The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00058

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
mr '
*
& Jewish Floridi&n

Volume 3 Number 4
and Mim All OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood. Florida Friday, January b, 1973
Price 2C cents
Hi-Rise Campaign Leaders
Choose Building Chairmen
Shifting into high gear for the
hard drive ahead, the Apart-
ment Division of Greater Holly-
MtLVIN BACK
wood's Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion, tinder the leadership of
Melvin 11. Baer, cochaJrman of
the 1973 JWF campaign, Is now
in the process of choosing build-
ing leadership and setting up
preliminary building meetings.
Giving voice to his optimism
relative to the forthcoming cam-
paign, Mr. Baer declared that
with ali the new residents and
new residential buildings that
have joined the Hollywood-Hal-
landale community, the year of
1973 should be a banner year
fur the pending campaign.
Mr. Baer said that at the pn --
ent time the vice chairmen of
his Apartments Division, includ-
ing Meyer- Kaplan, Jerome Ge-
virman. Sydiu-y Holtzman, Na-
than Pritcher, Alvin Hess, Os-
car Rozansky Leo Marder and
Ralph Grant, are choosing in-
dividual building chairmen for
the buildings in their districts.
Volunteers interested in the
work of UJA-Federation are in-
vited to contact them and work
with them in the planning of
building activities for the cam-
paign ahead, Mr. Baer added.
Focal point for the UJA-Fed-
eratlon campaign in 1973 will
bo the immigration of Sovi I
Jewrv into Israel and their ab-
JWF Women's Division
Plans Special Program
"Judaism Is My Bag" will be
the theme of an all day edu-
cational program arranged by
the Women's Division of Greater
Hollywood's Jewish Federation
Thursday, Feb. 1.
The program, which will be
held at Temple Beth El. will be
divided into morning and after-
noon sessions with a lunch
break in between.
Featured on the program will
be Dr. Allen Pollack, a dynamic,
young authority on Jewish life.
A professor at Yeshiva Univer-
sity and a Sovietologist for the
Institute for Jewish Life, Dr.
Pollack is also the chairman of
the American Professors for
Pw.ee in the Middle East.
Also highlighted on the pro-
gram will be a special perform-
ance of the Habimah Players,
produced and directed by Telsa
Balick. This group which in-
cludes Bunny Goldstein. Sylvia
Berman, Evelyn Blumenthal and
Elaine Ruda. has appeared many
times throughout the area.
This will mark the first time
that the Women's Division has
conducted an all-dav forum for
its members. It is be ing planned
as a learning as well as an en-
tertaining exoerience. Ticket in-
cludes lunch; reservations may
be made by calling the Federa-
tion office. There will be no so-
licitation of funds.
Temple Sinai Presenting
Theodore Bikel January 28
Theodore Bikel, an outstanding
guitarist and folk-singer, author,
lecturer and social activist as well
as stage, screen and television ac-
tor is scheduled to appear at
Temple Sinai Sunday. Jan. 28. He
will discuss the plight of Soviet
Jewry, the State of Israel in its
25th year, and contemporary
American-Jewish topics.
Born in Vienna. Mr. Bikel was
13 when he and his parents left
Austria for Palestine. He intended
to teach comparative linguistics,
being fluent in Hebrew. Yiddish
and German, but meanwhile he la-
bored on a Kibbutz. When he dis-
played more flair for reciting
Shakespeare than for farming. h
was allowed to stage local pag-
eants.
In 1943, he joined the famed
Habimah Theatre in Tel Aviv and
in 1946, entered the Royal Acad-
emy of Dramatic Art in London,
where he graduated with honors.
At that time, he began to take a
serious interest in folk music and
the guitar.
But. it was on the stage that
Bikel the actor began to make his
mark. Important roles in "A
Streetcar Named Desire" and in
"The Love of Four Colonels" won
hkn critical plaudits.
His Broadway staee appearances
Continued en Pse S-
sorption into the community
once they have arrived. Soviet
Jewish immigration during 1973
is expected to be double that of
1972, when more than 30.000 of
them came through Lod Airport
at Tel Aviv.
Increased funds from UJA-
Federation campaigns win go to
hi Ip olfset th" ransom and exit visa costs tor
Jewish brethren whose housing
and absorption must also be paid
for.
"Ecu all these reasons the
Greater Hollywood campaign
must be geared to reach every-
one in the Jewish community and
their help must be solicited in
helping the local Federation
reach the bigsest total ever
reached in any campaign." said
Mr. Baer.
ADL Urges Rogers
To Investigate
Christmas Mailing
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith has asked Secretary
of State William P. Rogers to
investigate whether an anti-
Israel Christmas mailing to
Americans bv the Jordanian
Ambassador to the United
States is in violation of the
Foreign Agents Registration
Act.
In a letter to Mr. Rogers,
Benjamin R. Epstein. ADL di-
rector, said that the marling
a recording entitled "Jerusalem
in Captivity: A Personal Mes-
sage from King Hussein," and
an accompanying letter gives
"a wholly distorted picture of
the conditions of Jerusalem
under Israeli rule." He enclosed
copies of the letter and record-
ing.
Both were sent this month to
thousands of American business-
men, religious leaders, college
professors and government offi-
cials in ail sections of the coun-
try from the Jordanian Embassy
in Washington, D. C, by Zuhayr
Mufti. Ambassador of Jordan, to
the I'nited States.
Mr. Epstein declared that the
ADL was disturbed by this mis-
use of the Christmas season to
dispense anti-Israel propaganda
which has the effect of dividing
Americans by their religious
beliefs.
"Beyond that," he added,
"neither the letter nor the re-
cording bears a statement as
required by Section 4 of the
Foreign Agents Registration Act
for the transmission in the
United States of political propa-
ganda by agents of a foreign
principal required to register
under the act."
Jewish Welfare federation Benefactors' Dinner
Attracts Community Leaders


Mrs. Albert Einstein and A. L. Mailman
9 if. If.
Gerald Sieael, Herbert Katz. guest speaker Avner Idan
Mrs. Idan and Melvin Baer
Soviet Activists
To Go On Trial
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
Jewish activists wil go on trial
shortly in Rostov and Minsk,
according to Jewish sources in
the Soviet Union, the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry re-
ported today.
The SSSJ said It learned that
I a/.11 I.iilmrsky of Rostov, an
engineer who was arrested last
July, will be tried In a closed
onriroom between Jan. 1 and
Jan. 15. lie has been charged
under Art. 75/1 of the Soviet
penal rode with giving secret
documents to unauthorized per-
sons.
No trial date has been set
for Yesim Davidovich of Minsk,
! ccused under Art. 190 of the
penal code of anti-Soviet slander
and illegal possession of a pistol.
Davidovich, 48, has suffered
three heart attacks and has told
friends he does not expect to
live through his trial, the SSSJ
reported.
In connection with the David-
ovich case, another activist sur-
named Kipnis who was given
an exit visa, was pulled off a
train at Brest as he was leaving
Russia Nov. 29 and returned to
Minsk where he is being held by
the KGB (secret police). Kipnis
is believed to be the owner of the
1941 pistol said to have been
found in Davidovich's iiosscssion,
the SSSJ reported.
The re-airests of Jews de-
tained In Moscow Dec. 18 aa
they demonstrated at the Su-
preme Soviet for amnesty for
Jewish political prisoners, was
reported by the SSSJ. Irma
Bronstein. of Novosibirsk an
her daughter, Victoria Poltini-
kov, were arrested after their
release in Moscow and have bee.i
sentenced to six months corre*
tlve labor. They are the motlwr
and sister of Eleanora Yanapoi-
sky, an activist who was per-
mitted to leave the Soviet I Hi" t*
earlier this year.
Corrective labor permits tha
prisoner to live at home while
working at a job prescribed by
the State. They must remit part
of their wages to the State. Tha
two additional arrests brought
to a total 23 sentenced in tr.j
last week.
Another of the Moscow dcn>
< nstrators. Margerita Shpilberg,
wife of the prisoner Arkaav
Shpilberg, has disappeared since
returning to Riga and may have
been imprisoned, the SSSJ saii.

.

Rabbi Kahane Awarded
Israeli Citizenship
JERUSALEM (WNS)
The Interior Ministry award-
ed Jewish Defense League
t leader Rabbi Meir Kahane
citizenship, after Kahane ap-
l>caled to the high court,
which crdered the Ministry'
to show cause why it had
refilled to award citizenship.
The Justice Ministry is
still considering whether to
charge him with attempting
to smuggle arms out of
Israel.
I
i" V
V


I
Page 2
+Jewist FhrkJian "d **">*'' Hollywood
Friday, January 5, 1973
Interview With Moshe Ko
By MARION XEVIXS
(EDITOR'S NOTE Mrion Nevins,
Ftondian-shofar news coordinator, re-
cently epent 10 days in Israel with a
group of American journalists spon-
sored by the American Zionist Fed-
eration. The following interview with
Moshe Kol. Israeli Minister of Tour-
ism, took place at that time.)
I suggested to King Hussein
that we open up the border be-
tween EiJat and Aqaba and run

.1

MOSHE KOL
water skiing races. I told him I
would even ajjree to let him win
one of the races, if we could just
have peace," smilingly said the
pixieish, gray-haired Moshe Kol,
Minister of Tourism for Israel.
Mr. Kol's remark, although
meant to bo humorous, was never-
thoioss a!so meant to be indicative
of the extent to which Israel would
go to secure peace.
Although tourism is only a small
pal of the Israeli ? ?ene affected (
by international condition?, Mr.
Kol explained, it is most i-mortant
to Israel because it is the greatest
single earner of foreign currency !
for the nation. It also engenders |
ir>te est in the tiny democracy by i
virtue of the enthusiasm generated '
by tourists upon their return to l
their homes.
Though each border incident
lo"- down the tourist tide tern-1
porarilv. the Dast vear has brought !
tno-e than 750.CC0 tourists to Is-1
rael as against 650 000 in 1971
and some 850.000 are expected
in 1973. These fig-ires don't include
the 150.000 Arab visitors who come
to Irrael under the s-irrmrer visit-
ing scheme. Minister Kol added.
"Not many people realize," said
Mr. Kol. "that 45% of our tourists
are Christian. Over the Christmas
ho'idays thousands of Christian
)ilgrims come to Nazareth.
"A new trend here." he went
>n, "is that Jews from all over the
vorW are now. coming to Israel for
he celebration of significant rites
n their liv^S Now'we have Bar
Vlitzvah? performed at the West-
rn Wall and in some cases entire
amilies of well-to-do Jews have
jome along to participate in the
ceremony."
In this same category, weddings
have been consecrated in Israel by
young Jewish couples from other
countries. All these things are en-
couraged and welcomed by Israel
through Mr. Kol's department, not
only for the dollars and' other for-
eign currency that it brings to
Israel but also for the realization
that it perpetrates a feeling of
Jewish continuity.
"Summer camps for boys and
girl; from all over the world have
become big tourist business here."
reported Mr. Kol. "In fact there
is a tremendous influx of young
people. They come in tour groups
or working groups helping on kib-
butzim and many thousands come
for schooling."
At the present time in Israel.
10.000 additional hotel room* are
under construction with most of
them expected to be ready during
1973. Israel already has some 300
lotels and kibbutz guest houses
with some 17.000 rooms available.
"We also have fully equipped
"amning site* and youth hostel*
available throughout the country
with new sites and new roads I to
make them accessible i being built
continually." said the proud Min-
ister of Tourism.
Mr. Kol has' been Minister of
Development and Tourism since
19J6. He has been a member ot
the Knesset since 1949. From 1946
to 1966 he was a member of the
Jewish Agency Executive and the
head of its Youth Aliyah Depart-
ment.
Sisterhood Torah
Fund Luncheon Set
The Sisterhood of Temple Sinai
will hold its Torah Fund Luncheon
Tuesday. Jan. 16, at noon in the
temple's Haber Karp Hall.
Mrs. David Shapiro, wife of the
spiritual leader of the temple will j
'ie the honorec at this fund-raisinc j
"un?heon proceeds of which wil' j
help in the support of a dormitory
for girls to be built in New York
"it\ to house the wom^n student*
ittending the Teachers Institute
->f the Jewish Theological Semi-
nary.
Guest speaker at the luncheon
will be Abraham Gittelson. as
sistant director of Miami's Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education
Mrs. Samuel Sisholce and Mrs.
'harks Plerson are chai-man and
:-o o'-ai-rmn of the event.
MIKE MICHAELS TROPIC CRAFT
ALUMINUM FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS, INC.
1055 N.W. 1st Court, Hallandale
Warehouse Shopping Center 920-0251

HOUSE OF WIGS
ITEIUl TOWERS NOffTH
1M1 $. Octal Drhre 922-0564
STYLING-
Shaping Cutting
Introducing
Custom Styling by TONI
DELIVERIES MADE
HRS: Tu.s. to Sot. 10 iq 5. Clos.d Monday
, i
there is a place for you in
Pine Crest School
Launching Cultural
Art Series Jan. 29
"The Preservation Hall Jazz
Band." New Orleans jazz pioneers.'
wBl open the Pine Crest School's '
ci't-ira' an series for its third |
season Monday. Jan. 29 Four ma-
jor prod-ictions will be offered
*"-in<; the series; all programs
:'! h" held at 8 p.m. in the Stacy
On^el and AurWorium on th*
e*"i-"s of 'he school located at
1W1! N'E 62nd St.. Fort Laudcr
Pine Crest is sponsoring the
Xo-th American premiere of tb
youth folk cnsTnh'e "Radost"
Mondav. Feb. 12. "RacKst" is a |
"prtae'e featuring 70 winners of |
fir't pri7s in Euroiie's folk fes-
tivals: the "ro-in won first miw
a- fh* 1969-70 UNICEF World
Folk Festival.
P;ne Crest's best m-isic drama
rd nrt "indents will be featured
ki the March 5 Festival of the
Arts. Th program will include
t-p schools Singing Pines, its 40-
plece hand and a one-act play per-
formed by the students.
The final program in the series
will feature Jose Greco, "dean" of'
the Sr>anih dance. March 26.
All seats are reserved; season
tickets are on sale at the Pine I
Crest Public Relations Office.
'PERSONAL LOANS ULTRA SIMPLE
Add up all the pluses in your life, and you'll discover one
important thing there really are a lot of positives in your life.
And every one of our Move Ahead Bank customers has one
big plus in common. It's the PLUS money we have ready
for you.
PLUS moneyThat's Personal Loans Ultra Simpleyour
Move Ahead Bank's way of keeping you up to your pluses.
Our personal loans are ultra simple to get. If you are a
First National customer, just ask us.
PLUS moneypart of what Moving Ahead is all about.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HOLLYWOOD
BROWARD COUNTY S SENIOR BANK Serving Conlinuously Since 1924
COMEI KMirsMI MIIW m. HOUTWOOtl 1X11 US4U7
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HALLANDALE
IMS US! U1IIHHI SUCK lim IIIAMUI IMS! 12*4111
SECOND NATIONAL BANK OF WEST HOLLYWOOD
Hourwooo iuhiohciiiiii us 441 uoHourvsMiin.Mourwooo jjoji kiimo
Eld drpoulo' miwed tc l?0 000 M* mbm f 0 i C HtmM'i If Of i j< R(i* Svslcm
ISKXJ-L
ALIYAH n^y
The ISRAEL ALIYAH CENTER offers
you Information and Guidance in:
-^ Professional Placement + Pursuing Your Education
+ Housing ^ Learning Hebrew in Ulpanim
j( Business Opportunities -fr Kibbutz Life
For further information mail this coupon to the
ISRAEL ALIYAH CENTER,
Ainsley Building, Suite 1401, 14 N.E. First Ave. and
Flagler St., Miami, Florida 33132 tel. (305) 353-6540.
Gentlemen:
? Please send me more information about Aliyah
opportunities.
? I would like to arrange an appointment for an interview.
(please print or type:)
Name
Address
Age Telephone ___
(area code)
City State Zip Code
Profession or trade _................. Years of Experience.......
)

BEST RATES HIGH QUALITY UNSURPASSED DEPENDABILITY
Israel
phis...
PHONE HOLLYWOOD 925-8222
1 BETH SHALOM SPECIAL $ 867 JAN 15-JAN 29 SOLO OUT
2 PURIM TOUR $ 927 MAR 12-MAR 26 ISRAEL
3 PASSOVER HOLIDAY TOUR $ 967 APR 11 APR 25 ISRAEL
4 25th ANNIVERSARY TOUR $ 937 APR 26 MAY 10 ISRAEL
5 SHAVOUT TOUR $ 957 APR 28 JUNE 11 ISRAEL-EUROPE
6 TEMPLE BETH SHALOM Hwd'$1267 JUNE 20 JULY 11 I5RAEI-EUROPE-
7 BROWARD TEEN TOUR $1197 JUNE 19 JULY 24 ISRAEL-EUROPE
8 TEMPLE SINAI-HOLLYWOOD $1357 JUNS 28 -JULY 19 ISRAEL-EUROPE
ISRAEL EUROPE
1973
TOURS
CALL FOR COLORFUL DETAILED BROCHURE
SHALOM TOURS PETERS TOURS
1800 S. Young Circle
Hollywood, Florida
MIAMI 944-4879


Friday, January 5, 1973
+Jewisll fhridHar ShofM of Hollywood
Page 3
\>
I.
J
:
Rabbi Schwartz To Speak
At Broward ZOA Meeting
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, spir-
itual lea CVnter, will be the guest speaker
at the Eoward Zionist District
mreMng Toesday at 8 p.m. in Tem-
ple Sirt9T^RJI!yWBWrr^|","~'""
Rahfci Schwartz, a founder of the
Long {tland Zionist Region, served
as raShi in Waterburg, Conn.. and
was in Himpstfad, L.I.. N.Y., for
33 yeas. He Ls a member of the
Rabbinicp Association of Greater
Miami at.'. has served as the Rab-
binical Assembly representative of
the Syn&cosue Council of America.
In ftddJIion to Rabbi Schwartz,
the mect^.-.g will feature songs by
Cantof Ja?ob Danziger. also of the
Hallantia-e Jewish Center. Cantor
Danzigti, a ho will sing in Hebrew,
Yiddish md English, will be ac-
compank d by Helen Schwartz,
wife of Hie rabbi. Mrs. Schwartz
is well known both as an educator
and as a musician and authority on
liturgical music.
Pres-dir.e officer for the meet-
ing will rr Sam J. Perry, president
of the Broward Zionist District.
The public is invited: there will
be no solicitation of funds.
Philharmonic Pops
Concert Jan. 11 to
Open 15th Season
The Gi eater Hollywood Phi!
harmonic Orchestra will open it
15th spe'cn of "pops" con-?rts a*
8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 11. in Younp
Circle Ee.-dshell.
Maestro Jan Wolanek will con
duct thr program of symphonic
HgtM c!;i--lcal and "oon" selection-
with a great artist in the sole
spotlight.
Jack Grant will narrate the con-
cert pr< :ram. Louis Pod?orsk
will continue a* concert master
anl WHbert Kirk"utrick as as
sistant to the director.
The programs arc free to th-
public and provided through thi
gourtesj <.! Hollywood R^creatloi
P:\ i-ion. Great >r Hoi'ywoo '
jChambi i of Comnv rce and load
in: bunk- industries and business
anen Ad< tioflfll assistance i< pro
sided by a 'grant from the Musi
:tprfci rr.r c Trul Fund, a o ibll
tervlce organization createi anr"
fnanced by the Recording Indus
Jrtes An rj an K.'!ation of Mu
.sicians and Local 655.
Maestro Wolanek has been con
fln'M'iT' s>-ti musical director o
the orchestra sir.ee its inception
15 veat ago.
FOR CREATIVE
UPHOLSTERY
Call
JOHN W. PUORTO
113 N.Dixie Highway
Hallandale
Phone 922-7760
Rent-A-Car
. am low as
$5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXIE HWY.
920-4141
HOtlTWOOO
MS-569S Miami
RABBI HARRV f. SCHWARTZ
Beth El Sisterhood
Schedules Lunch
The regular monthly buffet-
luncheon meeting of Temple Beth
B3 Sisterhood will be held Tuesday
at 11:30 a.m. In the temple.
Following a brief business meet-
ing conducted by the Sisterhood
president, Mrs. Milton Jacobs.^the
Habimah Players will present
"Passport to Promise."
The Habimah Players is a group
of local women who have been
performing together since 1967,
Mrs. Telsa Balick is the director;
Mrs. Richard Goldstein is the au-
thor of the production and the
cast includes Mrs. Robert Berman,
Mrs. Fred Blumenthal. Mrs. Mon-
oe Ruda and Mrs. S. J. Stolove.
"Passport to Promise" relates in
words and music the feelings of
courage and love of country that
xists among the people of the
State of Israel. Reservations can-
be mado through Mrs. Lewis K.
?ohn. vice president of the Sister-
hood and Mrs. Martin Renno. pro-
"pti chairman.
iiraM)
Bar net t Bank of Hollywood
T,le< SlrMt aflOtrTAvenut "
Phon 923-8222
ORDERS TAKEN NOW FOR
MINEOLA TANGELOS
ANGIE'S GROVES
BONDED FRUIT SHIPPERS
1809 Wiley Street, Hollywood
FRESH SQUEEZED ORANGE JUICE
TAKE-HOME MESH BAGS
COCONUT PATTIES 79c Lb.
CLAXTON FRUIT CAKES
Telephone 927-5447
CLEANING
PRESSING
LAUNDRY
WYNONA CLEANERS
PHONE: 922-5561
500 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
WE PICK UP AND DELIVER
Ira L. Huiittrr
Cetiera! Mjuager
Shields & Company
members principal securities ex( i1anges
7300 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
Telephone: 865-0522 Broward 925-7517 & 925-6897

111 Painst & Supplies
HARDWARE PAINT. IKC
HOUSEWARES ft GIFTS
HOME DECOR ACCESSORIES
Bath / Closet Accesseries
Belief Ji.slaws Reem Dividers
Wtetew Shales Artifkial Flowers
Dnhtery Reds Fellace
VallDSJer Plait*
Key & Lock Work Patio Furnitura
Store Hours 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Closed Sundays
160 EAST BEACH BOULEVARD
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA M08J
PHONE 92T-0MC
imim.....
STELL'S
IN THE HOLLYWOOD MALL
FEATURING THE FINEST LABELS
IN FEMININE SPORTS APPAREL
ARNOLD PALMER DAVID SMITH
HAYMAKERS HARBURT
B0DIN KNITS VOYAGER
.......UtTTITo

The most beautiful
Jewish Chapel in Florida
is just a few minutes
driving time from
Ft. Lauderdale.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL, INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach. 16480 N. E. 19th Avenue
Tel: 920-1010
To arrange a funaral anywhara in tha Unitad States,
call tha nearest Riverside Chapal
Murray N.Rubin, F.D.


rge 4
-Jewistiftcrkliar) and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 5. 1973-j
i
fJemsti Floridian
> MMHtH ** 4411 tilN Ui>i I \ mim>|i
OFFICE and PLANT120 M.B. 6th Strbbt Telephone 373- 4605
HCLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 920-6J92
P.O. Box 297 J, Miami, Florida 331C1
Fred K. Shochet Selma M. Thompson
Editor and Publisher Assistant to Publisher
MARION NEVI.VS. News Coordinator
Ths Jewish Floridisr Doe Not Guarantee Th* Kaahruth
Of 7h Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns.
Published Bi-W*e*Jy by ihe Jewish Floridian
ft-:-:r.d-Cl3ss Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
JrvsH Welfare Federation op Greater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Widens, Chairman; Ross Bc-kerraan. Ben
Sa_:er, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atlun,
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity end the Jewish Weekly.
MTiber of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
f English-Jewish Newspspers, t
MATTER OF FACT by*****.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 12.00
Out of Town '.'~>n Request
Volume 3
Friday, January 5, 1973
Number 4
2 SHEVAT 5733
Overlapping Studies Beneficial
Duplicating efforts by Jewish agencies have often been
criticized, but there cae times when their overlapping
studies prove of great benefit.
The American Jewish Committee recently warned of
the stepped-up missionary efforts of such well-organized
groups as Campus Crusade for Christ, the "Jesus Freaks"
and the highly financed "Key *73" drive of evangelistic
churches aimed, in part, at converting Jews to Christianity.
The seriousness of such movements and their possible
effect on impressionable Jewish youth has been well-
publicized.
On the other hand, a B'nai B'rith survey of 80 college
campuses reveals that the movement is finding few con-
verts among Jewish college students. Only a "negligible
percentage" of Jewish youth have been attracted to these
fundamentalist appeals, according to the study, which
also finds that the figures are "zealously overblown" and
do not justify some of the rising fears and alarm in the
Jewish community.
We imagine that the truth lies somewhere in between,
but more important is the fact that the Jewish community
has been alerted to another condition which highlights the
need for action to assure its survival. B'nai B'rith Hillel di-
dectors on campus have initiated programs of counterac-
tion for college youth gut our present situation calls for
even more study of where our American priorities should
be after years of neglect of the education of both our young
and old in Ihe meaning and strength of Judaism as a living
force.
All Doubts Now Removed
If there were any lingering doubts about the criticism
surrounding the CBS "Bridget Loves Bernie" program, the
poorly contrived Chanukah-Christmas show removed them.
The series continues to be an insult to the intelligence, as
well as to Christianity and Judaism, both of which it treats
with disrespect and ignorance.
Although the bigotry of Archie Bunker in that other
CBS contribution to American culture may cause distress
among many, there are at least the elements of humor and
honesty as saving graces. "Bridget Loves Bemie" has
neither and remains an affront that leaves little doubt about
how great a wasteland most of the television world repre-
sents.
NANKING, China In the
year after Pearl Harbor. I spent
a good deal of time in a Japa-
nese internment camp in Hong
Kong. This was basically because
Gen. Claire Cliennaulfs Flying
Tigers would have been crippled
without a tiny animating part
for our airplanes' .50-caliber ma-
chine guns called an 1-B sole-
noid.
I had desperately tried to
have the defective parts made
in China, in Burma and in Sing-
apore, always unsuccessful. Fi-
nally Claire Chennault sent me
to Manila to seek 1-B solenoids
there. It was a journey that bore
fruit, but only at the final in-
stant. So I caught the last plane
out of Manila, and I was thus
trapped in Hong Kong when the
Japanese broke through at Mag-
azine Gap.
THE POINT of this ancient
story is simple enough. I have
now seen at least four factories,
all in Chinese rural counties,
that you could not have reached
by road in the old days. All
four could easily have produced
unlimited quantities of 1-B sol-
enoids. precLsion-made as was
required, considerably more
easily than they currently and
most ingeniously produce their
own machine tools.
Everything in China has
changed, in truth, except the
endlessly resilient, hard-work-
ing and clever Chinese people.
The quality of life h->s r'-aiwl
vastly for the worse for the an-
cient ruling class but for the
better for everyone else. This is
true not only in the cities but
also in the formerly remotest
countryside.
The countryside itself bas
changed, localise there are now
trees and roads, and there are
no more graves wasting land
that -can be usefully cropped.
The agriculture has changed in
many fascinating ways, and it
will change further, too.
AS FOR industry, there were
under 40 factories, mostly handi-
craft in character, in this great
city in 1948. And there are now-
above ROO factories employing
about 1.6 million people.
If China has any luck, in fact,
I suspect the change in China
may prove more important for
the world future than the change
in Russia that took place with
Lenin's October Revolution. In
just under 40 years as a re-
porter, I am confident that the
month I have now spent in the
new China constituted the most
significant reportorial work I
have ever done.
Naturally, therefore. I have
thought a lot about how the
story ought to be handled. May-
be I should now begin writing
about all sorts of other things
that are more in the headlined
news. Nonetheless, it seems best
I give priority to the biggest
story I have ever covered. And
tH1? rrin"*r^< both a nrefa^e a"d
an explanation.
AS PREFACE. I must point
out that I have largely worked
out of the capital cities of the
provinces the government open-
ed for the first time to Susan
Mary and me. This, was no. limi-
tation (or so I thought I since
trips of up to 70 miles into the
country were easy, if you pre-
pared for a less than luxurious
overnight stay.
What we saw. of course, we
largely had to see through the
eyes of Yao Wei. the manager-
interpreter and general guide,
philosopher and friend provided
for us by the foreign office. At
the end of a month with hint,
my wife and I fully understand
why one of the ablest younger
reporters in Peking told us he
would give at least one of his
two least mentionable parts for
such a trip with Yao Wei.
So much for explanation.
Fourteen hours of daily legwork.
plus communications problems,
forbade regular reporting from
the scene.
Belatedly, however. I shall
now transform my voluminous
notes into reports from the many
scenes in question. For I think
those who wish to read have a
right to know the raw facts on
which I have based my tenta-
tive conclusions.
The conclusions will then fol-
low, although at an alarmingly
,r,r. t = -
tn *Urt fiifufo.
The Nixon-Kissinger Partnership
PART TWO
SIR. KISSINGER'S PLANET
By MAX LERNER
The year of 1970 was a bad one
for the Nixon-Kissinger partner-
ship, with both the Cambodian de-
MAX URNEI
cision and the Kent State killings.
With the new economic policy
and the projection of the trips
to Peking and Hanoi. 1971 was a
year of sowings and surprises. The
first year of harvest was 1972.
What lies ahead will decide wheth-
er it was a false harvest or a
genuine one.
It will also test how much
sense Mr. Kissinger's planet makes.
I take the phrase, of course, from
Saul Bellow's brilliant novel, "Mr.
Sammler's Planet," where an ex-
traordinary man had an extra-
ordinary private universe, ran by
his own gods and demons. Each
of us has one. and it is WE who
are out of luck if it doesn't run.
not the world. If Kissinger's very
public universe doesn't work, he'll
be out of luck, but so will the rest
of us.
It is a striking chapter in the
history of ideas how a doc-
toral thesis at Harvard on M.-t-
ternich and the concept of p
led to a set of Initiatives by Rich-
ard Nixon that transform I
can & olicy. The story ha<
been told several times, wit* dif-
fering degree of empathy and anti-
pathy, depending on the I
about Kisain
My own feeling is that whether
you approve of him as a p
stability. It made sense to study
both.
Mettemich was the dominating
figure in both. A conservative aris-
tocrat, the foreign minister of the
weakest of the great powers, hav-
ing to balance Prussia against Rus-
sia. England against France, he
saw that Europe would not be
free from other thrusts at mas-
tery like Napoleon's unless it
could achieve a power balance be-
tween the giants. Hence the first
of Kissinger's three crucial ideas
that of equilibrium.
But how achieve it? If you do
it by an arms race or by juggling
alliances, you achieve only an end-
less succession of wars and domi-
nations, and your world is en-1
crusted in blood-rust.
The only way to overcome rival-
vies is to establish a measure of
trust. In a time of danger and
strife you can do that only by
is irrelevant. Like Mr. Nixon, he
is what he is, and he got where
he did as he did. The question is:
How did his ideas develop and
how valid are they, and how well
have they worked?
DOMINATING FIGURE
Coming from the continent, with
his experience as a refugee, it was
natural for him to study power,
diplomacy and peacemaking. The
Congress of Vienna tried to pick
up the pieces in Europe after Na-
poleon's thrust at mastery, and
the concert of powers was aimed
at giving Europe a long-range
stripping away nonessential dif-
ferences and getting to the core of
what the great powers have in
common. Hence Kissinger's second
idea that of common national
interests leading to a concert (to-
day we say agreements based on
a meeting of minds" between the
powers.
The third idea flows from the
first two. National interests are
not frozen abstractions. They have
to do with lelt needs and prob-
lems. For any great power there id
i linkage between the diverse irons
it has in the fire. In a set of trade-
offs involving the linked interests,
al' of them geared toward the
coi.imon national interest, each of
the great powers finds itself a
gainer, in a game in which every
nation makes concessions but none
is a loser. Hence the third idea of
the Kissinger triad the idea of
linkage.
ROLE OVERPLAYED
Kissinger might say that some
of this is what I read into his
thii king, not what Ls there. I can
inly say that this is the meaning
I sec in how his new diplomacy
has thus far operated, supple-
mented by reading him and talk-
ing with him.
The role of Meiternich in his
thinking was important, but it can
be overplayed and has been.
Things have changed since Met-
temich. Europe is no longer the
arena of great power, which has
shifted westward to the United
States and eastward to Russia and
China. Power is more massive than
it has ever been, and more com-
plex in its reach. Home fronts are
more important The social fabric
is more fragile, tiadition more ten-
uous, ideas mope corrosive.
Most of all, the new weapons
are not only lethal but suicidal
The crucial common interest the
great powers had in Metternich's
time was the fear of revolutions
and the desire to shore the society
against them.
Critics on the left who say that
Kissinger is moved by the same
fear are talking doctrinal non-
sense. The great common interest
today is fear of nuclear destruc-
tion. It is what enables Mr. Nixon
and Kissinger to strive for some
"iui'ir."lr- for their Nanet
Copyright !!:;. T.os Aneeles Times
II.-ml Power Struggle Continues
TEL AVIV (JTA.-Mcnachem Beigin. leader of the Herut
Party, has moved to foreclose any possibility that Gen. Ezer Welz-
man might withdraw his resignation as chairman of the Party's
Executive. Weizman submitted his resignation at the close of the
Herut convention last Thursday Be -in was reported to have pro-
I the name of Kneaset-membfl Chaim Landau to replace him.
The Party's new 250-member Central Committee, composed largely
<>! Beigin supporters, is expected to accede to their teadera wishes
when it convenes Sunday to elect a new chairman. The four-day
Herut convention was marked by a power struggle between Wei*.
man's supporters and the veteran party members loyal to Bei.


Friday. January 5. 1973
+Jm1st> norkttan Shofr of Hollywood
Page 5-
VI
\
ORGANIZATION REPORTS
Hollywood Scholarship Foundation
By GRACE FINKEL. President
His checks were the color of an
apple and although his red, red
lips were smiling, his blue eyes
were watery with tears he was
fighting -to suppress, His school
records claimed him to be 17. but
he looked 14 or 15 tops. Was it
because he was so vulnerable? The
interviewer tried to put him at
ease. His problem?
He would soon be graduating
from high school. He was finishing
at the top of his class a straight
A average for three years. In addi-
tion, he worked at Pirate's World
weekends ar.d after rchool. At 16,
he had become the "man of the
house'' when his step-father dis-
appeared leaving his mother, two
young sisters and a bedridden
grandmother in their trailer home.
His mother straggled with the
hills and some part-time work and
James heir*';! with his meager
earnings. He had ambition to at-
tend college and then medical
school and to his credit a work-
study gram from the University of
Miami. He needed few clothes
boys like James can get by with
very little. He could manage his
living money from his job earnings
- but the university grant lacked
$500 and there was juct no way.
Cou'.d the Hollywood Scholar-
ship Foundation help?
It could and did.
Emily was next, a sad and har-
ried looking girl, worry not only
in her eyes but stamped on her en-
tire demeanor. Or maybe she was
just tired! She works six nights
a week at a local nursing home
beginning as an aide, but later pro-
noted to record clerk. She actually
Itates the work, but it pay's" well
and she needs it to support her-
self and to finance a beat-up car
she will need next year for trans-
portation to and from college.
Next year she hopes to go to
Florida Atlantic. Her scholastic
achievement in high school was so
outstanding that she can enter
there as a junior thus shorten-
ing her college career by two
years, a tremendous financial sav-
ings.
But the state has insufficient
funds to grant all needy students
free tuition and Emily hasn't
enough to pay her own way com-
pletely. She, too, is the victim of
a fatherless home. Emily hopes to
be a child guidance counselor.
Could Hollywood Scholarship
Foundation help?
It could and did.
Extreme cases? Well, perhaps.
Yet every year these stories are
brought to the Foundation. Each
one is somewhat different but they
all have one common denominator.
A bright, ambitious youngster with
a large potential for success
brought close to despair for lack
of college money.
Florida's educational system is
one of the country's most progres-
sive in providing fine two year
community colleges, such as Brow-
ard Community College and
Miami-Dade. But while they are
low cost in comparison to private
institutions, they are not free:
large numbers of students need
seme financial assistance to at-
tend.
For eight years the Hollywood
Scholarship Foundation has en-
deavored to give assistance to en-
tering freshmen who make every
effort to help themselves, but who
need a boost to make ends meet.
To date, it has assisted 263 young-
sters at a cost in excess of $100 000.
all of which was raised and ad-
ministered by volunteers.
Professional advice is freely
given by school guidance counsel-
ors. It maintains no office, em-
ploys no paid workers, therefore
every dollar raised is used for
scholarships.
Funds are raised at an annual
fashion show luncheon Le Fete
du Soleil each spring. In addi-
tion, philanthropic members of the
South Broward community make
direct donations. Youngsters from
all the South Broward areas are
eligible for assistance.
Temple Sinai Presenting
Theodore Bikel January 28
Continued from Page 1-
included memorable performances
in "Tonight in Samarkland." "The
Rope Dancers," "The Lark," and
starred in for television and radio.
An American citizen, who re-
sides in Connecticut with his wife
and two young sons he is known
as an activist in the reform wing
of the Democratic party and has
for many years been active in the
civil rights movement. He is also
highly active in the field of labor,
is cochairman of the American
Jewish Congress Governing Coun-
cil and a member of the Execu-
tive Board of the National Jewish
Music Council.
One of Mr. Bikel's greatest joys
is meeting with students on col-
lege campuses, and discussing top-
ics ranging from the radical Jew
to the new politics, to nudism in
the theatre. He is truly a man of
the world and comfortable in the
role of a concerned human being
who works in the arts.
Both adult and student tickets
for his appearance are available
at the temple office. 1201 John-
son St., or by mail.
Howard M. Metzenbaum, Cleve-
land businessman and Demo-
cratic nominee for the U.S. Sen-
ate in 1970, has been elected
as the new national chairman
of the Commission on Socia"'
Action of Reform Judaism, a
program-planning body which
represents the Union of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregation-
and the Onn-al Conference of
'Xmerican Rabbis.
A MUNICIPAL government
fi'nd nan extended loans of more
than 1L 1.25 million to residents
of East Jerusalem for new
housing this fiscal year. One of
the biggest complaints of Arabs
living in East Jerusalem Is that
the Israelis are building homes
only for Jewish immigrants to
Israel, and the Arabs are for-
gotten.
as Baron Von Trapp opposite
Mary Martin in "The Sound of
Music." His interpretation of
Tevye in the National Company of
'Fiddler On The Roof" was. praised
by critics and audiences alike.
He has starred in innumerable
top dramatic television shows in
the United States. Canada and
England, and has had numerous
nominations for Emmy Awards.
His best known s~reen efforts
are in "The African Queen," "The
Kidnappers." "The Russians Are
Coming, The Russians Are Com-
ing." "The Enemy Below," and
The Defiant Ones." For his film
role of a Southern sheriff in the
a-t film cited, he received an
Academy Ayvard nomination as
Best Supporting Actor.
As a folk singer, he has appear-
ed in cone ..!': world
and ha- record* I W album ->r foHc
songs, His latest album "Silent
No More." the freedom songs of
Soviet Jew, is based on tapes
smuggled out of the U.S.S.R.
Mr. Bikel's literary side as au-
thor, raconteur and lecturer is
evidenced by the one-man shows
he has conceived, written and
NOTICE
JEWISH ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION
IS IN FORMATION IN AREA OF
HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD. & SO. OCEAN DRIVE
PLEASE ATTEND MEETING AT
HOME FEDERAL SAVINGS BUILDING
1720 Harrison Street, Hollywood
TUESDAY, JANUARY 9 AT 7:30 P.M.
COLLATION AFTER MEETING
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PLEASE CALL
SIDNEY MARKS MEYER GASNER
929-8601 929-0960
MANUEL HOROWITZ
920-0359
BuildingTo Building
The residents of Oxford Towers had a successful and happ;
New Year's party at the Reef Restaurant. Helene Silverman an.".
Marion Hammciman wore in charge and there were drinks of
course, a big dinner, dancing, favors and all ingredients to mak
it a great evening for all those who attend.d. At the same tirm
and at the party Lenore and Morris Peizcr celebrate^ their 50tl\
Happy, Happy!!!!
Some 200 residents of the Hemispheres joined in the Hemi-
sphere festivities at Calder Race Track recently. The trophy
for the winner of the Hemispheres' race was presented by Bi!
Weiss, Max Amazon and Adele Ckildbcrg. Ethel Joel, chair-
man of the Entertainment Committee at La Mer Apartment-
has been busy arranging all kinds ot speciaJ things for the resi-
dents including evenings of book reviews, evenings of dancin.
and entertainment and evenings of games.
FULL TIME SEAMSTRESS, SHIRTS, ALTERATIONS
REPAIR WORK ALL DONE ON PREMISES
One hour
"nimimim:
THI MOST lit DPV CLEANING
ACROSS FROM BROWARD HIGH SCHOOL
1910 N. FEDERAL HWY. 923-1133 HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
SPOKEN
Spanish, French, German, Russian,
Italian, English
. and other Languages.
Offered by TIL0S -
The International
LINGUISTIC OVERSEAS SYSTEM.
at
PROSPECT HALL COLLEGE
Call Fort Lauderdale 522-2537
Hollywood 962-3277
P
Tie Unique Qcft u>
WATERCOLORS
A GALLERY
325 Miracle Mile 444 6743
HRIFTY
RENT-A-CAR
In Hollywood & Hallandale
NEIGHBORHOOD & AIRPORT SERVICES
Weekdays 927-1761 3000 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Evenings & Weekends 525-4355

INVESTOR WANTED
PARTNERSHIP CONSIDERED
Going Jewish Restaurant Business
Needs to Expand
VERY PROFITABLE VENTURE
ALL INQUIRIES WILL BE ANSWERED
Write P.O. Box 4022, Miami Beach, Flo. 33141
BRING GRANDMA CEAL YOUR NEW
OR TIRED OLD CLOTHES AND SHE WILL
DO SLACKS-SKIRTS DRESSESHEMS
DON'T FUSS OR MUSS FOR U00 & UP
GRANDMA CEAL
. WILL TAKE CARE OF ALL
- YOUR SEWING PROBLEMS
call 920-2690..simi day service
CALL 1-920-2690
PARKER PLAZA


Page 6
+ kni*t ncrkfian "<* Shofar ** Hollywood
Friday, January 5, 1973
scene around
by Marjo Nevins
'^AAAMMVMWWVWMVWi
One of the moot moving Bar Mitzvahs I have over attended
was the one recently at the Western Wall in the old city of
JerusaJim. The participants were Moroccan Jews and although
I actually could not understand the words, the mother of the
Bar Mitzvah boy. in a somewhat universal language of mothers
made i: known to me that I was welcome to participate in their
party and sip of their wine.
Recently the Western or Wailin- Wall, holiest shrine of the
Jewish world, has become the site for many such Bar Mitzvahs.
Since the meeting of the various Israeli forces at this wall on
the 7th of June in 1967 and the reuniting of the city of Jeru-
salem, the place has become a sanctuary for all. The dreams of
generations of persecuted and oppressed Jews have come true in
its restoration. Israeli army recruits often take their oaths with-
in the shadow of the wall and many other mass ceremonies take
place there.
But on the day on which I visited the wall, it was the
scene of three Bar Mitzvahs. The Moroccan Jews now Israelis
who captured my attention seemed in appearance like any
local Jewish family. The mother in pink satin with matching hat
and veil had shed her coat in spite of the chill in the air as had
most of the women in the party. The Bar Mitzvah boy was in-
structed to keep his heavy coat on however and the talis was
draped over it. I gathered all this by watching and by knowing
that a Jewish mother isn't much different any place she could
show off her new dress in the chill air but she wasn*t going to
have "her boy'" catch cold.
Ceremony over, the mother noticed me on the fringe of the
family group sort of eavesdropping. She came over to me and
beckoned and pointed to the wine and goodies. Words were un-
necessary. I joined the group of friends and relatives, hugged
them all and kissed the handsome dark-haired Bar Mitzvah boy.
At that momerrt I understood something about Jews and the
Jewish continuity. J saw in this boy counterpart of Bar Mitz-
vah boys all over the world what it means to be a Jew.
to "fr a
BITS AND PIECESRachel and Morris Lefkowitz cele-
brated their 50th weddtng anniversary recently and the Henri-
rtta Szold Group of Hadassah helped them with a special meet-
ing of the group. When Rabbi Harry Schwartz appears at
the next Broward Zionist meeting it will be an occasion that will
bring together two of the officers of the Long Island. N.Y. Zion-
ist Region of 27 years ago, for Sam Perry, the Broward Zionist
District president and Rabbi Schwartz served in that region
then.
ARTS FURNITURE CLINIC
Specializing in all wood furniture repairs
REHNISH1NG STRIPPING ANTIQUING
Nothing too small but largo quality of workmanship
Call for any information
920-7122
Reasonable Professional
420 S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood
HERZFELD & STERN
Established 1880
membewb kewyouk otock kxohamoc
3906 8. OCEAN DRIVE,
HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
ULimoNiai -mi ( HOWARD!
44-4TII (OtOll
MEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PALM BEACH MIAMI BEACH
ENEVA AMSTERDAM
JOHN R. EATON, Manager
SHELDON D. BERMAN, Co-Manager
FOREIGN
is
O PAINTING
DOMESTIC
TERRACE PAINT AND BODY
"YOU WRECK 'EM' "WE FIX" 'EM"
COMPLETE BODY & PAINTING SHOP
TERRACE AUTO FRAME SHOP
"YOU BEND EM WE MEND EM
ALL TYPE OF AUTO FRAME REPAIR
.:
JM1 S W IS
TilMACE
966-0349
/. HOLLYWOOD
. fLA.
Hallandale
Hadassah
Groups Meet
A number of Hallandale Chap-
ter of Hadassah groups have an-
nounced plans for January meet-
ing.
A regular meeting of the Park-
r (iroup will take place Tuesday.
>t 12-30 p.m. in the Parker Tower
Blue Room. A film entitled "What's
.yew in Hadassah?" will be shown.
Mrs. Manny Rose, vice president,
will be in charge of the program
for the Hallandale Chapter and
will give a reading on the topic
"What is a Jew?" Mrs. Harry
Zeiger is program chairman for i
the Parker Group with Mrs. Zach-!
ary Boosin presiding.
Chal Group will hold a regular
meeting Tuesday, Jan. 16. at noon
in the Home Federal Building in
Hallandale. Vice president in
charge of the program will be
Mrs. Manny Rose with Mrs. Cas-
per Alman nresiding.
The Hemispheres Group will
host a paid-up membership tea
Tuesday. Jan. 16. at 12:30 p.m. in
the Ocean Terrac? Room. A fihn
entitled "What's New In Hadas-
sah?" will be shown. Mrs. Ann
Cohn is vice president in charge
of the program; Mrs. Lawrence
Denk will preside.
The Imperial Group will have a
regular meeting Tuesday Jan. K
at 12:30 p.m. in the West Card
Room. Mrs- Sherman Fa*t. Flor-
ida Region fund-raising chairman,
will speak on "Hadassah In Is-
rael." Program .chairman is vice
president Mrs. Sidnev Fnetein
with Mrs. Sol Cooper presiding.
Plaza Tower* Group will hold a
regular meeting on Tuesday. Jan.
23. at 12:30 pm. in the Plaza
Towers Social Hall. Mrs. Sam
Sisholce. vice president in charge
of the program, will present Miss
Merle Norman, cosmetologist. Mrs.
Helen Fromm will preside.
National Youth Aliyah Chairman To
Speak At Hadassah Chapter Luncheon
The Hollywood Chapter of Ha-
dassah and its six affiliated groups
(Beach. Ml Scopus. Hilicrcst. Sha-
'om. H'AtH and Henrietta Szold"
will hold it.s annual Youth Aliyah
Pledge Luncheon Wednesday. Jan.
17. at 11:30 a.m. in the Reef Res-
taurant. 2700 S. And.ews Ave..
Fort Lauderdale.
Youth Aliyah servos as parent
and guardian for some 140.000
young people frcn 0 cvint-ie"
Currently there are 11.010 wards
cared for in 2(i7 kibbutzim, day
centers, youth \i3ages an I -!>ecia' j
schoo's. who are being prepared;
educationally and emotionally to I
lead normal lives.
Hadassah is the principal sup- i
porting agency of Youth Aliyah in
the United State*. It provides 40' I
nf the funds needed for mainten-
ance, education and special proj-
ects.
The speaker of the day wi'l be
Mrs. James Feidman. national
Youth Aliyah chairman, who re-
cently returned from b trip to
Israel. She will bring a "eport on
the latest development^ on the
various Hadassah projects. Miss
Karen Mils wil": rrcsent the musi-
cal entertainment.
i{-servations may no made by
contacting Mrs. Robert Berman,
chapter chairman, or Mrs. Ethel
Posnick. ccchaittnan; Mrs. Sid Dul-
berg. Beach Group; Mr. Steven
FairehlKI, Ml Scopus: Mrs. Louis
Jacobs. Hilicrcst; Mr:. Irving
Tavidoff. Shalom: Mrs, Morris
Koitunovsky. H'Atid. or Mrs. Perry
Segal. Henrietta Si-old.
&v.i n;cssan
F LOR [NCI S0SE
Comedy Proeeeds
Go To Civic And
Jewish Centers
"The Fifth Season." a comedv
ibont the ea-ment indu=1rv. wi>'
He staged with a professional and
emi-nrofeional east at t^e Hal
landa'e Jewish Center Su-dov
Mondav nnd Tuesdav. Jan. 21-23.
Two additional performances will
be given on Saturdav and Sundav
venings. Jan. 27 and Jan. 28. at
Wxie Park Audina-=ium at NW
10th Street and 8th Avenue in
Hallandale.
The production, which is under
the direction of Florence Rose, will
feature Rabbi Dov Bidniek of the
Hitlel Community Dav School and ;
Mike Brophv. Tickets nr* avail-i
th\o at the Hn'landalo Cho'Tibr nr'
Commerce, Hallandale City Hall I
"ashier and the Hallandale Jewish
Center at 416 NE 8th Ave.
Proceeds from all performances
will go to the Hallandale Civic
"enter Fund and the Hallandale
Jewish Center.
Specialists in Home Catered Parties Platters
Under the Rabbinical Supervision of
Rabbi Avrom Drazin Temple Israel
TAKE OUT FOODS
107 S. 20th Ave.
Hollywood, Fla. 33020
Phone 922-66SS
LUNCHEON DINNERS
11:30 A.M.- 11:0O P.M.
SATURDAYS SUNDAYS
1:00 P.M. 11:00 P.M.
- TAKE OUT -
, HONG KONG VILLAGE
v M: Chinese Restaurant
2. 008 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY, DANIA
PHONE 920-7077
M
SHIPS LAMPS (All Kinds)
VELVET PICTURES
SHIELDS
DINETTE SET
LIOUOR CART
Prices
You
Won"! Believe
VJ-ARLOS j
M
'ARLOS
AND
PANiSH
exican Imports
2281 Wilton Drive Phont S64-59V
OPEN MON. SAT. 9 9 P.M
ISRAEL
2 GLORIOUS WEEKS
"PURlJtl TOUR"
From Ft. Lauderdale
Including Eilat
$927
Per Person Double Occupancy
Departing March 12 Returning March 26
Top First Class Accommodations, Meals, Man/ Extras!!!
Call 925-8222
SHAIOM TOURS PETERS TOURS
1800 S. Young Circle
Hollywood, Florida


Friday. December 22, 1972
*Je*/slh fkliiMMl nd Shofar of Hollywood
Pciqe 7
**
Goren Promises To Publish
Full Text Of Langer Rulhi2
TEL AVIV fJTA) Chief i
Rabbi Shior-ju (Jteen has prom- i
iso.l that the Ju.ll text of the
uling in ih I.a.. --
,*i- wk ,p.ii,,:v p.ib;{*v<.' hcm-i
this week. He charged that >-
>re employing
methods, ol "terror" to try to
force their views on rabbis and
daya dm I religious court Judges]
anl riV .'a.'.'i that he would not
to! rate such acts.
Ki.)l;i Qaren h -s come under
severe attack (ram ultra-Ortho-
dox i< i' rl -i 'I*' bete S broad fa* "h- ru l*w? by p. nii*
itiai rabbinical .court last month
thai llanoeh and Miriam Langer
w.t. not baatw la and wen free
to nm-rv their Nances
Rabbi Gor i the text of
the ruling and the names of
the 3a) a li have r.cl been
leased until now to protect
t^ ., f-orn ha'.-assn: >:-t aiit!
physical violence.
Addressine the weekly meet-
ing oi h.> Engineers Club fure,
he said ho would seek to solve
all family and personal pr.>b-
kxns according to halacha ire-
ligio"s law) but wo'ild s?e to
it that halachu problems are
solved by rabbis and rabbinical
courts, not by yeshiva heads.
He a'd d that he would not al-
low "te.Tor" co be used to pre-
v ent "an m (n ai m iking Ue-
cisl ns according to their con-
Jewish Welfare federation Eerie.'actors' Dinner
A'trac's Community Leaders
Leo Mardr, Irving Mcdlin and Joseph Shmeizer
, s* & ir
Charles Upin, Meyer Kaplan and Jerome Gevirman
ft Dr. Norman Atkin and Mrs. J3emard Milloft
ft ft ft
Fate Of Jews Deeply
Concerned Truman
KANSAS CITY. Mo. (WNS)
Former President Han> S. Tru-
man, who died lapt week at the ]
HARRY S. TRUMAN
ige of 88 at the Research Hos-
pital and Medical Center here.
vat best known among Jews for
his recognition of Israel some 14
minutes after it was officially
established on May 7. 1948. His
fficial recognition followed by
minutes the official recognition of
the Jewish State by Joseph Stalin.
The Jewish t eople will also re-
member him for his efforts to ease
he migration of Jews to Palestine
from DP camps in Kurope and for
his campaign to establish better
!srael-Arab relations.
Former Secretary of State Dean
\cheson explained once that Tru-
man hail taken a strong pro-Israel
stand before as well as after the
establishment of the State. The
first consideration. Mr. Acheson
mid, was the wartime Jewish
refugees who "couldn't go back
to Russia or Poland and couldn't
0 back to Germany."
Truman's "moral and emotional"
obligation to the refugees was
:oi?-ted out to him by Eddie Jacob-
15on, a friend from Truman's
haberdashery days and "a con-
vinced Zionist," who "talked to
the President a great deal about
it," Mr. Acheson said.
'It may well be that in Truman
the Jewish voter finally found the
Mwerful Christian leader who per-
sonified that sense of civilized
world conscience which they had |
Hopefully assigned to hi^'pfe'deV(*
cessor. Franklin Roosevelt," j
states the Encyclopaedia Judaica. j
Mr. Truman had not always j
supported the establishment of a
Jewish State. As the Encyclo- '
>aedia shows, he advocated the en- \
iraace of 100.000 displaced Jews to
Palestine in 1945 and pressed
"on: less to liberalize the Immi-
gration laws to allow more dis-
'laced persons "including Jews"
o enter the United States. Yet he
maintained, in 1948, that the
' United States was the proper
agency for handling the long-range
solution of the Middle East prob-
lem.
The fact that Mr. Truman did
not recognize the State of Israel
until May 1948 aroused specula-
tion at the time that he was acting i
out of purely political reasons. He |
was up for reelection and the
Democratic Party was in a critical
state. Southern conservatives had
broken away to form the Dixie-
oats and urban-based liberal ele-
ments were being attracted to
Henry Wallace's jjlatform of "pro-
^rVsViV^n-ap-tansni."
In addition, Thomas Dewey, the-
Republican Party candidate, had
given strong pledges of supjiort to
the U.S. Zionists. When a Wallace
platform candidate in a largely
Jewish Congressional district in
the East Bronx won by a two-to-
one margin in February 1948, it
was at this juncture that Mr. Tru-
man supposedly decided to make
an all out bid to win back the
Jewish vote.
Over the long run. the liberal.
"Fair-Deal" administration over
which Mr. Truman presided from
1948 to 1952 remained popular
with Jews even when public opin-
ion began to run against it as a
result of the Korean War. Jews
showed practically no defection to
the Republican camp during the
Eisenhower Stevenson campaign
of 1952, a fact which reflected on
Truman's ability to satisfy Jewish
sentiments both in his policy to-
ward Israel and his stand on
domestic issues.
Simha Dinitz Facing
An Unusual Challenge
Question
Box
Ik., v
Dr. Joel Schneider and Dr. Joseph Hopen
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Why docs thp Jew offer a
prayer asking the Almighty to
guard his tongue from evil after
concluding the basic body of
prayer?
The Kabbalah (Zohar, Vayyikra
53a) states that he who has an
nil tongue will not have his
prayers accepted before the Al-
mighty.
After finishing the substantial
body of prayer one shows concern
that his plea be accepted and
considered rather than rejected by
1 the Almighty. Actually, the con-
cluding statement of the main
body of prayer is a plea that the
words of my mouth" be accept-
able before the Almighty. In order
to achieve such a goal a person is
ked to strive for the status of
i being one whose words are usually
( proper and well-intended.
Should the worshipper be one
' who normally speaks evil of
i others, he establishes the reputa-
| tion and the record of one who
' should not be taken seriously at
his word. Furthermore, one who
seeks to find favor in the eyes of
the Creator should show that he
! himself expresses an attitude of
I friendship towards his fellow man.
By GEOFFREY D. PAUL
Simha Dinitz, Israel's Ambassa-
dor-designate to the United States,
faces the unusual challenge of liv-
ing down his years of service with
the Prime Minister, Mrs. Golda
Meir.
Having been personally selected
and nominated for the job by Mrs.
Meir, he has now to disprove the
bitterly personal and sometimes
near-vicious allegations (made
semi-publicly in government and
press circles) that he is not the
man for the job and that only
Mrs* Meir's protection earned him
the Washington appointment.
Whatever is said about the man-
ner of the appointment and the
further damage done to the al-
ready shaky morale of the Foreign
Ministry, which might have been
expected to furnish, or at least to
suggest, the name of a new am-
bassador to the U.S.A. some of the
criticisms have been more than
unfair to a man of not incon-
siderable talents.
Born in Tel Aviv 40 years ago,
Mr. Dinitz is married to an Amer-
ican and has a son and two
daughters. Washington is a famil-
iar city to him he was a student
at Georgetown University almost
20 years ago (taking a degree in
Political Science) during which
time he worked as a guard at the
embassy to which he now returns
is ambassador.
He also served there in a dip-
lomatic capacity, as counsellor in
charge of information in the period
immediately following the Six-Day
War. But it is more particularly in
the service of Mrs. Meir that he
has familiarized himself with the
real power centers of the United
States, both national and Jewish.
Undoubtedly, the confidential
nature of the many missions he
has undertaken on Mrs. Meir's
behalf (and not only to the United
States) have obscured from the
reneral public the multi-faceted
abilities of the man. But this verv
same cloak-without dagger mode
of oxeratin" has irked the foreign
service which, with Dinitz havine
been promoted out of Its ranks
md over its hnd. e the noTnel
order disrupted and its capabilities
insulted.
of her period as Foreign Minister
In the mid-sixties and resumed this
role when she became Prime Min-
ister. But he has been more than
that. He has also served as her
window on the affairs of Israel
and the outside world and also
her watchdog, bringing Mrs. Meir
the latest gossip from round and
about and protecting her from
those, high or low, who might seek
to waste her time.
The fact that Mrs. Meir herself
invested him with the power to
interpose himself as he thought
necessary between her and the
rest of the world and that he used,
it as she would wish, is one of
the things held against him. Per-
haps in some respects, particularly
with regard to issues on the home,
front, he has been over-protective.j
But, with his close involvement1
in Cabinet matters and as her
[jersonal emissary or companion
on countless high-level missions,
it seems less than fair as has
been the case not to give him
the benefit of the .'.oubt and allow
him to prove his mettle under the
public spotlight.
Socially, Mr. Dinitz is more than
wrsonable. His tastes in music
in< I books, two of his favorite
forms of relaxation, are wide-
ranging. He has a quick wit, a
taste for Italian and Chinese cook-
ing and what he considers a good
svnse of wine.
His working colleagues rate him
as "vital" and easy to work with,
except when some urgent problem
bothers him. Then he tends to
become nervously irritable. They
also sense that, despite the pre-
dominantly outgoing nature of his
personality, he has a close-guarded
"secret self to which he admits
very few.
He has already done the right
thing by trying to build his bridges
to the Foreign Minister, Abba
Eban. who came near to resigning
over his appointment. It is reason-
Able to assume that he will no lesa
bligently apply himself to working
within the foreign service struc-
luie which his predecessor has
irequentlv declined to do.
Perhaps, as his enemies hope,
Mrs. Meir's eventual departure
From office will leave Dinitz ex-
posed and vulnerable. But there
is the equal possibility that, by
then, he Will have displayed his
ability adequately to fill the role
of Israel's top diplomat abroad.

Simha Dinitz served Mrs. Meir
as her prime adviser through most <). *!"-. Jewish Telegraphic Agency*


Pago 6
+Jewisl>nt*1(to*ri nd Shofsr of Hollywood
Friday. January 5, 1973
m mmn invitational
Lady Pros Shooting
For $30,000 in Prizes
When the lady pros teed off in
the 5th Annual Burdine's Invita-
tional LPGA Golf Tournament
this week, they were shooting for
$30,000 in prizes.
Just four years ago when the
first Burdine's purse was $35,000
it was the tour's richest. Now,
r.f course, other sponsors have
realized the appeal of women's
~olf and four $100,000-plus tourna-
ments dot a tour this year that
will exceed $1.4 million in total
pones.
Burdine's. however, has elected
to go "a different route," rather
than keep fighting for the
"ricl>est" tag with this year's Jan.
1-7 tournament at Doral Country
Club: Community involvement.
This year, as in the previous
tournaments, a charitable organi-
sation will receive upwards of
S25.000 from tournament pro-
<*eds. For the third straight year
the benefactor is the American
Cancer Society.
"We feel we can benefit the
j area much more this way," says
Sam McColloch, Burdine's vice
; president, who has been tourna-
; ment chairman since its inception.
| "It becomes such a competitive
thing when everyone's trying to
! have the largest purse. This way
; we can turn over a large sum of
money to a worthy organization.
And the people seem to like it
this way." ,-
The best example of the accept-
ance of the women pros by the
South Florida sporting public is
the sell-out of the amateur berths
in the pro-celebrity tournament
this year, the first time this has
happened. And it occurred three
weeks before the tournament.
Amateurs pay to play with the
lady pros and a group of well-
known figures from entertainment
and sports worlds. A total of 152
golfers teed off on Wednesday, pro-
celebrity day.
"I think it is indicative of the
heights the I-PGA has reached
nationally," Mr. McCoHoch de-
clared.
Another Burdine's innovation
which has helped 35 amateur spots
in the tournament become so cov-
eted is the satellite tournaments.
These tournaments are held by
women's golf organizations
throughout South Florida and the
winner gets a berth in the pro-
celebrity. A nominal entry fee by
each lady at her club tournament
comprises the pro-celebrity entry
fee. Thirty-five berths have been
filled in such competition, which
began with upwards of 4,000 com-
petitors.
Tickets to the tournament may
be purchased in advance from
Kiwanis Club members or Patrons
of the Museum of Science. They
also are available at all nine
Burdine's stores. Tickets pur-
chased in advance are good far
any day of .he tournament.
AJC Leader Urges Action
To Combat Ethnic Imagery

Receiving awards at the Annual Meeting
of Greater Hollywood's Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration are (from top to bottom) Mrs. Marsha
Tobin. for her outstanding woik in the Edu-
cational Division of the Women's Division,
rrom Jesse J. Martin. 1972 President of JWF;
Steven Brodie, for his outstanding work as
president of the Youth Council, from Herbert
Katz, 1973 Campaign chairman; Dr. Samuel
Meline, president of the Young Leaders
Council of JWF, receiving the Hy and Belle
Schlafer Award from Mr. Schlafer, and
Maurie Meyers. 1972 chairman of the Apart-
ments Division of JWF, receiving an award
from Mr. Martin.
By Special Report
BOSSEY, Switzerland An ap-
peal to religious leaders and intel-
lectuals the world over to join in
an international effort to combat
I the caricaturing and stereotyping
of religious, racial, national, and
ethnic groups wherever these ap-
pear was made here by an Amer-
ican Jewish interreligious leader.
In the course of a series of four
lectures before the Graduate
School of Ecumenical Studies of
the World Council of Churches,
Rabbi Marc H, Tanenbaum of New
York, national interreligious af-
fairs director of the American
Jewish Committee, urged an as-
sembly of scholars and post-gradu-
ate students to "take seriously the
responsibility of demythologizing
the variety of negative, distorted,
and often hostile group images that
abound in the world today.
"The overcoming systematically
of the myths and stereotypes that
many westerners hold of the east-
ern world, and vice versa, and that
Jews, Christians, Muslims. Budd-
hists, Hindus. Confucianists. and
others frequently hold about one
another with fantastic tenacity is
an essential precondition to the
building of a harmonious world
community,' he said.
Rabbi Tanenbaum. whose lec-
tures were devoted to the theme.
"Judaism. Pluralism, and World
Community.'" served as a member
of the Bossey Graduate Ecumeni-
cal Institute faculty during a
study week devoted to "Jewish-
Christian Relations."
Approximatedry 150 scholars,
theologians, and post-graduate to*
dents from Asia, Africa, Latin
America. North and South Amer-
ica, and Western Europe attended
the institute.

II
Looking over the State of Israel Atzmaut (In-
dependence) Award presented to Dr. Norman
Atkin at the Temple Beth El-Israel Dinner of
State at the Aventura Country Club are
principals in the dinner dance which re-
sulted in sales of $287,000 in State of Israel
Bond* From left are- Louis Conn, president
of the Hollywood synagogue; Consul Gen-
eral Yesheskel Carmel of Israel; Mrs. Atkin;
Dr. Atkin. new president of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of Hollywood; Judge Morton
Abram, chairman of the dinner, and Milton
M. Parson, director of the Israel Bonds Or-
ganization for South Florida.
ISRAEL'S MINISTER OF TOURISM
*t6ok oven toiwsmmmmjoIN'/**
m* 1977.
atmtamt/SA. 9seoo aco.ooo
fouanrs manntxut> SZWTT 7*0.000
/tfmom^0mif*oie J2.ooc .210.009.
A-


" .-.u. Jl. ^^ff^^
Friday. January 5, 1973
*Jewist> Ikx-Mian ** Hollywood
Page 9-
.MU

That's why cmr savings plans pay up to 6* per yean
If you have a dream,
Flagler Federal would like to
help it conic true.
After all, we're named
for Henry Flaglerthe man
who dreamed of a great
city when Miami was just
a trading post.
For big dreams, our 2-year
savings certificates pay
6% per year (on $5000 or more).
compounded daily so you
actually earn 6.18%.
For other dreams,
f^^M 1
r^-*Krr?m
^^7- aEQj/Sa
E?n|
mm
l^n io2h ^H ^&. vgdp yflH
m~ n *m KF'^'^II
wM
B^"-'" ^*7^B
Lv.* -^>J
KEkl^ TWjj
f^w^j
m *j*\ ^Wj^T^^^B
i
wc have 1-year
certificates that pay 5l/-%
(on SI000 or more).
And our flexible passbook
accounts that
pay 5%, from day of deposit to day
of withdrawal.
You sec, at Flagler Federal,
whether you bring us
a big dream or one not-so-big,
we think it's
our job to help it come true.
Mr. Flagler would have
wanted it that wav.
>,v

Savings and loan Aaoculion
We believe in people with dreams.
tmumrrnu'N- 101 N E First Avenue 377-1711 B1SCAYNE: 570 N.K. 8M Si.. 738-993 NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16501 N.K. 13th Avenue, 944-4314
DOWNTOWN: 101 .Vfc. F^enw^>7 mm ^^ Wa>i 22:,.263, HOLLYWOOD: IOI Hullywrnxl FtfnftM Cniier. 961-9389
_



NORTON
S8wd^i^3

Til
irsit ( VI. 'a
mi
- ."?'-
your cars
I
1
* ,>
with MICHELIN X'radial tires !
'
I
I #
'..
-
Waranteed 40,000 miles
BETTER STEERING CONTROL
Michelin X Radials let you steer
with less effort. You'll find less
sway on curves and greater directional
stability on straightaways.
PROVEN GAS SAVINGS
Your car's tank won't hold more gas
when you drive on Michelin but you'll
surely get more mileage to the gallon
because Michelin X Radials roll easier.
I
EL
h dn
n
<=o
I\r
7
ACCURATE BRAKING ACTION
Michelin's extra-large "footprint"
and steel-cord belt prevents the
braking force from distorting and
pinching the tread. Your car will
stop quicker, surer, safer.
UNSURPASSED DRIVING COMFORT
Michelin X Radial tires absorb bumps
and jolts like no other tire on the
road because radial cords flex in the
same direction. It's like giving your
car an extra set of shock absorbers!
i- ii
I
EXTRA LONG MILEAGE
Watch the odometer move up to 40.000
miles and beyond on a sfngie set of
Michelin X Radials... We guarantee it.


\ %m
\ \ \ v
v- \ \ v
V\\ A
kvx\
NORTON
TIRE CO
SINCE 1924
i-lT<
master charge
BankAmericmo
MICHELIN X
THE STEEL-CORD BELTED RADIAL
Waranted 40.000 miles
Michelin's 40.000-mile
optional credit or refund
inal purchase price and
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-1556
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Ave. 681-8541
MIAMI SHORES
8801 Biscayne Blvd. 759-4446
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 W. 49th St. 822-2500
tread life guarantee covers
based on consumer's orig-
proportion of mileage run.
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S. Dixie Hwy. 233-5241
SOUTH DADE
9001 S. Dixie Hwy. 667-7575
HOMESTEAD
30100 E. Federal Hwy. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD
497 S. State Rd. 7 987-0450
FT. LAUDERDALE
1830 W. Broward Blvd. 525-3136
FT. LAUDERDALE
1740 E. Sunrise Blvd. 525-7588
PLANTATION
381 N. State Road 7, 587-2186
.v>


^^1
m^m^^mmmmmammmm
Friday. January 5. 1973
+Jmlst> ncrktlar. Shof.r of Hollywood
- I
Page 11-
Rachel Abramowitz Women's
Leadership Institute Guest
Rachel Abramowitz. one of the
outstanding Jewish educators in
the South FIftnda,,area>-,wj1l^be
Jewish community and to contrib-
ute to it. This purposi- is being
furthered .bi^ fflonthlv meetings at
member's homes.
Each meet in? is planned around
a different topic and features
knowledgeable people from both
within and outside the community
in a presentation related to their
special subieet of expeitise. A dis-
cussion period follows.
RACHU ABKAMOWTIZ
the guest speaker at a meeting of
Ihe Women's Leadership Institute
of Greater Hollywood's Jewish
Welfare Federation Thursday, Jan.
';8, at 8 b.m. in the home of Mrs.
Sam Mchne.
Mrs. Abramowitz will speak on
the subject of "Jewish World Is-
sues." Women attending the meet-
ing will join in a general discus-
sion on the topic after the speak-
er's presentation.
The Women's leadership Insti-
tute is an arm of the Women's
Division of Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation. Its-
purpose is to make the Jewish
women in the commonity aware
of today's issues and teaching
thrm something of woman's role
in the Jewish community during
the past.
Through this knowledge it is
exnectW that they will be better
able to take their place in the
New JWV Members Sworn In
New members of Robert Z.
Franzblau Post 177, Jewish War
Veterans, and its auxiliary were
sworn in at a recent meeting in
which dignitaries of the State De-
partment took part. Meetings are
held at Temple Israel of Miramar
the second and fourth Tuesdays of
each month. All eligible persons
are invited to join. ____
AVTAWS
PAINT I BODY SHOP
?Collision WOM
* IHSUIUNCI 1 ISTIMAW
* CI10M f*WJ IOCT wow
. OOfGlAS

CAll-
920-7769
61
3 tiauNG
}~iDM
3020 TISUTAIL IIVD. D'HIl
TSEED
A
HOBBY?
LEARN GEM CUTTING
and FACETING
MAKE YOUR OWN
JEWELRY IN OUR SHOP
WE TEACH YOU.
JACK'S GEM SHOP
414 S.DIXIE HIGHWAY
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA
tt
Phone 927-9592
Patricia lane To Wei
Jerome B. Lefkowitz
Mr. and Mrs. L?o K. Lane. 4350
Hillcre;t Dr.. Hollywood, announce
the engagement of their daughter.
Patricia, to Jerome Barry Lef-
kowitz. soi of M-s. Fanni" Lef-
kowitz, 1017 Meridian Ave.. Miami
[J?eaeh^apd th- laj,.Josepte4A^f-
kow'tz.
Miss Lane graduated from South
Broward High School and Miami-
Dwfe Junior College and is pres-
ently a student at F"HHt I"f-
ational University. Her fiance at-
tended Yeshiva University in New
York, and o'ans to attend the Uni-
vc-ity of M'amv
ECONOMY MAINTENANCE
"lef Us Brighten Up Your Home Today"
QUALITY EXPERT WORKMANSHIP
Complete Painting Interior and Exterior
Roof Coating and Cleaning
Porch Enclosures
Simulated Brick and Stone
Marble Glaze Coating 30 X Thicker than Paint
All Types Additions and Remodeling
PHONE 966-9835 Hollywood

Hollywood Federal's Save By Mail service saves travel time, saves
effort, saves money, and we save you more money by supplying
the postage ^f both ways. <^" See a Hollywood Federal
Savings counselor for full details.


vf
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Ben Kaplan. Manager, Hallandale Office.
WEST HOLLYWOOD
DAVIE
HALLANDALE
EMERALD HILLS
ASS/
ase* *&& SF sS& EsB,vd- ss
KMU Phone:923-8241 Phone: 981.2000 Phone:584-5000


-^
mnmmmm^^^^^***
mts^mKBi
Page 12
* Jen is* Hcrkflan nd Shof of Hollywood
Friday, January 5, 1979
Hollywood Recreation Division Sponsors
Activities For Residents And Visitors
Hollywood Recreation Division
is sponsoring a variety of activities
for residents and winter visitors
at its downtown center. 2030 Polk
St.. and ajL David Park Center.
105 N. 33nT,Ct. (comer of .Holly-
wood Blvd.)
Among the classes to be offered
at David Park are beginner and
intermediate sewing, needlepoint
and bargello, custom tailoring,
round dancing, guitar, sketching,
yoga, interior decorating, con-
tract bridge and hula exercise.
The David Park Choraleers will
meet on Monday afternoons; Sen-
ior Citizens Club. Wednesday af-
ternoons and the Tripsters Club on
Friday afternoons. Free diabetes
and glaucoma tests will be given
from 1 to 4 p.m. the first Friday
of each month.
Children's classes at David Park
will include tap. ballet, jazz and
Hawaiian dancing, sketching, gui-
tar, judo, baton and chess.
The center is open for teen-age
activities on a specified time sched-
ule Monday through Saturday. De-
tails may be secured by telephon-
ing Diana Montella at the David
Park Center.
Adult classes at the Polk Street
Center will feature woodcarvinii.
yoga, beginner and intermediate
contract bridge, decoupage. begin-
ner and intermediate china paint-
ing, square dancing, beginner sew-
ing, ballroom dancing, art. bread
ijculpture, fabric painting, ma-
crame and flower arranging.
Cancer workshop for volunteers
will meet weekly at 9 ajti. Mon-
day; Sweet Adelines and Holly-
wood Squares. 7:30 p.m. Monday:
mandolin orchestra rehearsals.
9:30 ajn. Tuesday and Friday;
chess and checker clubs, 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday; stamp
club, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; 49ers
Senior Citizens Club. 1 p.m.
Wednesday; adult dances with live
combos, 8 p.m. Wednesdays and
Saturdays; senior arts and crafts
workshop. 10 a.m. Thursdays; dup-
licate bridge tourneys. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday; progressive bridge and
pinochle. 1 p.m. Friday, and art
workshop 12:30 n.m. Saturday.
There are states clubs and na-
tional retiree organizations that
meet monthly at the center. Free
glaucoma and diabetes tests are
given from 9 a.m. to noon the
fourth Friday of each month.
Futher information on the ac-
tivities may be obtained by caHing
the Hollywood Recreation office.
2030 Polk St. Printed schedules of
building activities. Young Circle
Bandshell and Beach Theater Un-
der the Stars programs may also
be picked up there.
Panelists To Be Featured Monday At
Meeting Of Beth Shalom Sisterhood
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom has announced two special
events for early 1973. The first is
a panel discussion to be held at
its regular meeting Monday at 8
p.m. when a panel of five Amer-
ican women, Protestant. Catholic.
Cuban, Negro and a Jew, will lead
a discussion.
Subjects for discussion will in-
clude "Is America Truly a Melt-
ing Pot?" and "How Do Minori-
ties Adjust?" Other topics may
be introduced by members of the
audience for discussion by the
panel, according to Mrs. Arthur
Rosean, program chairman. Re-
freshments will follow the meet-
ing, which is being held at the
temple.
The second planned event, which
is one of the most important un-
dertakings of the Sisterhood for
this year, is a Sweetheart Lunch-
eon to be held Wednesday. Feb.
14, at the temple.
The luncheon, the first event to
be held in the newly constructed
ballroom of the tempie. is planned
to honor Mrs. Jack Shapiro, wife
of the president of Temple Beth
Shalom, chairman of the Thrift
Shop Committee and worker in
all temple causes.
Luncheon for this inaugural
event in the new ballroom will be
a catered affair. A special feature
of the luncheon will be the appear-
ance of the Habimah Players to
entertain the guests. The public is
invited to attend and may make
reservations by calling the tem-
ple office.
BLVD DELI
2031 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
Open 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.
SPECIALIZING IN
JEWISH STYLE HOME COOKING
and Introducing Our
99c LUNCHEON SPECIAL
Take Out Service Call 925-9067
STUARTS RESTAURANT
and COFFEE SHOP
1841 N. YOUNG CIRCLE, HOLLYWOOD
SPECIALIZING IN PARTIES FOR ALL OCCASSIONS
"You Provide Guests We Do All The Rest"
OPEN 5 A.M. TO 8 P.M.
BREAKFAST LUNCH DNNER
TAKE OUT AND DELIVERY SERVICE
CALL 925-9090
Barnetl Bank ol Hollywood
Ty>' Street 1 19m Anno.
Phone 923-6222
KARAN ARMSTRONG
Karan Armstrong
Soloist In First
Concert Of Season
Metropolitan Ooera star Karan
Armstrong, roprano. who has just
completed a Furopean tour, wil1
:oin tenor Anastasio*. Vrenios ir
the first eorcert of the season
sponsored hy Cotimunitv Concrts
of South Browari. Sunday at 8:15
D.m. in the auditorium of South
Broward Hi^h School. N. Federal
Highway and Harding Street.
Hollywood
Men &, Women
ALTERATIONS
BY
Chet & Mary
122 N. 1st Ave. (Rear)
Hallandale. Fla. Ph. 921-2181
DAVE
PINTA'S

Mr. Vrenios. who recently re-
corded with Joan Sutherland. i-=
f cheduled to appear with the New
York Philharmonic Orchestra and
the Baltimore. Detroit. Milwaukee
and Toronto Symphonies this sea-
son.
The South Broward Community
Concert schedule includes a per-
formance by the New Orleans Phil-
harmonic Orchestra Feb. 13, a
concert featuring Frula March 11.
and Longstreth and Escosa. duo
harpists April 2.
mm
JZ&
CARBURETOR &
IGNITION SERVICE
DYNO
TESTING SERVICE
MOBILE
sen vice

929-1243
1021 N 20 AVE., HOllKWOOO
I
*JL
Cutto-n '.'d
DRAPEBiES
rd
8E0 SPREADS
INTERIOR DEC0RATIN3
FASHION FABRICS
805 N. FEDERAL HWT.
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA
Phone: 9230564
SHADES
SUP COVERS
UPHOLSTERY
THE
TRAVELERS
u
Ansel Insurance Agency^1
Ansel Wittenstein *
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry.
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
FlRtMArTS
FUND
AMERICAH
IMCMKCl COMrAKKC
YOU CANNOT BUY
A NEW OR USED FORD
FOR LESS ANYWHERE
fat
THAN AT
&brd
HOLLYWOOD FORD Inc.
FORD
1200 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HOLLYWOOD
922-6721 947-3411

j
V
1
E
e
a
t>
i
v
t
Vi
n
O
(i
ai
Pi
%'
R
w
VI
W
-;
V
Si

T-
V


Friday, January 5, 1973
M
^Jewlsiinerk/iar "' Shofar of Hollywood
Page 13
Truman And Other Presidents
i>. 11-......... .............,..
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
(C). 1972 Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
Every President has had some
relations with Jews. Even Zachary
Taylor, "Old Rough and Ready"
who told Rabbi Isaac M. Wise that
he was the-first rtrtibl -he"1 had met,
had met Jews who were not rabbis.
Washington is supposed to have
made a "lechayim" at a wedding
of a Jewish friend. Jefferson had
any number of Jewish friends.
Down in his home state. Richmond
*was probably the city with the
largest Jewish population in early
America.
Haym Salomon helped Madison
out in his early days, giving him
loans, but Madison wrote he did
not like to borrow from Salomon
because Salomon refused to take
interest from him, saying that the
price of money was high, interest
should only be exacted from those
who intend to use the money for
speculation.
We were about to say that may-
be Franklin Pierce coming all the
AY way from New Hampshire never
TT*had any relations with Jews, but
then we remembered that it was
President Pierce who offered Ju-
dah P. Benjamin a Supreme Court
appointment, but Benjamin turned
it down. That was long before
Wilson named Brandeis to the Su-
preme Court bench.
It's nice to have your friends
and relatives at a Bar Mitzvah or
at a wedding, but sometimes if
you are in need, one who is not
too close can be more helpful. It's
the same way with Presidents.
Take the case of William Howard
Taft. The Tafts were neighbors of
Rabbi Wise in Cincinnati.
There was the additional tie that
the Tafts were Unitarians, a creed
close to Judaism. When Taft ran
for re-election, the chairman of
the Republican convention was a
Jew. Gus Karger, the Washington
correspondent of the Cincinnati
Times-Star the paper owned by
Tafts brothers and which played
a prominent part in promoting
Taft as a national figure was a
Jew Yet in Jewish emergencies,
William Howard Taft did not com"
across.
When, following the Czarist re-
strictions against Jews. Congress
3decided to break off relations with
Russia as a protest. Taft opposed
it and the break was made by
Congress overriding Taft.
It wasn't that Taft was unsym-
pathetic. It was simply that Taft
was Mr. Establishment. The Czar
was the establishment to him.
When some American Jewish lead-
ers suggested the brilliant and
scholarly Judge Mayer Sulzberger
would make an ideal member of
the Supreme Court. Taft rejected
it. saying how would it look with
a man named Sulzberger on the
Supreme Court.
The first President to really do
'something for Klal Yisroel (the
Jewish community> was Woodrow
Wilson. Without his support, it is
doubtful if Britain would have
gone through with the Balfour
Declaration. When Wilson appoint-
ed Brandeis to the Supreme Court,
some Tory Jewish leaders pro-
tested. Rabbi Wire warned Wilson
that the same group would be
visiting him with a protest against
the Balfour Declaration.
I have a large waste basket,"
Wilson replied, smiling.
The career of Franklin D. Roose-
velt of course, had an enormous
number of Jewish associations,
coming as it did in the niehtmarish
days of Hitler. Even before those
anguished days. Jews had been
pro-Roosevelt. When ha ran for
governor of New York against the
R publican candidate, Ottinger,
wh > was a Jew. most of the Jews
\ I for F.D.R.
-cvelt. in his appointment of
Mngenthaii a Secretary of the
T; isury, with the Important par)
p! lyed in his administration by
v 1 lillrr.an and other Jews.
A that he had no prejudice
i lii 1 Jews. Yet In the matter of
F.D.R. earned I
I Silver and other Zionists
got no such welcome as they had
in Wilson's days. Perhaps the ex-
planation is that Roosevelt while
he made history, had no sense of
history as Wilson, the professional
historian, who could see the Jew
lin his histcaflaijdentity.
If the Zionist leaders made no
great impression on F.D.R., it ap-
pears that a meeting with the
king of Saudi Arabia did. Ibn
Saud was a colorful figure and
perhaps if Dr. Weizmann had come
visiting Roosevelt covered with a
big shawl, or flowing robe, it
might have been different.
But whatever were F.D.R.'s de-
ficiencies with respect to Israel
they were compensated for in his
successor, Harry Truman.
Truman could sympathize more
with the plights of the have-nots
than F.D.R., because he was not a
rich man's son as Roosevelt was.
One can tell much about a person
by his idols. Andrew Jackson was
Truman's. When Andrew Jackson
was in the White House. Congress-
men were invited to visit alpha-
betically. The first week, the A's
and B's went to the White House
dinner. The next week, the Con-
gressmen with names which be-
gan with B or C. That was for
complete democratic equality.
Israel has cause to remember
Andrew Jackson. The fact is, there
was an interval when President
Truman became very resistant to
the Zionist appeal. It appears some
Zionist leaders rubbed him the
wrong way and when Dr. Weiz-
mann sought to soeak to him. he
found the door to the White House
closed.
Eddie Jacobson. Truman's old
buddy, who had served with him
in the first World War and later
was his partner in a haberdashery
shop in Kansas City, sought to in-
tervene in behalf of Weizmann.
been designed to exclude Israel
Jewish consumption only,
clarify Israel's position, showed
Truman maps of the area. After
Weizmann's death, Mrs. Weiz-
mann visited the White House and
wilt* ab *eii Truwaa tiMtt few
husband said he was the only
President he had met who could
read maps, Truman laughed.
But Truman is said to have giv-
en way to tears when on Ben-
Gurion's last visit to America,
Truman visited him at his New
York hotel and Ben-Gurion said
to him, "I do not know how you
will stand in American history,
but you have a secure place in the
history of Israel."
Truman was deeply moved.
&*t* By BOB KIRBH, executive Director,
/swish Welfare federation of Greater Hollywood
To

Truman in his Memoirs express-
ed the highest regard for Eddie
Jacobson. He remarked on the fact
that their business partnership was
almost idyllic and that Jacobson
never asked him for a single favor
for himself when he became
President.
Nevertheless, when Eddie cam"
to the White House he found a
cold reception. Eddie Jacobso-
talked. but Truman said nothing
doing. Eddie figured it was a lost
cause and rase to leave. Just then
he spotted the statue of Andrew
Jackson on Tinman's desk. That
brought back memories.
"You were always talkin? to me
about Andrew Jackson. He was
your ideal. Well. I have an ideal
too. He is Dr. Weizmann. He is a
great man. He is a sick man and
has crowed the ocean to see you
and you won't even see him."
Truman couldn't take it any
longer. "You win," he said.
So it was that the United States
was the first nation to recognize
the indejiendence of Israel. Many
of the State Department chiefs
were always trying to double-
cross Israel, always calling atten-
tion of the President "to the vital
needs of America in the Middle
East." which of course they meant
oil Truman referred to these
State Department heads as "the
striped pants boys." Every time
the President said anything favor-
able to Israel "the striped pants
boys" would call in the Arabs and
say the statement was meant for
consumption only.
Truman was instrumental in
getting revision of the ongma
partition of the Nogev. which had
Palmer's
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 4440922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personoliied Memorial! Custom
Crafted In Our Own Workshop.
Briefing Kit
Readied For
Soviet Tours
By Special Report
NEW YORK With thousands
of Americans expected to visit the
Soviet Union on commercial mis-
sions or private tours, the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress has made
public a 32-page "Briefing Kit for
Travelers to the U.S.S.R." sub-
titled "How to Find and Meet Rus-
sian Jews."
The manual was introduced by
the authorsPhil Baum, associate
erecutive director of the AJCon-
gress, and Zev Furst, research as-
sociate. It is available from the
American Jewish Congress' na-
tional headquarters. 15 East 84th
St., New York City.
"A significant increase is antici-
pated in trade and cultural rela-
tions between the United States
and the Soviet Union." Mr. Baum
said. "These increased contacts
will afford greater opportunity
than ever before for American
Jews to let our fellow Jews in the
ij.S.S.R. know of our sense of fel-
lowship and continuing concern
for their future."
promote a commercial venture is really an antithesis of my
l_Vqle, and yet, just recently, I saw the show "From IsraelWith Love."
The performers are army entertainers of the Israeli Army really
young kids who sing moving and spirited melodies of current life in
Israel.
I am not a theatre critic and so I cannot really discuss the techni-
calities of the performance, but I can say it was a very emotional and
enjoyable experience for my family and me. However, the theatre was
not even one-third full.
At the end of the performance I met with the producer and the
director. I had already been informed that the show has not had monu-
mental success in terms of capacity audiences. In my discussion with
the producer and director, I asked them why? Certainly there have
been advertisements in the daily papers and contacts with Jewish
organizations and institutions, discount group rates and promotion
with the hotels and condominiums. Their answer was "The people
are getting tired of Israeli things. There has been too much about
Israel."
Their response shocked me. How can we whose beginning and
life blood are tied up with Israel, whose future development here in
America is in no small measure related to what Israel can offer us in
terms of our Judaism possibly think that there has been too much
Israel.
What country in the world has absorbed five times its population
within one generation? What country accepts unlimited immigration
with no quota? What place on the map has the opportunity to perpetu-
ate and develop a moral and ethical code of justice?
And yet, maybe they were right. Could it be that in our discus-
sions and explanations about Israel we have constantly given the
I image that Israel is a poor relation whose needs are constant and
whose cries for help seem always upon us? No one likes to be con-
stantly confronted by a destitute relative who always seems to be in
trouble. We have presented an image as professionals and organiza-
tions which may have tended to give a false story.
We have already started our 1973 United Jewish Appeal-Jewish
Welfare Federation campaign. One of the foremost things that we are
trying to do is to educate people to what the true situation is. And
what is that truth? That we are proud to be Jews and that others are
proud to be Jews, and that some Jews in some places have a more
diffficult time than some of us and that it is our responsibility to help
those who need help whether they be in Israel, the Soviet Union or
here in Florida. When we talk about Israel we should talk about our
helping Judaism survive to make each of us more secure and a better
person.
As I see it, Israel has given me a greater pride in being Jewish.
Israel opens the door to a future of morality and equity for all man-
kind, and Israel is a place and a people of humanity and love. What I
would be without it, is much more important than how it survives
without me.
The briefing kit is designed to
acquaint those who are planning
to visit the Soviet Union and are
therefore in a unique position to
help Soviet Jews -with the means
bj which the bonds of pcoplehooti
between Jews in America and
Jews in the Soviet Union may be
strengthened.
"Nothing contained in the man-
ual involves any violation of So-
viet law." Mr. Baum emphasized.
"In all of our recommendations,
we urge strict conformity with
Soviet law."
A HAPPY reunion or those
injured on the night of the Lod
Airport massacre ot May SO
occurred in Tel Aviv several
weeks ago at the wedding of one
of the girls who was hurt that
night. The wedding of Pnlna
Goldberg of Peta Tlkva to
Meir Dreyer took plaee In
Helchel Hapeer, with the other
Injured us well as doctors from
Sheba Hospital who treated
Hi.in. in attendance.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
temple 3etkl
Wemoziai
gardens
The only alljewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923-8255 or write:
"" TEMPLE BETHEL" /&3KK&!
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME:
mm
1338S W DIXIE
/I/ft
Memorial Chapel
"JEWISH fUNERAL DIRECTORS"
LOCAL AND OUT OF STATt
ARHANGLMENTS


Poge 14
Vjenisfi f/ortxfitjn and Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, January 5, 1973
Meeting 12:30 p.m. Parker
- Meeting 8 \itr\. Temple


Community Calendar
SUNDAY, JANIAKY 7
Youth Council of JWF Film Festival "Fu Manchu"
7:30 & 9 p.m. Temple Beth Shalom, 4601 Arthur St.
-MONDAY, J.4fSl,ARY 8
National Council of Jewish Women Meeting 12:30
p.m.J-J Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnspil St,
Tempi Beth Shalom Steurhood MrrhfWship Meeting
8 p.m. Temple Beth Shalom, 4601 Arthur St.
TIKSDAY. JANUARY 9
Parker Group Hadassah
Tower Blue Room
Broward Zionist District
Sinai. 1201 Johnson St.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10
Women's American ORT Social Assistance Luncheon
Noon Emerald Hills Country Club
National Women's Committee Brandeis University Board
Meeting 10 a.m. Galahad South home of Mrs. Miriam
Holtzman
THURSDAY, JANTARY 11
Temple Beth Shalom Concert Series 8:30 p.m. South
Broward High School Auditorium
SATURDAY, JANUARY IS
Henrietta Szold Group Hadassah -- Square Dance and
Supper 6:30 p.m. North Perry Community Center
MONDAY. JANUARY 15
National Women's Committee Brandeis University Study
Group 10 a.m. home of Mrs. Jack Goldberg. 3351 N.
40th Ave., Hollywood
National Council ol Jewish Women Discussion Group
12:30 pm. Home Federal Bldg.. Hallandale Blvd.
Women's Division Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Annual Luncheon Noon HiHcrest Country Club
TUESDAY, JANUARY 16
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Torah Fund Luncheon Noon
Temple Sinai
Chai Group Hada-ssah Meeting Noon Home Federal
Bldsj.. Hallandale
Hemispheres Hadassah Meeting 12-30 p.m. Ocean
Terrace Room, Hemispheres
Imperial Group Hadassah Meeting 12:30 p.m. West
Card Room. Imperial Towers
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 17
Hollywood Chapter Hadassah Youth Ahyah Luncheon
11-30 am Reef Restaurant. Fort Lauderdale
Hollywood Chapter B'nai B'rith Women Luncheon and
Card Party Noon South Pacific Restaurant. U.S. 1.
Hollywood
THURSDAY. JANUARY 18
Women's Leadership Institute of Jewish Welfare Federation
Meeting and Discussion on Jewish World Issues 8 p.m.
home of Audrey Melino. 4800 Madison St.
1 R1DAY. JANUARY 19
Hollvwood Chapter B'nai B'rith Women Rummage Sale
Ml Day 805 Glenn Parkway, Hollywood
Temple Sinai Rhubhaton Weekend Conducted by Temple
Sinai Camp Florida. Lake Placid, Fla.
DR. HERBERT W. E. POINSETT
Chiropractic Physician
announces that he has assumed the practice ot
DR. CALVIN G. RIDLEHOOVER
Chiropractic Physician
oil past records and histories
remain available
5915 Johnson St., Hollywood
983 5788
THE SHIRT BARN
NOW IN OUR NEW AND LARGER QUARTERS
SHIRTS SLACKS SPORTSWEAR
"QUALITY AT A PRICE"
136 N.E. 1st AVENUE, HALLANDALE
OPEN MONDAY SATURDAY 10-5
PHONE 922-3638
La-Crepe de Bretagne
CUISINE FRANCAISE
1434 N. Federal Highway, Dania
"DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT"
Excellent Food
Quaint and Charming Dining Room
FRENCH SPECIALTY CREPES BRETONNES
So Many Flavors!
"From an Old Brittany Recipe"
Also Featuring A Variety of French Gourmet Specialties
LUNCHEON AND DINNER
FOR RESERVATIONS 927-4100
Religious
Services
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
(Conservative. 416 N.E. 8th Avenue
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz, Cantor
Jacob Danziger.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conservative)
6920 S:W: 35th'"St.', Rabbi Av>om
Onazin, Cantor Abraham Koster.
HOUYWOOO
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
-----------
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conserva-
tive1725 Monroe Street. After Nov.
1 4S01 Arthur Street. Rabbi Mor-
ton Malavsky, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conservative.
310 SW (2nd Ave., Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5001
Thomas Street, Hollywood. Rabbi
Robert Fraiin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative) 1201
Johnson Street. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH OADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi -
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving _
Shulkes. 37
CANDLELIGHTING TIMF
2 SHEVAT 5:24
9?
*MrWWvVWWWWWWV^
MICHAEL HAXPKKT
Michael, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Saul Halpert, will celebratae his
Bar Mit7.vah Saturday morning,
Jan. 13, at Tmple Sinai. Holly-
wood.
ft ft ft
HOWARD si hi.oi i
Howard, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Marvin Schloff, will become Bar
Mn/,ah on Saturday, Jan. 6, at
Temple Israel of Miramar.
ft ft ft
BARRY \\ I IM'.lKc.
Barry, son of Mr. and Mis. Al
bert Weisberg, will be Bar Mitz-
vah Sntui-day, Jan. 13, at Temple
Israel of Miramar.
ft ft ft
at aiat***
SUZANA;
* PRINCESS
^Professional
\0riental
Be/ly"
Jiancer
V Ami:
"> HMMWivtt,
MTeem t Matrons!'
> learn The^
I Popular Art]
t '
tally
Dancing
EXftCtSE
FOR
HEALTH,
I0DY POSTUtr, ENTERTAINMENT
PRIVATE A GROUP CLASSES
Mentmf). AfreriMMi. titling!
>
>
r
Princess Jvisno
u Alio Available for PartiesClub ,
Dotes A Union Entertainment
966-0032 ;
Direct Spanish
Importers
Spanish colonial furni-
ture I accessories
imported t domestic
china t porcelain
line crystal
Spanish (randla'her
clock
VISIT OUR AUTHENTIC
SPANISH HOME
OPEN DAILY 9-7
We Also Ship Fruit
2nd are Still Shipping
Mitel Orangrs
1142 N. Federal Highway.
Dama
Ph. 923-5535
] "lust South ol the Airport"

STARDUST BALLROOM
"THE PLACE TO DANCE"
DANCING
EVEP.Y FBIBAY TO It P.M.
ItlM PER PERSOR
FREE
EVERT SBRBAT 4 TIT P.M.
PNOIIE:l2t-3SST(RR0W.)
rUFRESHMEHTS DANCE CLASS DOOR PRIZES
1855 IMywMd Blvd. Downtown Hollywood Elevator Strvici -
(fRtrajce at 105 N. 19th Avt.to 2sdF|oor,
"At THE SIGN OFTWEitA^
Problems with your Sliding Door?
call
WINDOOR-ARTa
COMPLETE SERVICE
SALES INSTALLATION
Also best ser.ice for windows doors screen* tub enclosure*
Porches and balconies enclosures
CALL ANY TIME
.123-1004 MM3S4
2022 N. Dixie Highway, Hollywood
CHI CHI'S
PIZZA
OPEN 11 A.M. to 12 MIDNIGHT
SERVING PIZZA AND ITALIAN DISHES
1206 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD
PHONE 922-4244
WE DELIVER HALLANDALE AND HOLLYWOOD AREA
Asher Hollander, M.D., F.A.C.S.
UROLOGY
wishes to announce
the opening of his
new office at
2500 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
HALLANDALE, FLORIDA 33009
4th Floor, Suite 403 Ph. 920-2222
'

Season Tickets Now On Sale
PINE CREST
CULTURAL ARTS
SERIES
THE PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND
JANUARY 29
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIER TOUR
YOUTH FOLK ENSEMBLE "RAD0ST"
FEBRUARY 12
M'JS'C. DRAMA AND ART EXTRAVAGANZA
A FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS
MARCH 5
JOSE GRECO AND NANA LORCA'S
FLAMENCO DANCE THEATRE
MARCH 26
Wl seers nwnwd. Sum* Sietecrlooon $11
performances nfll begin i I p m. lbs Steer Ctapel an*"
Audnenuro on the Pine Cresl campus
For HiorsutNM and reservations contact Out Pint Crist Public
Rtlilions 0rt.ee 1501 I F S2*d St. Ft Uedlrdalt. Fla 33301
Ptone- J7MS50


LL
.


LFriday, January 5. 1973
*Jmisfifh>iSdiar and Shofsr of Hollywood
Page IS
DATELINE ISRAEL By Robert Slater
Foreign Trainee Program
jfEXYAX mix-iikmist Nelson Oching, 36, left
TP his wife and two -small children at home and
came to Israel last November for a two-year stay.
During that time, he will be trained at the Ha-
dassah-Hebrew University Hospital to perform
various research techniques in biochemistry.
In another year, Oching, a soft-spoken, artic-
ulate "foreign trainee," will return to Kenya, where
he win try to introduce some of what he has learned
in the bio-chemistry department of the University
of Nairobi, where he teaches. He is one of a thou-
sand men and women from Africa, Asia and Latin
America who are studying here as part of Israel's
foreign aid program.
Because it can only invest a limited amount
of funds into the foreign assistance effort in all
some $10 million is spent by Israel annually the
emphasis is on utilizing those resources found in
the country. Hence, one of the critical elements of
Israeli foreign aid is the "foreign trainee" like Nel-
son Oching.
When Oching completes his Israeli studies, he
will return to Kenya to train his fellow countrymen.
Thus, without spending huge sums of money, Israel
is able to reach eventually cores more of the
educated classes of Kenya. This example is re-
peated constantly in the Israeli foreign aid endeavor.
The Israelis know that, by bringing these men
and women to Israel for a year or two, the effects
of their visit may be positive in terms of the em-
pathy that is built up for the Jewish state. That is
the unstated hope, at any rate.
At no time during his stay in Israel has Oching
felt pressure from government officials to adopt a
political line favorable to Israel. "As far as I'm
concerned, nobody has done anything to me to make
meaShink one way or the other,-' he says. "
Life for a foreign trainee in Israel is both edu-
cational and frustrating. The Ministry for Foreign
Affairs makes sure that the men and women are
given a chance to see the country. But, other than
making the first few days of their visit go smoothly
the trainee is met at the airport and taken to
his lodgings by a Ministry official the student is
pretty much left on his own after that.
Oching, who after all left his family back home,
feels the strangeness and solitude of Irving in a for-
eign environment by oneself perhaps more than do
the other trainees. He recalls how lively a Kenya
weekend could be and compares this with the Shab-
bat in Israel, when all he and his friends do is "stay
indoors."
But on the positive side, Oching feels a strong
sense of admiration for the manner in which the
Israelis have developed their land. "What I like
here," he remarks, "is what these people have done
with this dry soil. I'm from a rural area myself."
On a visit home this past summer, Oching told his
friends that Kenya would profit from expanding its
agricultural programs with Israel. When he spoke
to them, he had especially in mind a recent visit
through northern Israel. "I had the impression that
this is a very dry place, but what the Israelis have
done in the north is just fantastic."
Oching. one of four students in the Hadassah
bio-chemistry program under Prof. Eliezar Shafrir.
uses English at the hospital. He knows some He-
brew, bat says that not knowing more has made it
difficult for him to "penetrate" Israeli society,
something he very much wants to do.
i. mi'iiiiiK""
Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
Our Film Folk:
By HERBERT G. LUFT
Robinson Makes 200th Film
TllK FANTASTIC, "science-fact" story "Soylent Green"
reflects a dismal world half a century from now
when New Ya'k City is overcrowded teeming with mil-
lions of hungry and starvation-bred
citizens. Only the very rich can afford
a normal living. The multitude of jobless
men and women are fed with govern-
ment-rationed synthetics produced by
the Soylent Company which supplies
not only America but much of Europe.
A powerful police force prevents
bloody riots in the street. Charlton Hes-
ton essays a tough officer with Edward
G. Robinson, alias Sol Roth, his researcher. When the
latter learns that the last resource for artificial nourish-
ment, in substance, will be the abstract from human
corpses, he takes his own life because, as a Jew, he can-
not endure cannibalism.
Among 200 pictures made by Edward G. Robinson,
this seems to be the most horrifying though the veteran
performer has played almost everything, from kings to
beggers. from gangsters to monks, with his films running
the gamut from the profound to the profane, from the
historical setting to modern satire. Westerns, and films
dealing with melodramatic and metaphysical concepts.
Edward G. Robinson was born in Bucharest, Ru-
mania, one of five sons of Morris and Sarah Goldenberg.
His family emigrated to the states where Eddie originally
studied to become a rabbi. Fascinated by the stage, he
joined a stock company and in 1924 made his bow on the
screen with the picture, "The Bright Shawl," shot in
Havana, Cuba. He rose to the top, seven years later, as
the gangster-chieftain in Mervyn Leroy's, "Little Ceasar";
and became persona non grata in Nazi Germany when
portraying a strongly phrased officer ferreting out sub-
versives in "Confessions of a Nazi Spy" made by Anatole
Litvak for Warner Bros. Oddly enough, I saw Robinson
first in Germany in the only one of his films allowed under
the Hitler regime, "The Hatchet Man" in which he es-
sayed the role of a Chinese underworld figure in San
Francisco. And this was the picture I discussed with
fellow inmates while at Dachau.
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Argentina Has Special Interest
M
THE RETURN' OF PEROX to Argentina after an
exile of twenty years is something unique.
Argentina has a kind of special interest to Jews
mainly because of one man a
Jew known as Baron Maurice de
Hirsch.
The Baron was a great horse
race fan. He had a stable full of
I he best horses and his horses ran
nt all the leading tracks of Europe.
i A Jew who likes horse races.
What kind of a Jew is that?) But
there are many such Jews ... in
America, August Belmont, after whom the Belmont
tracks arc named, was a Jew like that.
But Baron rie Hirsch was a much better Jew
than Belmont. He not only liked a horse race, he
liked the human race. (Or if he didn't like them, at
least he tried to help the human race.) No man of
his day gave more for philanthropy Jewish or
non-Jewish.
And then he got a grand idea for saving the
Jews of Russia. He would colonize them in the new
world. Over in Argentina, where there was plenty
of room, the Jews would return to the soil, breathe
fresh air and walk in dignity. There would be no
more pogroms, no anti-Semitism.
Today, the Russian government places bars on
the emigration of Jews, but the Russian Czarist
government fully cooperated with Baron de Hirsch.
It was about the time that Theodor Herzl had
his great imaginative idea for the return of the
Jews to their ancient homeland. He went to se
Baron de Hirsch. De Hirsch scoffed at Herzl's plan
Palestine was a dead thing of the past, he said. It
is all right in the synagogue to pray about return-
ing to Zion, but never go back. Go forward. He
would not give any money for Herzl's plan and h>.
assured Herzl no Jewish bankers would give hint
money for so impractical a plan.
Baron de Hirsch was responsible for manj
thousands of Jews going to Argentina, setting up
successful agricultural colonies, where some 30.001
Jews worked on the soil. Not all stayed on the land.
Many moved to the cities where they engaged in
industry and commerce and the Argentina Jewish
population grew. Today it is around 200,000.
But if Baron de Hirsch were alive today anl
saw what happened'as the result of his practical
plan and compared U with the results of Herzl'
impractical but imaginative plan, what would ho
say? Perhaps Baron de Hirsch might have don
well to consider what another great Jew not long
before him. Disraeli, the Prime Minister ol
Britain, once said:
Imagination rules the world."
Justice With !
Honor, Mercy, Humor
THE MILLS OF ISRAEL'S justice grind consid-
erable spice which helps to make life in this
country so interesting and unique.
For example:
llii-sidic Zeal. A young Hassid
has made it his life's work to con-
vince Jews to don tefilin, phylac-
teries. Wherever he goes, on trains,
in stores, on the street, he accosts
his fellow Jews and offers them
the opportunity to enjoy the mitz-
vah. Once, summoned to court by
a neighbor who had a complaint on
other grounds entirely, the Hassid walked boldly
up to his legal opponent and under the eyes of the
judge urged the man to "layg" tefilin. When the
neighbor refused, the Hassid urged: "If you want to
win this case, you would do well to put on the
tefilin." The other grudgingly assented. I never
did find out who won.
A Woman's Privilege. When Mrs Lemmer im-
migrated to Palestine 35 years ago, she changed her
recorded birth date from 1910 to 1915 so that she
would have bettor chances in the marriage market
She did indeed git married. Years later, after her
lv:.-h;ind had died, she went to court asking that
her original and truthful birth date be recorded so
she could qualify for Old Age benefits. The loca.
court turned her down, but she appealed to the
District Court, and the Judge there upheld her
woman's prerogative to adjust her age. However,
he assessed her IL. 500 court costs for all the
bother she had caused.
And a Man's Evidence. Hizmi Salem of Rosh
Ha-Ayin complained that when he immigrated from
Yemen without any documents hi* birth datr was
erroneously listed 18 years less than his actual age
He is today not 48, but actually 6B. and entitled to
0!d Age benefits. His evidence- he has a daughter
38 years old, and even virile Yemenites have not
been known to have children at the age of 10. Three
courts dealt with the application and he was finally
granted an "official age" of around 57.
Temptation. A young man in Ramat Gan was
charged with attempted rape in the local National
Park. His father maintained that existence of the
park, with its wide isolated stretches, was a temp-
tation to youth. The city should abolish the park,
or failing that, pay all legal costs for the youth who
had fallen vicim to the city's poor planning.
It's Not Yours It's Mine. Moshe Aviam. a
government tax collector in Beersheba, was charged
with having pocketed IL. 9.C00 worth of tax income
which should have gone to the state coffers. He
was further charged with having collected an addi-
tional IL 98.000 which the taxpayers never owed
the government. The defendant agreed to refund
the IL. 9.000 to the government, but he maintained
it had no claim on the IL.,98,000 since this money
was never due to the government. This ingenuous
claim was rejected by the District Court, but Aviam
appealed to the Supreme Court. The latter con-
firmed that he had to fork over what he had col-
lected in the name of his employer. As a matter
of fact, the government had already reimbursed
the too-cooperative tax payers.
Law or Hit.tory? The Supreme Court rejected
an application for a new trial submitted by lawyer
Yitzhak David on the grounds that the lawyer had
no i>ersonal interest in the case, and it was a
matter ot history, not of law. The request: that
JeSUS of Nazareth did not have a fair trial 1900
years ago and should have a fresh hearing today.
The Advice Was Cheap. Meir Sehlesinger, 23.
of Holon, wound up in court because he put an ad in
the local newspaper: "Anybody interested in mak-
ing money should send II. 1 to P.O. Box. Holon.
attention Meir." The responses were numerous, at
one Pound each. The ambitious inquirers each re-
ceived a postcard: "Anybody interested in making
money should go out and work for it." The Judge
did not think it funny.

* "n -.rr-


Page 16
V-Jenist- FhrMlan "** *'' Hollywood
Friday, January 5. 1*73
Famous Name Brandt
at BAER'S
Hibriten
Thomasville
StiHtl
Kroehler
Stanley
Simmons
American
Lane
Bassett
Stevens Gvlistan
United
Seoly
Daystrom
Broyhill
Johnson-Carper
Rembrandt
Century
Selig
Founders
Decorator Scrvia '
Tremendous SelecfUm
Frea Delivery
4711 N. State Road 7
Ft. Lauderdalo
1025 S. Federal Higl way, Dania
CLEARANCE SALE


.
SAVE UP TO 50%
Yes after twenty-five years of service in Indiana and celebrating their fourth year in
South Florida, Boer's Furniture has opened th eir second showroom in Broward County.
Baer's Dania store now in our fourth full ye ar is offering South Bro ward a tremendous
sale on the newest and latest styles in name brand home furnishings. Our services include
a decorating staff to help you, free delivery and set up, terms available and the largest
selection of quality name-brand furniture ...ML ON SALE NOW.
Come in ami seo as and save now.
South BrouarcTs Largest Furniture Store
Open Sunday 1 to 6 P.M.
'AmpU Parking
Nmtionml Chai*
Ttrnu Availably
4 BLOCKS N. OP SHERIDAN \
Opee Deity f:3t to 5:30, Moodeyt ft Fridays Uetl f PAL
f HONE: f 274237

I
i


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EUU4RED8H_BGD9G0 INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T22:06:15Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00058
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES