The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00053

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^Jewisti Florid fan
and SIMM \K OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 2 Number 25
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 27, 1972
Price 20c
Federation Sets $1.5 Million As Campaign Goal
A $1.5 million campaign goal
was set by the Executive Com-
mittee of Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation this
week in a unanimous decision of
the governing body of the orga-
nization at its pre-campaign
meeting.
Although due consideration
was given to the fact that Is-
rael's needs at this time war-
rant an even greater amount
from this South Browarrt area,
the $1.5 million was decided up-
on as a realistic one for this
year's campaign and one capa-
ble of achievement.
In making the announcement
of the goal. Herbert D. Katz,
1973 campaign chairman, said,
"We all realize the tremendous
need of I^-aH at this time and
therefore everyone of us realizes
the imporance of achieving this
goal. We know that the three
basic needs of Israel today are
peace, absorption of immigrants
and economic stability. In the
area of immigration alone, about
70,000 immigrants are expected
to come to Israel this year
just about double the number
originally planned upon and
35.000 of these will come from
the ranks of Soviet Jewry whose
sad plight is known to us.
"Immigrants are necessary to
the fulfillment of Israel's prom-
ise and no country in the world
does as mu:h for their immi-
grants as does this tiny mid-
East democracy." Mr. Katz
continued. "Arrangements for
housing and jobs are made as
Arthur Teitelbaum To Be
Council's Guest Speaker
Arthur N. Teitelbaum. region-
al director of the Florida Re-
gional Office of the Anti-Defa-
AtTMUR rfrmi aum
motion League of B'nai B'rith,
will be the guest speaker at the
8 p.m. mooting of the Young
Leaders Council of Greater Hol-
lywood's Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration Wednesday at the homo
of Dr. Howard Bernian, 3500 N.
33rd Ter., Hollywood.
Th" Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith is a beneficiary
of Jewish Welfare Federation. It
is one of the oldest human rights
organizations in America. Mr.
Teitelbaum, who will address the
Young leaders on the subject of
anti-Semitism, is responsible for
the implementation of its hu-
man relations programs through-
out Florida, directing the
league's statewide activities in
the fields of interreligious coop-
eration, race relations, educa-
tion, police-community relations
and the counteraction of extrem-
ist activities.
This meeting is one of a series
of educational programs plan-
ned by the leadership of the
Young Leaders Council, which
was formed by Federation a
number of years ago in order to
develop leadership from the
young Jewish men of the commu-
nity.
The council's education pro-
grams have been set up on a
monthly schedule; anyone inter-
ested in joining the Young Lead-
ers and participating in their
program can get further infor-
mation by calling the offices of
Jewish We'fare Federation or
contacting F.rrol Rosen, mem-
bership vice president.
Postal Authorities Expand
Bomb Detection Efforts
standard procedure upon their
arrival in Israel. All these nec-
essary forms of aid for the new
Israeli citizens add to the tre-
mendous financial burden of the
country.
"With all these factors in
mind and also with the realiza-
tion that the needs of all of
Federation's local and national
beneficiary agencies have in-
creased, I'm confidant that the
people of the community will
get behind this year's cam-
paign and help us to achi"'-e
this record-setting goal." Mr.
Katz concluded.
In 1972. Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation's
campaign topped the million-
dollar mark for the first time in
the historv of the organization.
New Crisis Looms
Over Hausner Bill
JERUSALEM (WNS) With
the reconvening of the Knesset,
the possibility of a new govern-
ment crisis again arises.
The Independent Liberal Par-
ty has announced that it will
continue in its fight for the
limited civil marriages bill which
was submitted to the Knesset
by Gideon Hausner last June,
but shelved in order to avert a
crisis.
Premier Golds Melr warned
that if the Mapam faction, part
of the Labor Allrnment, sup-
ported the II-P Mil. she would
be forced to dissolve the co-
alition. However, many believe
that the election of Rabbi Shlo
mo Goren to the post of Chief
Ashkenazir Rabbi, will prevent
mi h a showdown if Rabbi Gor-
en can persuade the Liberals to
give him time to find a halaehic
solution to the problem of civil
marriage.
The Hausner bill proposes
civil marriages for couples who
are barred by religious law from
marrying. Chief among these
are "mamzers," people deem-
ed illegitimate by the Rabbinate
and therefore only allowed to
marry other mamzers, and di-
vorced women who are not al-
lowed to marry Cohens.
Rabbi Goren, who is consid-
ered to be one of the most lib-
eral of Israel's rabbis, has said
that he can find halaehic solu-
tions to these problems.
NEW YORK (WNS1 The
United States Postal Inspection
Service and the Bureau of Cus-
toms have moved to expanc'
efforts to detect and intercept
loiter bombs sent to this coun-
try from abroad.
This action came following
the explosion last week of a
letter bomb in a Bronx post
office. A postal clerk had both
hands Injured when an envelope
which he waa sorting exploded
in his hands.
Some reports said that the
envelope carried a Malaysian
|x>stmark and was addressed to
a Hadassah official, while others
said that the letter was com-
pletely destroyed and no iden-
tifying marks were noted.
Two letter bombs had previ-
ously been sent to members of
Iladassah. the women'* Zionist
organization. Both letters bore
Malaysian postmarks. At that
time federal authorities had re-
ported that they were X-raying
suspicions mail arriving in Waah-
lrinn. particularly Items ad-
drefwed to Jewish members of
Cmigre
The Beirut correspondent ror
the London Sunday Times re-
)K>rted that Shafik el Hout.
Palestinian Liberation Organi-
zation leader, had declared, "We
have to shock the West out of
Its euilt" conscience about the
Jews, and into recognizing the
plight of the Palestinian people.
That's why Lydda and Munich
were such tactical successes.
They showed we were prepared
to die for our cause."
This amount represented an in-
crease of $300,000 over the pre-
vious campaign.
More than 300 persons worked
on the Federation campaign in
1972. volunteering their services
to heh> achieve the goal. With
the continuing growth in the
South Broward area the Execu-
tive Committee is hoping to en-
list even more workers this year
so that all the new and old
areas of the community can be
covered.
Court Says Kahane
Must Stay In Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Supreme Court has overruled a
Tel Aviv district court's order
that would have permitted Rab-
bi Meir Kahane, leader of the
Jewish Defense League, to leave
the country while authorities de-
cide whether they will charge
him in connection with JDL arms
smuggling attempts.
Rabbi Kahane's passport was
confiscated when he was re-
manded in custody last month.
A magistrate's court released
him on bail but did not return
his passport.
Dr. Meline And Mrs. Tobin
Recipients Of JWF Awards
Dr. Samuel Meline. president
of the Young Leaders Council of
G eater Hollywood's Jewish
Welfare Federation, has been
named as the recipient of this
year's Hy and Belle Schlafer
Young Leaders Award, an honor
accorded '. ach year to one out-
standing young man in the Jew-
ish community.
At the same time, a special
award was given by Federation
to Mrs. Marsha Tobin in recog-
nition of her outstanding work
for JWF on educational pro-
grams aimed at the young wom-
en of the Jewish community.
The Hy and Belle Sshlafer
Award was originally established
so that recognition could be giv-
en to young men of outstanding
promise who have shown inter-
est in the work of G-eater Holly-
wood's Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion and in the welfare of the
local Jewish community.
Since the first award in 1965,
many of the winners have since
assumed significant roles in the
activities of Federation. The
first winner of the award. Dr.
Norman Atkin. l-'d JWF to
their first $1 million campaign
in his position as 1972 camptrgn
chairman. He is currently the
organization's president-elect.
Herbert D. Katz. who was the
w'nner of the award in 1968, was
recently named campaign chair-
man for 1972, following years of
service in many different calci-
fies for JWF. Other winners of
the S:hlafer award include Mel-
vin J. Zoller, Gerald Siegel. Dr.
Philip Weinstoin, Jr.. Dr. Shel-
don Willens and Ross P. Becker-
man.
The current winner has work-
ed a number of years for Fed-
eration as well as taking a ma-
jor part in the life of the local
Jewish community in addition to
hLs many professional involve-
ments. He is at present serving
his second term as president of
the Young Leaders Council and
during 1972 served as chairman
of the Dental Division i-.i JWFs
campaign and on the Alloca-
tions Committee. A vice presi-
dent of Temple Beth Shalom
and a member of B'nai B'rith's
Chai Lodge, he is also a past
president of the Greater Holly-
wood Dental Society.
In announcing the special
award to Mrs. Tobin, Jesse J.
Martin, president of Greater
Hollywood's Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration, declared. "The enthusi-
asm, devotion and hard work of
Marsha Tobin during these last
few years is something that can
not go unrecognized. Her spirit
has been the sparkplug through
which dozens of young women
have become interested and in-
volved in the work of our Fed-
eration. It is with much pride
that we of the Executive Com-
mittee honor her with this spe-
cial award."
Both Dr. Meline and Mrs.
Tobin will attend this year's
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations and Wel-
fare Funds as part of their
award. The Nov. 8-12 assembly
will take place in Toronto, Can.
Accompanying the winners to
the assembly will he a large
Hollywood contingent of top
Federation leadership including
Dr. and Mi's. Norman Atkin.
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Katz. Dr.
and Mrs. Philip Weinstein Jr..
Rabbi and Mrs. David Shapiro.
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Siegel. Ross
P. Beekerman. Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Katler and Mr. and Mrs.
Robert N. Kerbel.
The five-day assembly will
bring together some 1.800 Jew-
ish leaders rcDresenting virtu-
ally every community in the
United States and Canada. Top-
ics for the workshops will con-
centrate on the many concerns
Continue* an Psge 2
SMS. MARSHA TOWN
M. SAMUtL MUM


Fage 2
VJenistncricfclJn *"" Scorer of Hollywood
Friday, October 27, 1972
. .. LI -
Broward Delegation Attends
ORT Conclave In Jerusalem
\ delegation of women from th*
Broward Region recently attended
t:u N itionu' Bknud Conference of
Women's Auwh an OUT in Jent-
salem Wosnen repeesentifsj this
pea cit Mv-. Kdward Light, Re-
jion president, Mrs, Mussel Paul.
Executive CommKtec vice prvsi-
Jnt and tin. Morton Krias, Ex-
,:i-n i \ io president.
The meeting was at tended by
k.> leaders of Women's American
ORT from nearly 800 chapters in
the United State*. The conference
v* .'.idiv^eii bv [smell Prime
Minister Golda Heir, Minister of
1 "hew |T*W A'^io_-i. Minuter of
Finance Pincas Sanir and many
other top Israeli officials,
M Light, in renortiti'j on the
conference said, "This Is the first I
l that Women's American ORT
lii- ever met outside the conti-
n. ntal Ui i- i -St > -s. We feel it
was the moat historic national j
meet e c er held an.I enabled in
to make contact with the land
fn.in vvhieh ow traditions, value* i
and ethnic* have sprung, a land
which i- the present and future
hope lo so nianv of our oppressed
i hi en throu thotil the wot Id
.'ind wh'eh i- a vital source of
rtnal utr^nsrth and bodtlj pro-
tn Hoi for .lens In danger iny-
when
"We a< ilel 'gates, were ab'e to
Sie Bl last with our own ey.'- h0
.it a role ORT has played, i-
i\r. and i'l play In the up-
build! .: i-'ael bj providin b
esen olr for the countrv." site .id l"d. More
than 100.0CO stttdents have gradu-
ated from the ORT Israel network
since its establishment in 1949.
"Nearly a quarter of a million
fsraeHs haw graduated from ORT'
school*, in one country or another
and ORT's annual student enroll- j
ment in Israel is Mating the 50.000,
mark more than half the total i
vurUUvide ORT enboUment," Mrs. |
Light said. 'It is. therefore, very' I
clear why Premier Golda Meir has
-aid. "It is assuring to have the
wide network of ORT centers
throughout the country to take
care of part of the task of provid-;
ing cdu.-ational and vocational
training to thousands ami thou-!
rands of our people.' "
There are 14 chapters of Worn-:
en's American ORT in Rroward
County. Anyone Interested in Join-
ing should contact Mrs. Morton.
Krisa.
Drama Duet' To Present
Sisterhood's Book Review
The Sisterhood of Temnle Sinai
will hold its monthly meeting at 8
n.m. Tuesdav, Nov. 7, and will
also honor their new members.
A performance < "Drama Duet" will be featured in
the temole's Haber Karp Hall. The
hook tn !* n'av ci i- "Sunshine and
Salt b) .Sylvia Rothschild This
unusual form >: book reviewing is
done by Mrs, Murrai I.ipinskv and
Phillio Brass, who '-ret all the
hook's fundamentals into one pres-
entation, with each of them acting
out several parts.
Dr. Meline And Mrs. Tobin
Recipients Of JWF Awards
< i.lltilille.l from Page I-
i tin nities represented.
\ iini' th. primary concerns
hi.h ,\ir he spotlighted *
probli n ui met ting th.
mounting social, educational,
health and welfare problems of
Israel; the problem of the So-
viet .) m. especially In the light
.1 the new ransom d mand- for
i clung to emigrate, and
Dving the quality ol Jew-
Lb ile.
A.- litionally then- wlU dis-
cuss icis and workshops devoted
t.. 1973 fund-raising; federal d
ndowment fund programs, pub-
lic relations, community new
papers, leartershto develuoment
and mans other topic- vital Ul
the operation ol Federations
throughout the United States
and Canada.
CJF is the a-s<>eiat or. ol cen-
tral community organisations
Federations, Welfare Funds,
Community Councils serving
S00 Jewish communities in the
United States and Canada It
.ul- these communities to mo-
bilize maximum -up,nut (or
the 1'JA and Oth overseas
agencies as well as for major
national and local services In-
volving financing, planning and
operating health, welfare, cul-
tural, educational, community
relations and ottwi programs
benefit tine, all residents.
Senior Friendship
Club Fetes Weiser
Some 200 persons attended a
testimonial dinner and birthday
celebration for William Weiser and
honored him for hw work for the
Seii'or Friendship Club of Tem-
pi.- Bolh Shalom recentlv.
Honosed guests at the dinner
were Or. and Mrs, Morton Malav-
skv. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Shapiro,
and Cantor and Mrs. Irving Gold.
i
The invocation was given by
Dr. Malavsky. spiritual leader of
the temple, who received a $2,000
check to "o towards building a
new sanctuary and social hall for
the temple.
Temple president Jack Shapiro
spoke about the temple's program
and plans for the coming genera-
tion. Dorothy Kowitt. entertain-
ment chairman, was master of
ceremonies for the evening; Wil-
liam Bernstein, a vice president of
the club, prepared avd served the
dinner.
Hostesses and hosts for the eve-
ning included Mrs. Loull Bern-
stein. Mrs. Minnie Prank, Mrs.
Gertrude Friedman. Mat. Adcle
Gerbcr, Mrs. Betty Miller. Mrs.
Fanny Miller. Mrs. ReheOCfl Spie-
gal, Mrs Ann Turner. Louis Berk-
man, l. Cinnamon and Al Rosen-
iici _
Mrs Helen Kalish and Bob Bt-
kin were in charge ol tickets.
USY Weekend Set
At Temple Sinai
The annual United Synagogue
Youth weekend win be held at I
Temple Sinai Fridav. Saturday!
and Sunday, Nov. 10-12. Theme}
for the weekend is "Prayer th|
Whys and Wherefores."
!> Saul Wacha, professor of edu-.
cation at Phillip Lown School !or
Contemporary Jewish Studies it
Biancleis University, will in- the |
mw st speaker. He will conduct
-tiulv groups with the USY'ersj
Friday night and all day Saturday.
Those partleinating in the e.k-.
end will be Temple Sinai junior
and senior USY'ers and th- senior
USY'ers from the Southeast region
of the United Synagogue Youth.'
Sunday morning there will be a
sunrise service and breakfast on
the beach,
Hadassah Croup Presidents Plan
Sylvia Salter. president of the
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah.
was hostess at a breakfast nv-ei-
ing of all the Hadassah group pres-
idents recently where plans for
all chapter functions for the sos>
-on were finalized.
Present at the meeting were
Mrs. Barry Bogdan. Beach Group;
Mrs. George Sefteil. H'Atid: Mrs
Adele Foland. Henrietta Szold;
Mrs. Herman Goodman, Hillerest;
Mrs. Earl HcJejKH, Mt. Scopus,
and Mrs. Samuel Hutter. Shalom.
Functions arranged include the
paid-up membership tea to l>e h-Hcl;
the
Tuesday. Nov. 21 at 1 p.m. in
Viking Restaurant in Denia.
Luncheons for the coming sea-
son will include the Ami Luncheon
Dec. 12; tlte Youth AJiyah Lunch-
ion Jan. i7. and the Donqp,Lunch-
eon to be held March 2Tr
An educational Forum was plan-
ned for Feb. 20 with sessions from
10a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
At the same meeting of the
presidents, national quotas for
membership and fund-raising were
set up. Each group also announced
their regular meeting times for
the year.
LOUIS R. KURLAND, M.D.
DIPLOMATE AMERICAN BOARD Of OPHTHALMOLOGY
WISHES TO ANNOUNCE THE REMOVAL OF HIS OFFICE
TO
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PRACTICE LIMITED TO OPHTHALMOLOGY
TELEPHONE (305) 966-6363
THRIFTY RENT-A-CAR
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NEIGHBORHOOD & AIRPORT SERVICES
8 30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. 927-1761
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The completely Air-Conditionod
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YEARLY $CC weekly per person
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We cater to Ail Diets *2S el 178 nea
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Call John W. Puorto
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MllMndali
Phone 922-77*0
FREE CHAISE LOUNGES A MATS
GREAT ENTERTAINMENT DANCING, MOVIES
CELEBRITY HOUSE PARTIES
For Further Information & Reservations
Phone: 532-2541
Be Our Guest For a Day FREE LIMOUSINE SERVICE
ARIE ECKHAUS, Manifinf Director "*
Formerly of Scherf Manor of New York
ON THE OCEAN AT 41st STREET, MIAMI BEACH
Two Offices to Serve your Needs
^KURASH,
REALTORS
INC
Main Office 2429 Hollywood Blvd.
Phone 923-2461
Branch Office 7991 Johnson St.
Phone 966-9300 or 947-3332 Toll Free
Stanley S. Kurash Our Large Staff of
and Naomi R. Kurash Qualified Associates
Ready To Serve You.
Washington
FRUIT SHIPPERS
WATCH THIS PAPER FOR OPENING DATE!
Orders will be taken for the new
Crop Navels, Pink or White
Grapefruit for shipping.
Pure Orange and Grapefruit Juice
*
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BEACH
NOW IN HOLLYWOOD
JGl*. AT 450 NORTH PARK ROAD (Just across from the Hollywood Mall)
imnjj.j Phone 981-9192 Also four offices in Dade County to serve you.
Jack D. Gordon
PreS.d*r.;
Arthur H. Courshon
Chtirrrtn of th* Bosrd


lywooc
Page 3
RABBIS IN THE COMMUNITY
'
Spiritual World
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz
Hallandale Jewish Center
"I don't think I would over bo
happy without my rabbinical work.
RABBI HARRY t. SCHWARTZ
I can't LwagjM lH?inR without a
pulpit," says Kahbi Harry K.
Schwartz., newly apixjinted spirit-
ual leader for the Hallandale
Jewish Center.
This U the reason that al-
though the rabbi ostensibly came
to Florida to retire, he has served
throughout th.-> area as guest rabbi
since his arrival here. His love for
the pulpit made him realize that
he might an well take on a per-
manent i>ost even if only on a
part-time basis. And so before Ions
he and his wife will be moving to
Hallandale to bo closer to the-tem-
ple which he has been serving
since early September.
"Before I took on this new posi-
tion, I had served as guest rabbi
in dozens of congregations in the
area from Palm Beach to South j
Miami. Now I feel that I can [
hotter serve one community," says
Kahbi Schwartz, who revolved his
rabbinical training at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America i
and also holds Master of Hebrew
Literature and Doctor of Divinity (
degree*
Kahbi Schwartz occupied the \
pulpit at Congregation Beth te-
rse] in Hempstead, L.I., N.Y., for,
30 years and was often referred to
as the "Dean of Long bland
llano's." Besides his t/inple re- I
sensibilities, he was the founder
and organizer of the I-ong Island
Zionist region and was a member
of the Administrative Committee
f the Zionist Organization ol
America.
Here in Florida Kabbi Schwartz
is a member of the Rabbinical As-
sociation of Greater Miami and
ol the Southeastern Florida Re-
gion of the Rabbinkal Assembly.
He has served as the Rablmiical
Assembly representative on the
Synagogue Council of America and
was a member of its Social Jus-
tice Committee.
With all his honors through the
years, his eyes really light up
AUTHORIZED JOHNSON DEALER.
We service all popular OUTBOARDS
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BARRACUDA BOAT SALES
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when he speaks of his family. His
wife, Helen, he says, is a well-
VnoWn Jewish educator. She served
u principal of the rellgioui school
at Temple Roth Israel when- the
rabbi held the pulpit position. She
is Considered an authority on lit-
unrteal musk- and serves ns choir
director.
Speaking of his three boy* he
says, "These are children to be
proud of!" Joel, the oldest, is the
director of hematology at the
Coney Island Hospital in New
York. He is also on the statf of
Maimonides Hospital and a mem-
ber of the teaching staff at Brook-
lyn Downstate.
With all his activities," the
proud father says, 'he is a Sab-
bath observer. Even while he was
in the Air Force, he managed toI
switch his time around so that j
he could observe the Sabbath. My]
second son, Shalom, is also a Sab-
bath observer. He's a professor of
sociology and psychology at the
University of Wisconsin. At pres-
ent be is on leave of absence and
.caching at the Hebrew Univer-]
tty in Jerusalem. He's also an.
ordained rabbi."
Beryl, the youngest, is an at- <
torney in the District Attorney's l
office in Mineola. NY. A Hebrew
iChOlaT, he is also gifted musically.!
and li-d the choir for the High
Holy Dnvs in a synagogue in R >s- !
lyn, I..I..X.Y .
"I'm very happy with my new
ti mple affiliation and I think they!
are happy with me," says Rabbi
Schwartz. "We now have 700 [
memlM-rs here and with the new |
building we have everything avail-!
able for the congregants, so the
future looks bright for me and
tor the temple group."
In The Mail
KDITOR, riorldliui-Shofar:
A substantial bipartisan coalition
in the U.S. Senate served notice
a thou time ago that ii will op-
pose liberalization of tariff and
credits for the Soviet Union unless
that country rescinds its new
schedule Of prohibitive exis visas.
It is good to note that Sen.
Warren G. Magnuson (D-Wash. I
chairman of the Senate Commerce
Committee, who had original ly
sponsored a bill to grant most-
favored-nation status to the Soviet
Union has agreed to an amendment
by Sen. Henry M. Jackson (D-
Wash.), in which he would deny
this idea and credits to a nation
which would deny its citizens the
right to emigrate and impose out-
rageous exit fees.
I am glad to note that Florida
senators, Messrs. Gurney and
Chiles arc cosponsors of the Jack-
son amendment and we hope that
the readers of your paper will
write and commend these senators
for their interest and action.
The House has taken similar ac-
tion to back up this amendment. I
am sure that many of your read-
ers are familiar with the I ict that
the Jackson amendment was
strongly backed by the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry, an
umbrella organization of 34 na-
tional Ji wish organizations.
The leaders of this organization
met in Washington the latter part
of September and sent an open
letter to "resident Nixon urging
him not to move ahead with trade
concessions as long as the emula-
tion tax remains in force
Since the Soviet Union desires
trade relations with the United
States, protest letters to the Pres-
ident will strengthen his hand in
his dealings. These letters mast
continue and the coo|ieration of
your readers is urgently requested
as the condition of Soviet Jewry
is deteriorating at a rapid pace.
SAM J. PFRKY
Hollywood
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Page 4-
+Je*ldhncrSdKan shfr Hollywood
Friday. October 27, 1972
wJewisti Fleridian
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.B. 6th Street Telephone 373-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 920-6392
P.O. Box 2973, Miami, Florida 331C1
Fred K. Sjiochet Selma M. Thompson
Editor and Publisher Assistant to Publisher
MARION KEVINS. New Coordinator
The Jewlih Floridisn Don Not Guarantee The Kashrvth
Of The Merchandise Advertned In Ita Columns.
Published Bi-Weeijlv by the Jewish Floridian
Stcor.d-CTass Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
Jewish Welfare Federation op Greater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Wiilens, Chairman; Rom Berkerman, Ben
Salter, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atkin,
Tha Jewish Floridian haa abaorbed the Jewieh Unity and the Jewleh Weekly.
Member of the Jewieh Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide Newe Service, National Editorial Aaaociation, American Association
st English-Jewish Newspapera. and th Florida Preee Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Ares) One Year $2.00
Out of Town 1.1- jn Requeet
Volume 2
Friday, October 27, 1972
Number 25
19 HESHVAN 5733
MATTER OF FACT *'*#**
Contradictions Reveal Dilemma
Israel's Defense Minister, Moshe Dayan, in a recent
speech for local consumption, reaffirmed his belief
that Israel today has the kind of borders she can best live
with. There is no further point, he made it quite clear, in
talking about interim agreements and the nation should
get used to the situation in the Middle East as it exists,
coming to grips with such problems as living with Arabs
in the occupied territories and the question of their em-
ployment in Israel.
At about the same time. Foreign Minister Abba Ebons
annual statement to the 27th General Assembly of the
United Nations was regarded as assuring Egypt, in par-
ticular, that everything standing between them was sub-
ject to negotiation and that an interim agreement on re-
opening the Suez Canal was the best way to start the
peace process. Israel's preoccupation with mamtcrining the
ceasefire until peace was obtained, to quote Mr. Ebon,
"did not seek to perpetuate the ceasefire lines or freeze
the existing situation forever."
The seeming contradictions in speeches by two of
Israel's highest ranking officials is indicative of the dilemma
that continues to confront the Jewish state in its efforts to
find a solution in the Middle East which can bring peace
at last to that troubled area. In spite of this, there seem to
be some faint signs that behind the rhetoric including
Sadat's recent proposal on the Palestinian question which
was rejected summarily by Golda Meir there may be
some genuine attempts at reaching agreement
Some Interesting Developments
The difficulties being encountered by synagogues
across the country continue to lead to some interesting
developments which, if not exactly a trend, certainly bear
further study by religious observers.
In Salt Lake City, the two Jewish congregations, one
Reform and one Conservative, have just completed a mer-
ger. In Chicago, conversion classes this fall semester will
be a joint effort of the Conservative and Reform rabbinical
regional bodies. And in Manchester, N.H., the Reform and
Conservative congregations have set up a joint Junior-
Senior Religious High School. Discussions continue in
other cities, not only where there are few Jews but, also,
significantly, in much larger cities where the pressures
for joint action might not appear to be so great.
How To Vote
November 7 is Election Day. Jews traditionally vote in
much higher percentaaes than the rest of those registered
Though we are a small minority, because of our interest in
elections, our voting can be quite significant in terms of
results.
Much has been written about the "Jewish Vote" in the
upcoming presidential election. Though Jews in America
m the majority traditionally vote for the more liberal of
candidates it is not a case of unanimity. We basically
vote our conscience.
There are issues in this campaign which may be con-
sidered strictly Jewish issues Israel, Soviet Jewry, Pref-
erential Quotas; there are other issues which are not typi-
cally "Jewish," but which have been a traditional concern
of ours, such as war on povertv. Welfare Reform, Equal
Rights, Individual Freedom and Separation of Church and
State to mention just a few.
And then there are those thinas which concern us. not
only as Jews, but as Americans Vietnam War, Equal Edu-
cation for All, Social Security Benefits, Help for pur Elderly
and Crime on our Streets.
How we vote is between ourselves and our conscience.
All that is asked is that you study the issues and that you
vote.
DETROIT, Mich. In this
bizarre campaign, it Ls common
to hear liberal Democrats con-
soling themselves for the hor-
rors of 1972 with happy thougnts
about 1976. They believe Spiro
T. Agnew will lie the Republi-
can nominee four yean from
now; and they are sure they
can make mincemeat of him.
Maybe they are right. Further-
more. 197(i is a long, long way
ahead, nut it really is time, all
the same, for someone to point
out that the vice president is
more formMahls political figure
than the liberal Democrats like
to think.
SOME DAYS ago, this re-
porter flew out to Detroit with
t' e vice president and caught
his act here. It was an immense
surprise to anyone who had
never seen Mr. Agnew on the
mump before. Nothing; could
have been less like this picture
of Spiro Agnew conveyed by his
stumbling efforts in 1968, and
his ornate and violent oratory
of 1970.
In Detroit,, he was dignified
without being pompous, fervent
without being shrill, effective
without being tricky. He estab-
lished such a rapport with his
main audience the leaders of
the influential Polish-American
Congress that they spontane-
ously rose and sang the Polish
greeting song, "May You Live a
Thousand Years'." when the vice
president was leaving the hall.
THE SPEECH was of the
type that all politicians reserve
for such occasions, with a lot in
it about Polish heroes like Co-
pernicus, Kosciusko and Marie
Sklodowska Curie. But aside
from pronouncing Kosciusko's
name three different ways in
succession a pardonable slip
he delivered the speech quite
admirably. And there was loud
cheering when the vice presi-
dent talked about what it was
like to be an ethnic.
"I am of Greek heritage," he
began, "and I am as proud to
be an American of Greek ances-
try as you are to be Americans
of Polish ancestry." That was
the bit that really led to May
You Live a Thousand Years!"
at the end.
MAYBE ONE should not have
been quite so surprised. After
all. far and away the two best
speeches at the two political
convent :ons were delivered by
Sen. Edward Kennedy and the
vice president.
All the same, one could not
help thinking, with some aston-
ishment, about how effective
Spiro T. Agnew might be on
serious issues.
He should be exceptionally ef-
fective, if he ever tackles real
issues in the same tone, and
with the same manner, that he
showed before the Polish-Amer-
icans in Detroit.
THERE IS another aspect of
the vice president, too, that
ought to be of great interest to
all serious political handicap-
pers. including the many who
are vitriollcally anli-Agnew. By
all the sign, this year will so
a massive defection of ethnic
voters fr-'-m the Democratic
Party. And Spiro Agnew can
best be described as the super-
ethnic on the American scene
today.
"Ethnic" is a word he hates,
and rightly, because it is a way
of classifying people somewhat
like Theodore Roosovlt's angry
phrase, "hyphenated American-
But he is our super-ethnic, all
the same, both by nature and
by inheritance.
HIS FATHER was an immi-
grant, who made his living on a
grocery truck in the depress (in
vc,i;-s and never cast a Republi-
can vote. The family scrimped
and saved to send the son
through college. He became a
Republican as he moved up in
the world. Bat IWltfM has a*
the views that arc causing so
many faithfully Democratic
e'hni;- voters to recoU in horror
from Son. George McGovern.
In other words, he believes in
hard work. He is intensely pa-
triotic in a way that is now old--
fashioned except among eth-
nics. Ho is deeply proud of hav-
ing fought through the worst
time at Bastog-ie. and of hav-
ing been part of the U.S. arm-
ored thrust Into Nazi Germany.
He also thinks it is high time
to do tlii'vs about the label of
"the rich people's party"
which is the main ethnic objc-.
tion to the Republicans.
THE VICE president was
chosen in 1968 solely because
he happened to fit into the
President's electoral strategy.
Continued on Page 12-
J\S
Max lerner
Sees U
NEW YORK, N Y Sen. George McG.iv. rn has gene to
the media urgently with his detailed plan for getting out of
\ ietnam. but it availeth not. They have been full of Henry
Kissingers verbal marathon in Paris with Le Due Tho. The
news of one candidate's actual negotiations is bound to cro.-s
up tho news of another candidate's mere plans.
It has been a media election campaign thus far but not in
the sense we usually mean the clever media use that makes
the difference between victory and defeat. Actually Richard
Nixon as candidate has made little irse of TV and radio since
his nomination. It ls a media election in a quite different
sense one based on the fact that it has become an election
with one overwhelming issue the image of Sen. George Mc-
Govern. From this flows another fact that the original image
and counterimage of McGovern were shaped in the media,
largely on TV.
The decisive media phase came early. The whole funereal,
zany convention performance what Norman Mailer calls "St.
George and the Godfather" was pretty much finished by tho
end of the Republican National Convention. The wierd Eagleton
episode merely nailed down the coffin. Since then, the valiant
effort of the strategists and speechwriters and columnists to un-
do the McGovern image has failed.
IT IS sic case history by experts in both fields the media'and elec-
tions. No past election comes close to it in meaning.' The hap-
less McGovern cheerleaders consoled- themselves with the fond
conceit that the poolsters are disastrously, decisively wrong
Visions of 1948 Truman sugarplums dance in their heads. They
fail to see that the current election turns not on the mis-
reading of a groundswell for the underdog which observers
failed to pick up in time, as with Truman, but on an image
the McGovern imageso early and solidly fixed that nothing
seems to shake it
IT WAS THE CONVENTIONS that were the TV image
makers. The M:Govern strategists counted on his convention
exposure to make him nationally familiar. Aside from botching
the timing for his acceptance speech they didn't count on an-
other image that would also get continuous national exposure
that of a convention crowded with young men and women
whose profiles struck heartland America as too far-out, and
whose speeches scared the daylights out of it.
All that Mr. Nixon had to do at his own convention was to
make sure that every Republican speech drove home this far-
out image to a convention audience in prime time, using codal
phrases skillfully to achieve the desired effect. Most of the
commentators wrote that the Nixon convention was a bore.
Indeed it was, if you judged it on the level of color, vividness
and intellectual excitement. But it was meant as preparation
and rehearsal for the campaign itself and it succeeded. The
Republicans have used its results ever since. Never in my mem
ory has the media coverage of a brace of conventions so com-
pletely clinched the outcome of an election not even with the
Johnson-Goldwater campaign of 1964.
b I* -Cr
IT IS TRI"E, as almost every Washington correspondent
complains, that President Nixon has built a wall ("a mile high."
Kays one i between himself and the reporters. Mr. Nixon has
become even warier about the press corps during the camp.:
itself. They prod him about it at every chance, and he prods
back, implying that they are hostile to him and that some of
them use a "double standard" in judging him and his opponent.
This is par for the course in every administration But Mr.
Nixon's real motive is. given the big current lead, he doesi
want tho risk of a give-and-take with a very critical pre.-s
corps, and certainly doesn't want the TV spotlight on such fluid
dangerous occasions. He prefers media situations where he
in control.
He It most in control when he is alone on TV, or in an in-
formal setting with a fairly sympathetic group of questioner.
There is little doubt, as Ben Bagdikian puts. it. that TV has
become the "presidential medium" and with no, other President
so complitely as with Mr. Nixon. The image it leaves is immedi-
ate: It takes the editorials and commentaries a couple of days to
catch up. It conveys at once closeness and authority. And sum
Mr. Nixon links it largely with some present or looming event
Ul the exercise of his office, he can be light-years ahead of
McGovern, who must function only as critical outsider.
Somewhere during the campaign, I suspect at the very
-Start. McGovern lost touch with a very large segment of the
people, and thus far has not regained it. It Ls the wall that Mc-
Govern himself and his adviserrs built, not Mr. Nixon. There s
no point to hand-wringing about it by the Democrats. But there
are sane lessons in it for them, if they are to save their con-
gressional and Senate seats and salvage themselves as a party.


Friday, October 27, 1972'

+Jt**istinork/gan Shof.r of Hollywood
Page S-
. n
four years ago, many of us
never dreamed we'd be supporting
President Nixon in 1972.
Two things have happened. The Democrats have nominated George McGovern for President"a man who deeply
52*2? u*'And President Nixon, since assuming office, has pleasantly surprised and impressed us with his performance.'
We like his open-door policy to China... his determination to maintain a militarily strong America, especially in such
troubled areas as the Mideast... his program of aid to Israel (more than all previous Presidents combined)... his strong
opposition to a quota system in any shape, manner or form... and much, much more.
Because we like what President Nixon has doneand are disturbed by what Senator McGovern proposes to dowe
have formed the Concerned Citizens for the Re-election of the President. Many of our members are either Democrats
or Independents. Consider what a few have to say:

"For alt of my adult life I have been an enrolled Democrat and have consistently voted
for the candidates of the Democratic party. This year I feel committed as an
American and a Jew to assist in the re-election of President Richard Nixon.
"Aftermy recent meeting with the President, I am more convinced than ever that he
alone offers the best hope for a continued constructive relationship with the Soviet
Union that all Americans applaud. Furthermore, the President's fulfillment of his
promises of support for Israel leads me to believe that he is a man to be trusted by all of
us. 1 k now President Nixon is personally dealing with the Soviet leaders to effect an
end to the onerous exit tax placed on Jewish emigrants and I believe that he will be
successful. As an American and as a Jew, I wholeheartedly support the President's
re-election." a-^, ** uwht,
aron, N.Y.

"Even though I am a registered Democrat, I feel the only honest thing that I can do is to
put my home and my country before my political party.
"As a Jew with a lifetime background of proven work for my people wherever they are,
I cannot forgot for one moment how much good President Nixon has done for our
people and the people of the State of Israel. His most recent show of courage was the
veto the United States cast against the Arab motion to censure Israel in the Security
Council of the United Nations.
"I pledge my support to help re-elect President Nixon. No one has ever deserved it
more.
Louis tayar.
Lot A.>g.l.., California
"Although a lifelong Democrat, I now support the re-election of President Nixon. The
Presidents philosophy of government calls for constructive change without
endangering our basic institutions; progress without disruption and a pursuit of
justice which recognizes the freedom of all. The record of the present Administration
in establishing meaningful contacts with the superpowers, Russia and China, had
immeasurably increased the possibilities for a period of peaceful co-existence. The
record of his Administration in extending military and economic aid to Israel has
been outstanding-? 1.2 billion-surpassing the record of all previous administrations
combined.
"Because of this Administration's successful record in foreign policy, especially in the
Middle East, its achievements on the domestic front, and its prospects for molding
a strong and vibrant society, I urge that President Nixon be re-elected.".
Na Tack. N.w Yark ,
Tve had the pleasure oTmeeting recently whh President Richard Nixon as I have on
other important occasions. In addition to the President, I have also met with many
other members of his Administration. I have found the President readily accessible
and sympathetic to our views on Israel and Soviet Jewry just to mention two
important issues. I have found implicit faith in him; I trust him completely. He has
been a man of his word and I will do everything in my power to re-elect him."
Or. William A. Waalar,
Savannah, Oaarala
"As a lifelong Democrat, lam very happy to endorse the re-election of President
Nixon. His achievements in domestic and foreign affairs make him one of the greatest
Presidents in the history of our country. He is a recognized world leader who has
contributed greatly to detente in the world.
"The President told me recently of his abiding commitment to Israel and stated he
would never impose a settlement on Israel." samuai arhbara,
aorta. Illinois
"My name is David Luchins. I am a young Democrat, 24 years old. During the seven
months of the Democratic primaries I served on Senator Hubert Humphrey's
National Campaign staff as coordinator of his effort in the Jewish community.
"Many of the young people who worked with me for Humphrey's nomination are now
supporting the President's re-election. As Americans, as Democrats, or as Jews, we
cannot support the candidacy of Senator George McGovern.
"When I attended the Democratic National Convention, I saw for myself that
delegates were selected on a quota basis. I believe this is profoundly un-American.
President Nixon has declared himself against quotas of all kinds and has taken
effective steps to prevent the imposition of quotas in government and private industry."
avMUrthMM.
Albany, Now Tark
The Concerned Citizens campaign needs your support. We urge you to join with us in pledging your support and voting
for the re-election of President Nixon.
Concerned Citizens for the Re-election of the President.
Murray Alman
Dr. Seymour Alterman
Mrs. David Berg
Mrs. Be a Bernstein
Norman Braman
Mr*. Norman Ciment
Herbert Diamond
Gerald Falick
Jack Oaines
Abe Goldmen
Melvin Greenberg
Eugene Hyman
Mortimer May
Arthur Meltzer
Albert Morrison, Jr.
Lawrence C. Porter
Robert Russell
Sanford Rywell
Herbert Lee Simon
NedYaffe
Chairman, -
Max FisherDetroit, Michigan
Co-Chairmen,
Samuel RothbergPeoria, Illinois
Dr. Wm. WexlerSavannah, Georgia
Samuel HausmanNew York, New York
Vice-Chairmen,
Joseph MeyerhoffBaltimore, Maryland
Louis BoyarLos Angeles, California
Albert SpiegelLos Angeles, California
Taft SchreiberLos Angeles, California
Jay PritzkerChicago, Illinois
Albert AdelmanMilwaukee, Wisconsin
Rabbi Herschel Schacter-Bronx, N.Y.
Leonard GoldfinePhiladelphia, Penna.
David LitwinNewark, New Jersey
.a.*.. laMiealaWpM>".
a Mat Praia*. H SM-, Mm, t. L
, t MM.M1 mi r-il.li all Sj, MfcH C


Page 6
VJewHt fhridHani "d shofr of Hollywood
Friday. October 27, 1972
JFS Moves To
Larger Quarters
Early this month Jewish Family I
Service o:' Broward County relo-
cated in new and larger ofi ires
Suites 211 and 212) al 1SK)9 Har-
rison St. rloHywoxL Although the
i'iicv has occupied offices in the
1 larrison Suvet building for a
nhcT of yews, Its rapid growth
. i ivccnl years necessitated a
iow to laager quarters In the!
uildil K.
The professional c tunseling staff
- r o be 'ii increased to meet
the (rrowinu demand for the serv-
es pi ivided by this family agency
services pruvid d primarily to
the mount ng Jewish population of
] troward Count}
The stresses and pressures of
pri -ei t daj urban Ii in: are being
. ; i etc in the growing instability
l Jev Ish II Ii America, Divorce
ii"- and intermarriages are ris-
.1. mon ind moi o ehUdren an
awn into the drug culture,
hoi.l dn -out* are becoming
comn onp! ice, people are
ucstionins, previously accepted
ues and standards Older cltl-l
- ire i" a I veM by changing
..'wins a- well as th<- special
laptnt mi- precipitated by on-
'. i.nin ago.
In iu effort in help people solve'
their problems, Jewish Family
Service continues to emphasize the
development of family strength
and unity whi^h has always been
a powerful force in Jewish life.
The professional counseling staff
of Jewish Family Service and its
supporti\e services play a major
role in enabling troubled families
to generate their own solutions to
problems :i*id thus Insure the con-
tinuity of the bask tenets of Jew-
ish life
Although some families do work
out their problems on their own.
an increasing number have learned
tin' value of professional help in
working out mounting tensions and
anxieties. A medical symptom, di-
agnosed and treated early, fre-
quently prevents the development
i.i :i i i .us Illness, So it is with
family strife! Many difficulties can
be understood and worked through
in a few counseling sessions.
Appointments for confidential in-
tci \ lews may he arranged by tele-
phoning Jewish Family Sendee of
Broward Cuinty. a beneficiary of
the Jewish Welfare Federation of
Greater Hollywood and North
Broward and the United Fund of
Broward County.
Hollywood Section. |
NCJW Activities
Hollywood Section. National
Council of Jewish Women, will
hold its first social meeting of the
year Monday, at 11:30 a.m. in
Temple Beth 3, 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Mali Jongg and various card
tames will be played: members
are asked to bring their own sets
and cards. Refreshments will be
served and prizes awaHed. Clarice
Mendi laohn and Helen Zadig are
in Charge of reservations.
At the regular meeting of the
group Monday. Nov. (>. at 12:30
p.m.. Mrs Kdna L. Kcssler will
talk on "You Too Can Be an Art-
ist." This meeting will take place
at Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St.
An artist, teacher, lecturer and
interior designer, Mrs. Kessler is
includ'd in '"Who's Who of Amor-,
lean Art." "Who's Who of Ameri-
can Women." and "Who's Who of
the South and Southwest."
ui.uWVuViV'**' .....***o^^MMA^M^MV)At
Girl Scouts 'Helping Hands Day'
To Benefit Salvation Armv Center
The Broward Countv Girl Scout;
null II, Inc.. a Unit -d Fund
( i- devoting i' annual
"Hi Iping Hands Day" this year to
neflt the Salvation Army's Men's
Social Service Center in its pro-'
ii foi homeless and handicap-1
men p1 1901 W. Broward i
Jllvd., Fort Lauderdale.
Thi< department of the Salva-
ii ,! .\ my does noi re seive any
1 om the gen-
:! I ti'.' Salvation Army
th Uniti l Fund ol Broward
Count bm i~ entirelj II-sup-
li
o in donati ns of
c.othing, shoes, furniture, bric-a-
a< te., brought into th......ntei
its 1 trucks or through its 127
\i placi d at strategic
limit the county. This
leria processed and then
M in tii' army's four thrift
or sale. In other words.
in Salvation Army uses the sal-
agim ol used and waste mati
to sah age human li'- es
The Salvation Army has receiv-
ed permission to place trucks at
rrters throughont
the county on Saturday. The Girl
Scouts, who previously distributed
iit n siddhces In these areas
. i colli ft Ihese bus and take
. :n i the Salvation \ i truck
..Tii. al "ii near si loca Ion.
The Mi i;'. Social Service Cen-
at 1901 VV Broward Blvd., will
as a reecp niter
|fi 000 ; 'I ids ol
hit ^ and oods wei e c dli ted
thi scouts und n i aiTd for re
sale by the men of the Social Serv-
ice Center.
The full coo|teration of the pub-
lic of Broward County is necessary
t" make the Girl Scouts' "Helping
Hands Day" a success, and aid the
Salvation Aimy's Men's Social
Service Center program for home-
less and handlcanped men.
Minyan Club Breakfast
At Temple Sinai Sunday
The first Minyan Club of Tem-
ple Sinai breakfast, which wili take
place Sunday at 9 a.m. in the
temple, will be sponsored by Mr.
-Vnd Mrs. Adolph Sshonfeld in
honor of their wedding anniver-
sary and Mr. Schonf eld's 80th
birthday.
At -the breakfast now officers
and board members will be In-
Stalled. Officers to be installed
are Adolph Schonfeld. president:
Oscar Wachtcl, first vice presi-
dent: Sydney Holtzman, second
vice president. and Dr.
Isaac Schonfeld. secretary-treas-
urer. Members of the board of di-
rectors are Albert Freeman, I.ouis
Holland, Da\ id Podvesker. Isidore
Uingler. Nathan Widlitz. Mel
Reiser ami Samuel Miller.
scene aWnd
by Marj Nevins
* *ir*irN% VV^^%*yV^lVVV%N^fVS%*%A%*^^VVV*VV^^^^
Do you know Su/i? She s blond and pretty and drives a
bright given Volkswagen. I like to think she goes to Broward
Commutiit> College where she maintains a 3.5 average. She
goes with a boy who attends the University of Miami. I'm not
oo sure whether she's tall or short, as I only see her sitting
down behind the wheel of her little car. In fact I'm not even
sure that -he's Su/i. I only know that's the name on the front
of the car that I saw her driving. But it could be .
All this is part of my fantasy world, for I fit stories te
licen.-e pates. Not the Conventional ";0-niimbor.s on the rear end
of most of our Broward ears, hut those tantalizing front end
markers -ported by so many cars today.
There are Joan, Honey. Dick and Bon. Then we find the
doubles like Joan and Bon or Jane and Dick. The most tantaliz-
ing though are those like Lover Boy, Dearest or WOW. Thev
make the beat stories for me.
Like Lover Boy. To whom Ls he lover boy? Is it his image
of himself or did a girl give him the license plate as a gift of
love? He has dark hair, needs a shave and drives a red ear with
blue striping and peace signs on it. I. personally, think he
bought the plate himself.
Or how about that WOW? Are those her initials or is it an
exclamation? Is that gray-hatred middle-aged woman with the
70 Chewy Wamla Olive Wallaby? Or is it her husband William
Ogden Wallaby's ear? Or is she just saying WOW to the passing
world? I prefer to think the latter as I watch her going on her
way. I think that her life is really WOW and'in her way she
teals the need to tell it to the world. Anyway, I got the message
if no one else did.
Then there are the myriad of cars that salute oncoming
drivers with Shalom. Love or Peace. It makes me feel good. I
think of what nice people must be in those particular cars riding
along the Hollywood streets. Shalom to you!!'.:!
BITS AND PIKCES: Men's Club and Sisterhood of lempie
Sinai are honoring Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Widlitz at a dance
Nov. 5 Temple Sold Youth Croup is planning a weekend
retreat at a dude ranch in January.
Kosher sweet Chiffon
Margarine.
Good enough to fool even
a Jewish Mother Nature.
'Market Day' Proceeds Are
For Sisterhood Projects
ol the Mar eel l lay"
I of Tem-
N rV. 5, from
] to 6 n. will go in sup
I- ol th Si |-
! the rcligioui
i tee for the
B iths will be set uo;
oi -ii i i lable will be
n< cl th s, rum-
booi i cords, china m
ban ln .i le Item

Mi Mil in i"i' edman is chair-
thi tit. which will be
i lb. temple, 1351 S. 14th
ochal man is Mi- Bernard
\i Milton Jacobs 11 prasi-
Hi
Ah, how sweet it is. And how lucky you are.
Because Chiffon's the only Sweet Unsalted Margarine available
in a soft form. Plus you get 7* off if you clfo out the coupon.
So you've got the best of everything: A Kosher spread that's good
enough to fool Mother Nature, in two serving cups
good looking enough to put on your table.
Look for Sweet Chiffon* in the bright blue carton with the two
one half pound cups.

Save 7< on
new Sweet
nsalted Chiffon
argarine
(r We redeem thl non-transferable coupon for fact
m plus 3C handling only if you obtained it from
. ".^K'"1* ''"s l,em lnv0l piOKinj purchase Ot
lcie"J*, "*" W*"Quest. Void when presented by broker or
"*LZ17V* In.."""".'1!?' '"" |tne'*se restricted.
-.".w iil?",/M.'' M'" coupon ,0 *n"'son Clayton
"y 9o 7*
I
I
II
I
I
l
1774 HP
7

Friday. October 27, 1972
nationa
"PJewisti fhridi&n Shofar of Hollywood
Page 7
RESTAURANT ^
NeJ!S!f! Sl09Qn S a mTr P*"1 f ,he ""Nation's continuing, na-
tionwjde effort to improve hospitality and courtesy in restaurants and other
loodservice establishments.
Those firms listed on these paqes are taking the lead in intensifying their
efforts to be especially pleasant. They promise unusual service and food as
the eating out dnve of the 46 billion dollar industry offers to side track dull
loutine cooking and washing dishes and to substitute the fun of eatina
cut. *
With cafeterias, drive-ins, coffee shops, restaurants and gourmet dinner
yhouses sharing in the "WFRE GLAD YOU'RE HERE" effort, the 53-year-old
National Restaurant Association has launched its most successful promotion
effort in history.
South Floiida's restaurant industry is one of the most important in the total
economy, and many of the dining places here again have captured top honors
from magazines, newspapers and most important from the general
public for the guality of their food and service.
With 3.4 million employees, the foodservice industry including hospital,
school and in-plant leeding ranks fourth in the country in retail sales.
October is a good month to test the hospitality climate in a restaurant of
your choice.
Every
day is a holiday
when you
eat out
I'HINi \BI I> IIIICOI 4.11 THE COIRTESY > THE HMIOHIM, 1IESTAI ItAXTS
BAVARIAN VILLAGE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
1401 North Federal Highway, Hollywood
922-7321
CAFE DU BEAUJOLAIS
3134 N.E. 9th St.
Ft. Lauderdale 566-1416
CHEF ARTURO'S RESTAURANT
Italian Cuisine
6629 Taft. St., Hollywood 927-0405
THE CLOCK RESTAURANT
2300 North Federal Highway, Dania 522-9486
C0PA RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
939 North Federal Highway, Hollywood
927-04O5
DANTE'S RESTAURANT
2871 N. Federal Highway
Ft. Lauderdale 564-6666
"HELLO DELI" RESTAURANT
New Diplomat Mall
Hallandale 920-3400
HENRY'S CHINA HOUSE RESTAURANT
Open 24 Hours
2600 S. Federal Highway
Ft. Lauderdale 522-9944
HONG KONG RESTAURANT
Chinese Restaurant
5060 W. Federal Highway
Ft. Lauderdale- 771-3776
THE HUNGRY U RESTAURANT INC.
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Open 7 Days
1451 S. State Road No. 7 Phone 987-9860
THE ISLANDER RESTAURANT
1121 S. Federal Hwy.
Dania 925-8293
LA NORMANDIE RESTAURANT
Cuisine Francais
129 N. Federal Highway, Dania 927-1889
MOY'S CHINESE RESTAURANT
Lunch Dinner Late Supper
Open 11:30 A.M. 1:00 A.M. Take-Out
Young Circle On U.S. 1 922-4273
OLD HEIDELBERG RESTAURANT
In Front of Hollywood Dog Trade
Hallandale 922-1331
RONZO'S CAPRI PIZZA
6329 Miramar Parkway, Miramar 901-4627
Take out and Delivery
SEA AIR TOWERS RESTAURANT
3725 South Ocean Drive, Hollywood
Phone 920-9192
SNEAKY PETE'S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
1010 S. Federal Highway
Across from the Gulfstream Park
Hallandale 925-0806
SOUTH PACIFIC POLYNESIAN RESTAURANT
N. Federal Highway on U.S. 1
Hallandale 923-2421
STUART'S RESTAURANT
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1841 N. Young Circle, Hollywood
Phone 929-2218
VILLA DiGIORGIO
ITALIAN RESTAURANT
Open 5 P.M. 1 A.M.
918 S. Federal Highway
Across from Gulf Stream Race Track
VILLA MARIA ITAUAN RESTAURANT
124 S. Federal Highway, Hallandale
Phone 923-9454
RESTAURANT SUFPUOtS
SANFORD SUPPLY COMPANY, INC
2617 Park Rd., Pembroke Park, Hallandale
Phone: 961-0496
TUXEDO RESTAURANT SUPPLY CO.
Restaurant aV Bar Supplies
545 N. Andrews Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale
Phone: 763-7641
V
Every day is a holiday
when you eat out
^
/e


Page 8
vjenisfi fhrkflir "<* Shof.r of Hollywood
Friday. Octobor 27, 1972
Historical Background On Important Issues In News
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The follow 'in*
imcle is pan of a series of short fea-
tures written by members of the Ency-
clopedia Judaism staff in Jerusalem
especially for the jew.sh Telegraphic
Agency. The featurettes offer an in-
sight into the historical background of
important issues in the ncurs.)
Uganda Hrk been in the news in
recent months for many reasons
including the break with LsraeT
and President Irii Amin's recent
statement sympathizing with Hit-
ler*) annihilation of tho Jews.
Uganda first came into Jewish
history in 1903. At that time, the
young Zionist movement was mak-
ing its first steps toward obtaining
permission to establish a Jewish
homeland in Palestine, but the
Turkish rulers were not to make
any concessions in this direction.
The British Colonial Secretary Jo-
seph Chamberlain, who was im-
pressed by Theodor Herzl's pres-
entation fir the need of a Jewish
homeland, offered the Zionist or-
ganization the possibility of estab-
lishing an autonomous Jewish col-
ony in British East Africa. This
was known as the "Uganda
scheme."
The British government for-
mally proposed a Jewish settle-
ment in which the administration
of all internal affairs would be
autonomous under the supreme
control of the British government.
The British, apart from wanting
to help Jews suffering the pogroms
in Russia, were interested in at-
tracting manpower and capital to
develop the area. Herzl, who tend-
ed to accept the proposal, wanted
to help the East European masses
to prevent them from dispersing in
many countries and to create po-
litical ties with the British gov-
ernment which he thought would
help strengthen his position in the
negotiations on Eretz Israel.
The proposal was strongly op-
posed by the Russian Zionists and
the controversy threatened to
split the Zionist movement. The
two sides were only reconciled the
following year after the British
government withdrew iU offer.
However, had the Jews taken up
the offer, they would not have
been at the mer^y of Amin. TTie
boundaries of East Africa have
changed and the area suggested to
the Jews is now part 0f Kenya.
(c). 1S72 Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
FREE BOOKLET
"FAMILIAR
JEWISH WORDS
AND EXPRESSIONS"
Itni Hr fmr htm
pack*. ***kl*t t*:
CALVERT DISTILLERS CO.
Room 350
375 Park Avenue
New York, N.Y. 10022
$62.5 Million Sales Agreement With Israel Signed
WASHINGTON. DC. The
I" S. Department of Agriculture
has announce:! the signing of a
Public Law 480 agreement with
Israel providing for the sale of
$62.5 million worth of U.S. to d-
grains, wheat and or flour, edi-
ble vegetable oil and tobacco.
Participating in the signing
ceremony at the I'.S. Depart-
ment of State in Washington
were Ambassador Yitzhak Rubin
of Israel and I'.S. Assistant Sec-
retary of State Joseph S. BaSOO.
The Title I. dillnr Credit
Bcreement provides for $41.6 mil-
lion worth (about 650.000 met-
ric tons or 25.6 million bushels)
of feedgrains, $1R.9 million
worth (about 230.000 metric
metric tons of 7.34 n:ili<>n bush-
els i of wheat or what equiva-
lent in flour. $3.6 million worth
about 15.000 metric tons or 33.1
million 'Kxindsl of edible vege-
table oil. and $400,000 worth
(about 200 metric tons or 441.-
000 pounds! of tobacco.
Supply period Is ali'ii.lir
YOST 1!'7S. Sales will lie mode
by private I'.S. traders on a
ni'iitlLscrimiiiatorv basis. Pur-
chase authorizations lll be an-
nounced as isftued.
During negotiation of this
agreement, the government of
[srai 1 announced it will con-
tinue to carry out its agricultu-
ral self-help program, further
increasing food production
through intensive use of exist-
ing cropland, improving the fa-
c:,:ti's for the storage and dis-
tribution of food commodities,
and emphasizing adaptive n -
search to develop new high
yielding crop varities.
Ambassador Yitzhak Rabin of Israel and U.S. Assistant
Secretary of State Joseph Sisco sign Public Law 480, an
agreement with Israel providing for the sale of $62.5 mil-
lion worth of agricultural products during the calendar
year 1973.
Win with Sanka
2
J* NEW YORK
Pan Am makes the going greater
everyday to more cities in Europe than any other airline.
jlsrael Sweepstakes
L'Chayim! Enjoy all the good tasting coffee you want, any time
delicious Sanka Coffee with 97% of the Caffein taken out.
ROUND
TRIP
FARES
Pan Am
You spend 14 to 21 glorious days abroad. You jet Pan Am to London,
Paris or Rome; connecting jet to Israel. Stop over privileges in many
European countries.
plus hotelINTERtCONTINENTAL figs
LUXURIOUS i/in7io#iln*OS
ACCOMMODATIONS j|CI^SQlen2^"^
for one week
for two people-'
Overlooking the Old City-it's one of the worlds moat exciting hotel*
OFFICIAL RULES ENTER AS OFTEN AS YOU LIKE/NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
1. Um entry blank or write your name
and address clearly on a plain piece
Of peper 3" x 5".
2. Enclose your entry with any of th*
following: One inner seal from any size
Instant Sanka*. Freeze-Oried Sanka*
or the cod* number from the top of
the can of around Sankafor with the
word SANKA printed in plain block
letters on a piece of plain paper, 3"5".
3. Mail to: SANKA COFFEE.
P.O. Box 4443
Grand Central Station
New York. New York 10017
4. Vou may enter as often as you
wish, but each entry must be mailed
In a separate envelope.
5. All entries must be postmarked not
later than midnight. Dec 15. 1972 and
receive I not later than Dec. 22. 1972.
6. Winner of prize described below
will be selected by blindfold drawing
on Dec 26. 1972 and will be promptly
notified by mail. Prize is transferable
but not redeemable for cash, and
must ae redeemed within one year of
above date.
7. The prize consists of: 2 round trip
fares from New York to Israel via Pan
American Airways and connecting let
Plus room accommodation* for 2
people for one week at Hotel.Inter-
continental Jerusalem. Your air tickets
give 14to21 days abroad with stopover
privileges in many European cities.
8. Sweepstakes is open to all resi-
dents of the United States except
Idaho. Georgia and Washington, and
employees of General Foods Corpora-
tion. Its subsidiaries, advertising
agencies. |udglng staff, and their
families. Missouri residents are re
quired to send only their names and
addressee.
*. Any liability far federal, state and
local taxes will be the responsibility
of the winner.
10. NO PUftCHASE NECESSARY.
11. Void where prohibited, tax**) or
restricted by law.


Friday. October 27, 1972
MmM th+Minr and Shotar of Hollywood
Page 9-
Mrs. Morton Levin Chairs Torah Fund
Residence Hall Campaign Kickoff Day
The Florida Branch of th M. ..
The Florida Branch of the Na-
tional Women's League of the
I'nited Synagogue of America held
its annual Torah Fund-Residence
Hall Campaign Kickoff Day re-
cently with Mrs. Morton Levin of
Temple Beth Shalom, Hollywood,
as chairman.
Mrs. Levin is also branch vice
vesirtot and Torah Fund Resi-
dence Hall chairman. Serving with
her on Uic conm;ttee were Mrs.
David Edelstcin. Mrs. Fred B'ank.
Mrs. Arthur J. Brown, Mrs. Albert
Solo, Mrs. Abe Meyer, Mrs. Je-
rome Gilbert and Mrs. Sheldon
Cend/ier.________________________
Dr. Sackett To Be
Breakfast Speaker
At Temple Beth El
Dr. Walter W. Sackett, Jr..
physician and surgeon, will speak
Sunday during a breakfast at 9:30,
a.m. in the Tobin Auditorium of i rom ,he seminary's program. Mrs.
I' mple Beth El, 1351 S. 14th Ave. Ja<* w<,lfst( '> Of N,.rth Mia-i
Dr. Sackett, who will dismiss I ,Jca"n currcnt'v terv'hg as presi-
"Medicine, Morality and Ethnics:' d"nt of th<* F'or'.da branch.
The Right To Live The Right | "
To Die." dealing with the timely
issues on abortion and euthanasia.
is appearing in conjunction with
:he temple's adult education se- {
:ies. Hosts for the breakfast will
be the temple Brotherhood.
Dr. Sackett received his Ml)
decree from Rush Mc-lical College,
Chicago, and is a graduate of the
' diversity of Miami. He is on Ihe
laffs of Jackson Memorini and
Variety Children's Hospital, a
ember of the board of trustees
o! the University of Miami, and
-rives in Florida's House of Rep-
esentativcs. Author of "Bringing
up Rabies," and articles in medJ aj
magazines, he was n recipient of
Ihe U-M's Outstanding Alumni
Award, and has m rvtd as presi-
dent of the Dade County Medical
Association.
Children Collecting
I Coins For UNICEF
Guest speaker was Mas. Sol! Once again the children of this
Mcnkind, national chairman of the I -ommunity, through their schools,
lorah Fund Resident Hall project
and immediate past president of
National's Women's League She
is chiefly interested in stimulating
women to creatively understand
the league's aims and goals fos-
tering a full awareness of Judaism,
and deepening their understanding
of its relevancy as well as its beau-
ty and tradition.
Proceeds from the campaign will
lo to the Torah Fund, which maii-
ains the Jewish Theologi-al Semi-
nary of America, including its man /
programs and projects such as the
world famous Eternal Light radio
and TV pro-Trams. Another goal of
I Ihe campaign is to help build a
reside nee hall for women students
"f the seminary's Teachers' Insti-
tute.
The efforts of the Sist-rhooT.
Florida Branch are part of an in
tensive nationwide campaign to
raise funds so that the entire com-
munity can continue to bepffit
churches, and synagogues, will
'Trick or Treat" for UNICEF. col-
'ectirig coins instead of goodies on
Halloween.
Mrs. Sam Weinstein, who is co-
ordina'ing the local effort, urges
all parents to encourage their chil-
dren to participate in this humani-
'arian proiect. and aH adults to
turn on their lights and open their
hearts to "Trirrk or Treaters."
Mrs. Weinstein pointed 0"t that
i cents will protect four chi'd-en
'rom TB; 10 cents buys cnoueh
medicine t'> cure a ?hild of trach-
T"a. and SI buy 50 cakes of soap
ror a health center.
Assisting Mrs. Weinstein are M"t.
Eve Davidson, Mrs. Joseph Godo-
rov, Mrs. Lots Gay. Mr. and Mrs.
' illi Halnern. Mrs. Stanley Har-
ris, Mrs. R. Kaplan. Mr*. Joseph
Kara. Mrs. Frances Marcuson.
Mrs. Flo-ence Roth. Miss Beatrice
".id tph. Mr?. Martha Schnecter
Mrs. I.eon Sternberger and Mrs.
Hose Tu''n.
Judaica Program For Teens
Launched By Federation
A large group of enthusiastic
teen-agers this week became the
first students in a newly formed
Judaica program which is being
sponsored and administered by
Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wcl-
'are Federation in cooperati .n
with the temples of the area.
The program has been planned
for teen-agers of post confirmation
ge and a few openings are still
available in some of the classes
for interested young people. In
every case outstanding educators in
the field are serving as teachers.
Judging from the size of the en-
rollment, the following courses
proved to be among the mo-t pop-
ular with the teen-aged group.
Illfftory of the Holocaust and
Oetnparattve ReMftea Both
'nueht by Mrs. Ra-hel Abramo-
it/, a well-known t"acher of So-
viet history- at Dade Junior College j
ard the Univem'ty of Miami.
Trader Training Taught by
Mrs. Roslyn Se'iei, youth director
T,- ... <5jr.j ^ A-nn'd Pn-
training young people for posi-
tions as Sunday school teachers.
Ulpan Hebrew With Mrs. Mi-
riam Schmerler, educational di-
rector of Temple Sinai and Itamar
Kflncbcrger, a young Israeli who
has been teaching a number of
Hebrew schools in Dade County as
instructors.
Ivrael and Israeli Dances Jo-
seph Yanich, regional director of
the American Jewish Congress,
instructor.
There is still time for interested
prospective students to join in the
Ti.gram and take advantage of the
few remaining openings. For fur-
ther information call the office of
Jewish Welfare Federation.
Bob Watts Guest Speaker
The South Broward Bar Associa-
tion Auxiliary held a paid-up mem-
bership brunch recently in honor
of its past presidents. Guest speak-
kula. youth director of Temple) er <* Bo*1 G Watts, principal of
Beth El. This course is aimed at Orancreb'-ook Elementary School
Temple Solel Youth Group
Plans Jan. 26-28 Retreat
Applications will be accepted by
t tuple office through Oct. 29
lor the weekend retreat to be con-
d irted Jan. 26-28 by Robert Frazin
and members of Temple Solel's
Youth Advisory Board at the Cir-
< le F Dude Ranch Camp, located
on Sunset Lake in Lake Wales.
Fla., it has been announced.
The price of the weekend, (for
teen-agers in grades 9 through 12)
will include room and meals .bus
tare and the use of all the recrea-
tional facilities at the camp with
the exception of horseback riding
which Is available at an hourly
rate A weekend of study, worship
and fun is planned, beginning at
dinner time Jan. 26 and ending
after lunch Jan. 28. A small de-
'nsjt will hold von<- eservnt'nn.
rent pie Sinai Dedicating
l.ipntan Sports Complex
Sunday, Nov. 5, at 11 a.m.. tie
I.ipman Sports Cotyo'"* wil' ?
dicated at Temple Sinai. 1201
ihnson St., HoHywood.
The new athleti"" facility, which
i iudes two tennis courts, one
isketball court, flrao -'"'fle-
I courts and one padlleball
'urt, was donated to the temple
nation by Mr. and M" Arnv
l-pman, Mr. and Mrs. William
l.ipman. Mr. and M ,. Sol Broiv
\fr, and Mrs. Jerry Fradin an I
"vt Mr ra--H Har*i.______
Pine Hills Chapter Of ORT
Sponsors Halloween Party
The Pine Hills Chapter of Wom-
en s American ORT will sponsor
its second annual children's HaHo-
ween party Saturday from 11:30
m. to 2 p.m. at Fletcher Recrea-
tion Center, 7900 Johnson St., it
has been announced.
Entertainment will he provided
by Mike, Ch. 6's popular ventrilo-
quist, and his "friends" Joey and
Woody. There will also be a cos-
tume- narade and judging, with
prizes for best costume, and a box
luncheon will be served. For res-
ervation* ca*I M-*. Daniel Ashley
or Mrs. Heshey Niad.
Is it any wonder so many families prefer
the corn oil goodness of Unsalted Mazola* Margarine
Unsalted Mazola Margarine
Fresh, sweet flavor
Kosher and Parve
Guaranteed no-burn
The only margarine
for everybody in the family.
|10*
tonz
STONE COUPON
Cod lor 10 oil UnwIMd Mwola Marginn*.
10 Margarine
epe
Atom
To The Ot.-'c* For earn cc MM yet.- arc's*
m u* Kt-e-iwa Jtnt on \tm mutthmt Or
a roiwa' c* the spec *>c *f produ*' wc will
mv re ice fM har. cvj'om *.
dad tew y*i y<*.' c*.io-** have ce*p;a
s, r"< tsi"t o* in coil"M' orlt. Any
<-"ti w'>cai'Ct by you (c*st.tid ' Coupo* may not be a*>ncd Of MsNftfMd
by >oj VcJ *hcn presented by ou MACK b'obf', or .nstiijiiciji user or
arikfO C'0tO'tcd. tad o o"'"" r-
HstMal VOQf rustcH' uH pay a-y aa*
11 tr>e.Q ret* pu'chae of tuf-
BCJfM nof k to cove* roupoA* r'tkltd 'or
tdempi'O" cit be shoon or e<|io*l Lim I
cc to a fa^'iy Cai* (fro^e vaiua:
1/20 of K <&* only n U SA Sa-e to:
Ft t frcct Otvtsion. C*C lnfe"aiiO'te'. Itc.
Be> 10?. Omen. ioa M9M Otter capiraa
Apr,' ttn.
STORECOUPOM-
T*40|
104


and ihotar ot Hollywood
Friday, October 27, 1973
YOUNG LEADERS COUNCIL METING

1 jnSfj 8N 1

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Ht ^^" L^ jt
Marvoin Lee, (left) president of the Men's Club of Temple
Israel of Miramar is shown with Dr. Meline, who hosted the
organization's meeting launching the new season.
Dr. Alex Kabb (left) Dr. Alex Buchwald and Dr. Louis Kur-
land are involved in an apparently serious discussion at
the recent supper meeting of the council.
A number of young men attended the first Young Leaders
Council meeting of the season held in the home of its presi-
dent, Dr. Samuel Meline. Guests included (from left) Bill
Frank, Barry Holeve and Fred Lippman.
Interior Ministry Recognizes Sex Change
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Interior Ministry reports that it
has officially recognized chant,'!** of sail hy seven Israeli men who
have undergone operations d-iring the last two years. The two
mo*1 rf-ent changes recorded in the Ministry's Tel Aviv office
Involved two young men who underwent a series of o|>eration.s In
England. The men arrived at the office in female dress. On pro-
Ju :.ng dommerts attesting to their change of sex they were per-
mitted to register new first names and received identity eaxds
listing them as female.
Derogatory Definitions Of Jew Removed
LONDON' 1 JTA 1 Mnrrn* tdefcaovta. a msswlssr of the
Board of Deputlis of British Jews has scored a vttory in his. eam-
pSjign to l ave i suiting, d sogatary and 1 in wan anted" definitions
of Jew n iio.rd frcm various BVtsJi*h (Urtsoniries. Mr. Shlo'movitz,
who has an a lion pending agaimit Car ndon Press, publishers of the
various Ox'o d dictionaries, has been Informed that the definition
hits tx ii B in-I in the new edition of the "Twentieth Century"
dictionary, n now reads: "Jew A person at Hebrew d scent or
on, an Israelite; foffenal telyl a nairr, mtter; (offenselvly)
to over-i ach." Shloimovitj said thai the Introduction of the word
"o Pensively." end the dropping >' the word heat," waa rea-
u comprc ruse.
Temple Beth El
Adult Education
Temple Beth Era Adult Educa-
tion program has heen expanded
and now includes a variety of
classes and seminars such as Con-
versational Hebrew and Yiddish
tor Adults, bi-weekly Biota semi-
nars on Pirke Avot. "The Sayings
of the Fathers." a bi-weekly Sun-
day morning breakfast hosted by
the Temple Brotherhood with ape-
'ia^^aHgj^japeakcrs for rjnlt n*'
sion and "Dutch Treat" Conver-
sation with the Rabbi luncheons.
In addition, this year Dr. Sam-
uel Z. Jaffee, viritual leader of
the temple, is Initiating a Monday
eveninc scries on "What Can The
Modern Jew Believe?" which will
deal with basic concepts and val-
ues in Jewish life.
There will also be a series of
panel discussions during Novem-
ber, December, January and Feb-
ruary, A donation is required for
the Sundav morning breakfast
seminars; all other courses are
in e to members. For further In-
formation call the temple office.
Book Review Set At
BBW Chapter Meeting
The Ilallandale Chapter of B'nai
B'rfth Women was to hold its
meeting Thursday at 1 p.m. in the
Home Federal Bank Building, 2100
K. Ifallandale Beach Blvd.
Mrs. George Dinney is program
chairman; Mrs. Ann Ackerman. a
hook reviewer who has tx-en fea-
tured on many previous B'nai
IVrith program meetings, will re-
view "The President, by Drew
Pearson.
Herrick Slide Presentation
Lltied Lease 0:1 Ufa" which ,1,.,ls
, with this countr} engagement in
Mt. Seopus Croup of Hadassah autonlalcd warlar. Mr. Herrlck
presented Scott Herrlck, author, "/
... ... a--oc:atefl with Ttt Arr.cri.i
lecturer and world citizen, at it-- nca
moat peeent meeting. Mr. Merries Friend's ber
iiarrated a slide presentation en- I peace organization.
Think of them
as multiple
vitamins
with
wrinkles
We're not suggesting
you give up vitamin pills
for prunes. AH we're saying
is, Sunswect Prunes have
maay important vitamins.
Like A and B-1, B-2 and
niacin. Like minerals, too
calcium, plenty of iron,
rich in potassium.
Yet low in sodium.
Delicious with natural
sugar. So you can nibble
something sweet for
only a measly 18-odd
calorics per prune.
Abi gezunt
with
K
CERTTFTPD
KOSHfcil
SUNSWEET Pitted PRUNES
3UHD I 1ST E *S
closeout purchase!
YVES ST. LAURENT NO-IRON PERCALE SHEETS
BY FIELDCREST AT AN EXTRAORDINARY LOW PRICE
2
99
TWIN FLAT OR FITTED
Reg. $7. "Infinity." one of our best-selling designer sheets.
has been discontinued Limited quantities. Bold contemporary
brown and gold or green and blue striped Cotton/polyester
blend, all sizes in flat or fitted. Full, reg. $8, 3.99. Qusen. reg
12.50. 5.49. King reg. SI 5, 5.49. Cases reg 2/6.30. 2/3.99.
Bolster cases, reg. 2/6.70, 2/4.99.
COMESTICS. FOURTH FLOOR DOWNTOWN Ar ALL 9 BURDlNES STORES





12
ill
in
is
a
Fridcy. October 27. 1972
^Je^liii fkwkttan ""< Shofar of Hollywood
Pane l!
Organization Reports
Sisterhood Of Beth Shalom
B) MRS. MILTON J. lilt 11 It
Publicity C'huirmiin
T iih Mr*. Jerome Friedman at the
ii'lir. I SotnR all out to make this
oj ta mo-t productive years.
ctic qals on the execu-
re board assisted by the entire
:ii!..'-hip are planning numcr-
i ac -.itii's. Program chairman
nd fund-raising chairman are
Ira. Arthur Rosean and Mrs. Al-
ii i cijert. respectively.
The aaon started off with Ili-
Mghtal Wight in September with
Srorgifl, Palm Beach, astrologer-
, un t, a-; gCMfl speaker.
A do;- long leadership program
\-r- rested members followed
iih Mrs. Brown from Federation.
The on I membership meeting
tlturad two prominent local art-
JBmeS Clifford, sculptor in
rial, ami Patiicia Roble. land
seascape artist. They both
FinonMrated their artistic abili-
*. before the members as they
I itefl
Oct. 18 ia complete sellout of
Hah Jongg card party and lunch-
in Members are opening up their
kd'. fur a series of coffees and
it honoring prospective and new
Inerhood members. Mrs. Jerry
Wei membership chairman.
Our next meeting b scheduled
t X p m. Monday. Nov. with
cial guest Josef Yanich. execu-
( .!-tor. Southeast Region of
fterican Jewish Congress, who
ill show slides and speak on So-
vli i Jewry. He will have Prisoner
<>l Conscience Stars, which are in
grout demand with him. The meet-
ing is open to the public and re-
freshments w'll be served.
Our Thrift Shop on Tyler St.,
with Mrs. Jack Shapiro, chair-
man, has added a new crew to
assist her. All proceeds go towards
helping supplement children's He-
brew education.
On Wednesday. Nov. 15, Temple
Both Shalom's Annual Sisterhood
luncheon and fashion show is plan-
ned with proceeds going towards
youth cultural activities. Young
Sophisticates Fashions will be
modeled. Mrs. Leroy Koross is
chairman.
New innovations this year are:
A monthly informative and news)
Sisterhood Publication edited by
Mrs. Morton Levin; Adult Kduca-
tion coordinated by Mrs. Peter:
Bouer which includes "One Hour j
Discussion Group" with Rabbi!
Malavsky, I lebrew (Beg. i Pray- i
ers in Song with Cantor Gold, and
Israeli dancing.
Our Sisterhood is preparing a
cookbook including "household
hints" and woukl you believe Mrs.
Wolf Reichkind is designing fash-
ions for the ladies for a nominal
fee to go for Torah Fund.
Sisterhoods 4th annual Inter-
national Arts Festival Exhibition
and auction Is scheduled for Dec.
2. The exciting art collection Is
opened free to the public. Circle
your calendar for this event: chair-
man is Mrs. Sanford Roberts.
FACT:
Jo W UiJAlS^^^jpV-ov'icle "\he -fun4l? to
enable 3*8,000 underphVileo,ed Emigrant
CWikJren m Israel to attend pre-
K'\nciev-cp^ten clQ$se9. We musi also
Support ioq ooo secondanj school
cHJdren with pav-Val or -ful\ Scholarships.
Post Honoring 6 Veterans Friday
Victor B. Freedman Post 613.
wish War Veterans, will hold it*
immal Veteran's Day services Fri.
a> at 8:15 p.m. in Temple Sinai,
.in .]<: nson St.
Six memben of the past wlw
ivp fought In six different con
"t- will iie honored during
-'.ices. They are: Joseph
ksenthal, Spanish American War;
kaplain David Rugoff, World War
;Coim lander Herman Muransky.
Voi'd War II; Arthur Sherry,
n War: Charles Hausfeld,
Mnam War. and Sol Heller, a
member of the Israeli
fmiy.
Chaplain Runoff will give the
honoring those six men and
all war veterans; the sermon will
be given by Rabbi David Shapiro
>l Temple Sinai.
Chairman for the evening is W.
'Mil Schoenfeld, a charter member
f the post and Judge Advocate of
.he JWV'x Department of Florida.
Ml veterans and auxiliary mem-
lx rs are invited to participate.
Dance Team Exhibition
Dance instructors Rose and
. Hashcll Levin gave an exhibition
of their art following this week's
regular meeting of the Robert K.
Franzblau Miramar Post 177 and
| its Auxiliary in Temple Israel of
i Miramar.
Mrs. Maria Gale
Joins JFS Staff
Jewish Family Service of Brow-
ard County has announced the ap-
no'ntnwnt of Mrs. Ma'la Gale as a
member of its professional counsel-
ing staff.
Mrs. Gale received her Master's
degree in Social Work from the
Graduate School of Social Work
of Barry College. She was awarded
a B.A. degree magna cum laude
from the University of Miami
where she majored in psychology.
Practice training for her graduate
degree was taken at the Mailman
Center and the Jewish Family and
Children's Servi.-e of Miami.
Mrs. Gale is a long-term resi-
dent of Dade County. She was
confirmed at Temple Fmanu-El,
Miami Beach. The mother of three
teen-age children and the wife of
an active businessman. Mrs. Gale
has participated in many commu-
nity organizations, including 1TA.
B'nai B'rith, ORT and United
Fund.
leach Group Of Hadassah
Plans Ami Luncheon Dec. 12
At a general meeting of the
Beach Group of Hadassah plans
were made for the Ami Luncheon
for Youth Aliyah to be held Dec.
12 with Sid Dulberg as chairman.
Other highlights of the after-
noon were a book review of "Tres-
pass," a book by Fletcher Kuebcl
The review was given by Judge
Morton L. Abram.
Delicious
Sunsfiine*X
cookies
made
with
PURE
VEGETABLE
SHORTENING
YOU CAN BE SURE when you give your family
Hydrox Cookies and Vienna Fingers. They're baked with
pure vegetable shortening and it says so on the label.
DELICIOUSLY FRESH FROM Sunsfiine*
they're the tastiest creme filled cookies in town! Buy
some soon.
The freshest ideas keep coming from Sunsfiine'
Post Offices Will Distribute Alien .
Address-Report Forms In January
All post offices will cooperate in the anneal aHetl address
reporting program next January, the U.S. Postal Service has
announced.
The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 requires
aliens resident in the United States on Jan. 1 to report their
addresses to tin.1 Immigration and Naturalization Service.
As in past years, all post offices will participate in the
program to the extent of distributing adiress report cards
(Form I-.V5I to aliens and forwarding the cards after comple-
tion to Immigration and Naturalization Service offices.
The form--a rranila punch card similar to *he one used
for 1972 alien reporting will be available for d stribution at
post offices on the first business day of January 1973. Com-
pleted forms must be turned in before the end of January'-
EXECUTIVE PRIVATE CHAUFFEUR AVAILABLE
DRIVE YOUR CAR OR MINE
HOUR DAY OR WEEK
REASONABLE RATES LOCAL REFERENCES
Phone 584-3752
AMCO
ROOM AIR CONDITIONER CO
SALES SERVICE INSTALLATION
MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS AVAILABLE
FEDDERS WESTINGHOUSE
Phone 920-6860
MIKE'S QUICK COPY CENTER
PRINTING
INTRODUCTORY OFFER 1,000 LETTERHEADS $5.95
Bulletins Brochures Reports Statements Etc.
PHOTO OFFSET SAME DAY SERVICE
927-6262
306 W. Haliandale Beach Blvd.
(Between N.W 3rd and 4th Avenue)
THINKING OF DECORATING?
STOP IN AND BROWSE THROUGH OUR LARGE SELECTION
OF FINE WALLCOVERINGS TO SUIT YOUR BUDGET.
NOW HANDLING ALL FAMOUS BRANDS.
EXPERT DECORATIVE COUNSELING
-:- FREE SHOP AT HOME SERVICE :-:
HOLLYWOOD DECORATING CO.
1951 Pembroke Road, Hollywood
923-3997 944-4807


-..._ l_.u_.-_- -1
Page 12
+Jewlsl> IkrHUrun -l Shof.r of Hollywood
Friday, October 27, 1972,
"
BuildingTo Building
Galahad South will have a Masquerade Party on Halloween. Cham-
pagne for every contestant with a whole fifth for the winning one.
There will be music for dancing and refreshments with admission free
to members of the Men's Club.
Fairways South is also having a Halloween party with costumes
Oct. 28 according to Mrs. Jack Schwartz, president of the Women's
Social Club.
A well-known non-profit social service organization in Broward
and North Dade. the "Entertainment Exchange," continues active
pri'iwrations for the oncoming social season for its growing member-
ship, under the aegis of capable exchange board chairman, Norm
Speotor. Several of our very iKipular professional 1 pro-preview) nites,
will be presented in the social halls of various hi-rise exchange mem-
bers, during the next several months. Your reporter, Harry Greene.
-vill comment on these Pro-Previews" as they occur.
Letter Expresses Gratitude
To Executive Board of JWF
(The following Utter was received
recently bv the Executive Committee
of Greater Hollywood's fewish Wel-
fare Federation. It was written by
one of the young people who were
given financial aid last summer by
Federation so that they could par-
ticipate in a trip to Israel planned
by IpcJI Jewish groups.
(Tbe BXMMtVC Commitiee has de-
cided to investigate the possibility
of Federation sponsoring an Israeli
trip for local Jewish teen-agers dur-
ing the summer of 1973. A special
committee is nou- m formation for
this purpose. The trip u'ould be
planned on a community basis by
Federation with the cooperation of
Greater Hollywood's temples and
voutl: organizations )
Dear Sirs:
I have just recently returned
from a most enlightening and re-
ligious historical trip to Israel
This trip is undoubtedly one of. if
not the greatest experience in my
n* re Mfe. I am deeply grateful
that I had the opportunity to visit
Earael at such a young age I feel
that by going i>" this trip I have
(Staled a deeper understanding of
ludakm along with new o'Hiook
n life. I am going to dedicate my-
elf more to Judaism because I
have a better undcrsiandin-' of
vhal the problems are whether it
be in Israel in our -onvriunity, or
in the world.
After visiting many p'a~es '>'
Di rest, one of the most moving
i to see a Mai Pen, the o'.d-aie
hone- and awing how it is I ir
iUpporting, unlike many in A'lier-
ca I will never forget what thr
guide 'aid. "In America peopli
'i an old-age home to die: here
I In > come to live."
Another movu experience was
seeing Yad Vashem. the memorial
10 the six million, and of c HUM
l::;.bing Massada and watching
he sunrise and listening to the
story of our forefathers.
I wish to thank the exeeiiti e
hoard of Federation for their fi-
nancial aid. Without yjur support
and assistance this trip would not!
have been possible for me.
NAME WITHHELD;
New 1972-73 Hebrew
Almanac Ih Available
The new pocket-sized 1972-73
(5733i Hebrew Almanac (Luach)
issued by the Wilno Kosher Saus-
ige Co., features the entire year's I
alen.lar in English and Hebrew,
the Friday candlelighting times in j
Eastern, Central and Pacific time |
zones adjusted for Daylight Sav-
bigs Time, all the holidays and fast !
days, pennissable wedding dates [
important prayers in English andj
Hebrew and both the American
and Israeli national anthems.
This new almanac, which Is now
available to readers of The Jewish |
Floiidian absolutely free, may be ;
Stained by w iting to The Jewish j
rTori Han, P.O. Box 2973. Miami.
Kla. 33101 ann requesting a copy, j
Be sure to include your name, ad-
dress and zip cde.
Jleuitt
Memorial Cnapel
'JEWISH fUSlHAL DIKtCrOM"
LOCAL AND OUT OF STATt
AMRANCtMfNTS
947-2790 '
IJMS W. OIKIf HWY HM.
Al H. Thomas of Memphis.
Tenn., a prominent attorney
and Jewish communal
leader, has been appointed
general chairman of the
74th Anniversary Biennial
Convention of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions of America, to be held
in Boca Raton. Wednesday,
Nov. 22 through Sunday,
Nov. 26. Seme 2.000 dale-
gates are expected to at-
tend the five-day conclave
of the bi-national orqemiza-
tion serving over 3,000 syn-
agogues throughout the
United States and Canada
with a variety of programs
and activities.
Teen
Scene
i
By LAl'RA KATZ
The only conclusion one could
dtaw about the kick-off program
of the Jewish Youth Council was
that it was an overwhelming suc-
cess. The event, held Sunday, Oct.
8 at Bob Herman's ranch in Davic,
was a picnic, pool party and a
football game combined. Approxi-
mately 225 kids and 35 adults at-
tended.
During the fun-filled afternoon,
all who were present wrote post-
cards to President Nixon, request-
ing that he use his good offices to
aid in the release of Russian Jews
being held in the Soviet Union
against their will. The youth re-
quested that the President not give
"Most Favored Nation" status to
the Soviet Union since they are
demanding a ransom of between
$5,000 and $30,000 for educated
Jews who wish to emigrate to
Israel.
The afternoon was highlighted
by a sandlot football game between
the Youth Leaders Council of Holly-
wood and the Jewish Vouth Coun-
cil. The Youth Council team, cap-
tained by Steve Brodle, routed the
Young Leaders by a scon? of 12-6.
The hard-working but defeated
Young Leaders were led by Bob
IV-r man.
For those loyal Dolphin fans
who never miss a game, TV sets
were provided in order that they
could see the Dolphins defeat the
New York Jets 27-17.
Hundreds of hamburgers, hot
dogs and sodas wen served along
with heaping mounds of potato
Stdps, salads, pretzels and dessert.
Pretty good menu for 25 cents!
Blessed with a beautiful after-
noon, the event proved to lie most
enjoyable for all who attended. It
turned o'lt to be the greatest suc-
eu of any event of its kini ever
held in the South Broward area.
This was due mainly to the hard
work .f the Young Leaders Coun-
cil. I>r. Sam MeUM, alone with
Mark Fried. Youth Council ad-
visor, and lt'in Treshan, adminis-
trative associate of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of Greater Holly-
wood.
Special thanks should be ac-
corded to Boh an 1 Sylvia Berimui
who graciously offered the use of
their home and facilities. Including
the swimming ikhjI. Not only did
they volunteer their home, but
also put in many hours of hard
work to see that everyone had an
enjoyable time.
Through the cooperation of R<>z
9sldel of Tomsk Sinai. Shirley
Goldman of Temple Beth Shalom.
Arnold Fakula of Temple Beth El.
and] Biwmin of Temple Solel.
lay and KIl.-ii Schlomt and Hal
Kravitz of Young Judea of Temple
Israel of Miramar. good attend-
ance from all the groups was
assured.
kf *

Palmer9s
Mimmi Monument Company
327f S.W. Ith Street, Miomi
444-0*21 4444*22
CWtoe) 0> The Seats*
Personalized Memorials Cast**
Crofted In Oar Own Worksko,.
NIXON, GROMYKO DISCUSSED
TAX ON JEWISH EMIGRES
By Special Report
WASHINGTON. D.C. President Richard M. Nixon and
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Grumyko. who met recently fir.t
at the White House and later at Camp David, the presidential
retreat in the Maryland mountains, discussed a variety of topics
of interest to both nations, it was reported.
In addition to the formal steps taken to implement the two
documents signed at the Moscow summit last May limiting de-
ployment of defensive missiles and freezing the long-range of-
fensive missile arsenals for five years, such international issues
as Vietnam, the Middle East, the European Security Conference
and mutual, balanced troop reduction were discussed, White
House press secretary Ronald L. Zeigler said.
The spokesman also reported that the Soviet tax on Jewish
emigrees was discussed during the Nixon-Gromyko talks, but
he could give no further details.
, ..... ,,, 'VI Ill'" "I'M I 'l
IM^lliftsi
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
V- Street el lain Avenue
Pnone _--___
Fri
SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
with
funeral Home Contacts throughout
the United States
Funeral Director Available 24 Hours A Day
To Assist With All Funeral Arrangements
nou.\*ootrs oldest ... most iuvi/wwi)
BOWJT A
CfGrJQrelPafifJH.
140 So. Dlile Hlqhwey fH. 13-4545
Hollywood, Florida 33020
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Wlemotial
Cjazdens
The only til Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For
923-1
TEMPLE BETH EL "".""' /^'iV',
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME:________________________________ _________
aped, perpetual care, reasonably priced. %i* '''*V-J>"fl
or information call: _>g_v*_Vvl
23 8255 or write: _&4*? 1
TEMPLE BETH EL MWRr.
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ea
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or
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v
.;
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I
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:
:-
B
I
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ll
h |
ii
n
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ADDRESS:
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
\Cv^vAMel Insurance Agencyf|
I mJm A"sel Wittewteii S
0 All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
I 9239518 9453527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
IHI.MMl co*r


Friday. October 27, 1972
-Jmrist fkridtinn nd Shefar of Hollywood
Page 13
PERSONALITY PROflU
Visiting Israeli
Air Force Pilot
Bar Mitzvah
-.hu.;iM-.'.
The first thing that hits your
.y, < is a'l the comforts and lux-
\r\ *& Aortfhuv&'Hr '**-*
fK ," says the Rood-looking young
1-i'i'li as he sits in the home of
his Hollywood hostess ami tri.s to
a\ lain his impressions of Ameri-
ca life.
"If I were to compare the lives
of my sisters with one of your
vivrs, I would have to say
tliat American women have it
easier. When my sisters or
Uier r-'o into the kitchen to
i hey conio out hot and look-
| t aa i! they had been cooking;
loillSj housework.
"In this country, the kitchens
,ok like scientific laboratories and
vi n in the midst of cooking a
real, the American housewife
iks cool and clean and as
though she could have come from
a party."
Another big difference in family
He here is the activity pattern of
our children. "Here in the states."
ays the young Sabra. "the chil-
dren seem to run from one activ-
ity to another. They belong to
tmiple groups, they take all kinds
of lessons. In Israel they have
more free time. I think this Amer-
ican way is better and more inter-
ring for the kids.
"Of course, in Israel all the
youngsters have to spend some
11 of each week in what we call
Muty hours." Thb is a period
gad to alert the children to a
srn-e of responsibility and men-
tal :> prepare them for their stint
in 'he Army."
'1 he dark-haired young man.
who is visiting here on leave from
the Israeli Air Force, saved up his
ves so that he could have one
nger stretch of free time to visit
the United States. While here he
ill visit all the members of his
family who emigrated here in 1939
wFvn his own pTfrenU went to
srael. Aware of present day se-
ll: :ty problems, he thinks it b"st
oi to mention his name or the
Bnies of his hosts across the coun-
V
"All the people I've visited have
te n extremely gracious," says the
puns Sabra. "I never realized
tow much real concern the Ameri-
mii Jewish community has for Is-
le! I always felt that they just
igned checks and gave money
but now I know that m-st of
Ibem are really interested and
Wicerned."
The 27-year-old Air Force man's
paii-nts arrived in what was then
stine in 1939 and both of them
kh-ved in the British Army. Their
economic struggles have lasted
through the years and although
in' N now ii,e in a home overlook-
ing the harbor of Haifa, the home
hotite. the entire family, includ-
ing his married sister and her hus-
band and two small children. His
mother keeps tiie home and
watches the children so that her
daughter Is able to work and help'
>rt the household.
"I think it is natural for people
like my parents to feel a hit of re-
sentment when they see the pro-
visions that are being made today
for new Immigrants. Although they ,
know that Immigration la mast I
Important for the future of Israel,
they can't help but compare their
Own situation when they arrived
in the country to the housing and
jobs offered to today's immi-
grants," he commented.
However, with all the hardships
and problems which Israelis have
to face, none would ever consider
settling permanently anyplace else,
he said, adding that in time they
will have all the creature comforts,
and in the meantime they have a
purpose and a cause.
Tickets Available
For Concert Series
Community Concerts of South
Broward will present a varied se-
lection of musical evenings during
its fourth season of concerts. Tic-
kets are available by membership
onry for the entire series. Mrs.
Carl Petkoff. 2300 Park Lane.
Hollywood, is in charge of reserva.
tions.
The first presentation of the se-
ries will be an evening of songs
by the singing duo Vrenios and
Armstrong Jan. 7. Both of these
young singers have extensive back-
grounds in the operatic and con-
cert fields.
Following these artists on the
Community Concerts schedule will
be the New Orleaas Symphony
Orchestra Feb. 13; the Yugosla-
vian dance troupe March 11 and
harpists Longstreth and Escosa
April 2.
Officers of Community Concerts
of South Broward for the coming
season are George Moxon, presi-
dent; Jack Grant, Mrs. Ray Sch-
lichte, Julius Harris and Mrs. Carl
Petkoff. vice presidents; Mrs. Dan-
iel Friedman, secretary, and Dan-
iel Friedman, treasurer.
\I.AN FISHER
Allan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bern-
ard Fisher, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Oct. 28, at Tem-
ple Israel of Miramar.
# # #
NEAL APPEIX
Neal, son pf Mj.^and Mrs. IsaJ
done AppeH, witt bi-omeBar Mitzi
\ah SatdYday, Oct 28 aT8:33 am!
at Temple Sinai.
ft ft ft
IJBBY KOBRKT
Libby, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Albert Kobert, will celebrate her
Hat Mitzvah Friday, Oct. 27 at
S:13 p.m. at Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
STI ART KRMTZNER
Stuart, sou of Mr. and Mrs.
Milton Krettzner, will celebrate
Bar M'tzvah Saturday morn-
ing, Oct. 28. at Temple Beth Sha-
lom.
ft ft
GARY PORTXOY
Gary, son of Dr. and Mrs. Barry
Portnoy, will become Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday morning, Oct. 28, at
TV iv.pic Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
nnsm weiss
Julie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Weiss, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah Saturday. Oct. 28 at
11 a.m. at Temple Beth El.
ft ft ft
SUSAN (. ARMl/.O
Susan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Garmizo, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah Friday evening, Nov.
3, at Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft ft
GREGG GLASER
Greet;, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gun-
ther Glaser. will Iv Bar Mi'^vah
Sntn"Hiv morning, Nov. 4, at Tem-
ple Beth Stalom.
ft ft ft
BARRY SARKEI.I.
Barry, son of M-. and Mrs. Da-
vid Sarkell, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning, Nov.
4 at Temnle Shalom.
i.i.w;iui.iiuiuiuiu,.iii.' i wmm i

*4s SSee St
a> BOB KERBEL, Executive Director,
Jewish Welfare federation ei Greater Holly wood*
sJHaH** of \fmt %
JOSEPH AISOP
(Continued from Page 4-
He was cooly used by the Presi-
dent in 1969-70 because Richard
M. Nixon wanted someone to
rough talk, in just the way that
Mr. Agnew obediently did. That
hurt him badly, and he knows
it, too.
But the super-ethnic is no
stupid humbler. He is just what
the ;iounger McGovernites would
call "a terrible square" as
befits a super-ethnic. And may-
be, just maybe, we are now see-
ing the end of the era of fash-
ionably "with it" politicians.
The last five years have seen the Jewish youth of Amorlca take
Its place in the political and rebellious aspect of life in all itejphasea.
With riots and rebellion on our campuses', with Jewish youth taking
strong radical left positions, it is only natural that we, of older gen-
erations, look at youth in a very negative way and yet, other
things are happening right here in the South Broward area.
On Oct. 8. the Jewish youth of Hollywood in a get together spon-
sored by the Jewkh Welfare Federation in cooperation with all Jew-
ish youth groups in the ana. had a lociflj and educational day. Frankly.
we expected about 100 of OUT teen agCTS and wi had over 225. They
played ball, went swimming, watched the Dolphin game on TV, wrote
irde to 'resident Nixon asking that he use his influence in ref-
erence to the ransom of Soviet Jew;, participated in readings and
li-. us-ions, and much more; they showed enthusiasm for being to-
-r-Mtvr vith other .Tow* in a meaningful program and obviously de-
sired more such activities.
The Jew ish Youth ( oundl la not an organization within itself, but
rather is a coordinated body or all Jewish youth groups and non-
affiliated Jewish youth in this area. Just recently a little meeting to
plan future programs was organized. Four people were invited, and
17 attended. What are they saying to US?
Each temple has its own youth groups and, of course, there are
AZA and Young Judea. What there is NOT, however, is a Jewish
Community Center with on-yoing programs of Jewish interest for
Jewish youth. There is no one place where our teen-agers, regardless
of their affiliation or lack of involvement in organized youth groups,
can meet to discuss common things, lram about themselves, partici-
pate in Jewish activities, and just have fun together.
In 1945 when this was a smaller community, there was one
temple in town; it was called the Jewish Community Center of Holly-
wood, and this was where many of the Jewish families spent their
time and energies. As the community got larger and the Jewish peo-
ple wanted different identification with different kinds of Judaism,
more temples were developed and in some measure the community wv
fractionalized. Temple and group chauvinism developed. Protection
and survival of the institution and its progre ns were prime.
We are now at a point of examining wht ther there needs to be a
pulling together again and developing one instrumentality to serve all
the Jews in this area our seniors, young marrieds, youth and chil-
dren Is the community now ready for a Jewish Community Center?
Is it mature enough to understand that a center would not threaten
the existence of any institution, but rather enhance its programs and
membership? ...^j
If not now when?
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Start an aasy. systematic savings plan.
Than watch your monay grow
even fastar than you can it.
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HHkridHnr "d shofar of Hollywood
K-^omni unity ^^alcndi
Sax-
GoH
< i
ar
TODAY, in liir.l.li 27
Vicir B. Friedman Pob( 613 JWV Veteran Day Services
8:15 p.m. Tetanle Sinai
SATURDAY, (K'TOBKR %
Temple Beth Ahm Sisterhood Social 8:30 p.m.
onj Hotel, Miiuni Beach
SUNDAY, DOTOBEH 29
Broward-Palm Beach Council B'nai B'rith Lodges
Tournament All Day Hiii'cVeM Country Club
Minyan Club Temple Sinai Breakfast 9 a.m. Tem-
ple Sinai.
MONDAY, <>< TOBKR 80
National Council of Jewish Women, Hollywood Chapter -
Card Party 11:30 a.m. Temple Beth El
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER I
Young Leaders Council of Jewish Welfare Federation
Mit'ting S p.m. home of Dr. Howard Herman
THURSDAY, NOVEMBEB I
Miramax Chapter of Pioneer Women Membership Tea
Noon Miramar R creation Center
1-itlliAY. NOVEMBEB 3
Board Meeting
10 a.m
Jay-
Market Day
10:30 i
11 a.m.
All Day
Hill-
Temple
Dinner-Dance
Beach Group Hadassah
member's home
SATIKOAY, NOVEMBEB
Temple Sold Sisterhood Square Dance s p.m.
cee Center, Hollywood
SUNDAY. NOVEMBEB S
Sisterhood Temple Beth i:i
Temple Beth K!
Hillcrest Hadassah Board Meeting
crest Re Teat Ion I tall No. l
Dedication Lipman Sports Complex
Sinai
Temple Sinai Sisterhood and Men's Club
5:30 p.m. Temple Sinai
Miramar Chapter of Pioneer Women Rummage Sale
All Day Civic League BWg, 805 Glenn Parkway. Holly-
wood
Sisterhood Temple Beth Shalom Art Show and Auction
All Day Temple Beth Shalom. 4601 Arthur St.
MONDAY. NOVEMBEB 6
National Council of Jewish Women. Hollywood Section
Meeting 12:30 p.m. Temple Sinai
TUESDAY, NOVEMBEB *
ML Scopus Hadassah Board Meeting 8 p.m. mem-
ber's home
Men's Club Temple Sinai Meeting K p.m. Temple
Sinai
sisterhood Temple Sinai Meeting 8 p.m. Temple
Sinai
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER K
National Women's Committee of BrandeJi University
Hollywood Chapter Meeting 10 a.m. Galahad South
Israel Bond Dinner (lalahnd Court
Till RSD.W, NOVKMBKR 9
H'Atid Group Hadassah Meeting
Israel ol Miramar
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER tfl
USY Annual Weekend
S p.m. Temple
Temple Sinai
Religious
Services
HAUANDAU
HALLANDALB JEWISH CENTER
(Conaervative. 411 N.E. 8th Avenue
Rabbi Harry E. Schvwarta, Cantor
Jacob Danziger.
Kriil; p.m. wrtnon topic: LM
fs N.n itHiwitiixh ii"-i>- Saturday
a.m. Itabbl Bchwarta will iniCTftt
in. Hcrtptttrfl l-eaaon W HM wmk
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Conaervative)
6920 S.W. 35th St.. Rabbi Avrom
Dnaiin, Cantor Abraham Koeter.
H0UYW00O
TEMPLE BETH EL (Reform) 13S1 S.
14th Avo.. Hollywood. Rabb. Samuel
I Jaffa.
Friday 8:15 p.m. Dr. Jnffi- "ill **
. on "Th. Pillar -f Salt, A Parwhl.- for
our l.lv.s." Satunlay It am.. Bn*
Mltavab: .lull.-. daaghtar of Mr. anil
\ii.- Henry Welaa.
BETH SHALOM (Temple) Conferva-
tive1725 Monroe Street. After Nov.
1 4601 Arthur Street. Rabbi Mor-
ton Malavaky, Cantor Irving Gold.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conaervative.
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Salomon Benerroch.
, Rabbi Solomon- Banarrorii will offici-
ate ;it Friday night awvicen al I I!
(i in Saturday morning s.-r\i.s. p :i m
ReclHtratlon opan for Uebranw and
Sunday nchooL
timi.iv is p ..I Saturday S a m., Bar
Ml la van: Mlahael .Minsk.
------a-----
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5001
Thomaa Street, Hollywood. Rabbi
Robert Frazin.
PYtda) I pm mi Shoiidan Hill* B3e-
in. Mliiry BchooU, xrrmnn topic:
"llriiiui I Lavea Ik-rnlv Will It
Ui.-i."' followed by Onl Bbabbal
' Bponaora4 by Blaternoad.
------a-------
TEMPLE SINAI (Conaervative) 1201
Johnson Street. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH OADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kinftley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
JCRC Progress Report
Issued By Chairman
iday.
The Jewish Community Rela-1 ni/alion in the South B var(
tioi.s Council of the Jewish Wei-1 area in order to educate the Ivb
tare Federation of Greater Holly-| tian co.r.munity as to the >ellet
wood chairman, Joseph Kidman, and concerns of the Jewish com-
has issued the following progress mimity and to combat A aba)
propa^aiulft which is so prevaja*
in I fie area.
f
CANDLELIGHTING TliMF
19 HESHVAN 6:21
vvVWvWVWWWWAAAeAA,
TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
We mr happy to announce
that Mickey Perlmutter is back with us.
f
/
count
1918 Hollywood Boulevard
927-2337 923-3659
Sisterhood Square Dance
The Sisterhood of Temple Solel
will hold a square dance Saturday,
Nov. 4, at S p.m. in the Jaycee
Center. 29.'K) Hollywood Blvd. A
late dinner will be served. For in-
formation contact Judy Mish or
Paula Sedel. Reservations will be
limited to 100 couples.
j^j^MMMM'
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froftaional
priental
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suzana;
BON VOYAGE TRAVEL
ISRAM AND
"present the EH
SUNNY SEVEN TO ISRAEL
FALL/WINTER 1972-73
from $459. from N.Y.
from $571. from MIAMI
(a'tar He v. 1, $575)
Plui S3.00 U.S. Tox
JET ROUNDTRIR,
FIRST CUSS HOTELS -
PRIVATE RATN AND BREAKFAST
CALL
KURT ROTHSCHILD
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BON VOYAGE TRAVEL, INC.
TOUR ISRAEL HEADQUARTERS
AND TOP AGENCY IN
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
1074-1076 INTERAMA RLVD.
We speak Hebrew Yiddish.German
French Spanish -
Italian Roumanian
COZE BEAUTY SA10M
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Hollywood
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There IS a very special kind of nursing home..
.. with the highest standards of excellence .. the most
qualified staff of people who really care .. fully ac-
credited by government agencies administered with
understanding, compassion and concern for its patients.
And now. with its new group nursing plan to overcome
the problem of arranging for your own nursing aides .
. and Kosher meat meals, under dietary observances
both available for only a nominal additional cost.
Golden Isles Convalescent Center, inc.
2400 E Hallandale Beach Boulevard
Hillandele. Florida 33009 Phones: (305) 927 9717 or 944 6340.
V
fMet
rejiort as of mid-October:
At this time every major oma-'
ni/alion in the South Broward
area has been contacted and is
now participating in the activities
of the Jewish Community Relations
Council.
The "Salute to Israel" procjam,
sponsored by JCRC locally, at-
tracted an audience of about 1,200
persons, the largest group of its
kind ever to attend a community
event of this sort. Mrs. Ruth
Dayan, ex-wife of Israel's defense
minister, and a representative
group of local leaders sjnike to
those intending.
Through the efforts of JCRC. a i nounced a musical series for 1972-
news conference was set up for 73 ac. pait f its cultural pi ./ram
Mrs. Dayan. All the major TV,, t^ first of three Thursd eve
I radio stations and newspapers. njnR pro!,rams wi ^ ,
were re,,, rented. Mrs. Dayan laau0l Browar(, fflgn Sch J
spoke about the tragedy at the g:30 Nov m Th(1
lV^l- <.'am,'S "' MT^\ F,"lr n Tl"1 Town." a theitrtcal
JCRC has now established a proTram of son an,j rtan(. llj(,h.
telegram bank and has MtaoBshed |Wlt8 from tho mi|,Joa, eomedy
show, will cover a rajiice o: num-
At the present time JCT. 1. ,n
the process of upirrading a: 1 cX.
panding its committees in 01 lerto
reach out to nil segments >[ th,
community. Alrendy formed art
the Soviet Jewry Corr. -.ittw
ludao-Christian Relation^ Commit
tee. Publicity Committee and 25Lh
Anniversary Committee.
Hotli Shalom To
Present Musical
Temple TV>th Shalom ),-
t;
nalr,
nut
jxJi
tha
see:
Jev
tle
kib
be
a reserve fund so that should the
occasion arise more than 1,030
'.('legri'tvs can be sent to the
proper authorities. More than 503
telegrams have been sent to the
President, senators and congress-
hers from current Broadwiv hitl
-hows to numbers from nostalgic |
and ever nopular musical eomedy
classics. The "Four On The Town"
trouiic has anpeared before many
men regarding; the plight of So- nationa, al,dienceS. piavin.- hefore
viet Jews and the newly bnyostd gtandJng room onlv nous(>s
ransom. Additional telegrams on!
this iBsua will also Ik- sent at the; On Jan. 11. "The Ayalon- will
appn>priate time. ^ heard in concert in th new
JCRC is also in the process of ballroom of Temple Beth Shalom,
; organizing a team of speakers to j and Feb. 22. the well-known Is-
go to meetings of every major | raeli songstress Geula G /. will
Jewish organization in the com- appear.
munity and obtain hand written
letters to the President, senators,
and congressmen relating to the
problem of Soviet Jews. In this
way JCRC will be able to keep
records of how many letters are
written, what is written and to
whom they are sent.
At the behest of JCRC. lead-
ers of the Jewish community of
the area have formed a Jodao-
Christian Relations Committee
which will attempt to speak at
every Christian church and orga-
Series or individual tick can
be purchnued at the temple office.
For additional Information cnl
the terrmle officp.
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01


m
jday, October 27. 1972
+Jewist norkUar nd Shefar of Hollywood
Page 15
Israel Newsletter
vari
hns
com.
abb
Mnt
i-'in
let
iy Carl Alperi
Jerusalem Is Not The Same As Brooklyn
[>',i,\M OF ACTIVITIES ^f .u. t..^_l' ... i O-/
, .
an-
ram.
I at
at
ram
rical
liu'h-
uriy
mm
hli
rtsic
ledy
w-n"
i any
foi'O
will
new
lom.
Is-
will
J1IF. 'RO(,uAM OF ACTIVITIES of the Jewish
Defense League in the United Stat<-s had origi-
nally been watched with some sympathy from here.
The Israelis felt an empathy for
Jews who fought back against
anti-Semites. A clout on the head
of a bully commands more respect
than a whining complaint to an
inactive police department.
The first apiJcarance of the JDL
in Israel was met with some curi-
osity. What could its members do
here, in defense of Jews, that was
not already being done by the government, by the
]Klice and by the Israel armed forces-? The fact
that the JDL members were coming to Lsrael
eemrd fulfillment of their professed love of the
Jewish nation. They were coming to associate
themselves with the state in the army, on the
kibbutz, in industry, in academic life. They would
be we;come, like all immigrants to Lsrael.
The mood tow ard the Jewish Defense League has
changed. They have come, it would seem, not to
join lrael, but to challenge it and its authority
Their first venture into Arab relations was a
catastrophe. When someone threw a bomb some-
risare, the heroes of the Jewish Defense League
Sgan beating up innocent Arab passeraby in the
OOK REVIEW Seymour Liebmon
V History Of Zionism
HE E'.IOK A History of Zionism by Walter Laqueur
lo:' Rinehart .% Winston. S10) is a disappointment
:nc, but thi< need not deter anyone from reading it.
Its deficiencies lay in two areas. The
iii-st is that the history is not developed
thematic alls- or chronologically. Without
a background knowledge of Zionism, the
uninitiated may find themselves in a
maze that baffles and thwarts an at-
tempt to grasp the current history.
The second area includes the lack of
tables and fundamental statistics. The
dates ol the emergence of the major
bnist fa tions. as well as dates, places and number of
legatei and their party representation to Zionist con-
ttses are difficult to find and the index is not much
kfistani The foregoing are only representative of
I > oth< r shortcomings.
Liqueur i-s a scholar and a highly capable writer.
ttybe me expected too much. His theses are too sub-
Mi ve end constitute an unnecessary appendage. Too
toy pages are devoted to biographical material includ-
K almost a synopsis of Her/I's diaries which Marvin
Menthal did many years ago.
Lauqueur presents many esoteric bits of data which
preal assiduous research but contribute nothing to the
lory ... Zionism. An example is the gem that Rabbi
bliscbei wrote in 1863 about the danger of Arab ban-
d the rabbi had never been in Palestine. That
ni.n-hlMoricial trivia. The fact that anti-Jewish feeling
ad by the Churches in 1K99 and shortly there*
Iter is important only if the feeling had permanency
N affected later Arab Jewish relationships. Laqueur
not fully evaluate the earlier statements. The bib-
aph> is excellent, however.
Taotak} and the Jt by Joseph Nedava I Jewish
Plication Society. $6i is misnamed. "The Jews and the
mununirt Revolution" would be more accurate and
ion descriptive of the book. The subtitle might be
etaky and Jewish Revolutionaries." He, as Ilya Ehren-
;!. was an atlteist and a confirmed assimitationist. He
- a Jew solely by accident of birth. Even in his will.
'"n shortly prior to his assassination in Mexico, he
" "-Semitism as a product of the decaying capitalist
ler, The book is well-written by a professor of iiolitical
''ice in Israel.
Hyn-.an J. Fligel has produced two books. The Life
1 Times of Max Pine and lard ZUberW (B'nai Zion
undationi. Pin.- (laM-UMt was a dedicated leader in
Gewirkahaften Campaign and the first American
'' to the Histadrut Zilbert .1881-19491 enriched
Jewish elements in Ashk.nazic Jewry. He was an
' mdiflg voice teacher and numbered many great.
E"iLb>w PupiU. The book has excel lenj_aj>jgndjccs;i-
.Ifs bad enough that we have our own domes-
tic breed of hot-tempered ruffians, but we cer-
tainly don't have to import more of them
An abortive attempt by the JDL to institute a
Jewish boycott of Arab business and stores, was
vigorously repudiated and rejected by every Is-
raeli. What Rabbi Meir Kahanc does not seem to
understand is that our purpose is not to make war
against the Arabs, either thos.> who live in our
midst or those who live acro.-s the borders, but to
make peace with them. Anything which will in-
flame, aggravate and irritate relations is treason
against Israel's best interests.
DATEUNE ISRAEl By Robert Slater
Soviet Immigrants
Need Time To Adjust
I
^ 3.->-YE.\R-OI.I> mathematician from Moscow
Leonid Frank, is a newly arrived Russian
with a dilferent slant on the problems of the So-
viet Jewish exodue. -There is much too must stress
stress placed on aliyah. and not enough on the prob-
lems that Russians encounter when they reach
Israel" says the bachelor immigrant, who arrived
in Israel with his mother five months ago.
Like other Russian Jews, he finds the Israeli
bureaucracy rigid and thinks that it would be better
if the government put Soviet Jewish immigrants in
government offices to serve as clerks "Then," he
notes, "things should improve."
As a bachelor, Frank Ls fairly unique among
his Soviet Jewish colleagues most come with
families, young children, and occasionally families
might be forced to leave behind sons hound for the
Russian army. "But," says Frank, "the problems
we bachelors face are just as difficult." He ob-
served that men under the age of 40 were given a
single room, and often were expected to share it
with two or three other single men.
While expressing his own i>crsonal hesitation
about jumping into Israeli politics in the first few-
months, Frank agrees with the persistent report-;
that Soviet Jews, when they make the political
jump, jump to the right.
"Statistically', it is correct," Frank said, "that
the Russians are joining the right-wing political
parties in Israel, when they join at all." It is no
surprise that partial like Herut are so popular
among the new Russian immigrants. After all, ob-
serves Frank, "wherever the Russian goes to
Israel or somewhere else he's going to be afraid
of Socialism, because of his experiences in the So-
viet Union."
The most enthusiastic Russian immigrant re-
quires time to adjust to a new life, a new country,
a new language, and a new political system. But.
with the passing of time, Soviet Jews will want to
take part in the political process. "The Russians
will want to influence, and not just be influenced."
says Frank, adding, "After all, it is their country
now, their homeland."
Another frequently heard problem among Rus-
sian immigrants is the lack of Russian-language
material available In Israel, opening a yawning
cultural gap for the newcomers. With little to read
in Russian and with only rudimentary skills in
Hebrew during their first few months in latest, a
number of Soviet Jews aiv said to feel fairly iso-
lated thoa* first crucial months in theii new coun-
try.
Naturally enough, the subject of the Soviet
ransom decree arose during a conversation with
the solidly built, dark-haired Russian. He exhibited
no great bitterness toward the Soviet government,
but chose rather to express the hops that the
American Jewish community would bring pres-
sure to bear upon the Russians to back down from
their latest move against aliyah.
An easy-going man with a friendly nature.
Krank spends his .lays at the Ulpan Et/ion Hebrew-
language program in Jerusalem, when' he studies
Hebrew several hours a day. He i^ hoping to secure
a teaching position In the Mathematics Department
Of the Hebrew University. In Russia, he was en-
gaged in theoretical research in mathematics at a
MOSCOW institute.
(e). IfTS, .1'ucsli Trli-RTiii>lii< Ar.-iii \ >
More recently the JDL has proclaimed it* own
war against the mayor of Hebron. Provocative
demonstrations may be good for headlines and
publicity, on which organizations like this thrive,
but they aie in essence anti-Israel. These are the
very days when glimmerings of peace are detected.
A mood of conciliation is in the air, on both sides.
There is a spirit of understanding and a desire
for normal relations. On the other hand the die-
hard Arab terrorists are doing everything they
can to disrupt such normalcy, and to prevent Arab-
Jeuish understanding. How odd that the Jewish
Defense league seems to be cooperating in the
same anti-peace ;>olicy.
1 am happy to report that the JDL has not
sueceedud in enrolling any large following here. To
the contrary. its ill-conceived activities have
aroused public opinion against them. They have
been pMVMatfve but they have also provoked
rumblings 0f discontent against themselves. There
have already been open hints in some quarters
that if the JDL becomes overly obstreperous, there
are Israelis who are prepared to crack their heads
and bloody their noses if the police wont take
action.
Rabhi Kahane makes a great mistake if he
Btea any parallel between the streets of Jerusalem
and the streets of Brooklyn. There is no room
here for a private vigilant:' movement.

Jews In Sports
By: HASKELL COHEN
Coach Cracks Barrier
jmill.K Mrs. Gavriel Silver Shapiro found it impossible
to crack the Iron Curtain barrier without a visa, an
Israeli coaching an American basketball team accom-
plished this very feat, much to the consternation of the
Soviets. lion Zohar. who shepherded an American bas-
ketball team from Nassau County on Long Island, under
tin s|>rvsorship of the U.S. Committee lor Sports for
Israel, flew to the Holy Land last month with his All-
Stars to play against the Israeli national team. The
purpose was to prepare the Israelis for the Olympic
trials which were scheduled for two weeks before the
actual games in the city of Augsburg. Germany.
The Amateur Athletic Ui.ion of the United States
upon learning of the proposed junket to Israel, contacted
Zohar and asked him to represent the United States
with his team in the third annual Yuri Gagarin Me-
morial International Tournament scheduled for Tbilisi in
Georgia. The AAU assume*! the financial responsibility
for this trip once the group left Israel.
Although the AAl' had applied for a visa for Zohar,
it didn't come through in time, so that when the All-
Stars left Israel fate hi July. Coach Zohar was without
a Russian visa. Furthermore, as a temporary resident of
the United States, he was traveling on an Israeli pass-
port. Upon the arrival of the team, the coach was de-
tained and advised this column that he was treated in
a very courteous fashion; he was put up in a hotel near
the airport while the rest of the team under Associate
Coach Kd Krinsky left for Tbilisi. Within a day a visa
was provided for Zohar. so that actually he was sep-
arated fi-om the team a total of ."50 hours, catching up
with his boys in the Georgian capital.
Incidentally, the Israeli part o'" the tour was a
smashing success, with four successive triumphs. In
Georgia the U.S. quintet won its first three games
against the Ruassasi alternate Olympic team, the Georg-
ian national team and Finland. Losses were sustained
at the hands of the Russian Olympic 5 and Czechoslo-
vakia's Olympic squad.
Zohar and his associate. Ed Krinsky of Westbury,
Ling Lsland. report that they were given the run of
Tbilisi and went and mw everything Uwy wanted.
It has always been my contention that more can
be accomplished through the medium of sports on an
international level than dozens of diplomatic meetings
and parleys. The moral of this column is that if you
want to get into the U.S.S.R.. see to it that you are
a! I dialed with S top-flight organization and the likeli-
hood is that you will have a much easier time getting
behind the cu.tain.
, >. 1972, ,i. wish Tclesrmptak Arc


Page 18
+Je*ist tkridHkHr nd Shof m of Hollywood
Friday, October 27
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