in tem-
ples since he was 18 and so when
he moved to Miramar. he joined
Temple Israel. "There was a short
period after my Bar Mitzvah," he
says, "when I dropped out of tem-
ple activities but then my family
moved to long Island and I joined
the youth group in the temnle
there. Since then I have always
been active in synagogues in one
capacity or another."
It was in this first youth group
,that Mr. Powell met his wife,
whom he married while serving
in the Air Force. Now they have
four children. Their oldest son.
Steve. 16, is an active member of
Judea.
Their father is especially proud
of the growth of the youth groups
in the temple. "Two years ago,"
Mr. Powell cited, "our youth
group had about 20 members
now we have more than 140. We
feel that this is just one of the Im-
portant services that our temple
furnishes. Our youth group with
its classes with its companion-
ship and socials is designed to
nrovide an interesting outlet for
young people. It's so important to
keep our young people involved
and we have so many in our tem-
ple family."
At the other end of the pole,
Mr. Powell points with pride to
the Golden Age Club of the tem-
ple. "They're the mainstay of our
minyan and Friday night services.
They're really the most active
group I have ever known. All you
have to do is mention that the
temple needs and they go to
work and try to get it."
"I, myself, joined Temple Israel'
about Vk years ago and was im-
pressed immediately with the feel-
ing of warmth and friendliness. I
hope that this atmosphere will al-
ways be a part of the temple. I
think it's one of the most import-
ant things we have to offer. We
want new members in our temple
and we want to make them feel
at home and welcome. My wife
and I have made many friends
from among the temple member-
ship and our social life is almost
always spent with friends from
the temple. I like to think that
our Rabbi Drazin is one of my
good friends. We go to Dolphin
games together and have a fine
relationship." I hope we'll make
many more new friends.
am I MM ......I : ii ii iwumwm m:;.....iiimiii'n B m- i uiUli mriw.iin iiMnni'UiBiniHi.iiia inn,u..i.iuH..:] i.i'.i.m*
Israel
25 To Present
'To Live Another Summer'
The Israel 25 Committee unde
the chairmanship of Abe Durbin
ha-- announced that they will pr<
M it "To Live Another Summer"
on Tuesday, Feb. 27 at Tempi.
Beth El.
Working on the committee are
Shirley Cohen. Seima Hopen Mar-
cia light, Yola Spencer, Mrs. Nor-
man Platt. Ira Cite, Irving Green
Mrs. Israel Majzel. Mrs. Milton
Jacobs. Mrs. Melvin Spencer, Mrs,
Edna Jacobs, Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Mrs. Selma Hopen, Irving Geisser
Rabbi Arthur J. Abrams. Rabl I
Robert P. Frazin. Rabbi David
Shapiro, Mrs. Roslyn Seidel, Mrs.
Shirley Cohen, Rabbi Samuel
Jaffe and Joseph Kleiman.
The Israel 25 Committee was
formed to commemorate the 25th
anniversary of the establishment
of Israel, which falls on May 7.
197:!. It marks a major milestone j
in Israel's history, symbolizing the
coming to maturity of the new
state and its acceptance as the
only progressive democacy In the
Middle East. The local committee
ha- planned this presentation as
the kick-off event in the celebra-
tion. ____
BuildingTo Building
. Galahad West Men's Club has announced their new date ofof-
fic-rs for 1973 and they include Sam Marks as present; Georff
Schneider as first vice president; William Knntor. see^J-<*.P*"
dent; Murray Davidman. treasurer and Sy Cohen sec.e tary. Ed Bm-
~ i. th now entertainment chairman and it looks like th< > ha\
DR. MERON LEVITATS
Dr. M. Levitats
To Speak \t
Laders Council
The Young Leaders Council of
Jewish Welfare Federation will
hold its next meeting on Wednes-
day, Feb. 7 at the home of Dr.
Meron Levitats. 3320 N. 37th Ct.,
Hollywood at 8 p.m. The program
will consist of a review of the
book, "Forged in Fury" by Michael
Elkin, with a discussion following
the presentation.
Federation's Young Leaders
Council is a group of men in the
local Jewish community who are
interested and involved with the
activities of the community. Pro-
grams are set up for them
throughout the year on a broad
educational basis. The purpose of
the Young Leaders program is to
train young men to assume posi-
tions of leadership in the Jewish
community and more particularly
in the work of Jewish Welfare
Federation. A majority of the
present members of the executive
committee of Federation are grad-
uates of the Young Leaders Coun-
cil.
Copies of "Forged in Fury" have
been distributed to members of
the council so that they can take
part in the discussion which will
follow the review. For those who
have not received copies and who
wish to attend the Feb. 7 meeting,
copies may be obtained at the
Federation office at 19C9 Harrison
St.
Brandeb U. Women
Honor Life Members
The HoMywood Chapter of the
National Women's Committee of
Brandeis University is holding a
luncheon In honor or life members
on Thursday, Feb. 8. The noontime
affair will be held at the home
of Dr. Marilyn Segal. 700 Wash-
ington St.. Hollywood.
Mrs. Albert Berler. president of
the National Women's Committee,
will be guest speaker. ___
By MB KIKBEL, txocotho Director,
Jewish Welfare federation of Greater Hollywood
It's that time of year again when we begin in earnest our annual
UJA-JWF campaign. Some 156 high rises are in the process of being
organized each one with a building chairman and workers pledge
cards are being distributed campaign events are being planned.
Many exciting things are happening and the staff of the Federation
is going out of its mind trying to get everything organized. As we
have had meeting after meeting, one important problem seems to be
coming to the forefront, and that is, our volunteer workers, in most
cases, are hesitant about soliciting for a contribution, especially in
face-to-face confrontation.
I don't like to solicit either. Who does? It's not easy to ask some-
one to contribute money. It sometimes makes one feel that it is
beneath his dignity. And there are those who feel that everyone should
know his responsibility and should give freely, and in large amounts,
without being solicited. In a way, it is like going to the dentist, we
feel we would probably go so much more often if there was no pain
attached to it.
The average solicitor, when meeting a prospect, says something
like this: "Mr. Goldberg, it is that time of year again. I have your
I'JA pledge card. I would like you to make a contribution." There are
variations of this theme, but, basically, this seems to be what most
people do. Is this the best method? I certainly don't think so. What we
must do is inform our contributors and prospects of the real facts. We
have to educate them in terms of their responsibility as a Jew to all
other Jews. We have to help them understand the level of giving that
is needed. We have to tell them that although 80 per cent of the
money we raise goes to the UJA. that we represent 36 different agencies
and we are coming to them only once for a contribution to all 36. In
some way, we have to impart, that if we came to them that many-
times during the year we could possibly get contributions for each of
these organizations. What a bother this would be to the contributor,
and an impossibility for us.
Ail worthwhile Jewish organizations have agreed that there
should be one major thrust in one campaign.
In 1943 we stated we did not know what was happening to the
Jews in Europe. In 1945 we could not believe that it happened. And
now in 1973. we have an op;>ortunity, if there are enough funds avail-
able, to resettle tens of thousands of families from the Soviet Union.
We can no longer say we do not know or we do not understand. Our
prospects can tell us they do not care, and then if the doors close in
the Soviet Union, and if we cannot help those who need our help, then
the burden of shame and guilt will be on thorn. We must educate -
we must inform- and we mast perform in the highest tradition of
Judaism.
We ill do what one Jew must for another.
At Meadow Brook. Jack
merman is the new entertainment
a fine program of activities lined up. .
Bobic-r tells us that they're planning a brunch or Sunday Fb ^
Lox and bagels, danish and coffee will be on >"7 "
Hallandale Mflton Weinkle wiU be on hand to speak to momi. i
2?Sift nub that day. President of that group tor this year is Nat
Rappaport with Sid Trott as entertainment chairman
The Women's Club at Paradise Towers elected Ruth Pace as its |
new president; Anne Becker, secretary; Ann Spiegel, treasurer: Ethel |
Zied. vice president and Evelyn Mannes, assistant treasurer. mis ,
really docs seem to be the time for new officers and every group that ,
has a new slate is welcome to send them on to the column so we can
print them.
In the meantime, will tell you that the new board of directors at
Imperial Towers North are Albert Dumbleton, president; Murray
Pliskoff. vice president; Sam Korman. treasurer; Sam Schneider, as- .
sistant treasurer, and Harriet Polak, secretary. Elsie Carnage a noted j
Chicago book reviewer is now living at the Hemispheres. She's busy
doing reviews at various organizations with one of her first for the
members of Galahad Hall Social Club. On that occasion she reviewed
Meyer Levin's book, "The Settlers."
Oxford Towers leaders include Lou Goldberg, Jim Eisenhower
Jules Silverman, Bernard Gross, Dean Schall, Bill Kamen and S.d
Kent_____Send in your list and some of your coming events, your
members will be glad to read them.
Palmer9s
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3279 S.W. 8h Street, Miami
444-0921 4440922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personalized Memoriols Custom
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For information call: ieti^'JfM
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Paul J. Houlihan, L.F.O.


Page 14
*Jewisi> ftcridHan nd Shotar of Hollywood

Friday, Foferoary 2, 1373
c
\tu Ksalcndar
cvnrnitm
MONDAY. FEBRVARY 3
National Councrl of Jewish Women, Hollywood Chapter
Meeting 12:30 pjn. -i Temple Sinai,
Sistiihood Tomplo Beth Shajom l'% Program at Regular
Meetins 8 p.m. T^em^fe Beth Shaloto
Hemispheres UJA-JWF Meeting and Entertainment
8 p.m. Hemispheres Auditorium
MMBMl FUM'ABY
Sisterhood Temple Sinai Meeting 8 pjn. Temple
Sinai
Mt. Scopus Harlnssah Film Showfns 10:30 a.m.
Home Federal Bids., Hollywood
WKIJNKSU.W. KRBRt'ARY 7 .
Fairways Group Hatlassah -- Basrwir and White Elephant
Sale 12:30 p.m. Home Federal Bkig.. HaHandale
Young Leaders Connctt of Jewish Welfare Federation
Book Review 8 p.m. Home of Dr; Meron Levitais
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 -
City of Hope. South Broward Chapter Luncheon Noon
Edea Roc Hotel
National Women's Committee of Brandeis University, Holly,
wood Group Life Member Luncheon Noon Home of
Mrs. Marilyn Segal
H Arki Hadassah Meeting 8 pm. Temple Israel of
Miramax .
Parker Plaaa UJA-JWF Committee Meeting ami Coffee
1:M p.m. Parker Plaza Gold Room
SI'XUAY, 1TOBBUARY li
Balahad North UJA-JWF Committee Brunch 10 a.m.
Recreation Room
Galahad North UJA-JWF Committee Brunch 10 a.m.
Recreation Room
MONDAY. FBBRIARY 13
Pioneer Women Life Membership Brunch Noon Al-
giers Hotel, Miami Beach
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women Rummage Sule 7:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. Civic League Bldg., Hollywood
TUESDAY. FEBRUARY IS
SLstorliood Temple Beth El Intrafaith Luncheon 11:30
a.m. Temple Beth El
Broward Zionist District Meeting 8 p.m. Temple
Sinai
Hillcrest Hadassah Meeting 12:30 p.m. Recreation
Hall 1
Shalom Hadassah Fi'm Showing 12:30 p.m. Home
Federal Bldg., Hollywood
Parker Hadassah Meeting Noon Parker Towers
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women Rummage Sale 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Civic League Bldg.. Hollywood
WKPMISDAY, FEBRUARY 14
Sisterhood Temple Beth Shalom Sweetheart Luncheon -
11:30 a.m. Temple Beth Shalom, 4G01 Arthur St.
HaHandale Hadassah Youth Aliyah Luncheon Noon -
Americana Hotel. Minmi Beach
National Women's Committee of Brandeis University, Holly-
wood Chapter Meeting 10 a.m. Galahad South
Beach Group Hadassah Luncheon and Card Partj
Noon Hal andale Jewish Center
THURSDAY FEBRUARY 15
Women's Leadership Training Institute of JWF Book
Review S pm, Home of Mrs, Louil Kurland
HaHandale Chapter American Israeli Lighthouse Meet-
ing 12:30 pm Home Federal Bldg.. HaHandale Blvd.
Henrietta Szcld Hadassah Meeting 12:30 pm. Mira-
mar Recreation Center
FRIDAY. FEBR1 ABX 10
Holljwood .Scholarship Foundation Luncheon and Fashion
Show 11:30 a.m. Diplomat Hotel. .
\
La-Crepe de Bretagne
CUISINE FRANCAISE
1434 N. Federal Highway, Dania
"DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT"
Excellent Food
Quaint and Charming Dining Room
FRENCH SPECIALTY CREPES BRETONNES
So Many Flavors!
"From an Old Brittany Recipe"
Also Featuring A Variety of French Gourmet Specialties
LUNCHEON AND DINNER
FOR RESERVATIONS 927-4100
!
THE SHIRT BARN
NOW IN OUR NEW AND LARGER QUARTERS
SHIRTS SLACKS SPORTSWEAR
"QUALITY AT A PRICE"
136 N.E. 1st AVENUE, HALLANDALE
OPEN MONDAY SATURDAY 10-5
PHONE 922-3638
Religious
Services
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH
CENTER
(Coneervatlve. 416 N.E. 8th Avenue
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, *>
Jacob Daiuiger. i
HAWIMMM1.1 JKW1SH OK NT Elf
Kililny 8:41 p.m. Service 'dedicated to
"Peace." SHtunUy t a.m. Sermon:
"Scriptural 1-csHon of the Week."
MltAMAt
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Coneervatlve)
920 8.W. 38th St., Rabbi Avrom
Dnazin, Cantor Abraham Koater.
-
HOUYW00O
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1361 8,
14th Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
Sabbath *ervU*-R will b<- held.at Tem-
i.l. lie Hi El KruUiy. S:l'. p.m. Dr.
JUmatl Z. Jaffe. spiritual leader, will
apeafc em "Eli. EU" The- Woul -Muntc
nt our People.
BETH 8HALOM (Temple) Conserva-
tive-1726 Monroe Street. After. Nov.
1 4801 Arthur.Street. Rabbi Mor.
ton Malaveky. Cantor Irving Gold.
1 4)
TEMPLE BETH AHM- Coneervatlve.
310 SW 62nd AVe.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 600*
Thame)a> Street, Hollywood. Rabbi
Robert Frazin.
Bargain Fair In Square
At Recreation Center
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative) 1201
Johnson Street. Rabbi. David Shapiro
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.
NMTtt MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
W>rVrV
L The annual v.'r%ii^aui Fair in
fie SqV8%* %i9 taC place 9:301
a.m. Feb. 3, in the courtyard of |
Hollywood Recreation Center. Uhle-
York, president of Hollywood
Stamp Club, will serve as chair-
man of the fund-raising event.
There will be trinkets and treas-
ure booths thrifty clothing cor-
ners, shoe bars, book baskets, re-
freshment stiuid. a bake sale and
an auction at better merchandise
at 2 p.m. to top off the day.
Those with "white elephants""
i that need a new home; clean, used
clothing, toys, jewelry, books, lug-
gage and electrical appliances in
working order, may contribute
them to the bargain-fair sale. The
merchandise can be dropped off
at the center, 2030 Polk S<.
George Gordon, president of the
49ers Senior Citizens Club will
I head the group- working in the'
'"baubles and bangles" booth. Mo.
i Helen KalLsh, president of New
York State Club, and KImer Kluen-
der, president of past president.
will direct the sale at the clothing
racks. Charles Metzler. president
CANOLELIGHTING TIMF
30 SHEVAT 5:45
V>r>f>AM^Mn^^W>A* Bar Mitzvah
ANDREW GOLDS iELN
Andrew, son of Mr. and Mr<.
Walter Goldstein, will celebrate his
'Jar Mitzvah on Saturday morning.
Feb. 10. at Temple Solel with
services and reception at Emerald
Hills Country- Club.
& -fr
Peter and Richard S'hwnrt/.
Peter and Rkhard, sons of Mrs.
Sue Schwartz, will celebrate their
":w Mltzvahs on Saturday morn-
'V' Peb. ", at Temple Israel of
Miramar.
to -to -to
TINA BBII R
Tina, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Milton Brier, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah on Friday evening,
F.b. 9.
JEFFREY '/AVI XX
Jeffrey. son of Mr. and Mrs. Sid-
lev Zwinn, will celebrate his Bar
ib on Saturday morning. Feb.
'". at Temple Sinai.
to -to
ELIZABETH SINftER
Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. an'
'.!- Morris Singer, will eelebrati
her Bal Mitzvah on Friday eve-
ning, Fib. 9, at Temple Sin li.
^ it
MABK gTURMAN
Mark, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stan-
lev Sturman, will celebrate his Bar
Mit7vah on Saturday morning,
Feb. 3 at Temple Beth EL
to H
DAVID LIGHT
David, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed-
ward M. Light, will celebrate his
Rar Mitzvah on Saturday morning.
Feb. 10 at Temple Beth El. Da\ id
is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs
Frank Yagu la, charter member
of the temple.
ROBERT
TAYLOR
INCOME TAX SERVICE
$5 up
6801 Pembroke Road
Pembroke Pines,
Florida 33023
Phone 966-Ten Forty
of Railroad Club, will direct the
a -Us ities at the refreshment booth
along with Joseph. Gianneitt, presi-
dent of New Knfclatort CIudV' -* >
Other club president* haOdlmif
the fbcedrprice tables are Uro Botr
teBi, New Jersey Club; Mrs. M.l-
dred Schneider of Oiuo Club; Mr*.
K. R. Reetz, Wisconsin. Club; Mrs.
Erma Crader-, Happy Rascals-;
Hugh Riae, Illinois Clato, arA^i**. '
Genevive Bergs trom. Birthdeep
Club. Mrs. Lauretta- JacObse* ''- -
president of; Indiana Club, fc^fca*'.
eharge of the, book- basket; and-
Pat FUcher." president o&, RennsyJw
vania Club, wUl- head "the balta >*
sale cortvmlttee;
In case, of'pain, the bargain .-fata "
will be moved indoors at the wn
ler. Hollywood Stamp Chib-muV r>
her*, will handle the auction sale;
which will be set up indoors, what*
prospective- Wddci-s may cxamin* i /
itenw in advame.
The annual white*elephant *ah>* -
proceed"; are used' fo purchase ad-
ditional equipment for the center /
and to sponsor youth projects; "^
scholarshi|>s and tournaments. .
BUDGET CLEANERS
AND LAUNDRY
<
303 SOUTH 21st AVE.
SHIRTS
ON
DIXIE NWY.
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921-0622 GOOD FOR LIMITED TIME 921-0622
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Insurance Estimates Wrecks Rebuilt Frame Repairs
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Phone: 983-2046

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117 S.W. 1 ST. MALI ANDALE


f
i
Friday. February 2, 1973
fJf^istiinkridHifim end Shofer of Hollywood
Page 15


As We Were Saying:
Bv ROBERT E. SEGAl
1*1
A Zealous Press... .A Free People
| TAKE A fiRATK tlllW of'the plight of the
press." the late A. J. I.iobling wrote a dozen"
years ago, 'it i the weak slat under the bed of
democracy."
This past year has witnessed
too many kicks at that feeble
slat, sometimes by toes of govern-
ment. And citi7.ons concerned
about the right to dig for informa
tion and the need to know what's
going on have .-ood reasons to
keep their zeal for a free press in
America at a higher level in 1973
Among the alarming threats to press freedom
in recent months, the cases of Earl J. Caldwell of
San Francisco and Peter J. Bridge of Newark, N.J.,
turning on refusal to answer grand jury questions,
are perhaps the most significant. Bridge spent 20
day-* in jail because he felt obliged to guard the
confidentiality of his source in connection with the
alleged offer of a bribe to a Housing Authority
-member. Caldwell refused twice to testify before
^'-federal grand juries desiring a look at his notes on
confidental interviews with Black Panthers.
-
BOOK REVIEW Sevmour I i.Inn an
.
'Judenrat*
i
In the Caldwell matter, the Supreme Court on
June 29 overruled a lower court and held that news-
men could not refuse to give a grand jury informa-
tion about their confidential sources. Here it seems
important to note that Justice Potter Stewart, in
his dissent, contended that the government does
A number of states, notably Illinois, Maryland,
and New York protects confidentiality of report-
ers; and it Is good news that Sen. Sam J. Krvin Jr..
of North Carolina has promised to give high priority
to a search for similar federal legislation this year.
J
TUK RKClvNT FUSCLOSI'RKH that some six Israelis.
aim ins thorn Sabras and kibbutzniks, were aiding and
-cooperating with Arabs and that they are alleged to "be
traitors came- as a sho-Jc to Jews in the
Ylshuv and Diaspora.
Dining" World War II. it was believed
that some, if not many, of the officials
of the Jewish Councils in Eastern Eur-
ope colla!>orated with the Nazis in order
to save tlie lives of their families and
friends and that sometimes they ac-
cepted l>ribes from 'others.
Isaiah Trunk's Judenrat. with intro- -
, duction by Jacob Robinson (The Macmillan Co., $14.951
A*- a major contribution to the history of the holocaust
TJeribd arri it dispels the myths about the Councils, the
Judenrats. It is the first detailed analysis of the "self-
gformmont" Imposed upon the Jews by the Nazis. The
Councils wen- not tlie vamo as the kehillot nor-was the
leadership Identical The Councils came into being by
order of Rcinhard Heydrich. Nazi chief of the Secuiity
Police.
The Jews of Poland were segregated, spoliated and
-Vr -given psetidocnmmunnl autonomy by means of the Coun-
> ctls so as to facilitate the "final solution." The author who
''* oonfined the book to tlie Councils in Poland, the former
I Baltic "tates of F.stonia, Lithuania, and Latvia and
;.,. Byelorussia, and the Ukraine, is a research associate at
Itho YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. He gathered
land studied archival material relating to 405 communities
'land he interviewed many survivors of the holocaust living
in Israel and the United States.
Trunk states thai generalizations must be avoided
md that judgment cannot be passed on the officials of
L Councils since thej wore under pressure, wore terror-
led physically and psychically, and thai demands were
,;,,. on an "either or" basis do this or be shot. He
[akes the point that many Jews at tlv outset were
nforted with the prospect of ghetto autonomy which.
iy thought, would make life bearable, little realizing
t the ghetto would become ''controlled laboratories
B- the progressWe destruction of Jewish life and the
Councils, the instruments of the destruction." When the
SOSes of deportation of those selected by the Judenrats
|ine clear it was "perhaps the most excruciating moral
nment encountered by a representative body in
Some Council members committed suicide. Ultimately
met Council members perished. Jacob Robinson con-
-taldes the introduction, "It would appear, then, that
*Jejn all factors are considered. Jewish participation or
{^^participation- in the deportations bail no substantial
jjjfluenoe one way or another on the final outcome."
Thanks to Dr. Trunk. Judenrat will no longer be a
mi'--Hiii Israel News/efter
By Carl Alperi
Big Parities...
Little Parities
A>'V POLITICAL PARTY in Israel which polls
one per cent of the total vote is assured of a
seat in the Knesset, even if these votes are gar-
nered from widely scattered parts
of the country. This type of propor-
tional representation encourages
the multiplication of many small
parties. The popular vote is thus
fragmentized into more than a
dozen streams, and no one party
has ever succeed >d in achieving an
absolute majority in Israel.
____ It was recently proposed that
the 'floor" for Knesset representation be raised to
2'i or 3'f or perhaps even %% of the vote cast.
Naturally, the smaMor parties, faced by threat
of political extinction, are up in arms. In their oppo-
sition to the plan, such impossible allies as the
Communists and the -extremely religious Agudat
Israel nave-Joined'forces together'with five or six
other small groups to pro-rent the raising of the
minimiun figure above the present'one per cent.
The two largest parties. Labor arid Gahal. orig-
inally endorsed tlie.proposal, ;each for its own rea-
sons. Labor was hopeful that with the disappearance
of the nuisance parties, the floating Vote would
come to.it. ajjd at last give Labor an absolute ma-
jority. And Gahal was equally hopeful that it would
inherit the largest part of the independent vote,
thus strengthening it in its bid to provide an alter-
native to the Labor government.
The electoral reform was opposed, for the most
art in the name of democracy. Even minority
viewpoints should bo afforded opportunity to be
heard, furthermore, the reform will eliminate from
the Knesset some of the. colorful personalities who
have been gadflies to the big and dominant pities
Israel has been sadly lacking in a properly organized
political opposition which can from time to time
serve as an alternative to the monotonous regu-
larity with which Labor continues to hold the reins.
It is certainly no reflection on the party or Golda
Meir Dayan, Alton, Sapir and Abba Khan to say
that true democracy would be better served if
Labor would occasionally face the throat ol being
replaced in Jerusalem.
Two other doctoral reform proposals were also
,.,,,.,......i Ore was to raie the number of Km ssel
Uihers from 120 to .50. This would hi no way
-,,,, the ratio of strength among the MpedKt
;; i .s i, would simply add snore members ... Per-
nent enabling the accretion of new. young
IS wtthout me.rily chopping off the perennial
old-timers.
Another proposal was to institute an electoral
svstem baso,l a. least partly on local constituone,,,.
This ystem would give local voters a chmce to
Select their own representatives, and even oros-
party HnVs if necessary, rather than leave the
choice of candidates exclusively in the ban* of the
patty leadership. -as at present.
As we enter the long H-month pre-election
period, it appear, that the big parties have gotten
cold feet. The original enthusiasm for the reforms
appear, to have died down and it is foregone
elusion that nothing wil, hap,*,, Th.sn.ans
that no major changes or surpluses can be expect*
ta 197.1 It remains only for Labor to dec.de. once
and for all; who 'will he H. flw bearer.
II.....hniiiwmr" f'-"'~* "~ -.-
-...-.
Meanwhile, tlie observation of Congressman
Jerome Waldie of California is pertinent: "I believe
we m in the midst of an attack on the press moti-
vated by a desire of government not to have its
weaknesses and failures disclosed by a free and in-
dependent press. This attack has culminated in at-
have the right to force a reporter to appear before
a grand Jury if it can prove that it is seeking infor-
mation clearly relevant to a precisely defined sub-
ject of governmental inquiry and that the reporter
is the only available source of such information.
(Underscoring added.)
But a half year later, the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for the Second Circuit iNew Yorki affirmed
a lower court's decision to grant journalists the
right to refuse to disclose a confidential news
source, citing "a paramount public interest in the
maintenance of a vigorous, aggressive, and inde-
|x>ndcnt press'' and declaring: "Freedom of the
press may be stifled by direct, or, more subtly, by
indirect restraints. Happily, the First Amendment
tolerates neither, absent a concern so compelling as
to override the precious rights of freedom of speech
and the press."
tempts to jail newsmen in oixier to intimidate the
press."
Some may disagree and should be thankful they
have that right. But others will recall with dismay
these trends in 1972: Vice President Agnew's not
very subtle reminder to broadcasters that they are
licensed by the federal government; the FBI's act
of swooping down on a Boston bank with a federal
grand Jury subpoena to obtain copies of all checks
drawn on and deposited in the account of the Uni-
tarian-Universalist Association between June 1 and
Oct. 15. I?>71 after that church's printing outlet, the
Beacon Press, published Sen. Mike Gravel's version
of the Pentagon Papers.
Thomas .Tefforson wrote this to Co]. Kdward
Carrington 186 years ago: "Were it left to me to
decide whether we should have a government with-
out newspapers, or newspapeiN without a -?jovern-
ment. I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the
latter. "To which Albert Camus was to add a mod-
ern postscript: "Freedom of the press Is perhaps
the freedom that has suffered the most from the
gradual degradation of the idea of liberty."
Yet President Nixon, recently the beneficiary
of a great vote of confidence, lias taken leaders of
the BWB8 media to task for that which he regards
as their failure "to understand the necessity to
stand by the President when be makes a terribly
difficult, potentially tuipoi>ular decision."
Between You and Me;
By BORIS SM0LAR

Life With Hasidim
<<>. i!>":i Jewish Telegraphic Agvncy)
VHR GBOWINti INTKRKST among American-born
J. ws in the Hasidic movement in this country has
stimulated the writing and publication of a number of
attractive books on Hasidism. The latest
is the The Face of Faith." published
recently by the Baltimore Hebrew Col-
lege Press.
It is a captivating hook. Its text is
excellent. Its highly sensitive and beauti-
ful photographs portraying the daily life
of Hasidim and their families at home,
In the street, at work and at learning
leave an indelible impression.
The text is writ ton by Prof. George Gershon Kranz-
ler, a noted sociologist and educator. It conveys the at-
mosphere of Williamsburg, the section In Brooklyn whore
0 vibrant llasidic life is going on in a neighborhood popu-
lated by blacks. Puerto Ricans and other racial minorities.
Neither the drab setting of the neighborhood nor the ten-
sions prevailing there impede the Hasidic groups from
conducting their intensive, colorful and distinctive life.
The Hasidim in Wuikui--tomx eiri and ymmg. men
and women cling to old Ho.-idic traditions. They con-
tinue to dress in their Hasidic Barb. They maintain their
religious ethics strictly in the spirit of their fathers and
forefathers tn Eastern Europe, where the Hasidic com-
munit'es a.x>se In the 18th century. They are people living
in their own world of puritanical concept*. "Serving C.Dd
With Joy" is their motto. And they find joy in their pray-
erl and in the'traditional religious ceremonies to a iwint
of being completely oblivious tothe world around them. .
-


Page 16
Famous Nome Brands
at BAER'S
Hibrlte*
Thomosille
Stiffel
Kroehler
Stanley
Simmon!
American
Lane
Bassett
Stevens Gulistan
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Sealy
Deystrem
Breyhill
Johnson-Carper
Rembrandt
Century
Selig
Founders
DANIA
1025 S. Federal Highway
527-0237
JMf# norkOem nl &"*" <* Hollywood
1
Friday, February 2. 1973
__ ev4
FEBRUARY
CLEARANCE SALE

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While at Boer's introduce yourself fo one of the Baer family who h always there to
please you.
Com* in and &e as emtf save) mow.
South BrowartPs Largest Furniture Store
DAILY 9 to 9 P.M. SAT. 9:30-5:30 SUN. 1 to 6
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UBHUUHE.
4 BLOCKS N. OF SHERIDAN
FT. LAUDERDALE
4711 N. State Road 7
731-8830


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