The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00054

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
eJem$ti Florid tin
and SHOFAIt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Number 26
Hollywood, Florida Friday, November 10, 1972
Price 20c
TERRORISTS' RELEASE STRONGLY PROTESTED
xplanation Demanded From West Germany
IALEM (JTA) For-
ester Abba Eban told
Bet last week that Is-
demanded an cxplana-
, the West German gov-
J as to why it freed the
Irvivlng Munich terror-
Kchange for the passen-
1 crew of a hijacked Luf-
kirliner.
an, speaking softly but
ely concealed anger,
ed Bonn's strong resist-
terrorist demands last
kith its speedy decision
in to the hijackers. He
V V V
said Israel was determined to
get to the root of the apparent
contradiction and demanded
that Germany explain just what
is its policy toward terrorism.
The thrust of his statement was
to place the blame squarely on
the West German government
for releasting the killers.
The Foreign Ministry had pre-
viously summoned the West Ger-
man Ambassador Jenco Von
Putkammer, to the Foreign Min-
istry to hand him "a protest in
the strongest possible language"
against the release of the
V V 9
terrorists.
A Foreign Ministry spokes-
man said later that Eban had
expressed to the German envoy
the "shock and dismay" of the
people and the government of
Israel over the release of the
three terrorists who participated
in the Sept. 5 slaying of 11
Israeli Olympic athletes at
Munich. According to the
spokesman, Mr. Eban stressed
that the terrorists were "now
free to kill again" and termed
Continued On Page 8
* V v
vidence Of Collusion Claimed
VIV (JTA) Israelis
with anger last week
t Germany's release of
ee Munich terrorists.
aceful demonstrations
Id outside the West Ger-
ssy here. Beefed up po-
Itails guarded the em-
e:nises.
demonstrators handed
note*, to West German
and carried placards
'No Legalization of Ter-
"Fatah and Gestapo
Munich" and "Germans
[Hi-tad rut Executive anr
that it was suspending
s of Israeli delegations
Germany pending clari-
of the situation. How-
Histadrut spokesman
lat West German delega-
[ invited to Israel by the
union federation would
welcome.
embittered Israelis
that there was evidence
of collusion between West Ger-
many and the terrorists. They
Implied that the hijack of the
Lufthansa jet and the release
of the three .Munich terrorists
was pre-planned to rid Ger-
many of the "headache" of try-
ing and sentencing the Palestin-
ian killers.
Especially bitter were the
families of the slain Israeli ath-
letes. The widow of Joseph Ro-
mano said she was "shocked
that the killers of my husband
and his colleagues were set free.
The West German authorities
have added sin to crime. ... It
Menu as if the Germans invited
the hijacking to get the three
terrorists off their backs."
Shoshana Shapiro, widow of
another Munich victim, Amitzur
Shapiro, said she was "sick and
embittered. It is almost a be-
trayal by the West Germans.
Israel means nothing to them."
Fascell, Rigillo Special
Guests At Annual Meeting
Congressman Dante Fascell and years ago from New Jersey to
Vito Rigillo, executive vice presi- join the United Fund. Federation
dent of the United Fund of Dade this year received $504,763 from
the United Fund which is ear-
marked to meet a portion of the
deficit for the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, the Jewish Vo-
cational Service, the Jewish Home
for the Aged and the YM-YWHA
of Greater Miami. This money is
budgeted by Federation.
The Annual Meeting and Dinner,
which wi'l be he'd in the Carillon
Hotel, Miami Beach, will honor
Arthur S. Rosichan, Federation's
executive vice president, who has
been a social worker, teacher and
a leader of the Greater Miami
Jewish community since 1960.
According to Fred K. Sho?het,
chairman of the Annual Meeting
Committee, and Mrs. Robert Rus-
sell, cochairman of the event, the
evening will also feature the elec-
tion of officers and board mem-
bers and the presentation of the
Presidents' Leadership Award for
1972.
Soviet Decree Restricting Use Of Telephones Signed
NEW YORK (JTA) A new
Soviet decree this time re-
stricting the use of telephones
is seen by the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry as plac-
ing Soviet Jews "in graver trou-
ble than they were before."
The NCSJ reported that Aug.
31 Premier Aleksei N. Kosygin
signed Document 655, passed by
the presidium of the Supreme
Soviet as a supplement to Arti-
cle 74, barring phone :calls be-
tween Soviet towns If their con-
tent is contrary to the interests
of the state and public order.
"This Is obviously an attempt
to cut down on communication
of Jews," said an NCSJ spokes-
woman, adding that interna-
tional law is vague enough to
allow the Kremlin to bar phone
calls overseas also.
Melvin Baer, Gerald Siegel To
Serve As Campaign Cochairmen
lerbert D. Katz. 1973 cam-pi chairman of Greater Holly-Id's Jewish Welfare Federa-
^tr ^Jfck
m
EStod3
rL* jp
^B W^nuMrieii' >i9
^A- ^r^B
MUVIH N. Mil
pn this week announced the
?polntment of Melvin H. Baer
Gerald Siegel as his cochalr-
aen. Both men have worked in
previous years on Federation's
campaign and have been active
in Jewish activities in the com-
munity.
Mr. Baer's responsibility In the
campaign will be as chairman in
charge of the Apartment Divi-
sion, a position considered of the
utmost Importance to the cam-
paign because of the tremendous
growth of apartment population
in the area and the impact of
this population on the activities
of the Jewish community.
In 1972. Mr. Baer served as
cocha'rman of the Apartments
Division and was part of the
campaign leadership team which
accomplished the first million
dollar campaign for the Holly-
wood-Halhtndale community.
Mr. Baer Is a former resident
of South Bend, Ind., where he
was also active In many com-
munity affairs. As a resident
and businessman in this area,
he has said that he feels a re-
sponsibility to the community
in which he lives and works to
do something in return for the
betterment of that community
and that his Involvement with
support from Federation.
ARTHUR S. ROSICHAN
County will be special guests at
the 34th Annual Meeting and Din-
ner of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, Nov. 20, according to
Federation president Robert Rus-
sell.
Rep. Fascell has held state and
local government posts for 18
years. He was elected to Congress
and has served continuously as a
national Congressman since 1954
and has been In the forefront of
those airing the plight of Miami's
senior citizens, many of whom live
on South Beach (a constituency
that was recently re-included in
Congressman Fascell's area of
representat ion).
Mr. Rigillo came to Miami three
Airline Pilots React
To Latest Hijackings
LONDON (JTA) The Sec-
retary General of the Associa-
tion of Scientific. Technical and
Managerial Staffs says his union
will support members at air-
fields who deny service to planes
of the Libyan State Airlines.
The British Airline Pilots As-
sociation said it will conduct a
referendum of its 5,000 members
to ascertain what protest action
they are willing to take against
hijacking. The pilots will be
asked if they would support a
worldwide strike or bans against
countries harboring hijackers.
JWF and its causes stems from
his beliefs in the needs of Israel
as well as the many other agen-
cies which receive part of their
Gerald Siegel, a vice president
of JWF, will assume the respon-
sibility of all the business and
professional groups organized to
further the campaign. Mr. Siegel
has been an assistant campaign
chairman and a member of the
Campaign Cabinet. He is also a
member of Federation's execu-
tive committee.
Mr. Siegel, a long-time resi-
dent of Hollywood, was the 1967
winner of the Young Leaders
Award for outstanding service
to Federation, and is currently
a member of the group's Ad-
visory Committee. Mr. Siegel's
wife, Perle, is a past president
of the Women's Division of JWF.
In announcing the appoint-
ments Mr. Katz said. "I am
proud to have secured the help
of such outstanding men and
hard workers as Mr. Siegel and
Mr. Baer for our forthcoming
campaign. I'm sure that with
their leadership our record set-
ting $15 million goal will be-
come a reality."
Planning for the Silver Anniversary of Brandeis University
are (from left to right) Dean Clarence Q. Berger. executive
vice president of Brandeis University; Ralph Levitz, chair-
man of the board of Levitz Furniture Corp. a fellow of
Brandeis University, and general chairman of the 25th
Anniversary Celebration Committee; Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man of Temple Emanu-El, Miami Beach, a president's coun-
cilor of Brandeis University, and Henry August of Holly-
wood, a fellow of Brandeis University. Numerous private
functions will precede a gala dinner-dance to be held Dec.
14 at the Doral Country Club and an off-campus meeting
of the Brandeis board of trustees to be held Dec. 14, 15 and
16 at the Doral Hotel Miami Beach.


Fage 2
+Jt**ist fsWMsYI nd shof>r of Hollywood
Friday, November 10 1972
Leading Educators, Rabbis
To Coordinate Activities
iii. youth advisory board of the
JowishMOUth Council of the Jew-
ish Wigjv Fcderatk>n <>i GretRer
Ho^Awood met recently in the
OB >l room of Hi-1 Federation of-
fices for the purpose of discussing
coordination o; activities and co-
i h ration among the various syna-
to tea 'in.I other croups in tho
South Brow at (t area
I i ...ill were I .11 I (UlsSllk. eMSC* :
uti\ director of the Florida Re-1
10 ol I'.'nai r.'r.th Youtli Ori;a-
ni/ itio;.; Bruce Finoman, youth
Ivisor, Temple Sinai; Rabbi Rob-
it Prazin of Temple SoW; Shir-
ley Goldman, >outh director. Tem-
pk< Beth Shalom; Rabbi Samuel]
J.-if-e of T.mpl.' Beth El; Rabbi
Morton Malnv-ky of Temple Both
5 forlorn; Arnold Pafcula, educa*
1 Ohal director, Tern;)!.' Both El;
.Mrk Pousman, regional executive
diivctor of Young Judee; Rosryn
6 .1. youth director. Temple Si-
and Ronald Treahan, admlnis-
M ve associate, Jewish Welfare
Fedfration ol Greater Hollywood. <
'l Me rabbis agreed thai the syna-
! would attempt t.. coordi-:
11 their confirmation programs
- >'' synajrogue classes wo ild
me. i . i he youth directors ol Temple
Sinai, Temple Beth El, Yo
.in,i.,i BBYO and Temple Beth
Shalom agreed to plan meetings ol
their youth groups on the same
I i and that the night on which
hold the i meetings would
not conflict with confirmation
The) feh thai c i tain ac-
IMfli a should be .....Tved exclu-
'<< the community-wide
>'- ol the Jewish Youth Coun-'
ind Hi it .1 wi-h Youth Coun-
thould hold a maximum of
major iwent* throughout the
....
i hi --> leading educators and rab-
bis hi id thai tain artii Ities I. nd
ruelves t., Youth Council eo-l
nation and supervaion Among
tin-, were Soviet Jewry and Sa-
tu i-i I.-. campai,gns, a- well.
irgc scal< alii ind preecnta-
... I
Th. uroup unanimoual] a^reod
thai future acth Ities ) coordi-
II .1 in order to eliminate any
inflicts between organization*.1
and a muster calendar i'IishVd
for all synagogues and community-
wide efgfenfcntloM. it was ai-.>,ir-,
oided that certain community-wide i
events during the year will be held j
by Youth Council and thnt all or- |
-.'animations will lend their sup- '
port and assistance.
The Bike-a-thon w hich was so '
KUCceBsful last year, will remain as
ana of the activities of Youth Coun-1
eH. It will be held in the spring j
each year.
Mr. Tbesban announced some of
the upcoming activities planned by
die office r< of the Jewish Youth
Council. Including a Soviet Jewry
presentation In conjunction with
T. mple Sinai Sisterhood and
United Synagogue Youth of Tem-
ple Sinai.
Fea-tured in this program will
l>e Rabbi Tibor Stern of the Jacob
C. Cohen Community Synagogue,
Miami Beach, who recently re-
lumed Horn the Soviet Union
where he Mnjm Hie only American.
rabbi ever known to have perform- '
ed a conversion in the Moscow
tynagogue. Rcena Abramowitz. a
I7-yeor-oM -Indent who has tour-1
ed the Soviet Union extensively ,
and spoken on behalf of Soviet
Jewry at many major events
throughout the United state- iii
also appear.
The Youth Council i- also plan-1
ning an awards banquet at the j
end of the year, nt which time
the leadership of Youth Council:
will present to outstanding Jew-
ish individuals and organizations |
In the community awards for
achievement throughout the past I
year.
Mr. Tie-han explained that two
Ol the purposes of Youth Councill
would be to facilitate the activi-
ties ol Individual organizations and I
in assist them whenever necessary
to encourage and attract unafflli-|
ated and uncommitted Jewish
youth into the Jewish community
and tn provide service on a com-
mimity-wide basis in all area- In
which a ii'..I Is Indicated. In no
cast would Yo.ltli Council attempt
to set tin competitive programs,
and it will make every effort to
avoid duplication of activities, he
-aid
Broward ZOA To [
Hold 1st General
Meeting of Season
The Oroward Zionist District ol
Hollywood will hold it-- first gen-|
eral meeting of the season Tues-
day at X p.m. in the I labor Hasp
Mall of Temple Sinai. 1201 Johnson '
St.. Hollywood.
Guest speaker for the evening,
will be Mortimer- May. past no-,
tional president of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America, who was a
delegate to the 75th Jubilee Con- i
vent ion of the ZOA held recently!
in Lsrae! and played a principal,
part in the proceedings.
j
Mr. May previously had visited j
the Soviet Union and at this meet-
ing, which is a return engagement j
in Hollywood for him. he will re- i
port on the convention, his visit
to the U.S.R.R.. and the General '
Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds
held in Toronto. Can., which he i
attended
A song recital and concert by ,
Israeli accordlohtel Arle Kadurl
will also he featured at the meet-
Ing, Mr. Kaduri's program will in-
clude Israeli and Yiddish numbers
plus a sing-along.
Important buainese matters will
he re ported upon by members Mel
Reiser, Rose Perry and Isadore
Goldberg. Sam J. Perry, president.
will be the presiding officer. There
will be no admission charge and
mi solicitation of funds. The public
It invited.
CONRAD R. JACOBS, M.D.
DlflOMAlE AMERICAN BOA80 OF PSYCHIATtV
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF HIS OFFICE
TO THE
MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING
(SUITE 304)
1131 NORTH 35th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33021
TELEPHONE 966-6657
IN ASSOC'AtiON WITH
H. BRUCE JONES, M. D.
IN
THE PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRY
NCJW Membership
Luncheon Monday
The National Council of Jewish
Women. Hollywood Section, mem-
bership luncheon will lie held Mon-
day noon at the home of Mrs, My-
ron Segal, 700 Washington St..
Hollywood All new members and
prospective members have been ;
invited to this "Get Together and
Get Acquainted" affair.
Mrs Esther Robinson is mem-
bership vice president, Mrs. Se-
ella Stender. Chairman, and Mrs.
Francis Rothbart. cochairman. are
accepting reservations.
On Monday, Nov. 20. Mrs June
Cordon, discussion group chair-
man, will give a book review on
Meyer Levin's must recent novel.
"Enemies" a love story. All
members and friends are invited
to attend; the meeting will begin
at 1 p.m. in the Hallandale Home
Federal Bldg., 2100 E. Hallandale
Blvd.
Benefactors Dinner .
Opens 1973 Campaign
The official opening of the wood's Jewish Welfare Fedvia-
197.: camiNtigh of the .l.ui-b tion, Uto Executive Commit ti-
Welfare Ifew&itipo,.^ (Inat. r r//o. I hat organization felt it nec-
essary to set a still higher goal.
IloTly'w.wid will take' place af a
benefactors dinner at G p.m.
Thursday, Die. i4. at the Diplo-
mat Country Club.
The Federation benefactors are
comprised of outstanding mem-
bers of the local Jew isti commu-
nity who have contributed $1,000
or more to the JWF campaign.
Guest speaker at The dinner
will he Avner Idan. Minister
Plenipotentiary ol" the State of
Israel, who has been In the serv-
ice of the Israeli government
since Lsrael won its independ-
ence in \94X and assumed his
present position as Minister and
Deputy Chief of Mission at the
Embassy of Israel in Washing-
ton. DC. in 1971.
This year will mark the first
time that a benefactors group
has br-on singled out from the
Jewish community and given the
honor ol providing the initial
impetus to start the campaign.
The Importance of the dollar
amount ol the pledges to be
given by the dinner guest- ran
be realized by the record Sl.S
million goal set recently by the
Hollywood communin
In 1972 the campaign of the
local Federation topped the mil-
lion-dollar mark for the first
time. However, because of the
tremendously increased needs ol
Israel and of the many benefi-
cial.\ agencies of dealer Holly-
Reservations for the dinner
may be made by calling the Jew-
ish Welfare F-deration office.
A minimum contribution ol
$1,000 to the 1973 campaign win
be a requirement for attendance.
Dietary laws will be observed
ajid there will be a cover charge.
Mary Diinetz To
Speak Sunday At
| Temple Breakfast
Mary C Dwnetz. a member of
j the National Organization of
Women (NOWi, will speak during
a breakfast at 9:30 a.m.. Sunday
, in the Tobin Auditorium of Tem-
; pie Beth Kl. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Mary, who will sneak on "The
, Emancipation of the American
Jewish Princess." is appearing in
conjunction with the temples
adult education series. Hosts for
Ihe breakfast will be'the temple
'.'.i iiherhood.
\ graduate of Radettffe college
and partner In a Miami advertis-
ing marketing firm, Mary is a
convenor of lh" National Women's
Political Caucus; the Florida
Women's Political Caucus; founder
j of the Dade County Women's Po-
litical Caucus, and oi the Feminist
Party, Miami Chapter.
be completely Air-ConOitionad
& Heated
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YEAR ROUND RESIDENT HOTEL
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double occupancy
YEARLY
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$120 M.... SINCU OCCUPANCY
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We cater to All Diets >0" :- --"
FSEE CMAISt LOUNGES & MATS .._...
WAT ENTtHTAINMCNT DANCING. MOVIIS
CELCSNITT HOUSE PANTIES
For Further Informstion It Reservstions
Phone: 532-2541
Be Our Guest For a Day FREE LIMOUSINE SERVICE
ARIE ECKHAUS. Manacinc Dlractar
Formarly of Scharf Manor at Nr York
ON THE OCEAN AT 41st STREET. MIAMI BEACH
FRUIT SHIPPERS
WATCH THIS PAPER FOR OPENING DATE!
Orders will be taken for the new
Crop Navels, Pink or White
Grapefruit for shipping.
Pure Orange and Grapefruit Juice
Washington
I i % f
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BEACH
NOW IN HOLLYWOOD

S&% 'AT 450 NOfrTH PARK ROAD (Just across from the Hollywood Mall)
Phone: 981 9192 Also four offices in Dade County to serve you.
Jack D. Gordon
Arthur H. Courshon
CSaVwma ol th* Bund


Friday, Wwwto-M, 197?

.
-JewMReridtort WShelererfHellyweae'
Percy 3
Local Temples, Synagogues
To Mark ORT Sabbath Nov. 17
Broward synagogues and temples
will observe "ORT Sabbath 1972"
Nov. 17.
In special services, similar to
hundreds of others throughout the
nation, a tribute will be paid to the
global vocational education and
training of the Organization for
Rehabilitation through Training
(ORT).
The schedule of services in the
Broward area is as follows:
Beth El: 1351 S. 14th Ave., Rab-
bi Samuel Jaffe will officiate;
Meadowbrook Towers and South
Ocpan Chapters will participate.
Beth Shalom: 4601 Arthur St.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky, officiat-
ing. Services will start at 8:15.
Mrs. Sheldon Klaff. president of
Sheridan Heights Chapter will give
the ORT address: Mrs. Norton
Sinert, president of the Hollywood
Hills Chapter will pronounce the
candlelight prayer. Hostesses will
be Mrs. Bernle Chazin. Mrs. Mel
Talbert, Mrs. Bruce Moidel, Mrs.
Hy Rosen, Mrs. David Topping and
Mrs. Ralph Rosen. The women of
ORT will sponsor the Oneg Shab-
bat.
HalbuidaJ* JpwMi Center: 416
NE 8th Ave., Rabbi Harry E.
Schwartz, will officiate and give
the ORT address. Hostesses will
be president Mrs. Herman Gold-
stein, Mrs. Rita Levine. Mrs. Lurie
Rubenstein. and Mrs. Rose Hilton
of the Meadowbrook Towers
Chapter of ORT.
Temple brad: 6920 S.W. 35th
St. Rabbi Avrom Drazin. officiat-
ing. Mrs. Bernie Goldman, presi-
dent of Miramar Chapter will give
the ORT address. Mrs. Gene Beru-
sche, Plantation Chapter will light
the candles and give the prayer.
Also participating in the services
will be Pine Hill and Romont Gar-
l den Chapters.
Temple Sinai: 1201 Johnson St.
Rabbi David Shapiro will give the
ORT address. Hollywood Chapter
president Mrs. Bernard Plotkin
and Hollywood Beach president,
Mrs. Herman Bookman will rep-
resent ORT and present the tem-
ple with a donation of prayer
'>''S
COZE BEAUTY SALON
Specioliiinq In Women's
end Men's Hair Styling
and Air-Combing
3001 S. Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Galahad Hall North 927 5862
* PRINCESS
professional
\0riental
iDoncer
* Am*
>V Heasewhws
*Tt*i et
loaf. The
* rentier Art
I of
SUZAN4*
Dancing
KBClSt
KM
HIAITM,
MOV rOSTUtt, BnWTAmnWT
rtlVATE QtOUP CLASSES
, Afternoons, freoiot
1
Sr aliment. Altemeem. fvenMff ,
Ahm tm/Utk h> NrawnOye ,
PmH* t Unioo tntort-inmonl -
11 AA14 -
5
966-0032 .
Tempi* njoM. g^! j^^^ St
Rabbi Robert Frazin: Hillcrest
Hills president, Mrs. Meyer Dia-
mond, Mrs. Eve Kerner, Mrs. Irv-
ing Glassman, Mrs. Nat Harris,
Mrs. Sidney Miller. Mrs. Mernard
Kamine and members of the newly
formed Escom Chapter will host
and sponsor the Oneg Shabbat.
Mrs. Samuel Press, education
vice president, said ORT Sabbath
is that very special time when the
ORT story is told in temples and
synagogues throughout the coun-
try. Some rabbis devote their en-
tire sermon to ORT, while others
include it. A large number invite
an ORT member to tell it herself
from the pulpit or at the Oneg
Shabbat after services.
Whether she is allotted two, five
or ten minutes this is a unique
opportunity to kindle a spark of
Jewish conscience in Jews who
have become so assimilated they
have forgotten they are Jews, in
parents and young people who
have lost their way.
ORT representatives describe
ORTs life-saving relevant program
of self-help through meaningful vo-
cational education, its compassion
for those it helps, its Jewish char-
acter, its special concern for Is-
rael's survival, growth and devel-
opment in the face of murder,
massacre, internal problems and
of ORTs aid to our people in
France, Israel, Italy, Iran, North
Africa India and South America.
They also explain how the 110,-
000 members are helping Jews
overseas who are poverty-stricken,
uprooted, trying to build a home-
land and its activities in this coun-
try to free Soviet Jewry, combat
anti-Semitism, aid the elderly poor
and reach out to girls and boys
with a living example of the dig-
nity of labor and fulfillment
through vocational education.
Couples To Host
Tables For Ten
At Hillel Dinner
Some 21 couples will each host
tables for 10 at the third annual
dinner dance of the Hillel Com-
munity Day School Saturday eve-'
ning. Nov. 18, at the Eden Roc
Hotel.
Cocktails and hors d'oeuvres will
be served prior to the dinner to be
held in the Cotillion room of the
hotel.
Music for dancing will be pro-
vided by the Bert Sheldon and Ted
Martin Orchestras, according to
Mrs. Harvey Baxter, chairman.
Serving with Mrs. Baxter on the
dinner-dance committee are Mrs.
Mel Drucker. Mrs. Herb Gold,
Mrs. Lee Duffner and Mrs. Mar-
shall Baltuch.
Host couples are Mr. and Mrs.
Marshall Baltuch, Mr. ami Mrs.
Harvey Baxter, Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing Canner, Dr. and Mrs. Joel
Dennis, Dr. and Mrs. Melvyn
Drucker, Dr. and Mrs. Lee Duffner,
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Genad, Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert Gold, Dr. and Mrs.
Murray Kane, Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing Kuttler, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Lipson. Rabbi Max Lipschitz, Mr.
arid Mrs. Max Rothenberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Scheck. Rabbi
and Mrs. Milton Schlinsky, Mr.
and Mrs. Leonard Schreiber, Mr.
and Mrs. Saul Schreiber, Mr. and
Mrs. Don Solomon, Judge and Mrs.
Arthur Winton, Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Wolowitz, Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
ton Zemel.
Imperial Group Activities
The Imperial Group of Hadassah
will hold a "Queen for a Day"
meeting Tuesday honoring hospi-
tality chairman Leah Shalett on
her 75th birthday. Tuesday, Nov.
21, the group's luncheon meeting
will honor Mr. and Mrs. Lou Schil-
ler on their 50th wedding anniver-
sary.
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RIVERSIDE
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Tel: 920-1010
To arrange* a funeral anywhere in the United States,
Call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Murray N. Rubin, F.D.


Page 4-
9-Jenistincr/fdKann nd Shofsr of Hollywood
Friday. November 10 1972
pJewisti Ftofidlian
.....I Ml HI (.HI .MM HiM I 1 imi.iIi
OFFICE and PLANT i:o N E. 6th Street
HOLLYWOOD OFITCE
Tillphone 573-4605
Telephone 920-6392
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 331C1
Frt.d K. ShOCHBT
Edit in and Publisker
Sp.lma M. Thompson
Assistant to Publisher
MARION NEVINS. Newa Coordinator
The Jewish Floridian Doe* Not Guinntei TM Kaahruth
Of The Merchandise Advertiaed In Ita Columm.
Published Bi-W>rl[lv bv the Jewish Flonitan
Bccor.d>CbM Po-i^c P.'ntft Miami. Ha. v j >i % ,
. e'ish Welfare Federation op Chutes Hollywood Shopar ]
Editorial
Advisory COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Widens, Chairman; Ross BVkerman. Ben
Salter, Mahun Nevin?, Dr. Norman Atkin.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and th- Florida Press Association.
MATTER OF FACT **
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local A-"**) One Year $2.00
Out of Town U^aMi Request
Volume 2
:'iidcty. November 10, 1972
Number 26
4 KISLEV 5733
This Report Will Not Be Ignored
Whe-n Ihe 41st General Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federation and Welfare Funds opens next Wednes-
day in Toronto, it will have in the background an Amer-
.can Jewish Committee study entitled "Future of the Jewish
Community in America."
Coincidental or not. the release of the task force study
on the even of the CJFWF meeting makes certain that it
.vill not be ignored at least for the immediate present
3s have so many other studies and proposals of the past
Part of the reason for this is the fact that a summary oi
'he study and its conclusions provides very little new in-
rormation that isn't already in the hands of our Federa-
ions; the agenda for the five-day assembly includes dis-
:ussion of poverty, education, changing community serv-
ces and other items emphasized in the AJC report.
The issues, as it is in our general society, will again
be fought out along the lines of priorities. Israel and Soviet
,'ewry continue to top the list if pre-convention publicity
s any indicator. Improving the guality of Jewish life, a
new direction in Federation service, is certain to receive
i good deal of attention if only because of its newness and
he amount of emphasis placed on its importance by the
CJFWF leadership.
One of the highlights will be the first of a series of
key reports on the recently completed American Jewish
Population Study. Parts of that report covering Greater
Miami have already been published here, but it was not
:omplete and the significance of the most comprehensive
rensus in our history has not yet been established by
lational and local planners.
Clear Choices In Every Contest
Next Tuesday's election may be one of the most de-
:isive in our history, both on a national and state level,
and it may also bring out the smallest percentage of voters
:n modern times.
Granting the alienation and frustration of the Amer-
ican people that has been widely described by the news
media, the cold fact is that our very democracy is at stake
when the people remain silent. In every contest, from
President to State House, there are clear choices that can
make a difference in our lives. The refusal to vote is not
to describe the failure of government to satisfy every one
of our needs but. rather, a refusal on the part of the stay-
it-home voter to appreciate and to understand his birth-
ight as an American citizen.
The Jewish vote has been distinguished primarily by
our above-average turnout. It is our hope that we will meet
he challenge next Tuesday.
Capitulation Set A Precedent
The capitulation of the German government to the
Arab hijackers was a shocking act, not only from a Jewish
view, but internationally. It has set a precedent which can
Vive only encouragement to other criminals of similar
.nind, and we can now anticipate a new wave of terror in
he air.
The fact that the hijackers blackmailed the German
'/overnment to deliver the three Arabs involved in the
Munich murders can be viewed only as an unforgivable
act that seems to have flowed almost inevitably from the
blunders committed at the time of the Olympic tragedy.
If the nations of the world have not learned yet that
strength, not weakness, in dealing with these pirates is
the only solution to a grave problem, then they should be
prepared for continuance of these terrible deeds.
WASHINGTON, D.C
Among the inner group in the
.Nixon Administration, tho fu-
ture of Dr. Henry A. Kissinger
is now a favorite subject for im-
passioned simulation. And no
wonder, in view of the outlook
f>t h+*T.rtJ htjfhatf! \.
WTJHIOM").^ S>f4 llif "iiicTS
gate and all the rest, the odds
are heavy 011 the President's
triumphant ro-eloetion. Abroad.
the 'linn o, for an honorable
early settlement of the Viet-
namese war appear to be rea-
sonably good and for the
first time during the long, cruel-
ly bard effort in which Henry
Kissinger has been the Presi-
dent's oilier self from start to
finish.
Kissinger has seised the Presi-
di nt remarkably well in many
other ways, too Bui there is
peculation about his future for
a simple reason. He is like one
ol the enormously grand pieces
Ol old furniture that sometimes
sells at a discount compared to
an antique of poorer quality be-
cause the dealers say "They are
not easy to place."
THERE IS therefore a real
Kissinger problem, which has
been made all the more vivid and
Intriguing by recent develop-
ments. But in order to under-
stand the problem, oik- must
begin at the beginning, with the
curious relationship between
Henry A. Kissinger and his mas-
ter in the White House.
Concerning this relationship,
there three important ]>oints
to grasp. First, it is by no
means so unprecedented as most
people think. President Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt and I-arry L.
Hopkins deliberately chose Ed-
ward R. Stettlnius as wartime
Secretary of State because Stet-
tinius could he counted on to
do nothing whatever except
to be pleasant and look hand-
some. Foreign iKjIicymaking was
the exclusive preserve of the
White House at that time, as
now.
SKCOXD, Richard M. Nixon
is much more Kissinger's master
than Franklin D. Roosevelt was
Hopkins' master. Harry Hopkins
often used to work through oth-
ers Gen. George C. Marshall
or Prime Minister Winston
Churchill or other i>ersonal al-
lies to get President Roose-
velt to see things as Hopkins
saw them. Kissinger would nev-
er and could never do that with
President Nixon.
Furthermore, nil the major de-
cisions in the foreign field have
been Nixon decisions rather than
Kissinger decisions, Concerning
at least one of these decisions,
the resumed bombing and block-
ade of North Vietnam. Kissinger
was even lukewarm at first. To
those who know him well. Kis-
singer makes no secret of his
admiration for Ihe President's
courage, Intelligence and long-
ightedness,
this MOD foreign policy suc-
cesses of the Nixon years have
been primarily Mr. Nixon's suc-
cesses, Third and finally, how-
ever, Henry Kissinger has also
been the President's really In-
dispensable technician.
He hi- alwayi got action out
of the hu Intractable bareauc-
. In the massive intelligen <
flow, he has always glimpsed
thi first ii.'.i- ni new opportuni-
i i At lea-! once, in the ens,-
ol the pening toward China,
ii been crucially import-
anl And he has always done
f.>! the Pi esident what no Presi-
dent can ever do for himself.
I le has dally to all the com-
plex details of policy execution.
BO Tin Bl you have the fue>
dameiii 11-. worth recording be-
i n all but uniw r-
' To these fun-
dami nt ill II Is pnl) worth B 11
ing that Kissingar would untrues-
iM) like to stay n tor
while. ObvlOtUly, he would like
1" assi.i in the completion of
the grand design for new world
relationships thai the President
has already so successfully
skeiehi d out.
The only difficulty is that
matter of Kissinger not being
' easy to place.'' Kissinger could
not try to carry on as before in
the White House, for instance,
if the President should choose
former Secretary of the Treas-
ury John Connelly as hU new
Secretary aff". state. In tfcuth.
Kissinger InMhe* \VNiir* *
with any really self-assertive
S.r ret a i > of State is pretty hard
to picture
THIS THERE are only four
possibilities. First (and least
probable i, the present decidedly
messy situation will be continued
but then we shall just about
cease t<> have a State Depart-
find
iy
iinius
cease 10 n\e a oiaie i*'(>ari-
OUad Of 'be President will find
alinw Jjecretarv of. State fully
prepared ;* ?cr\e*Tr Slettinius
("outlimed cm Page 9
As...

Max Lerner
Sees If
NEW YORK, N.Y. If war is a fierce maiden, peace is a
coy one, but well worth the wooing she evicts The long-awaited
cease-fire Is bound to mark the end and beginning of an era, and
bring Joy to many and mixed Ueublg* '" a toW; The joy i-
dear, not onlj to the POWs and their families, and to families on
both side, of the lines, but to countless people who have waited
tor years tor some signs of the ending of this brutal, never-
ending conflict.
The mixed blessings are also there. I talked with a young
wliter who had given everything to the McGovern campaign
"11 peace comes,'' he said, "I have to be happy about it. But
why dost it come now, and not four years ago, or after the elec-
tion? I've done nothing else since March except work for Mc-
Govern. and I thought we were beginning to turn the corner,
and now it all collapses." He isn't alone in his rage over the
timing of the drive for a cease-fire.
But Nixon and Kissinger couldn't have staged the drive by
themselves. Hanoi had to collaliorate. The American settlement
terms have been pretty clearly known, and little about them
has changed in the la*t months. Hanoi's peace strategy was also
pretty clear, and there was little to do except wait for Hanoi
to decide that Mr. Nixon wasn't to be thrown on the ash heap
of history by the American people. When Hanoi finally con-
vinced itself that Mr. Nixon was bound to win the election, a
new climate emerged for the bargaining, and Mr. Nixon and
Kissinger were swift to follow it up.
ir 'a *
HANOI HAD TO CHANGE ITS MIX!) on several scores. It
had said tluit there could be no cease-fire without a political
settlement first. It had said that President Thieu would have
to go. Both turned out to be hard-line rhetoric, and the American
negotiators must have known it all the time.
Vet Thieu's role, not only as person but as symbol, gathers
into a single knot all the difficulties that still remain on the hard
road to an actual peace. I don't think Hanoi has ever underrated
Thieu's ability and his capacity for maneuver, but many Amer-
icans have.
Neither he nor his ruling group wants to give up the power
they have struggled to win and to hold on to. But also their lives
have made them convinced anti-Communists. They put little
faith in the tripartite interim regime for Saigon that Kissinger
and I-c Due Tho have agreed to. Theiu has studied what hap-
pened in Eastern Europe in the 1940s, and he knows something
about Asian Communism, too. He believes that, whether by
force or guile or both, the Communists will manage to convert
the tripartite regime into a unitary' one, outwardly neutral, in-
wardly and actually Communist. If he has to travel that tri-
lmrtite road and the chances are strong that he will have to
he w ill be dragged kicking and struggling.
* !^ f>
IF HE IS A REALIST, be will know that historically it
was in the cards. The key is American power. Without Amer-
ican power, he would have been no one. The story is that the
night before the military junta chose him as president he told
his wife he had no chance and had resigned himself to defeat
It was the junta that chose him, hut the Americans came to rely
on him. helped build him up, sustained him by their military
IKiwer. The Americans used him to build a viable Saigon gov-
ernment. Rut they have had enough of the war and within the
frame of American guarantees Thieu and his people will have
to he largely <>n their own.
This is what happens to a client-state when it has to de-
pend on its patron-state. America has the "or else," the power
t Withdraw military supi>ort from the Saigon government, and
Thieu has to racognta the stark reality of that "or else." He
may nurse a grievance again I Nixon, and feel after the long
arduous road they traveled together, Mr. Nixon finally cor
too much to Hanoi, and at the wrong time. But in the etui he
must recognise the reality principle.

Thieu docs have one weapon still- Mr. Nixon's fear of a
backlash Inside of the United states atf the notion spreads that
there has been l In ti iyal of the South Vietnamese regime. Mr.
er have all along feared a passionate "stab-in-
tbe-back" myth that might break the fabric of the civil society
Inside America Tins ii why they have refused for years to
settle with Hanoi on terms thai would have bam too clearly
Hanoi'! term- A determined Thieu might appeal to the American
bai klash vote even before Ike election, much.as Hanoi has all
along iied to appeal to the anti-Nixon arfd* antiwar vote.
Thu, far Mr. Nixon's tactics and timing have worked. If he
can get re-elected, which is all but certain, he will come on as a
tiiumphant leader whose jtolitical Strateg) has been vindie
He will thus be stronger in negotiating to turn a cease-fin' Into
a real peace, and stronger also in meeting the potential backlash.


Friday. November 10, 1972
*'Jfnisti fk ridUar nd Shofar of Hollywood
Page b-
FREE PARKING AT ALL JM STORES!

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14.50 FULL BUSHEL
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Tree ripened to perfection,
juicy Florida navel oranges
and sweet, thin skinned
grapefruit make delectable
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1.50 delivery charge west
of the Mississippi.
CITRUS SHOP, at all jm
stores except pompano
dtdom ru&fv
M THE STORE WITH THE FLORIDA FLAIR:
DECORATIVE PLANTER GIFT
15.50 HALF BUSHEL
Attractive wood-like gift planter full of
tree ripened Florida citrus makes a sunny
holiday gift.
i


Page 6
*Jei*H*>rm and Shof.r of Hollywood
Fxiday, November 10 1972
JCRC Committee Initiates
Judeo-Christian Dialogue
The Judeo-Christian Relations
Committee of tt Jewish Commu-
nity Relations Council of the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation of Greater
Hollywood has initiated a program
to promote greater understanding
and cooperation between the Jew-
ish and Christian spiritual leaders
of the South Broward area.
The chairman of the Judeo-
Christian Relations Committee is
Robert P. Frazln. spiritual leader
of Temple Solel, Hollywood.
Rabbi Frazin has served as rab-
binical advisor to the Southeast
Federation of Temple Youth, an
organization of 1,200 teen-agers.
He has also served as administra-
tor of the Greater Miami Division
of Temple Youth, and temple di-
rector of the Ray and Philip N.
Coleman Camp in northeast Geor-
gia He initiated and advised the
Miami Mitzvah Corps, a group of
teen-agers who voluntarily worked
with the underprivileged.
Before coming to South Florida,
Rabbi Frazin was advisor to the
Ohio Valley Federation of Temple
Youth, and program director of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations Camp-Institute in
Zionsville, Ind.
Rabbi Frazin is a member of
the board of the Jewish Family
Service of Greater Hollywood,
Camp Ka-dee-mah. and the Brow-
ard Board of Rabbis. Mayor Keat-
ing recently appointed him to the
City of Hollywood's Youth Affairs
Board.
brotherhood between the Jewish
and Christian communities will be
reinforced.
On behalf of the Judeo-Christian
Relations Committee, Rabbi Frazin
has sent the following letter to
every major Christian congrega-
tion in the community:
"We of the Jewi&b, community
feel that in order to strengthen
our bond of understanding and
cooperation with our Christian
neighbors, it s imperative that
Christians and Jews continue an
ever-growing dialogue and un-
derstanding of one another's be-
liefs and concerns.
"Therefore, we would like the
opportunity to me?t with your
congregation in order to explain
our philosophy and concerns. We
further would like you to in-
form us so that we may have a
better understanding of your be-
liefs and philosophy.
The Speakers Bureau of the
Jewish Welfare Federation of
Greater Hollywood has available
late and well informed on re-
nity who are extremely articu-
leaders of the Jewish commu-
ligious and secular issues within
Judaism and would like the op-
portunity to present these to
your congregation. I am sure
that in the interest of brother-
hood you would be interested in
establishing a dialogue.
You may contact Ronald S.
Treshan at the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Greater Holly-
wood. 1909 Harrison St., Holly-
wood, (telephone 927-0536) or
you mav call me at Temple
Solel. 989-0205."
It is the hope of the Jewish
Community Relations Council that
through its efforts the spirit of
Men's Club To Present
Documentary Film Monday
The Men's Club of Temple Sinai
will present its first adult educa-
tion forum Monday at 9 p.m. in
the temple's Haber Karp Hal!. The
program will feature a 90-minute
documentary entitled "A Wall in
Jerusalem." provided by El A] Air-
Urn's and presented by Klhanan Se-
gal. Southeast Region district
manager.
Subject of the film is the found-
ing of the State of Israel from
the shtetls in eastern Europe to
the War of Independence in 1947.
Art Exhibit And
Juried Show Set
In Young Circle
The Seven Lively Arts Festival,
Inc. will stage its first winter art
exhibit and juried show Saturday,
Dec. 2. and Sunday. Dec. 3, at
Young Circle, according to an an-
nouncement by Mrs. Char'es Ad-
ams, program vice president.
The "Gallery on the Green" will
be set up from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
both days along the walkways of
the patk and on its perimeter. All
exhibitors will be eligible to com-
pete in the show with judges view-
ing the artist's work Saturday at
1 p.m.
Cash awards will be given for
winners in all categories; eligible
for entry are oils, acrylics, water
colors, sculpture, graphics, draw-
ing, photography, mixed media
and crafts. Entry blanks may be
obtained from Jane Rose, perform-
ing arts supervisor at the Recrea-
tion Center.
William D. Horvitz is president
of Seven Lively Arts Festival, Inc.:
Mrs. Thomas A. Thomas is vice
president. Cochairmen of this
event are Mrs. Jerome Bryant and
Mrs. John Kellner.
Lighthouse Luncheon Set
The Hallandale Chapter of the
American Israeli Lighthouse of
Florida will hold a membership
luncheon at noon Thursday, Nov.
16, at the Golden Horn Apart-
ments, 437 Golden Dr., Hallan-
dale.
JWF's Annual Meeting
Scheduled For Dec. 3
Jewish Welfare Federation of |
Greater Hollywood will hold it*
annual meeting, in accordance with
the Articles of Incorporation, Sun-
day, Dec. 3, at 10 a.m. at La Mer.
Anyone who has made a mini-
mum donation of $25 to the Fed-
eration campaign and is thus con-
sidered a member of Jewish Wel-
fare Federation is invited to at-
tend.
The agenda will include the con-
sideration and election of a board
of trustees and the election of of-
ficers for Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation for the
coming year.
The slate of proposed officers
will be presented by Federation's
newly appointed nominating com-
mittee, headed by Ben Salter, hon-
orary president for life of the or-
ganization. Serving on the new
nominating committee with Mr.
Salter arc Dr. Norman Atkin. Hob-
ert Baer. Robert Gordon, Dr. Shel-
don WiHeW and Jesse J. Martin,
current president and ex officio
member of the committee.
A preliminary meeting of the
committee has already been hold
and the proposed slate will be an-
nounced well in advance of the
annual meeting.
Nominations to the board of
trustees other than those made
by the nominating committee may
be made only in writing, signed by
at least 20 voting members ot the
corporation, and filed with the sec-
retary of the corporation at least
five days before the annual meet-
ing.
Reservations for the met ting
should he made by calling the
Federation office.
Dr. Malavsky To Conduct
Two-Week Tow In January
Dr. Morton Malavsky. spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Shalom, will
conduct a two-week tour to Israel
next January. The tour will in-
clude stays in some of the newest
hotels in the first-class category,
two meals daily, two days in Eilat,
Hi depth sightseeing with sjiec.il
visits and meetings.
Arrangements for the Jan 15.
29 excursion have been made
through Shalom Tours in coopera-
tion with Peters Tours. For bro-
ehures and information, please call
Dr. Malavsky or Shalom Tours.
Evening Courses Offered By
Temple Israel of Miramar
A program of adult education is
offered this year at Temple Israel
of Miramar with evening courses
Monday and Wednesday nights.
Among the courses being taught
are Jewish history. Mrs. Irene
Cohen: Israeli Folk Dancing, Miss
Maria Cohen; Klementary Hebrew,
Mrs. Phyllis Drazin: Intermediate
Conversational Hebrew, Mrs. Orah
Zipper, and Jewish Customs. Rit-
uals and Contemporary Problems.
Rabbi Avrom Dnizin. For further
information, call the temple office
or Arnie Feiner.
ATTENTION
PUBLICITY CHAIRMEN
News relwM safentttai to
The Jewish lloriiiian h Mild
be typewritten regularly,
(NOT all capita'*) :i-vl dou-
hle-'paeed f> aOOTI f-r <"M-
t'lr'al cT-r copies Mill not be aeoeptet.
Publicity chni-ni^n are re-
minded to a\ aid \rordln-ss
and literary nourishes. The
deadline for ataafaa with pic-
ture* is Moadav 5 p.m., for
rHea*e* without pictures,
TupmIav noon.
ISRAEL
A PERSONAL HISTORY BY
DAVID BEN-GURION
PERSONALLY AUTOGRAPHED LIMITED EDITIONS
50.00
A truly magnificent gift for the collector. From a
limited luxury edition that is personally signed by the
author and elegantly bound in richest leather.
Including many historic photographs plus the
latest of the author on the frontispiece. Protected by
a slipcase.
BOOKS, MIAMI, DADELAND, 163rd STREET, HOLLYWOOD
All photos w-ihmltted to
the I-Torl.llan for reproduc-
tion must have nfimwiy-
inc typewrit tii captions.
No photo wMI be acr->tai
that has writ in- on the ha-k
and photos will not be rr-
FREE PARKING AT ALL JM STORES!


Friday, November 10, 1972
+Jewlstl Horldnar "<* Shofsr of Hollywood
Pago 7

letters to the editor
EDITOR, FloridUn-Shofar:
"As I See It," I am inclined to
believe that Mr. Kerbel, executive
director of the JWF of Greater
Hollywood (I assume this includes
HaMandale and Miramar) is bark-
ing up the wrong tree when he
suggests that this area is ready
for a Jewish community center.
It is true that he puts it in the
form of a question in his column
of Oct. 27, but he is actually pro-
moting the idea when he questions
our maturity if we fail to under-
stand that a center would not
threaten the existence of any in-
stitution, but rather enhance its
programs and membership.
I thoroughly disagree. It is my
opinion that JWF is primarily a
fund-raising agency and with the
needs growing each year, the em-
phasis should be in that direction.
It is true that our Jewish Family
Service and camp activities are
growing and successful. Also other
subsidiaries like the Young Lead-
ers (mostly professionals). But to
take over many of the functions
of our temples, is biting off more
than we can chew. Next thing you
know, someone might be suggest-
ing that we need a center for re-
ligious purposes.
I can see an institution like this
or a YM-YWHA in a large city
like Miami, New York, Chicago,
etc., but our comparatively small
area is thoroughly covered by many
temples. It seems to me that the
main reason for the growth of
these temples is the growth of our
senior population and they desire
a religious, social, educational in-
stitution and they are getting it.
How can ail these temples and
their members maintain a separate
institution when they are con-
stantly appealing and raising funds
to develop more and more activi-
ties for education, youth and other
projects?
In this connection. I would like
1o refer to my letter in your issue
dated May 14, 1971. In this com-
munication, I referred to the an-
nual convention of the Rabbinical
Council in Miami. It was pointed
out that our welfare federations
should give stronger and substan-
tial support to Jewish education.
Also the need to enroll 10.000 new
tuition free students in Hebrew
day schools.
Our temples are engaged in
building bigger and newer institu-
tions and the JWF is raising its
goal to a $1.5 million for the next
campaign. Where is all this to
come from unless our philanthro-
pists come to the rescue? It is
probably true that our area has
thousands of families unaffiliated.
The temples do not turn them
down if they can't pay dues or
education fees. However, they
would not support a community
center either.
I recall a temple that tried to
build up a young married group.
They offered their facilities rent
free if I may put it that way.
However, when it was suggested
that they form a committee to
help a project, they refused. All
that they were interested in were
group parties, like theatres, boat
trips, golfing etc.
Mr. Kerbel finished his column
by stating: "If not now When?"
My answer is that our needs are
too great, locally, nationally and
internationally. Right now we must
work and help finance the develop-
ment and strength of the State
of Israel, support our temples and
help Soviet Jewry. Why not let
well enough alone?
SAM .1. PERRY
Hollywood
EDITOR, Floridin-Shofar:
Though there are many state-
ments in Mr. Perry's letter with
which I could take issue, I will
mention just a few.
Obviously, Mr. Perry is confused
about what the Jewish Welfare
Federation is, does and should do.
The JWF developed both the Jew-
ish Family Service and Camp Ka-
Dee-Mah. It also raises money to
provide services for the local com-
munity need* which are not being
met. One of these may well be a
program for all Jewish people:
our older citizens, our youth and
our children whose needs are not
being met by the temples.
Another area in which Federa-
tion functions is that of coopera-
tion and coordination. Isn't it a
shame that children from one tem-
ple rarely see and associate with
children from another? And what
about those people in this com-
munity, both young and old. who
are not members of temples? And
where should our teen-agers go on
Saturday night and holidays for
educational, social and cultural
activities?
On one hand Mr. Perry states
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Telephone: 920-3S57 J
+
that we need to support Jewish
education, and yet he has not kept
himself informed that the JWF
has provided a free school of Ju-
daism for high school students.
Mr. Perry states that our needs
are great locally, nationally and
internationally, and I, of course,
agree. One of our needs, it seems
to me, will be a Jewish commu-
nity Center. Mr. Perry feels that a
center might be appropriate In a
large community and he mentions
a few. May I add that the Holly-
wood area has the largest Jewish
population without a Jewish cen-
ter in the entire United States.
I would like Mr. Perry to tell
me, other than for Bat or Bar
Mitzvahs, how many teen-age chil-
dren he sees at religious services.
Obviously they have other inter-
ests. Shouldn't we help move their
interest more to Judaism and Jew-
ish activities?
ROBERT X. KERBEL.
Hollywood
Israel Night Fete
At Parker Dorado
Will Honor Gordon
Norman Gordon, Hallandalc
community leader, will receive the
coveted Shalom Award at a "Night
in Israel" Wednesday at 8 p.m. in
the Parker Dorado Blue Room.
The program is sponsored by the
Parker Dorado Israel Bonds Com-
mittee, with Lou Manes as chair-
man. Zachary Boos in and Manny
Lauterbach arc cochairmen with
Nat Malamuth and Morris Billet
honorary chairmen.
Joey Russell, popular American
Jewish humorist, headlines the
evening's program. Lila Savitt, in-
ternational singer and accordionist,
also will entertain.
Mr. Gordon has been a Zionist
since his student days at the Uni-
versity of Odessa in Russia. He
was a delegate in Israel for his
area's Israel Bonds committee in
1962, and at that time he and his
wife, Edith, were presented to
David Ben-Gurion.
Wednesday night's program is a
major function of the Broward
County campaign for State of Is-
rael Bonds, according to Milton
M. Parson, director of the Bonds
organization in South Florida.
Roger Berrebi is coordinator for
the Parker Dorado function.
Hillcre'.t Hadassoh Group
Marks Jewish Book Month
The Hillcrest Group of Hadas-
sah will mark Jewish Book Month
at its meeting in Recreation Hal!
1 Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. accord-
ing to an announcement made by
Mrs. Herman Goodman, president.
In honor of the occacion, Thom-
as Cohen, past chairman of the
ADI- Metropo'itan Region, Metro-
politan Co'inril. New York City, a
mmber of the 70A in Brooklyn,
N.Y., and of the Speakers' Bureau.
(Brooklyn Division) Jewish Na-
tional Furd. will review "The
Wr)d of Sholom A'eichem."
Mrs. Goldman To Speak At
Leadership Institute Meet
Mrs. Shirley Goldman, youth di- ganization planned for the younger
rector of Temple Beth Shalom and Jewish women of the community
a well-known Jewish educator, will and oriented to providing them
with cultural and informational
material on Judaism. It is geared
especially to interest, .the young
women in providing a Jewish home
and background for their families.
The institute has planned monthly
meetings throughout the year with
a different topic for each session.
Lecture-Discussion Series
On U.S., World Politics
The Greater Hollywood Chapter
of Brandeis University Women's
Committee announces a lecture
series and study group on the
United States and World Politics,
with Dr. William T. Primus of
Miami-Dadc Junior College as lec-
turer and discussion leader.
The program will start Monday
at 10 a.m in Temple Beth F.l, Hol-
lywood. Attendance is limited to
members of the National Women's
Committee. For further informa-
tion contact Mrs. Jesse Weiner of
Hallandalc.
ft *
DON'T LET W0R MAIL END
UP IN THE DEAD LETTER
OFFICE. MAKE SURE
YOUR ADDRESSES ARE
written CLEARLY ANP
THAT THEY ARE CoWlETE
SHIRLEY GOLDMAN
be the guest at a meeting of the
Women's Leadership Institute of
Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wel-
fare Federation at 8 pjn. Thurs-
day, 4721 N. 36th Ct., Hollywood.
Mrs. Glassman is a member of the
Planning Committee of the insti-
tute.
Topic of the evening will be
"Judaism in Our Home"; Mrs.
Goldman will incorporate ways of
making a Jewish atmosphere lov-
able and livable for a family.
Mrs. Goldman, a member of the
national board and secretary of
the Jewish Youth Director's Assoc-
iation, is an active participant in
USY youth programs on national
and regional levels. She is a grad-
uate ef the Montrfiore School of
Nursing and the University of
Pittsburgh, where she majored in
child psychology and elementary
education, and has been associated
with Temple Beth Shalom since
1964.
The Women's Leadership Insti-
tute of JWF is an arm of the or-
Hemispheres Luncheon And
Card Party Wednesday Noon
The Hemispheres Group of Ha-
dassah will hold a luncheon and
card party Wednesday noon in the
Hemispheres Restaurant. Donation
will include lunch, gratuities and-
tax. Helen Rubin and Ruth Potick
are accepting reservations.
The group will hold its regular
meeting Tuesday, Nov. 21, at 1
pm. in the Ocean Terrace room
of the Hemispheres. Featured will
be a review of the Herman Wouk
book "Winds of War" by Bess-
Zciger.
Sisterhood Fashion Show
The Sisterhood of Temple Sole*
is sponsoring a luncheon and fash-
ion show Tuesday at Rolling HiHs-
Country Club featuring fashions
by Melha's. Sheila Katlin and
Debbie Morris are accepting res-
ervations for the 11 a.m. event;
they may also be made by calling
the temple office.
Temple Beth Shalom ^Wollyvvoocl
i t i, C?*ed*H&^ *, *
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,^V 3> 10T2. ~ 19T3 ^SEASON______if T5
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for the Entire Series
r3or- Tickets and Information c*u B-:TH JHALOM PW0G7AM ZLJ1ZZ '72-'73
TO: TEIS-LE BTH SHALCM, "1601 Arthur otr.ct, Hollywood, Florid* 33021
TITXF.T 3EJE3VATIQN:
I ) PATRON, dNTiaB SERIES, $20.00 PER PSRSOH
( SMTI9E SEHIES, $10.00 TER PE-JOOH
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( ) "FOUR ON THE tOWf*
( ) "THE AYALCN.i"
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CHILDREN \ PSICB.
Enclosed find chock in amount of $______________
NAME ________________________________,-------,-------------------------
Nail tickt< tot
MTIiKSS,


Page 8
Jfctrlsfl ncridtor Shofar of Hollywood
Friday, November 10 1972
^**^****^***w************A***
scene around
by M,ri, Vi"s
Once upon a time I wont to bed as the sun lose those
days I get up as the sun rises. Using modern phraseology I guess
you could say I've been recycled It is a question of ecology for
if one looks up the word in the American Heritage Dictionary
one finds it means the relationship between organisms and their
environment" And my environment has changed my sleeping
habits and my rising habits.
During a major portion or my life, each day ended at the
same long table facing the door at 51st Street Lindy's in New
York. There at that table from 3 a.m. when the night clubs
closed in those days, all of us associated in any way with that
kind of business streamed in and took their place at the table.
\W ale. ivo talked over coffee, we left and others took our places
iit rhe tahie until about for a quick clean up before the place reopened for the day people.
Then eamo the move to Florida and for a while the late late
shows on television took the place of the table at Lindy's and
we still stayed awake late and rose later. But then came this
paper with an of lice that opens at a conventional time and a
boss who gets their even earlier than convention calls for. So
now I watch the sun rise through sleep rested eyea rather than
through -moke wearied ones.
The streets look the -a'ue though at early morn. They're
quiet and there's no traffic. In Hollywood, one can get through
the circle and down Hollywood Blvd. in a matter of seconds and
the parking spaci s arc abundant and u?atrollod by meter maids.
The stores arc closed tight with Just a few ambitious storekeep-
ers ("it sweeping the sidewalk in front of their place ol business
and getting ready for their day. A few stalwarts like Manny of
the newsstand and coffee shop has opened his doors and one ran
stop m and buj lite latest news. Royal Market is open to offer
its goodies Lewis Brothers arc doling out cans of paint to men
ofl to palm norm And as I open the door of my Federation-
housed office, l find thai I cant be early enough to arrive before
; '>i> Kertx I, the exi cutivc director. He manages to beat me every
i is ami i must saj I'm grateful for that for he's a much better
coffee maker than I am. I have informed him that I've dedicated
my life to not learning to do anything culinary and I have no
intention of breaking my record now. The mornings are nice
whether you greet them at the end of the day or at the beginn-
ing, it's a new star! and a whole new ball game and it's good to
be part of it.
BITS AM) IMKCK.S Rabbi Milavsky is in th process of
organizing another of his tours to Israel. The trip will lat from
Jan. 15-1*1. Anyone who wants to get more information can call
thi temple office Incidentally the first week in November
marked the first time in 20 yean that the Beth Shalom congre-
ation attended services at Arthur St.. the site of their new
sanctuary. Although the new buildings are not complete yet,
services were held in the youth lounge and in some of the class-
rooms as the old building on Monroe St. has been sold.
lore than fi.i young women gathered at Rikki Goodman's
home recently tor a meeting of the Leadership institute of jwf.
The evening was spent listening to the representatives of the
1> mo-ratio and Republican parties speak about their presiden-
tial candidates. At the next meeting of this group. Shirley Gold-
man, the youth director of Temple Beth Shalom, will be the guest.
Among people attending the first meeting of the Seven
Lively Ails Festival were Mrs. Kd Wentwottb, Jr., wife of the
Sun-Tattler editor, Mrs David Keating, wife of the mayor. Mrs.
Lea Jaffe. Walter Gray. Mrs. Irving Pixel and a number of
ether people interested in this l.Uh annual event. They got to-
gether to arrange the winter art show and all the other events
wliich will be coming up in the spring.
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Packer hosted an exciting social Satur-
day. Oct. 29, for the Henrietta S/.old Group of Hadassah. The
large turnout enjoyed an appetising buffet and listened to fas-
cinating speakers till a late hour. Jeff Sarrow, athletic ad-
visor to the Jewish Youth Council, said flag football and basket-
ball games will bo held very Sunday afternoon at Temple Beth
Kl. Compiling will bo the various youth organizations from the
area. Temple Solel Sisterhood is having a luncheon at Rolling
Hills Country Club with Melbo supplying a fashion show Nov. 14.
BOULEVARD
DELI
2301 Hollywood Boulevard
Open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.
SPECIALIZING IN
JEWISH STYLE HOME COOKING
and Introducing Our
( LUNCHEON SPECIAL
Take Out Service
Call 925-9067
Beth Shalom To Present
'Four on the Town' Nov. 30
The first in a series of three cul-
tural programs sponsored by Tem-
ple Beth Shalom will be held
Thursday evening. Nov. 30 at
South Broward High School. Fea-
tured will be music oC Broadway,
both old and new, in a production
entitled Four On Ttie Town."
The performance will be pre-
sented with top professional tal-
ent as singers. Jack Kleiner is the
ticket chairman for the shows.
Bar net t Bank of Hollywood
T|k' Slrtel al Win Avt-.it
Pfton2XS222
3
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commune v Pre$eB,i079.73
OF SOUTH BK<*A* theIV//-/,J
at NEW ORLEANS
PHILHARMONIC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
The Mf. O-leo-M IHsilnot"***" S.mpfcrwiy. the trori*j
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...... Hum
f*l ImsIhIiiIiiii. Ioi Angeles. leV A...
i*w>i vrphony 'email
ondaawood Fehtvo-r 13, "973
/the frula
W%i*> ill *\r e.o'x lolo' phnl r"o-i
and t*we> bi.tban. O' *'og>ng rtUl A BBS)
e.eb<<
vd Voclo
' e--"nl* of #***, i
p>*>en t'og*d costumed and UgMod b* D'agotle*
Draiir> iU!A .land. (.vd*. > top
echelon o' na*>0ai tompotun Mii'ih I I
1973.
ARMSTRONG AND VRENIOS
f.f.t chosen 'a tow at lOknti with the Rage*
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he So" ''onotco Op*>o *Ud***l .- I96S. and
he AUt'opnMaf Op**a *-*,io- M I 960 She it
non o ro^uiet tempr. o* *- M'-ofofc*o fhe
rno'UKwt twCteit Ol the (Ovng teno*. Ant>atH
Virnoi >t vode'ivofed b h.i Mf)r In lean &wlhe'lond !(> p*ifo*masCOS hu.o
been w**> Inr San fnvrnt'O $fg Ope'O. No
onol Ope-a ol Wnn]lt od the Vi
SmpKor lonwotr t 1973
1.0!\<;STRKTH AND ESCOSA
tenqsiieHS and fttota Ka~>e bee" deltghimg audisMtt and imihi **
She ut-ety of rKc ptefHOTim-nu. 'he* 4nislmtIj l mttfwn lamn Had and Cotncoi* tr. itol Hail Ko tMOugM ej"> exy iyenr"'*
andmonTlan. p-J 7 1973
MEMBERSHIP DRI\ E M>\ EMBER i:i-18
CAMPAIGN CLOSES NOVEMBER lit. 1972.
tor Infitrmaiiim
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O to. I 774. Ho.lr.ood. rW^fa 11011
A- This Advertisement is Sponsored by the Cooperation of the Following:
1 Mr. and Mrs. Julius Harris
2 Tuesday Morning Musicale
3 Citizens National Isnk of W. Hwd.
4 Becker Properties
5 Apollo Masonry
6 Hollywood Ford
7 Hamilton Gifts and Jewelry
Jack Grant
9 Caschetta Realty
10 Broward Music Center
11 Binder Baldwin Music Cantor
12 Maestro Jan Wolanek
13 Coastal Business Supply
14 Worsen Insurance
15 Wesson Jewelers
14. Julio Main* of Julia's Music
17 Sterling National Bank of Da vie
IB Bamett Hardware end faint
19 Johnson-Foster Funeral Home
20 Washington Federal Savings B lean
21 Walsh Texaco, 5690 Johnson Street
22 Meero Electric


lay, November 10, 1972
+Jewist ncrictiaun "d Shofar of Hollywood
Page 9-
PER50NAUTY PROFILE
Jack Shapiro
"A thoroughly good man" I tcen-aycd youngsters, Mr. Shapiro
a hat is known as a sweet person' I 'aid, "This ijr*af Ijiinn they re
. "he doesn't flfva whar he car T'oini; for our yo^ng M-oplc I was
1 >ne of 10 l'-:yM| f a very-
poor family in England and the
only one that came to this coun-
try. Every other year I go back to
England to .see my family as well
as traveling on to Israel each
time. When I see my brother's
and sister's children and grand-
children. I find that they are all)
.so proud of being Jews. They all I
<>rk at maintaining their heri-
tage. I'd like to see that for our
young people over here.
"it'.s strange but when I wai <
boy preparing for my Bar Mitzvah
my folks couldn't afford to pay the
teacher and very often he used to
beat me. I used to say that when
I completed my Bar Mitzvah I'd
never go inside a temple My fattier should see me now!"
Mr. Shapiro has been active in
Jewish and civic organizations
since his arrival here in 1930 when
the entire population of the city
was about 10.0C0 and the Jewish
community was tiny. Hi? was one
of the founders and charter mem-
ben of Temple Beth Shalom and
has been a member of its board of
directors since its origin. This is
his fourth term as president.
A member of the board of direc-
tor of Jewish Welfare Federation
and prominent in the activities of
B'nai B'rith and ZOA. Mr. Shapiro
received the coveted Jerusalem
Feace Award for the State of Is-
rael for his work in behalf of the
State of Israel Bonds.

JACK SHAPIRO
he gJves what s needed" .
he's one of the few men I know
who is both a doer and a giver."
These are jut some of the re-
mark! made about Jack Shapiro.
president of Temple Beth Shalom
b) his rabbi, Dr. Morton Malavsky;
by a former president of his tem-
ple and by his friends. Just the
mention of his name seems to
bring forth words of love and af-
fection.
/Ml of these remarks would be
brushed off by Mr. Shapiro, how-
ex er, for no says. "I just want to
ilo thirds, for the children so that
they can be proud of their heri-
tage."
Mr. Shapiro's wife. Rachel, con-
curs w'.th her husband's ideas.
' Kache! always says she wants to
~oe thing* while, her eyes are open.
We both feel that way. In other
words we want to get things done
im fore they blow the trumpet for
i- We want to smell the flowers
now."
And through all of Mr. Shapiro's
words, the one phrase that keeps
recurring is "for the children."
And so it would seem that his life
(Ls well as that of his wife is de-
voted to making a more meaning-
ful life for our Jewish children.
"We're losing more Jewish chil-
dren in this country through as-
similation in these times than
we're losing in the wars," he says.
"We have got to teach them to he
proud of their heritage and to
carry on Jewish tradition."
On being shown the curricula of
the new Judaica program aimed at
Bar Mitzvah
NICK i.omismi ill
Nick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Goldsmith, will become a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning. Nov.
11. at Temple Solel, which holds
services at Emerald Hills Coun-
try Club.
ft -ft
fSTKVEN A.NHAl/r
'Steven, son-of Mr. arid Mfs.'fr-
win Anhalt. will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Saturday. Nov. 18 at
Temple Sinai.
ft ft ft
MAROIA AKONSON
Marcia, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Sumner Aronson, will cele-
brate her Bat Mitzvah Friday eve-
ning. Nov. 10. at Temple Beth
Shalom.
ft ft ft
MARC NAKilS
Marc, son of Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing Naigus, will become Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday morning, Nov. 11.
at Temple Beth Shalom.
# ^ $
STANI.K.% S1I.VKK. JR.
Stanley Jr.. son of Dr. and Mrs.
Stanley Silver, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday morning.
Nov. 11. at Temple Beth El.
-ft ft ft
ALAN ROSEXTHAI.
Alan, son or Mr. and Mrs. Har-
vey Roscnthal, will celebrate his
Bar Mitrvaii oaiurday morning.
Nov. 18. at Temple Beth El.
# *} *>
KKITH BENNETT
Keith Michael, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Louis Bennett, became a Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Beth El Satur-
day. Nov. 4. The celebrant is an
eighth grade student at Nova Mid-
dle School and a member of AZA.


Mr. Sha|>iro became a builder
whan h arrived here in Holly-
wood; he built homes for many ]
of the prominent people in town !
and constructed many of the larger |
buildings. He retired in 1970 and ;
now spends part of each day at j
the temple grounds watching over;
cwi v detail of the construction of
Temple Beth Shalom's new sanc-
tuary which will be completed
next March.
"This is our dream come true,"
says Mr. Shapiro speaking of the
new building. "This is all that
Rachel and I want to see this
building finished and in use. There
are 750 children in our religious
school now and we want it for
them'"
Parker Group Luncheon Set
The Parker Group of Hadassah
will hold a luncheon for the bene-
l"it of medical research Monday
noon Nov.'20, at the Parker Tow-
ers.
sJ\A.alt*r of \fe( tjfi
JOSEPH ALSQP
[Continued from Page 4-
sorved, under the White House
on a da"-to-day basis.
Or Kissinger himself will be
made Secretary- of State, which
he is eminently well qualified to
be. Or the President will dis-
pense with his indispensable
technician, also losing all of
Kissinger's vast, irreplaceable
knowledge of the Nixon poli-
cies' background and complexi-
ties.
With President Nixon, one can
never know in such cases, ex-
cept that in this particular case,
the Presidents choice will be far
from easy.
YOU CANNOT BUY
A NEW OR USED FORD
FOR LESS ANYWHERE
MM mMBv,*C"**-1 ^^HI
HOLLYWOOD FORD Inc.
FORD
1200 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HOLLYWOOD
922-6721 947-3411
By BOB KtRBU, [xecutlve Director,
/wish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood
I stand accused. It is a dfffidlilr position, as a member of the Jew-"
i*h community, to be charged with the kind of crime that has besn j
l*vj-lecUuin.-l jue |aWnVWtMkt ^*fttl that"'I must develop and
present to you my defense.
I have tried to Ret from the plaintiffs the specific areas that
aided them in coming to their conclusion -what is their evidence?
Where had I gone wrong?
I have been labeled and stamjx'd by some as being "too Jewish."
Why did they level these things at me? Was it because of attend-
ance at synagogue on Shabbath, or that one of my sons attends a
Hebrew day school, or that our home is Kosher? Do they think that
having a Succoth it too traditional? Is it because I seem to be always
talking about Judaism, Jewish community, Israel. Soviet Jewry, issues
facing American Jews, and raising money for Jewish causes? Ls it be-
cause I seem to be critical of the lack of a Jewish community, the
boles in our Jewish educal onal system, the chauvinism of our Jewish
institutions.
And then I stopped myself and said "How can I be too Jewish,
especially when I (eel so Ignorant about my Judaism, when I attempt
to study as much as I can about my people; their history, problems,
philosophies and future? Is it wrong to center my life around Judaism
am I excluding other things in the general community? What does
one do when he offers his services to the United Fund and the black
community and then is not called upon? Is it being too Jewish when
one asks questions about Judaism and constantly seeks to find the
answers?"
I deny categorically and without equivocation that I am too
Jewish. I admit and ask forgiveness that I am not Jewish enough. I
do not always think of others before myself. I do not always do what
I should do. And I do not know enough about our history or philosophy,
our peoplehood and our religion.
I have been falsely accused. I hoi>c some day that I can live up to
the accusation.
INTERIOR. DICORATINO
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Page 10
+JewlstFk>rldla*7 aid SJwfar o* Hollywood
Friday, November 10 1972
C'OfMMiMfiiYy y^m^aicndi
ar
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10
USY Annual Weekend Temple Sinai
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women Moetzet Hapoalot Fund
Raising Luncheon 12:30 p.m. Diplomat Country Club
Sisterhood Temple Sinai Night at the Opera ^ 8 pin. "<
Temple Sinai
MONDAY, N<>\ I.MHI1I IS
Hollywood Chapter Brandeis National Women's Committee
Study Group 10 a.m. Temple Beth El
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 14
Hollywood Chapter Hadassah Paid-up Membership Tea
12:30 p.m.
Fairways Group Hadassah Membership Tea 2 p.m.
Hallandale Recreation Center
Broward ZOA Meeting 8 p.m. Temple Sinai
Shalom Group Hadassah Meeting 12:30 p.m. Home
Federal Bldg., Hollywood
Sisterhood Temple Beth F.I Book Review Noon Tem-
ple Beth F.l
Mens Club Temple Sinai Film Showing 9 p.m. Tem-
ple Sinai
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Beach Group Hadassah Meeting 12:30 p.m. Galahad
South Recreation Room
Hemispheres Group Hadassah Luncheon and Card Party
Noon Hemispheres Restaurant
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16
Broward County Regional Board ORT Meeting 10 ajn.
Home Federal Hollywood
Henrietta Szold Hadassah Meeting Noon Miramar
Recreation Center
Hallandale Chapter Hadassah Membership Coffee 1
pjn. Hallandale Jewish Center
American Israeli Lighthouse Hallandale Chapter Noon
Luncheon Golden Horn, 437 Golden Isle Drive
Women's Leadership Institute of Jewish Welfare Federation
Meeting 8 p.m. Home of Helen Glassman 4721 N.
36th Court
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER It
Brandeis Woman's Committee Sabbath All Temples
SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 18
Hillel Day School Dance 8 p.m. Eden Roc Hotel
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20
National Council of Jewish Women Hollywood Section
Discussion Group 12 30 p.m. Home Federal Bldg.,
Hallandale Blvd.
Parker Group Hadassah Luncheon Noon Parker
Towers
B'nai B'rith Women Hollywood Chapter 725 8 p.m.
Meeting HoiTW Federal Bldg., Hollywood
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21
HiUcrest Hadassah Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hillcrest
Recreation Hall 1
Plaza Towers Hadassah Meeting with Fashion Show
12:30 p.m Social Hall
Hollywood Chapter Hadassah Paid-up Membership Tea
1 p.m. Viking Restaurant
Imi>erial Group Hadassah Luncheon Noon Imperial
Towei
Hemisphere* Hadassah Book R<-view 1 p.m Ocean
Terrace Room, Hcmpsphercs
TIURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2$
H'Atid Group Hadassah Board Meeting 8 p.m. Tem-
ple Israel Miramar
STARDUST BALLROOM
"THE PLACE TO DANCE"
DANCING
EVEBY FB1B4T TO 11 T.M.
S2.00 m rtBSOK
EVEMSMMT4TI7P.il.
W;2I-;57<.IMW..
FREE
REFRESHMENTS RMCE CUSS NOR PRIZES
185 wtrwid Blvd Downtown Hollywood Elevator Service
([trace it 105 N. 19th Aw to M Flow
T THE SIGN OF THE STAR''
STUARTS
RESTAURANT & COFFEE SHOP
1141 North Young Circle
SPECIALIZING IN PARTIES FOR ALL OCCASIONS
"You Provide Guest We Do All The Rest"
Breakfast lunch Dinner
TAKE OUT AND DELIVERY SERVICE
CALL 929-2218
Religious
Services
KAUAHOAli
HALLANDALE JEWISH CKNTBK
(Conaarvatlva. 4 N.E. 8th Avenua
Rabbi Harry C. Schwartz, Cantor
Jacob Damiger.
,,~aUMAt .
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conaarvatlvo)
6920 S.W. 35th St., Rabbi Avrom
Dnazin, Cantor Abraham Koatar.
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 1351 S.
14th Ava.. Hollywood. Rabbi Samuel
Jaffa.
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conaerva-
tive1725 Monroe Street. After Nov.
1 4*01 Arthur Street. Rabbi Mor-
ton MalaveKy, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conservative.
310 SW 82nd Ave- Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5001
Thoma* Street, Hollywood. Rabbi
Robert Frazin.
TEMPLE SINAI (Conservative) 1201
Johnson Street. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingslay. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
Israeli W. German
Relations Reach An
All Time New Low
By Special Report
BONNIsraeli-West German
relations reached a new low in the
wake of Sundays skyjacking of
a Lufthansa jet and the release
of throe Arab terrorists captured
last Saptember after they and
their companions had killed 11
Israeli athletes in Germany for
the Olympic games.
Israel's Ambassador to West
Germany, Kliashiv Ben-Horin,
was recalled by his government
and is scheduled to leave within
a few days. His departure may
mark a turning point in an era
during which successive German
governments have built a spe-
cial relationship with Israel by
way of atonement for the Holo-
caust, which took the lives of
more than six million Jews.
Ambassador Ben-Horin gave
no indication of how long he ex-
pected to be absent from his
post, but West German officials
were inclined toward the view
that his dt'imrture was a gesture
of Israel's displeasure and Chan-
cellor Willy Brandt has called
the Israeli attitude "unjusti-
fied."
BBW diopter Penny Sole
B'nai B'rith Women, Chapter
725 will hold a penny sale along
with their regular meeting Mon-
day, November 20 at 8 p.m. at the
Home Federal Building at Young
Circle. Members are requested to
bring canned goods, staple foods
such as coffee, tea and sugar,
crackers, tuna fish, sardines, etc!
plus a shopping bag to carry home
their own purchases.
Plow Towers Group Mooting
The Plaza Towers Group of Ha-
dassah will hold a meeting Tues-
day, Nov. 21, at 12:30 pjn. in the
Plaza Towers social hall. The pro-
gram will feature Florence Rose,
who will give a reading on "What
is a Jew?" There will also be a
fashion show with members of
the Hadassah group serving as
models.
ISRAEL APARTMENT
2 BEDROOM FURN.
for mm year. S aria eft te Ditta-
t>ff. T.V., eokeay, .urU.ktf
park mmi Dtps*. Call HI 3t73
(MS) ar 751-MM (305).
Temple Sinai To Present
Program On Soviet Union
On Tuesday, Dec. 5, Temple Si- j Union concerning the newly in,.
nai Sisterhood in conjunction with posed ransom and the flight for
the Jewish Youth Council of the| freedom on the part of Jews and
other minorities who are being re-
pressed and persecuted by the
Soviet government.
A direct phone call to a Russian
Jewish activist will be made dm-.
ing the program and broadcast so
the audience will be able to hear
first-hand what is occurring there.
Miss Abramowitz will bring the
1 youth up to date on events in
. the U.S.S.R., and inform the young
people as to how they may actively
work toward freeing Jews in the
Soviet Union and the important
part American young people play
in aiding persecuted peoples in thia
totalitarian regime.
Hollywood Temples To Mark
Brandeis Sabbath Nov. 17
Brandeis Sabbath will be ob-
served Nov. 17 in most of the tem-
ples of the Greater Hollywood
area.
KAMI TIM* M. STfftN
Jewish Welfare Federation of
Greater Hollywood, will present a
program entitled, "A Night with
Jews Returning from the Soviet
Union," featuring Rabbi Tibor
Stem, spiritual leader of Jacob C.
Cohen Community Synagogue in
Miami Beach, and Reena Abram-
owitz, a 17-year-old student. Both
have recently returned from an ex-
tensive tour of the Soviet Union.
Rabbi Stern, a well-known schol-
ar, has published 14 volumes in
three languages, and a proposed
constitution for the State of Is-
rael. He is an Halachic authority
in Jewish law, a recipient of a
scholastic award from former pres-
ident of Israel, Ben Zvi, and a per-
sonal friend of the present presi-
dent, Zalman Shazar.
During his tour of the Soviet
Union, Rabbi Stern became the
only American rabbi known to
have performed a conversion in
the Moscow synagogue. He has
been a long-time activist in at-
tempting to free Jews from the
Soviet Union in order to enable
them to emigrate to Israel and
the United States.
During the 8 p.m. program at
Temple Sinai, Rabbi Stern and
Miss Abramowitz will bring the
public up to date on recent events
that have occurred in the Soviet
A special service will be held at
Temple Beth El, 1351 S. 14th Ave.,
Hollywood, with Brandeis Univer-
sity National Women's Committee
as hostesses jointly with Mr. and
Mrs. Lawrence Nusbaum in cele-
bration of Mr. Nusbaum's birth-
day. Mrs. Nusbaum will light the
tapers. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe will
recognize the 25th anniversary of
the founding of Brandeis Univer-
sity.
Hallandale Hadassah Plans
Paid-up Membership Coffee
The Hallandale Chapter of Ha-
dassah is holding a paid-un mem-
bership coffee Thursday, Nov. 16,
at 1 p.m. at th" Hallandale Jewish
Tenter, 4th St. and 8th Ave
Sneaker for the meeting will be
Mrs. Joyce Anton, publicity chair-
man of the Tampa region. Musical
entertainment will be supplied by
Mrs. Herbert Williams and Mm,
Albert I.emow with Jerry Carretta,
accompanist.
Chairman of the meeting will
bo membership vice president Mrs,
George S. Vizenthal; Mrs. Manny
Rose is program vice prcaidei
TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
We are happy to announce
that Mickey Perlmutter is back with us.
f
/
count >
1918 Hollywood Boulevard
927-2337 ~ 923-3659
THRIFTY RENTACAR
In Hollywood A Hallandale
NEIGHBORHOOD & AIRPORT SERVICES
:30 A.M. te 5:30 P.M. 3000 Hallandale leech orvd.
525-4355 Anytime
AMCO
ROOM AIR CONDITIONER CO
SALES SERVICE INSTALLATION
MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS AVAILABLE
FED0ERS WESTINGHOOSE
Phone 9206860
U


liday. November 10, 1972
+Jewlsil fkrrtitr *nd Shofor of Hoi I ywood
Page It
Building-To Building flSfiSL
Meadowbrook Towers has found Ihnt their monthly parties are
p taimfsyt. t^di month different entertainment Ls i.lanned ... At
ic ovww-r paj.ty KronH Alontel.-on and Lester Metzger participated in
ie *ntnia:nnient :,;. Plaza' Towels North was among ihoo build-
g having a Halloween parry. 'Kvvryone came in r3sTOWewSth prizes'
ir the beat This buildinc also haa a choral group which Is prac-
cins tor a conceit in March Kvery Tuesday night its games at
ie imperial Towers, re|>orts Ruth Romm.
New officers at Parker Tower Ladles Club are Gertrude Simon.
resident; Doris Sanet, vice president; Mercedes Robinson, treasurer,
nd Sara Josephson, secretary. Rase Gould, entertainment chairman!
cently wrote a skit for one of the meetings Nov. 1 this group
.Id a "iuncheon and fashion show at Kmerald Hills with Nat Allen
upplyir.g the clothes.
Th- Social Club at Oulfstream Gardens is planning a cruise for
Ihe weak of Nov. 18. Contact Ann Schwartz if yon want to join the
roup. The. same club just recently visited the west coast of Florida.
At Fairways North an evening at Beau Rivage proved a super
ftoeiiil evening for the Women's Club, Mrs. Murray Rubin, chairman, re-
wi-ts Sam Taiiowc, Lenny Friedberg and Murray Feurstein are
unning game nights at Fairway Riviers each Tuesday. Following
he games, Edith and Morry Jacobs serve goodies for the players .
finny Krumbein and Arthur Si'inbers are the cochairmen of enter-
airrment at Imperial Gardens. Their Halloween party was a big suc-
ks too. Now they're planning for New Year's Eve.
Explanation Demanded
From West Germany
Continued from Page l
ihelr surroittler an aflront to the
memory of the Israeli sports-
men whom they murdered."
Ambassador Von Putkammer
told newsmen after his meeting
1th Mr. Elian that he under-
stood how Israel felt but that
(iermany was not at war and
its first consideration was to
sue the lives of the passengers
and crew of the hijacked plane.
He said Germany acted in ac-
cordance with international law
and rejected the term "sur-
render."
Mr. Khan niilil that while some
ol the details of Sunday's events
leinain confused and contrnolc-
tarjr, the fact Is that the West
Qenaaoa decided in principle to
free rile terrorists In return for
Ike hijacked plane and Its pas-
ieasjttn> "Who knows which
Israelis have lieen sentenced to
ile:ith or injury as a result of
theif release?" he said. The
West (jennans acted despite
clear-cut warnings and appeals
from the Israeli government,
iimveyed urgently liy Ambassa-
dor Kliashiv Iten-llorin in Bonn,
not to give in to the hijackers'
demands, he declared.
The Foreign Minister also dis-
closed that "Israel was not the
unly government that pleaded
with the Germans not to give
the terrorists their victory," but
he did not identify the other
governments.
Mr. Kban gave the Knesset
detailed review of Israel's ef-
forts to resist the hijackers. He
disclosed that at one jxiint For-
eign Minister Walter Scheel in-
sisted that the Bavarian State
government was the responsible
authority. But this was dismiss-
ed outright by Ambassador Ben-
Horin. who insisted that the re-
sponsibtllty lay squarely with
Bonn.
Mr. Kban found a West Ger-
man government sjiokesman's
statement that "Germany was
not res|M>nsiblc for the Middle
East conflict" somewhat dis-
turbing. "There is no justifica-
tion for any role of smugness or
self-righteousness on the part
of the West German spokes-
man," he said. He vowed that Is-
rael would continue its fight to
destroy the terrorists and would
act against any Arab govern-
ment that offered the terrorists
aid. i The 13 passengers and sev-
en crew memliers of the German
airliner were freed only after the
hijacked plane landed at Tri|x>li,
Libya. I
Jlevtt
memorial Cnape/
"JtWISH fUMCAL DIC70SS"
LOCAL AND OUT OF STATC
AMRANGEMF NTS
947-2790
i
1J3SS W DIXIE MWV M M.
More than PO young people of |
[Kist-c.nfirmation age are now en-
rolled in i he newly formed Judalca
prtigram which is being held four
nights a week i WoHywood.
The program was originated
with the purpose of filling a need
in Hie Jewish community to sup-
plement the Jewish educational
background of teen-agers. The
need for this type of program was
pointed up by an informal study
made by various interested Jewish
organizations in the community.
The courses have been planned
especially to interest this high^
school-aged group. They have been
built on the principle of open dis-
cussion groups a program which
has been proven to be interesting
and effective for teaching young
people.
The program will continue for a
10-week period with classes being
conducted at Temple Beth El,
Hollywood, from 7-9 p.m. Mondays.
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.
The series is being sponsored by
JWF of Greater Hollywood. Tem-
ple Beth El, Temple Beth Shalom,
Temple Israel of Miramar. Tem-
ple Sinai and Temple Solel in co-
operation with the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of Greater
Miami.
Interested students can still join
the classes by calling Jewish Wel-
fare Federation and signifying
their intention.
The Monday schedule of classes,
conducted at Temple Beth El, 1351
S. 14th Avc., includes "The Holo-
caust: Tragedy of Modern Society
What Happened? Why? So
What?" il hr.i "Comparative Re-
ligion: A Comparison of Modern
Eastern Religions and Philoso-
phies" il hr.l and "Jewish Cook-
ing: Gastronomic Delights
Learn by Doing" (1 hr.l
A two-hour class is being held
at Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St..
each Tuesday. A "Teacher Train-
ing" class, it covers techniques and
content.
Several classes are being con-
ducted at Temple Beth Shalom
lfiOl Arthur St., Thursday eve-
nings. They include "Israel: Past,
Present and Future Its Signifi-
cance to the Future of Judaism"
il hr.l L'lpan Hebrew 101," "Ul-
pan Hebrew 201." and Israeli
Song and Dance."
Tuesday Morning Musicale
Sponsoring Music Contest
One of the most important ae-1 ticm df unusual instruments, the
tivities of the Tuesday.. Morning composer will'be permitted to sub-
Municale ol -.Hollyw<*adt;i* its an-;mit a tape weordinftr elUl-
nual contest for Broward County
composers, according to Mrs. J.
Frank Magec, president of the
Tuesday Morning Musicale. which
is a member of the Florida Fed-
eration of Music Clubs and the
National Federation of Music
Clubs.
All entries must be original, un-
published works of either vocal or
Instrumental music and may be
solos or ensembles. There is no
age limit.
U.S. Savings Bonds will be
awarded the first place winners in
each of the two categories, vocal
and Instrumental, and cash prizes
will be given for second place. If,
in the opinion of the contest judges,
entries do not merit awards, none
will be given.
All winning selections will be
performed nt the Tuesday Morn-
ing Musicale's "Parade of Ameri-
can Music" program Feb. 13. If a
composition requires a combina-
All manuscripts are to be mailed
to Mrs. Robert B. Magor. contest
chairman. 2120 N. 31st Rd.. Holly-
wood, Fla. 33021. The deadline for
all entries is Dt. 10. Manuscripts
will not be returned by mail, but
may be picked up at the home of
the contest chairman.
IS etc Technion Group
Miss Anne Keleman. national di-
rector of Women's Division. Amer-
ican Society for Technion-Israel
Institute of TechnoloQ'. and hon-
orary national president Mrs.
David Garbelnick. a winter resi-
dent of Hollywood, are coming to
Hollywood to assist in the forma-
tion of a new chapter of Technion
which will take place Wednesday.
at a noon luncheon hosted by Mrs.
Emil Lublin. 3725 So. Ocean Dr.
Mrs. Louis Moss is founding presi-
dent.
FACT
By KABBI SAMIKI..I. FOX
(i), I Ml Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
Why does tradition require
that tin- last line or Hit- Holy
Scroll containing the Five Rooks
ol Hoses always end In the
middle of the line?
Since this verse completes the
scroll, the rabbis insisted that it
should not be carried to the end
of the line. This demonstrates that
one can never consider himself to
have completed the study of the
Torah. This would encourage con-
stant concern ami study of the
Torah.
Rabbi Reviewing
Cliaim Potok Book
The monthly meeting of Temple
Belli El Sisterhood, a buffet lunch-
eon in celebration of Jewish Book
Month, will be held Tuesday at
the temnlc. Mrs. Martin Renno Ls
program chairman.
As part of the program. Rabbi |
Samuel 7.. Jaffe. spiritual leader of
the temple, will review the book.
"My Name is Asher Lev," by
Chaim Potok.
In "My Name is Asher Lev," Mr.
Potok, who is also the author of
The Chosen" and 'The Promise,"
tells the rtorj of a gifted artistic
young man and the conflict be-
tween his art and his strong Chas-
sidic family tradition.
Palmer's
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Closed On The Sabbath
Personalised Memorials Custom
Crafted In Our Own Workshop.
During the past rime
'months, tne Jewish Aqencv
has had to Spend rnorey
+nan $53 million.- with
-funds from UJA--To
provide neu) apartments
-for immigrants -from
the Soviet Union
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
^Temple 3etA 1
Wemotiat
(jatdens
The only all-jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923 8256 or write:_
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME:
ADDRESS:
_ PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
TRAVE
U
m
AMERICAN
IHiuM*ci conrtviv
>vAstl Insurance Agency;^! fund
Ansel Wittenstein 8K
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527


Page 12-
^Jenisif rUrridlffUr "* Shof" Hollywood
Friday, November 10 19?2V
mm um\v
SALE! EXCITING FAST ACTION
AURORA "AFX" RACECAR SET!
14.99 reg 25
Over 18 feet of exciting action, two cars that race at blistering speeds over a banked
speedway. Two trigger action control guns provide lightning fast reaction. Set
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TOYS, at all jm stores except pompano
1 OS PEED
FLEETWING RACER
74.90 REG. 89.90
Lightweight racer, three
pieced forged crank, de
railleur protector and
center pull brakes.
TABLE AND CHAIR
SET FOR THE KIDS
9.99 REG. 20.00
Two scouped nestable chairs
with table. Ideal for snacks
and games. In red,
avocado or white.
A 10-SPEED FAVORITE
FROM MURRAY
69.99
Racing handle bar, deluxe
saddle, side pull brakes, chain
guard. A great racer, in green!


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