The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00048

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Flondi&n
Volume 2 Number 20
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood. Florida Friday, August 18, 1972
Price 20 cer.:
MARKING ISRAEL'S 25th ANNIVERSARY
Salute To Israel First Event In American Celebration
Outstanding members of the
international diplomatic scene,
prominent members of the local
MRS. RUTH DAYAN
and statewide political arena
and top stars of the entertain-
ment world will appear at a spe-
cial Salute to Israel program at
Temple Beth Kl in Hollywood
on Tuesday evening, Sept. 5.
The program will be the open-
ing event in the American cele-
bration of Israel's 25th anniver-
sary and part of the Florida
Salutes Israel program being
jointly sponsored by the Israel
Government Tourist office. El
Al Israel Airlines, Eastern Air-
lines and foreign tours. Local
sponsors of the program are the
Jewish Welfare Federation of
Greater Hollywood and the Jew-
ish Community Relations Coun-
cil.
Mrs. Ruth Dayan, ex-wife of
Defense Minister Moshe Dayan,
will head the group of foreign
visitors appearing at this event.
This will mark the first time
that Mrs. Dayan has appeared
in Hollywood.
In Israel, Mrs. Dayan is the
president of Masktt, a govern-
ment operated arts and crafts
company which she founded in
1954. She has played a key role
in developing the arts and craft
industry in Israel, a significant
element in helping to reduce the
country's balance of payments
deficit.
Another outstanding person-
WHITE HOUSE EXPLAINS
Nixon Didn't Mean To Imply
..., w
Greece Was A U.S. Outpost
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
White House said last week
that Presi tent Nixon did not in-
tend to imply, in remarks at his
July 27 news conference, that
Greece or Turkey would be in-
volved in the defense of Israel.
The i*sue arose recently when
officials of the Greek govern-
ment declared that they object
to any implication that Greece
is a U.S. outpost for the protec-
tion of Israel.
Deptifv Foreigm Minister Chris-
tian Xanthopolous-Pulamas de-
clared that "Greece's friendly re-
lations with the Arab world rule
out any direct or Indirect par-
ticipation In any acts aimed at
our Arab friends."
The Greek official made his
statement in commenting on
President Nixon's remark that
he continues to support aid to
Greece and Turkey, which he
said was even more important
now than in the past "because of
the fact that without aid to
Greece and Turkey, you have no
viable policy to save Israel."
(ierald L. Warren, deputy
White House press secretary,
said that the President was
"talking broadly" on the Im-
portance of U.S. strength to
"all of our friends and allies in
the southern Mediterranean"
when he made his comment
about U.S. aid to Greece and
Turkey "
State Department spokesman
John King refused to discuss any
phase of the matter, in keeping
with the continued refusal of
the department to discuss Mid-
dle East issues since Egyptian
President Sadat ordered the
ouster of Soviet military advis-
ors last month.
Israel's Ties To 'Reactionary Forces'
) Soured The New Left, Paul Jacobs Says
JERUSALEM (WNS) Paul
Jacobs, a New Leftist from San
Francisco, charged that Israel's
alignment with "reactionary
forces," coupled with its post-
Six-Day War policies, have
caused the New Left to become
anti-Israel and anti-Zionist.
Mr. Jacobs told the closing
session of the American Jewish
Congress-sponsored 10th annuRl
American-Israeli Dialogue that
the New Left was "soured" by
Foreign Minister Abba Eban's
presentation of the State of Is-
rael Award to Gov. Ronald Rea-
gan of California, and the Amer-
ican Histadrut's dinner honoring
Mayor (then police chief) Frank
L. Rizzo of Philadelphia.
Mr. Jacobs also denounced
what he called "Israeli interfer-
ence in American Presidential
campaigns," a reference to Am-
bassador Yitzhak Rabin's re-
ported but since denied en-
dorsement of President Nixon's
reelection.
Prof. Theodore Draper of the
Institute of Advanced Studies at
Princeton University, declared
that Israeli interference in the
Presidential campaign was "un-
precedented, unwise and short-
sighted." He added that he him-
self would be tempted to vote
for Sen. George McGovern just
because of the reported endorse-
ment of President Nixon by Is-
raeli officials.
age who will join the program
will be Jacob Goren, director of
the Southern Region for the Is-
rael Government Tourist office.
Mr. Goren is a native Israeli
but has lived and worked in At-
lanta, Ga., since 1969. He has
occupied his present position
since 1970.
Heading the group from the
entertainment world appearing
on the program will be Mike
Burstein, one of Israel's leading
motion picture and stage stars.
Although born in this country,
Mr. Burstein has lived and
worked in Israel for the past 10
years. He appears there on both
radio and television and has also
made a number of films. He has
just completed an Israeli-Ger-
man co-produced film called
"Death of a Stranger," in
which he co-starred with Jason
Robards.
The Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council, one of the local
sponsors, is a group composed
of representatives of all the
local Jewish organizations as
well as the synagogues of the
area. President of the Council
is Joseph Kleiman.
Cochairmen of the committee
planning the Salute to Israel
program are Mrs. Edward
Light, Women's American ORT;
Mrs. Frances Briefer, Hadassah
and Mrs. Alan Jacobs, Holly-
wood Section of National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women.
Many other local dignitaries
as well as stars from the enter-
tainment world who will be ap-
pearing in the area at that time,
have signified their intention of
joining this initial celebration of
Israel's 25th anniversary. There
will be no admission charge and
no solicitation of funds.
MIKE BURSTEIN
Herbert D. Katz Appointed
'73 JWF Campaign Chairman
HERBERT D. KATZ
Herbert D. Katz, prominent
local attorney and vice presi-
dent of Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation, has
been selected as JWFs cam-
paign chairman for the coming
year. Announcement of the ap-
pointment was made this week
by Federation's Executive Com-
mittee.
Mr. Katz, who has long been
active in the work of Federa-
tion, served last year as associ-
ate chairman of the campaign
and was part of the team that
made this the largest campaign
in Hollywood's history.
Starting his work with Fed-
eration in their Young Leaders
Council, Mr. Katz was the win-
ner of its coveted Hy and Belle
Schlafer Young Leaders Award
in 1968. He is also a member of
the National UJA Young Lead-
ers Cabinet, the National Cash
Committee of UJA and the
Campaign Services Committee
of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tion and Welfare Funds, and a
past president of the board of-
directors of Camp Ka-Dce-Mah,
a local day camp founded by
Hollywood's Jewish Welfare
Federation.
Mr. Katz is also the Florida
state chairman for the Opera-
tion Israel program of UJA. He
and his wife, Ellie, and two of
their children, Laura and Tom,
recently returned from an ex-
tensive tour of Israel, marking
the third time Mr. Katz has
visited Israel in the past few
years.
In speaking of his appoint-
ment Mr. Katz said, "I am
honored and pleased to have the
opportunity of serving as cam-
paign chairman for 1973. My
awareness of the great humani-
tarian needs of the people of Is-
rael has been reinforced by my
trip to Israel this summer. I
hope to gather around me for
this campaign the top people in
the Jewish community and am
hoping that ultimately we will
have more than 1,000 people
working on the campaign."
The Executive Committee of*
JWF reports that many new
ideas are now being considered
for the 1973 campaign. Among
the ideas being considered is the
possibility of week-end or nil-
day retreats for campaign work-
kers, during which the campaign
would be evaluated ar.1 its pro-
gress assessed. Top echelon peo-
p!s from other communities
would be invited to meet with
Hollywood's campaign workers
and discuss campaign proce -
dures and experts in the field
of solicitation would be asked to
report on the latest methods of
seeking funds.
All Quiet On The Western Front
As Second Anniversary Passes
TEL AVD7(JTA)All was
quiet on the western front of the
Suez Canal Aug. 7, the second
anniversary of the cease-fire.
Helmetless Egyptian soldiers
were seen fishing off the west-
ern shores, some of them wading
deep in the water, and military
sources reported nothing un-
usual on the Israeli side.
Foreign Minister Abba Khan,
peaking to foreign newsmen,
aid that recent Israeli-United
States contacts had shown no
signs of any changes In l.s.
policy since the ouster last
month of Soviet advisors from
Egypt by President Sadat. He
added that both the United Stat-
es and Israel believe the ouster
has significantly weakened the
Soviet strategic preoeace in the
Middle EasC
Summing up Israel's position
on the second anniversary, Mr.
Eban said Israel now has no rea-
son "to doubt the prudence and
efficacy" of its decision on Aug.
1, 1970 to respond positively to
the U.S. initiative which led to
the cease-fire.
He listed alx Items "on the
credit side of the balance sheet,"
iacHMling "lives saved" on both
sides; development of a "dynam-
ic of peace or at least non-
war", a stronger Israel; the de-
cline of terrorist activities and
Increased Israeli cooperation
with the West Bank Arabs; a
rise In Israel's Gross National
Product and exports and stimu-
lation of Israel's economy and
society by Increased altyah, and
the removal of a large portion''
of the Soviet military establish-
ment from Egypt, "one of the
most dangerous sources of po-
tential tension in the region."
Continued on Pans /


Fage 2
Ttw Jowi* Baridi SW H.Bywd
Friday, August 18, 1972
Operation Israel Offering
January Tour For Leaders
A group of local leaders will be
invited by 6reater"-Hiatywwcxr.f|
J<" ish Wollare Federation to
idpete in a sjieoial trip to
Israel thi> ooniiii',' January. The
group will bs seletteil <>n th.- basis
I their imohenx-nt and interest
ii i w Nark <>f JWF
The tour, part of the filiation
I-iael program of I'JA. ii slated
lean foi Israel on Thursday.
' M 4. and ji-tuin on Sunday.
Jan 14
Tne trip will differ from the
usual sight-seeing trip to Israel
n-ttfit it wilPU^tfrVm'fki chiefly
to giving the partici|ants a be-
hind-the-scenes view of Israeli life
today and showing thorn the many
urgent needs of the young demo-
cracy. An opportunity will be af-
forded them to see the Israel that
very few visitors ever see and
meet with Israeli I mm all walks
>f life.
Tour members will visit the ab-
sorption centers and the develop-
tr.ent towns. They will learn about
the many problems arising in
; these new communities "and the (
. methods being used to solve them.
They will visit border kibbutzim
and to give them a well-rounded I
. picture of Israel, they will visit |
historic sites and cultural centers.
Meetings will he set up for them
with top Israeli officials and in
addition they will meet with the i
leadership of Hailassah. OKT and i
> other organizations having groups j
here in Hollywood: the organi/a- ,
twin heads will explain some of
the problems besetting them and
the progress made towards solu- t
ttooa.
The tour is o|>en to couples and
will provide deluxe bccommoda- j
t:'>ns al] the way with everything
included. Cost for the ten days
will be $825 from New York. An
attempt is being made to arrange
a flight directly from Miami.
Should these plans work out. a
new all-inclusive price will I* of-
1. red.
For farther information on this !
special Hollywood group tnp, con-
tact Jewish Welfare Federation,
19<*> Harrison St.. Hollywood.
Tax Reform Bills Revised
WASHINGTON (WNS Sen. Gaylord Nelson D.-Wlso.i and
Rep. James Corman iD.-Calif.) sponsors of tax reform bills that
wotik". have seriously affected bequests to Israel, have amended
their bills to eliminate the threat. Eliminated were clauses artUng
a "floor" on charitable contributions and permitting deductions fo;
tax purposes only if the bequests were to be used predominantly
within the I'niied Slates or any of its possessions. '
More than 1.000 guests joined in a special tribute to Israel
at the Grossinger Hotel and Country Club during a recent
Israeli Festival Weekend" staged there in cooperation
with El Al Israel Airlines and the Ministry of Tourism.
Pictured in the hotel lobby with model of an El Al jet aze
(horn left to right! Jacob Pachter. director of the Israeli
Government Tourist Office. Eastern Region, U.S.A.. Ruth
Zadok, El Al ground hostess at Kennedy Airport: Mrs. Paul
Grossinger, who originated and coordinated the two-day
festival; Karen Arezzi. another El Al ground hostess at
Kennedy Airport, and Harold Seligmann. president of Four
Star Tours, a leading U.S. packager of tours to Israel
illel Registration To Close On Friday
-I i n urn will close soon at
Hi. -Iilx-1 C'ommunitv Day School:
tin '.Milline far new r. _,i-.tr:nit.>
has been set for Kr-..i:i>
The maximum number of chil-
dr*H thwi will be acce'rtol is 130.
Moat cfaaaea are Tilling rapidlv
and many have alreadj poached
tlie maximum of 20. There are.
how p et -ome openings available
in neand, seventh and eu'bt'i
grades. Anyone Interested bi reg-
ftratiaq is asked to coated the
*
---------


News Briefs
]
Maiden Voyage For Zim Haifa
GENOA IJTAl- Tlie 35/MMen Zim Haifa, the Orel con-
fateer sMp to lw.tr n Israel flag, was chedulcrf to leave Genai
MlpyHNl n it- rnnijer vovage tn New York last week.
i#"Hi(*li Groups Meet With Chancellor
NEW rOfUS fWNSl Repi. svntatives of the Ameiican Jaw*
-ii Congress. tl* American Jewish Committee, the Jewish Labor
' 'mmittc. ai).i tlv Anti-Defamation League of B'nai ITrtth met
ith N. vv Vork f'itj School Chancellor Harvey Seribner to demand
the removal of Lilis Fuentes. newly appointed sti[.ertntendent of
-School Distiict No. 1 in the Lower Ea*t Ride. Ftientes has been
accuxid of maltiog anti-St initic and anti-Italian remarks while he
was principal oi Public School 136 in Rrookl>n.
Jewish Bloe 0>iirrpt Deplored
WASHINGTON 'UN's:. Tlv president of B'nai B'rith de-
plored political eampalgha thai "linprufleHflj and niMlfliianiMMinlj"
approach the Amu kail Jewish eomnattty as "one iarae" group of
fOimn A singular emphasis" on Israel, "which some supporters
>f r-ity (>f laaaM to which the vast majority of Jewish
voti a react.*' Dr. Dav k M Hluml>en,- of Knoxville. told a mid-year
meeting of the B'nai B'lith lioard ot governors. "We would remind
c-indkkit.* of all parti.-s that .lews do not vote as a bloc or in re-
poaaa % my alngfa laaas."
NEW!
Acoustical Vinyl
CEILING SPRAY
Give New Life to Old or Cracked CoiMngs
& OFFICES ft HOMES ft NEW CONSTRUCTION
CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE 989-3983
Orywal rlacttriag Hoaat
BOWERS & SONS
Lkemed I laserad
principal. Rabbi Dov BidnL-k. at
th. -ih.iil.
Tlie new HUM Imildins at 21288
Btscajma Blvd. is being con-.pletely
i-omodeiod and will be ready for
th*' op.!iin<; of school Sept. .">. New
safety features have been added,
to iho complex; a complete over-
haul and rebeautification of the
swimming pool, a new dining fa-
cility, "canopy style." and audi-
torium is beta: art up.
The community will he invited
to tour and view the new facilities
in early September.
Washington
5 Federal
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BEACH
NOW IN HOLLYWOOD
AT 450 NORTH PARK ROAD (Just across from the Hollywood MaU)
Phone: 981-9192 Also lour offices in Bade County to serve you

Jack O. Gordon
Ptttidt::
Arthur H. Courshon
Cm r-rtn of 1/x 8c*td

Caribbean cruise sensation
to be continued.
Florida's grand and glorious Nieuw Amsterdam
now cruises into summer and bevond
-. "', P* ana* bMd on dMai oup*ncy m
She s elaborate, engaging, and is she wb^ct v,i^,.i,,y
ever popular. So popular we've ex- pTO.*!kEiv n y ioom
tended our Florida Nieuw Amsterdam r' I >oi
10 day cruises through June. July and TC! ?!****.luth ',.f '' D Comptft dataibi
atl the rest of the year. There s little >>'" D'immr N*h c^> cfu.. O f.m
wonder people have taken to the Nieuw M*trro,o C/.t.
Amsterdam. She's a majestic ship. t%J
37,000tons. and every bit as palatial Addrati.........................
as cruiseships were meant to be. She i ,................. s-.i.......2-.......
has balconies, terraces, the grandest !., /.........
of grand ballrooms She has the grand- <- os of n*- i> 1 .a.iir,.
est service too. and no tips are required
She is quite the meiestv of Florida
cruiseships and now. lonawill shereion.
10-DAY CRUISES TO 6 CARIBBEAN
AND SOUTH AMERICAN PORTS
From Port Everglades 10 A'uba.
La Guaira (for Caracas).
Isla o> UiiijjiiM Marumoue Si Thomas.
^ Holland
Aug. it: From $285 to "Baa! AtDeHCa
6, Oct 16, Oct 27, Nov. 6, JA WOT PrillOOC
v. 27, De<. B: From $280 to $840. '^^ UlUlaCb
Dutch and we want everything to be perfect.
$895


Friday. August 18. 1972
Th. J.wi,h FlerUien t Sh.f.r *f Hollyw.^l
Page 3
12 DAYS ABROAD WITH PRESIDENT NIXON
Educated Citizens Unaware
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
(Chief JTA Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON Soviet
Jews who JMStify the liquidation
of Jewishness enjoy high sta-
tion and extraordinary living
comfort?. They also incur dis-
trust and sometimes disdain from
their superiors. Evidence of this
appeared when the "Soviet Prop-
aganda Eleven" visited Amer-
ican cities last Autumn. More
emerged in Moscow during the
summit conference.
Knowledgeable western sourc-
es in Moscow told the JTA that
the "show-case Jews" are "trap-
|x-d" by their own cupidity or
timidity. Many of them possibly
are remorseful now but they
cannot shift lest they meet
ignominy or something else.
MOST OF those in the fore-
front today were bright young
intellectuals yesterday, eager to
test their talent and prove their
loyalty. They came forward even
while the anti-Semitic signals
were flashing in 1948-53 when
Stalin was liquidating Jewish
intcllortualism and closing down
Yiddish schools to wipe out Jew-
ishness by repression and attri-
tion.
When the JTA reporter chal-
lenged the remarks about So-
viet Jews being provided foreign
journalists, a Russian official
exclaimed typically: "These are
facts, given to you by Jews!"
To this the response was that
even in Nazi times some Jews
betrayed their own people; ren-
egades may be found every-
where; look at Soviet history.
The Russian understood and
agreed. "Brother fought brother;
it is true," he said.
HOW WOULD a "showcase
Jew" to react to such an attitude
toward him Had he heard it?
Nevertheless. fresh blood
surges ever forward. A post-
summit Soviet announcement
has disclosed that a new book
published about Birobidzhan
contains glowing chapters of
life in that "Jewish Autonomous
Region" by writers with Jewish
names, including "Mike Davkiov,
an American journalist." Do
these writers know or care that
Birobidzhan has neither been
Jewish nor autonomous since
Stalin's planners established
that colony in 1926 to siphon off
urbanized Jews from Russia and
the Ukraine to help build a
Far Eastern Siberian buffer
against Japan?
NOT ONLY the performers
at Moscow's International Press
Center stressed Jews can prac-
tice their culture in Birobidzhan.
Tourist guides also emphasize
that to visitors whn the Jew-
ish question arises. But when a
well-educated Leningrad guide
was asked if she would move
to Birobidzhan if she were Jew-
ish she hastily responded nega-
tively. "I like a big city and not
being 80 far away from the cul-
ture here." she said. Of course.
Curiously, none of the four
Jews in the "Propaganda Elev-
en" poilicipated on the central
stage for the foreign press. Col.
Gen. David Dragunsky, the star
performer on three continents,
never appeared in the Moscow
presentations. Perhaps he has
been ostracized for accepting
replicas lof an old Israeli coin at
the Kansas City synagogue. Prof.
S. Ziv, the authority on Soviet
law who was regarded as the
harshest among the "eleven" in
denigrating Jewish life, did par-
ticipate in a srvclal news con-
MILTON FORMAN
INSURANCE CONSULTANT
NOW AN ASSOCIATE o
fMlBY RICHARDSON INC
0T IAUDMDAU
'77 1440 Q* 932 2062
ference along with Aron Ver-
gelis, the editor of Sovietteche
Heimland. The JTA reporter
perhaps inadvertently caused
this programming.
BEARING in mind that the
Jews among the "eleven" al-
ways were accompanied by non-
Jewish companions when meet-
ing Americans, the reporter
asked the press center's ap-
pointments desk for a private
conversation with Vergelis. Ziv
was trotted out to join Vergelis
in a "press conference" along
with the usual panopoly of So-
viet officials. To the annoyance
of the press center promoters,
the JTA reporter refused to at-
tend.
However, a conversation with
Vergelis dk1. ensue. On his last
full day in Moscow, the JTA re-
porter was suddenly informed
that Vergelis was at the center.
Did he still wish to see him?
Immediately a conversation was
arranged. Upon his return to
Washington, the reporter re-
ceived a friendly visit from two
Soviet diplomats. One of their
first questions, without any clue
whatever from the reporter, was
"How did your talk go with
Vergelis?" Apparently Soviet
bureaucratic communications can
be good.
THE PRESS conferences in
Moscow were controlled by the
director-general of the Soviet
news agency Tass, Leonid Za-
myatin. When the writer Boris
Bielek, a Jew stumbled in ex-
plaining why so few Jews
15,000 live in Birobidzhan,
Zamyatin took over. "If we
forced our Jews to go to Biro-
bidzhan," the Tass chief inter-
polated, "you (the reporter)
would be the first to demand
that they be sent to Israel."
The unhappy Bielek did not re-
main on the scene long after
that "explanation."
Two incidents indicated the
amazing lack of current infor-
mation or pretense of it
even among Soviet intellectuals.
One concerns Vergelis himself.
EDITOR OF the Soviet Union's
only Yiddish magazine, Ver-
gelis presumably has access to
at least Soviet publications and
news services. Yet when he was
asked by JTA for an opinion
about Soviet Ambassador Jacob
Malik's vicious anti-Semitic dia-
tribes at the United Nations,"
Vergelis refused to accept the
fact that Malik had made them.
"I don't believe it," he said
twice. "Malik is very popular.
He is a very good diplomat and
very intelligent. It can't be true."
CERTAINLY. Vergelis may
have been covering up. Nonethe-
less, the record can only show
what he said about Malik.
After novelist James Michen-
er's walkout on Alexander Cha-
kovskys remarks, the JTA
sought at the press center to
learn how Pravda treated his
protest. An alert, friendly man
of about 40 translated that Cha-
kovsky had participated in the
press conference.
"ISN'T there anything about
Michener's protest?" JTA asked
the translator.
"Protest?" he responded in-
credulously. "What protest?"
An explanation followed. The
man turned) back to Pravda,
puzzlement and concern deep-
ening on his face.
"No, there is nothing here," he
said slowly.
He then was asked about Min-
ister of Culture Ekaterina Furt-
scva's long criticism at the press
center of Nobel Prize winner
Alexander Solzhenitsyn. "I don't
know about it," he replied un-
comfortably.
Who was this translator? A
Russian political scientist who
has studied in the United States.
Despite his professional training.
he was chained to Pravda. If
that paper, the Soviet's best, did
not carry a report, then obvi-
ously, to him, no such news
existed.
A FAIR conclusion is that
when such educated Soviet citi-
zens are unaware of develop-
ments on their own premises it
is unlikely that they can fully
understand situations abroad or
at home.
As JTA has already reported,
a young man at the Moscow
synagogue knew about Michener
and Chakovsky. Israel's Radio
Kol Yisroel had informed him.
A lesson exists here for those
who would ban broadcasting to
the Soviet Union anc"i its satel-
lites as "cold war relics." De-
tente must include people as
well as governments.
(From the file* of the JTA)
SiNKURASH;ElTMS

INC.
Branch office: 7991 Johnson St.
966-9300 or 947-3332 (Toll Free)
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Murray N.Rubin, ED.


Page 4
Ik. Jewish rlerieVta* I Sh.f.f of Hellr~ee4
Friday. August 18. 1972
^wWJM&iari | MATTER OF FACT *****
3FHCE and PL\NT -120 N C. th Street Telif-hone S7J-4405
HOLLYWOOD OH 1(1 Telephone 920-6J9:
P.O. Box :<>?3. Miami Flokida ISICI
F*n> K. Snoc.irr Sn ma M. Thompson
Editor ami PnW:>l.rr Auutant 10 P.ib'mher
MARION' jrEVTNS. New* Coordinator
I TM Jewrieti FtorUiar Oere Net Ovarantee Tha Kaohrvtti
Of Tha Mercr.ar.aiea A*v*rt.ss Published Ri-Wrrfcjv fcv the Jtwuh PtonJun
5rcor.iCJa Post apt Paid at Miami. Hi.
Jewish Wnnai Pu>e*vtkc op Crhiii Hollywood Shopae Edttoiual
AdvisMY CoMMirrtf Dr. Sheldon Wiflroe, Chairman; Row bV-kcrraan. ten
Salttr, Marion Mtvta*, Dr. Norman At kin.
T*a Jamiiah Fin*in hat et>oorbt ths Jrw.er. Unity and tha Jewish Weakly
Member of tha Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Sevan Art* Feature Syndicate.
Wer'awide N.i Service. National editorial Association. American Association
' Englih- Jewish Ntwapaprre, and th Florida Press Association
INSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year t?M
Osrt ef Tawn \lpon Reavest
Volume 2
Friday, August 18. 1972
Number 20
8 ELUL 5732
Withdrawal A Danger Sign
The evidence seems quite clear that the Jewish com-
munities of Poland Czechoslovakia and Bulgaria are in the
1 rst stages oi their existence, and while there are signs of
vigor in Yuqoslavia. Rumania and Hungary the long range
portents are not much better.
For Soviet Jewry, the great majority of whom will not
bo permitted to leave even if they so desire, me next decade
will be decisive. The situation in Russia demands our cotv
t.nued support, both in aid to emigration and in constant
rressure on the Soviet government to remind it of its oblige-
t.ons to permit i:s Jews the right to express themselves if
they wish.
The report to the American Jewish Committee, while
dealing with the future of our people in Eastern Europe,
should be a sobering one for us in a country where freedom
cf choice at times appears to be as dangerous to Jewish
survival as the repression suffered in the lands dominated
by the Communist dictators. The withdrawal of Jews in
recent years iiom participation in the classic institutions of
cur people, the synagogue in particular, is a danger sign
t.iat must not be ignored.
Arabs Searching For Truth
Among the many problems confronting the Arab
rations it is reported, is the proliferation of Israeli books
in local libraries One of the reasons, a critic of this phe-
onon points out. is that the Arab has lost faith in Arab
communications and publicity media and in his search
lor truth has turned to Israeli broadcasts and publications.
Since the report appeared in a Cairo newspaper and
called tor control of Israeli books and literature in Arab
countries we teei it is authentic And it confirms our trust
in a tree press and open communications as the best hope
tor peace at home and abroad.
Study Contradicts Earlier Research
Two out oi every five Lutherans wen found to hove
prejudices about Communists, homosexuals, drug addicts.
PF** and members of the SU.S. in a major study of
that Pints*sum body conducted recently, but onJy about
one in frv bad antrSemitic attitudes, leading to the con-
dusjon that anti-Semitism is not related to Christian belief.
bat to fear at diversity.
The fadings contradict earlier reeeaidi mat found a
deSnne crmpscliuu between Christian orthodoxy and prer
-dice tssiiiEat Jews. That there is such a relationship was
ths- conclusion at two California researchers published in
their 1966 book "Cnristian Beliefs and Anti-Semitism "
- in earber srud.es by both Chistian and Jewish
---"res
It is too soon to guess what effect the Lutbetan study
w-Jl have on Christian textbooks and educational material
Even before the 1966 report there was recognition of the
hkilniatty oxtb-Sernitic material contained in many of these
rooks and corrections were made by a number of the lead-
rhurch organizations. Fear of diversity may be a
Lutheran hangup as it is far many people of all faith*
be connection of those lean with lews cannot be dis-
Rwd sc easily as not being of Cnristian concern
Christian Leaders Speaking Out
-r.sticn Seders enuaxed in the past for their failure
to speaV; out in support of Jewish interests when they con-
xtad with those of Arabs, have not been silent on the May
) Lydda Airport massacre, particularly in editorials is
important religious publications
The director of the Institute far JudaeoChristian Studies
i Catholic Seton Hall University summed up most of
the stcterr n the nhservuteuu that, "a so-called libera-
tion movement that no longer pnsesssm the courage to fight
ks battle but needs hnbngs to snoot innocent victims has
lost the iast shied oi dignity.'
WASHINGTON After Mi-
ami Beach, the ghost of Frank
It. Kent ought to haunt every
senior political reporter. Besides
great wit and charm. Frank had
11 talent as a political re-
pSCtsr. But when Franklin Del-
ano Roosevelt changed all the
old rules of our politics. Frank
refused to admit the changes.
So his reporti'v: began to go
wry wrong imlee-'.
Till: HE ARE those who think
the rules of our politics have
.ti3iin been radically changed.
They may be right. They may
bs disastrously wrong. All that
is now certain however, is that
the nomination of Sen. George
' McGowm has produced an
I cithcr-or situation without any
recent precedent.
Either the political rules have
i in fact changed in which case
I the Democrats will win. and
both American politics and
! American policy will take quite
new- directions. Or the rules
| have not changed all that much
in M hich case. President Nix-
i on will not only win but will
' also, at least very probably.
I make the Republicans into the
I country's majority party for a
I goo,' many years to come.
I'XDEB THE old rules. Dem-
ocratic victory' is demonstrably
impossible. The south has been
Siven up. Organized labor has
beta enraged and alienated.
The Republicans have been ef-
fectively conceded huge shares
of the Irish, Italian and Slavic
Catholic votes and maybe as
rmich as half the Jewish vote.
Frank Mankiewicz plainly
wanted compromises. Initially
indeed, both Mankiewicz and
Sen. McGovern even tried to
prevent the challenge to the
I>le> Ik-legation. But the bril-
liant young zealots leading the
McGovern organization would
permit no such concessions to
the old political rules.
THESE VOt'NG men are in
truth the source and. fountain-
head of the doctrine that all
the rules have changed. Their
view needs to be weighed, if
only because they are obviously
among the ablest new figures
to appear on the political scene
In a couple of decades. But their
view also needs to be analyzed
in the light of the ascertainablc
'acts.
For example, they say, with
/'il>lime confidence, that Mc-
Govern can afford to lose mil-
lions of olher normally Demo-
cratic voters, because he will
get virtually all the many mil-
lions of votes of those between
the a^es of 18 and 29.
BIT WILL the senator really
get the support of quite so many
of these younger voters?
The pollsters have been work-
ing their computers overtime to
get a line on that question. The
Gallup organization finds, for
instance, that among the regis-
tered voters lift ween 18 and 29.
McGovern now has an import-
ant but not really enormous
majority. The split is 33rr for
McGovern against 39'J for Pres-
ident Nixon, with the rest un-
decided.
RATHER HORSE, the Gallup
organization also finds that the
split of all potential voters in
this age group is only 49 for
McGovern against 41 for Nixon,
with the rest undecided.
That means that among this
age group's potential voters who
have not yet registered., there is
much more pro-Nixon. anti-Me-
Govern sentiment than among
those who are registered. Yet
mass registration of the unreg-
istered young, and getting out
the whole young vote next No-
vember, are two of the prim."
alms of the youthful leaders of
the McGovern organization.
FOR sl'CH reasons as th
foregoing, one thinks of Frank
Kent, an ok*, friend, and one
winders whether the political
'ulri tmnt~TEM sfmsMini jU^
way that upsets every tradi-
tional calculation.
Change there has certainly-
been. But may it not be that
the most important changes are
tlw strong Republican drifts now
show ing in the south and among
the so-called "ethnic groups?'
We shall know the answer in
November. At any rate, the
DiTnocrats have arranged mat-
ters so that the answer will te
starkly plain.
sacrificed to the "new politic-
ians" loathing of Mayor Rich-
ard Daley.
Under the old rules, what was
cone to Mayor Daley is hardly
credible. Mayor Daley's organi-
zation, after all, contributed -i
nificantly to President Truman's
upset-victory in 1948. He was
almost single-handedly respon-
sible for the narrow success jf
President Kennedy in 1960
IN FACT, one of President
Nixor/s most admirable act!
was his refund to TWtr con-
flict by challenging the Chi-
cago voting figures on which
John F. Kennedy's I960 vic-
tory rested.
If the oi rule* still operate,
moreover, it will be perfectly
easy for Mayor Daley to per-
form his feat of 19S0 in.rev.-rse,
thereby giving Illinois to Presi-
dent Nixon. That is ju>t wtut
he means to do. too.
XOTHISfi less than a pas-
sionate faith In quite new po-
litical rules can therefore ex-
plain the treatment of Mayor
Daley by the McGovern Btgo
command. There was a split n
the command about this matti .
to be sure.
PAKT III The ifUgy mj*km_______
What Happened To The Revolution?
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
in a aeries of five articles )
NEW YORK. NY. What
happened to the ecology revolu-
tion? It started later than the
ones in the ghettos and on the
campuses and drew on a broader
spectrum of support and Is still
going strong.
Instead of using violence, its
aim was the opposite to un-
do the vMence that men had
done to their environment.
Alone among the passionate
movements of our time. K has
aimed at balance, not polariza-
tion, at bearing alienations
tespecially of man from nat-
ure', not sharpening them.
I.ot.it ALLY, tliere should
have been a strong link between
the protest about the city and
the protest about the environ-
ment, for the shame of the cities
w as as much ecological blight as
social blight. But this dMn't
work out The leaders of the
ethnic inner-city revolts show-
ed far less interest in the prob-
lems of pollution, population and
technology than they did in in-
come, social justice and political
pow
Yet the environmental prob-
lems abide. What makes the
cities unlivable and ungovern-
able, makes them so for all. and
no group has immunity from
the damnation of the "unhea-
city Similarly the cull's
will sot be saved except by
those who have some sense of
piece and have put down roots
into their block and neighbor-
hood
THE POLLITIOV problem
air. streams, lakes, noise, dead
birds, vanishing species
couldn't by itself have fed the
fires of the ecology- movement
Other sources of Incitement
have added to it and kept it
alixe
One was the imputation move-
ment, reaching an intense form
in Zero Population Growth It
provided a new- cause to fight
for to help people make a life
by refusing to congest the living
space that nature had provided.
THE SECOND was the Wom-
en's Liberation Movement,
which brought a new passion to
the fight for revised state abor-
tion law-s and for day-care cen-
ters.
The third was a revival of the
liberal passion against the big
corporations and big technology.
but in a new form.
IT IS LESS an attack on
their mono;>oly position than on
what they will do to the en-
vironment if left unchecked. And
it has bmadened out to an at-
tack on the whole idea of econ-
omic growth.
The antipollution movement
ItMst had mi heroes to build
around, unless Rachel Carson
can be counted as a posthumous
heroine. But the ZPG cause was
dramatized by Paul Ehrlich. the
women's movement by Betty
Friedan and Gloria Steinem. the
anticorporation movement by
Ralper Nader.
THE ANTIWAR movement
fed the flame further by its em-
phasis on the eoosvstenvs that
have been destroyed kg Ameri-
can bambing in |xn vietnsaaa.
Tlie Stodstaato conference on
the Rrvtronment ahowed that
the problems are worldwide,
and it gaw e.nivivv to the
term doosi w.itchuv^ tapscl
ally in Baa mil And the Club of
Rome, in its report OB the
I growth played this
end-oi-the woild theme hard,
calling on the woi
growth in every aacment af
the ecosystem n.i ararh towsru
what John Stuart Mill oat led
"the stationary state
RVKII\ II vs revolution
gone so t.ist broti.Viung ami
clarifying as it movt I without
the suvklen deflation ami ool-
NP" the more vio-
lent revolution* of the past .le
cade. But the general accept-
ance of its antipollution de-
mands has dulled its suiting
edge. Those who thought it
might be an important issue in
the 19T2 elections have turm-J
out wrong.
Pollution has become a no-no
for everyone. To a lesser e\
so has population growth, al-
though the recent figures on the
decline of the birthrate have
taken some of the steam out f
the issue. Technology and econ-
omic groA-th also show signs f
becoming no-nos.
BIT THK ecology revolution
can't subsist only on saying no.
It must say yv* to some things-
It should say yes not only to the
conserving of natural resources,
but to the kind of technology
which can put new energy re-
sources to use. can cope with
pollution and can relieve human
drudgery. It says yes to the
mood of the college young who
want to settle on the land and
who have discovered a new na-
turalism in their hfe values.
But it should equally say yes
to other young people, from
blue-collar and white-.
iBBS, who don't want to
break with technology-, ami who
want to use the skills of hand
ami eve in vocational era!'
shoukt say- yes to all forms of
social creativeness and moral
invaginatton. which shape an en-
vironment witmn and bej
the natural environment.
IT is BIGHT to limit runa-
way technology and eco'
pea Ik But if there is
grow th. every social probk
comes stickier, every group
" and demand harder to ful-
fill, every coafhet harder lo re-
solve.
The problem k not to stop
proa th. but control H. and thu-
achieve balance within mans
natural and social environmen'
NEXT The Eros Revolution
oVsvjnafci rats. Laa aagiln Ta"


Friday. August 18. 1972
Ttte J#wiih Floridiin t Shof.r of Hollywood
Vaq* 5
KMOflMMT PROFflf
Joseph L Schwartz
"My inU-reM and involvement in
Jewish Welfare Federal ion really
developed after I joined the Young
JOSEPH L* SCHWARTZ
Naders Council," snul Joseph L.
Schwartz, newly elected vice presi-
dent of the .council. ''"When I
moved to Hollywood in 19*57, 1
worked with lien Sailer for a
while. Ben is deeply involved with
,'< deration and he suggested I join
the Y can't really say I had much con-
viction ahout it at the time, but in
the years since I've joined, my own
filing of involvement and interest
in its causes has jjrown tremen-
dously."
Joe Schwartz is almost a native
Kloridinn. having come here with
his parents whim he was a baby.
He graduated from Miami Beach
High School and then attended the
University of Florida. For his law
degree however, he left Florida.
He graduated from Harvard Law
School in 1962.
Mr Schwartz met his wife, Be-
nita, in Miami. Although she, too,
.ittended the University of Florida,
the span of years didn't coincide;
Joe had gradual ed before she en-
tered. They were married after
his graduation from law school and
are the parents of two children:
Jonathan, fi, and Amy, 4.
Mr. Schwartz feels that the edu-
cational programs which the Young
Leaders Ooiweil has carried out
during the last few yean have
given him a great deal of knowl-
edge ahout the Jewish community,
its no ds, about Israel and its place
in the world and its need?.
Speaking about Israel today, Mr.
Schwartz said, "I feel that the
survival of Israel is necessary for
the benefit of Jews everywhere.
Should it ever fall. I feel that we
would have the greatest wave of
The Famouj
too; oien cantor
LEIB RASKIN
Formerly of
Ml. EDEN Center
Bronx. N. Y..
W HIGH HOLY DAYS
& SUKKOTH ,Bea^,,ul Sukkt
on Premises)
at the
Located on the Ocean
at 21st St., Miami Beach
a PLANNEO ENTERTAINMENT
a FREE PARKING
a FREE CHAISE LOUNGES
Reserve for Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meals
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Under (u) Supervision
Where Every'Meal n i Banquet
HIGH HOLY DAYS
PACKAGES AVAILABLE
For Reservations
Phone: 538 6631
and enjoy the holidays with the
BERKOWITZ FAMILY
we have ever
iiiti-S'initism
known."
On the local scene, Mr.
I-hw.irtz. like so many other-, is
most BiUdeaa IB ~<-e a eommunitv
cetetvr built here. "I really would
like a community center for m>
own use and of course for the use
of my children as they grow older,"
he staled.
The outlook for the Young lead-
ers Council Retting the center
buildinc started is sood. he feelsH
"We're making plans for getting
man people interested in the proj-
ect and for getting the money
that will be needed." he continued.
Besides his membership in Younu
Leaders Council. Mr. Schwartz i
the immediate past president of
the Hollywood-South Broward Bar
Association. He is the awetar)
of the Optimists Cluh of Holly-
wood Hills, where he resides and
has his offices
A firm believer in the import-
ance of the synagogue's role in the
community and the importance o
membership in a temple for all
Jews, Mr. Schwartz is a member
of the board of director* of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom.
CAPI, AVELLONE & KLEIN, PA
.... ^ .-
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
KENNETH J. MONSON, M. D.
IN THE PRACTICE Or RADIATION THERAPY
ANDRE S CAPI. M D.
THEODORE M AVELLONE. M D.
RUBIN KLEIN M D.
ALEXANDER I. KERNISH M O.
JOSEPH V CUSMANO M D
DONALD M MANDELBAUM M D.
ROBERT S POMERANTZ M D.
ALBERT M IOSUE M D.
JOEL A SCHNEIDER M D.
300 NORTH 20tm AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 330ZO
PHONE 923 3301
OOO NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY
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2010 Principles of Economics I
2020 Principles of Economics I
1510 Problems of Philosophy
1520 Introduction to Formal
Logic
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
5650 Intro, to Computers
3801 Introduction to EDP
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3400 Introduction to Marketing
3900 Business Organization and
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3901 Personnel Administration
7110 Engineering Sates Survey
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
2401 Introductory Psychology
2411 Introduction to Social
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BUSINESS CORE COURSES
3630 Corporation Finance
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2072 Money and Banking
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Mailman-Hollywood Center. 3301 College Avenue Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33314


Page 6
11m J.wiih FlwMim $>* HsHyw***
Friday. August 13, 1972

scene around
by M,n|| NtViHs
This is the lime Of yoar that is really rough for new gather-
ers, Of course, 1 am not including the political prognosticators
who are having a Held day In thia year of presidential elections.
They can keep thomaelvaa busy and their reading public en-
grossed by addinc and nibtracting predicted electoral votes, by
-in; on the Change <>1 public opinion incurred by each state-
ment o! either of the candidates or a myriad of other things that
me a 1 Important in an election year.
For the ordinary news gatherer outside the field of politics.
however, it's dullsville. Morning mail is filled with brightly col-
ored postcards from all corners of the world from dozens of
people who write that they wish you were there (but would hate
it if you showed up). Their bits of news are fascinating such
as "Constant blue skies and cool breezes." This bit of happy
news usually arrives just after you have waded through the
puddles on Harrison St. to get to your desk.
No parties no meetings. No Invitations come to this desk
at this time of the year so can't write about the beautiful party
that was given this week and the beautiful people who were there.
But I can dream, can't I?
Last week I went to a magnificent party. It was given in a
breathtakingly beautiful palace on the border of Paris and Lon-
don. (Now these cities don't ordinarily border but it would
be nice if they did and it would save a lot of traveling. Anyway,
this party was given in an air-conditioned garden topped by a
starlit sky. permanently affixed in the balmy atmosphere 20
feet above the tall stately trees surrounding this garden.
As I looked around the garden, I realized that all the men
were handsome and all the women were beautiful and all the
good solid names of the community known as Hollywood were
there so that just naming them would please the average reader.
At this party, no one had an unattractive wife or husband. Ev-
eryone was a magical age neither too young or too old and ev-
eryone had a perfect figure neither too fat or too scrawny.
Truly everyone wu gorgeous and their clothes were even
more gorgeous and their manners impeccable. I can dream, can't
I?
A ir it
BITS AND PIECES Bernard Glantz, president of the
South Beach Civic Association, has just been appointed to the
Citizen's Advisory Board by Dave Keating and his confreres on
the City Commission Ron Treshaii of JWF was the speaker
at a Friday night service at Temple Sinai recently.....Ha-
dassah Bowling league begins its season early in September.
It's Thursday mornings and women who are interested can get
in touch with Maxine Heichen or Norma Sonnenklar.
THE MALL THEATRES I & II
At the New Diplomat Mall E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale- 920-5656
Selective Film Presentations
How to
make money
without
working
for it.
Mk your mony go to work.
Bring it in to trto Banks to Go With.
First National Bank of Hollywood and
First National Bank of Halljndal*
Stan an aasy. systematic savings plan.
Than w jlch your money grow
van fastar than you can say* it.
Th* First National 3anks pay liberal
interest And compound it every
quarter Vou get interest on
your interest
Better start now Every day you
watt you re losing money.
FMST NATIONAL BANK
Of Nourwooo
H0UYWO0D BLVD.
t 20th AVE
t30-4Sji7
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF NALLANOAU
1900 HALLANDALE
BEACH BLVD.
20-4331
EACH DEPOSITOR INSURED TO $20 000 MEMBER FDlC
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
Twin Membership
Teas Planned By
Mt Seopns Group
The Mt. Scopus Group of Hadm-
sah is continuing its membership
drive by staging twin membership
teas on Wednesday. Aug. 30.
An idea inaugurated by Mrs.
I^ury Meinstein, membership
chairman, the teas will be held on
the same day but at different
times and places.
A morning tea will be held at
10 a.m. at the home of Mrs. Irving
London of Emerald Hills. In the
evening a tea will be held at the
Kmerald Hills home of Mrs. Je-
rome Fradin.
Mailed invitations will be fol-
lowed up with a personal call to
ascertain which tea the prosi>ec-
tive member wishes to attend.
Mrs. Earl Heichen, president of
the Mt. Scopus group, will wel-
come the guests.
Mrs. Roz Soltz. a former Na-
tional Board member of Hadas-
sah now living in Israel, will be
present at both events. Mrs. Soltz,
who speaks to Hadassah groups on
her infrequent visits to the United
States, will report on the Hadas-
sah program in Israel.
Season's 1st Mootinfl Hold By Senior Friendship Club
The Senior Friendship Club of
Temple Beth Shalom held its first
meeting of the new season this
week in the Social Hall at 1725
Plans for the 1972-73 season, In-
cluding social activities and fund
raising projects, were discussed
and card games were an tnged for
those who cared to participate.
Monroe St.
Clay Covington. Hollywood Federal's Emerald Hills branch
manager, congratulates Lois Weinberg on winning the first
prize a 22-day, expense-paid vacation for two to Madrid,
Spain. The occasion marked the Grand Opening Celebra-
tion of Hollywood Federal's sixth (and newest) office La the
Poet Haste Shopping Center, Emerald Hills.
BTJIIDI 1ST E3 'S
ft
i *
shrinks, shirts and jeans...
THAT'S HOW LAYERING GOES TO SCHOOL
From our big collection: cotton knit
shrink by Pelican Cove; red, navy,
ourple solid, $5. Polyester/cotton
shirt by C.M.C., red or blua
checks, $8. Boy-cut jeans
by Pelican Cove; acrylic/
polyester knit, heather
or solid navy, purple,
red, $9. Sizes fro~t
4-14 in group.
YOUNG PECPLFSWORl?.
FOURTH FLOOR DOWNTOWN MIAMI
AND AT ALL BURDINFS STORli


Friday. August 18, 1972
11m Jewish Fl.ndi.n t StWer .< Holly w..ej
Page 7
Organization Reports
(ED/TOR'S NOTE: Organizanon
residents have been minted to
submit reports on the accomplish-
menu of their groups for the sea-
son just past and goals of their
i -ganizations for the coming year.
These reports will he published dur-
ing the next few months so that
:he community at large will have
louXedgt of programs of the van-
, us Greater Hollywood orgamza-
cms).
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
HOLLYWOOD CHAPTER 725
By BEATRICE KAKF
Publicity Chairman
Hollywood Chapter 725, B'nai
i iilh Women, sent five delegates
t, the 32nd annual Convention of
the Southeastern Region of B'nai
lirith.
The delegates who attended in-
cluded Mrs. Anthony Zecola,
pies; Mrs. Angelo Palumbo. chap-
ter counselor; Mrs. David LeVine,
irustee and community veterans
service and bulletin chairman, and
Mrs. Marjorie Schiffman, donor
records chairman.
At this convention chapter 725
u as given three awards. They in-
cluded one for meeting allocation;
one for meeting allocation by
early deadline date and the "Out-
standing Treasurer" award, which
| went to Mrs. Harry Zimmer.
Three members also became
I Life Members: Mrs. David LeVine,
Mrs. Marjorie Schiffman and Mrs.
| Anthony Zecola.
{T -to &
Hillcrest Group Hodossah
By MRS. BETTY GOODMAN
Prealdmt
Hillcrest Hadassah has a very
active group of women working
I for Israel and the United States
I with much enthusiasm. Among
I cur activities are a study group,
I choral group, a panel discussion
[croup, a lecture series and Minyan
Dinner, Entertainment Set
The Hollywood Hills Chapter of
Women's American ORT plans an
evening of entertainment Satur-
day at 8:30 p.m. in the Sheraton
Hotel, Fort Lauderdale. Featured
is the evening's entertainment is
ihe "Ice International" show;
I there will also be a full course din-
[ ner served. For reservations, con-
tact Mrs. Mel Adelman.
All Quiet On The Western
Front On Second Anniversary
Continued from Page 1
On the debit side, Mr. Eban
I, was the fact that peice or
negotiations toward peace had
not yet come about. But. he ad-
<1 d, there was "wide accept -
ance" in the world of the need
for direct negotiations between
parties to disputes, particularly
>n the light of recent experiences
in other areas of conflict.
Mr. Eban said it would be
bad" for Israel to seek to ab-
sorb a million Palestinian Arabs
who do not want to be absorb-
ed into Israel but he stressed
Israel would not return to the
l>ie-Six-Day War boundaries.
He envisions close economic in-
tercourse with the Arabs after
lieace is established, he declared.
Sold One
Aluminum Mfg., Inc
OUTDOOR
FURNITURE
POLISHED OR
ANOOIZED
ALUMINUM GOLD
LOUNGES CHAIRS
PATIO TABLES
925-4811
70 N.W. 7 ST.. HAlLANDAlf
groups. We also have two mem-
bers who give book reviews.
Our New Year greeting card
lists all participating Hadassah
members and is sent out with our
bulletin to all members. The cover
of our card was designed by Rose
Stein, a prainter well known in
Hollywood art circles.
Mrs. Louis Unterberger. our
membership chairman, reports
that a membership drive is now
going on.
Our September meet'ng will be
he'd on the 19th of the month. It
will feature games with prizes.
No charge for participation.
In October we will have our
membership brunch which will be
free to members and prospective
members. Later on we will have
an Eye Rank Luncheon and our
usual Chanukah and Purim
parties.
Hallandale Chapter Of Hadassah Plans For 72-73 Season
Plans for the 1972-73 season
are now being formulated by the
Hallandale Chapter of Hadassah.
Arrangements have been made
to hold the Youth Aliyah luncheon
at the Americana Hotel on Feb.
14, and Mrs. Milton Kauffman has
been named to serve as chairman.
The Gold Patron Luncheon will
lake place on April 4 at Emerald
Hills Country Chub; Mrs. Zacrrary
Boosin will be the chairman for
this event. The Donor Luncheon
is slated for March 22 at the Dip-
omat Hotel with Mrs. Lawrence
Dank as chairman.
Mrs. Albert Aaron Hallandale
Chapter president, plans to attend
the Aug. 20-23 Hadassah National
Tonvention in the New York Hil-
ton Hotel. A number of group
^residents will also attend, includ-
ing Mrs. Casper Alman. Chid; Mrs.
Theo Marcus. Fairways; Mrs. I
-awrencc Dank, Hemispheres; j
Mrs. Sol Cooper. Imperial; Mrs. I
Zachary Boosin, Parker, and Mrs.
Helen Fromm, Plaza Towers.
The Hallandale Chapter also
announced the following meetings
for its groups for September:
Fairways Group, Wednesday,
Sept. 6 at the Home Federal Bldg.
in Hallandale; Chai Group Tues-
day, Sept. 19, at the Home Federal Social Hall.
Bldg. in Hallandale; Imperial
Group. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in the
West Bldg. Social Hall at the Im-
perial Towers; Plaza Towers
Group, Tuesday, Sept. 19, in the
Social Hall of Plaza Towers, and
the Parker Group, Wednesday.
Sept. 27, at the Parker Dorado
JEWISH COMMUNITY IN AMERICA NEEDS PROTECTION
THE JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE HELPS PROTECT JEWS
YOUR MONEY CAN HELP STRENGTHEN I. D. L
PLEASE SEND CHECKS PAYABLE TO:
JEWISH DEFENSE LEAGUE
49 West 27th Street
New York, N. Y. 10001
First Federal of Miami
offers this colorful gift
A pictorial calendar
of Jewish Days.
Aft* A/IAM Af*t tftAAt
. Mm |MN< "*l"'i'i>wniiiH'fft* Ttw-4 Mv ***
tN* i mri> mw no >asw it Mfc Hf
ICTORlAl ALeNDAR
of ewisb Ays
We want to get to know you.
Why not stop by any First
Federal of Miami office soon
for your own lovely calendar
of Jewish Days. It's a big 9x16
inches, and comes complete
with cord for wall-hanging.
Each Jewish Day is noted
in red and titled in both
Hebrew and English.
Every month carries its
own colorful Biblical scene
and complete quotation from
the Bible.
So come on in. And let's
get acquainted. Your gift
calendar is simply our way of
saying, "Happy 5733." Our
supply is limited (no phone
or mail requests please).
So get yours while they last.
At any First Federal of
Miami office.
S> First Federal

of Miami
First Choice of South Florida Savers.
Office Serving Broward County: 18495 Biscayne Boulevard, N. Miami Beach.
f>-it Federal Saving* and Loan Association of Miami / America's Oldest federal... Latgest i-> the South / W H Walker. Ji. Chairman / Member Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation
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ovtSTLANO Shopping Center I ROOSEVELT 6015 NW 7th Ave. / LITTLE RIVER 8380 N E 2nd Ave / NORTH MIAMI 00 N.E. 12Stn St / N E I8m STREET 1849S Biscayne Boulevard


Page 8
Vn Jcwlth f l-/Mim Sh. ( NaHywMd
Friday, August 18. 1973
A Triumph Over
Danger And Fear
There were at least 100 persons .
CTOWled tt>Rethr in front of the >
television set for the evening new s
telecast. They watched and lis-
toned""K-th "imrwtienee as the
rewscaster reported the news
from abtoad and a few events in
Israel.
And then, the hitherto restrain-
ed excitement hurst forth. "Look!
IfsTOiafln An the little ore!"
"Oh. my! Klla looks scared"
Rivka. Rivka! That's Rivka.
Who is that standing behind her""
"its Yosef. Now the reporter is
talking to him."
"Where is Violet? There she i!"
"Look at Miriam trying to hide
behind Olga .*'
AND SO it went for the next
four minutes: those now in the au-
dience had lecn the acton in the
drama unfolding on the television
screen. Four minutes of high ex- j
dtement as they identified each |
other on the screen. Four minutes
ot laughing at each other's -- and
their own mistakes.
Four minutes of reminder .gra-
phically acted out by themselves,
that they had looked at the face
of danger, that thev had l>een I
afraid, and that they had triumph-
ed over the danger and the fear |
just as they had triumphed over
danger and fear in the land they j
had left, to come home, to come
to Israel.
IT WAS Friday evening. June J
23, in Kiryat Shmonah. That 1
morning, at three o'clock, a |
Katyusha rocket shell hurst
through the ceiling of the kitchen
in the Rotenberg apartment and
demolished the refrigerator. The i
force of the impact was so great
that the plaster on the other side
of the kitchen wall was torn off
and scattered all across the bed-
room where the Rosenbergs were
sleeping.
The bedroom was on the other
Bide of the kitchen wall, and im-
mediately below the six>t where
Ihe impact of the shell had torn
off the plaster, little Klla had been
Sleeping.
N'usik Rosenberg is .18. He and
his wife Rclla. and their two chil-
dren Natan. 13. and Klla. 3
had come to Israel from the Sov-
iet Union in February. They had
gone directly to Kiryat Shmonah
where, with the help of Jewish
Agency programs supported by
the United Jewish Appeal, they
would learn the language of their
new home, begin the process of
finding jobs and a place to live,
put the children in schools; in
short, to lay the foundations of
their new life, the life they had
chosen in full awareness that the
beginnings would be dilficult. that
the hardships would be many.
WERK Katyusha shells part of
Ihc difficult beginnings, one of the
hardships? Perhaps not in the
kitchen, next to Klla's bed. But
they knew they were going to a
country- of war. Not the war of
armies with their planes and
tanks and cannons in direct con-
Hillel Summer Institute Points
Up 'Rebellion Toward Tradition'
frontation as in the Six-Day War.
But that Israel still faced attacks |
across its borders, that Israel
lived in a constant state of alert,
this they'hart Known "" and in
spite of knowing, came on aliyah.
Nusik Rosenberg certainly knew
what it was all about. He had
served for eight years in the So-
viet army. And practically on ar-
rival in Israel he had obtained a
job as a n>echanical technician in
Haifa, which will be their new-
home next month when their ul-
na n course is terminated.
MOST OK the people who
crowded around the television set
that Friday evening were from
Russia, in Israel only a lew-
months. Had they been scared?
They had indeed. But there had
been no panic as they went to the
shelter. And they all attended
their ulpan classes only a few
hours later.
There was the same busy chat-
tel- and they responded to the tra-
ditional KIddush and they sang
the traditional Sabbath songs with
the same warmth anil vigor as on
every other Friday night. And
they watched television as they
had every other Friday night. But
this night was different, to be sure
they knew they would see
themselves on television.
thkkk WAS a special quality
to this Friday night. The Mayoi
ot Kiryat Shmonah was at dinner
with them. The Rabbi was there
to make the Klddush and eat with
them and to lead them in song,
and to recite the gomel blessing
for those who hare escaped great
danger. And some of the soldiers
stationed in and near the town
had come to eat the Sabbath meal
with them. And from Jerusalem
had come the officials of the Jew-
ish Agency to be with them that
Friday night as a simple act of
solidarity and understanding.
"What do they want of us that
they shoot us?" cried little Ella
as her i>arcnts led her from the
bedroom full or smoke and plaster
dust. And the "veteran" settlers
of Kiryat Shmonah, who have
been living for all these years just
this side of the Lebanese border,
gathered round to reassure the
family and voice that peculiarly
Israeli blessing evolved in the
years of struggle: "Yhiye b'seder"
"It will bo all right."
Temple Sold Dinner-Dance
At Hillcrest Country Club
Temple Solel will hold its second
annual gala summer dinner-dance
Saturday evening. Aug. 26, at
Hillcrest Country Club. Cocktails
ami hors d'ocuvrcs will be served
at 7:30 p.m. with dinner follow-
i ing. Dancing will continue through
i the evening.
Reservations may be made by
! contacting any member of the
I ticket committee or the temple of-
| flee. Committee members are
: Paula Sedel, June Mcinstein.
Eleanor Rubin. Rhoda Roseman
and Bill Rabins.
WASHINGTON Dr. Alfred
Jdfepe, the national director of
B'nai B'rjlh Hillel Foundations.
descT_M The. growing, number of
Jewish college students wlio re-
main dissatisfied with the conven-
tional religious institutions of the
Jewish establishment, yet find
little empathy with an anti-reli-
gious stance as "a rebellion to-
ward tradition."
'They's creating their own
modes of religious expression
Ad l(K)king deep into Jewish tra-
dition to find them," says Dr.
Jospe. a veteran of 32 years in
campus work.
A clear example of the trend
can be found in the program that
will highlight the Hillel Founda-
tions' annual summer institute
this month.
The students have had a say in
the courses of study for their
week-long institute at Camp B'nai
B'rith in Starlight, Pa. And what
they said totaled up to 47 sepa-
rate courses directed by an in-
stitute faculty of Hillel staff mem-
bers and other specialists in
which the emphasis is heavy on
such subjects as Haskiism, Jew-
ish mysticism, traditional texts
and personal religious observance.
There are topical issues too. The
200-or-so students who have en-
roled for this year's institute,
which opens Aug. 23, have listed
Jewish attitudes toward women's
lib, homosexualty, social protest |
and radical lifestyles among the
subjects to be probed during their
intensive, morn-to-dusk sessions.
But it is the heightened interest
of the young people in new forms
of religious expressions that dis-
tinguishes this year's institute
from those of the past.
"There is an attempt to move
away from what many students
feel is the empty religious conven-
tionalism of their parents," says
Dr. Jospe. "They want to go deep-
er to discover Jewish tradition, al-
though on their own terms. They
study Buber, delve Into mysticism
and emulate the Hasidim."
The summer Institute, initiated
by the Hillel Foundations 27 years
ago. has grown into the largest
continuing program of its kind in
the world. Since the first session,
more than 5,000 students have
participated in the institute's free-
wheeling discussions and have
heard and challeneged the
views of the diverse institute fac-
ulty of Jewish intellectuals and
activists.
The institute program is design-
ed to Increase the students' un-
derstanding of Judaism so that
they will be able to operate out
of a Jewish framework in ap-
proaching not only religious but
also moral and political issues.
Dr. Jospe doesn't fret about the
much-reported indifference of
students towards ideas and issues.
"There is a great deal of apathy
on campus. There always hai
been But we don't see it at Hillc)
Institutes, They are a different
breed." ..
The all-night, often tempestu-
ous "rap sessions" that mark
! every institute testify to the stu-
iients' continuing interest in the
world around them. "Our ki.Js are
always excited if anything, they
care too much," says Dr. Jospe.
Interested students are invited
to write to B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations, 1640 Rhode IslaMd
Ave., N.W., Washington. B.C.
20036.
Palmers
Mimml Monument Ctmmmny
3279 S.W. Its Street, Miawi
4444921 4444*22
Open Sunday thru Friday
Personality aWmsriah Casts*
Craft**' In 0*r 0w* Wwtshaa.
Luncheon-Splash Party Sot
The Sisterhood of Temple Sinai
will hold a luncheon and splash
J party at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug.
I 29. in the home of president, Mrs.
Joel Rottman. 1045 S. North Lake
Dr., Hollywood. Reservations may
he made by calling Mrs. Philip
Mautner. Members and their
friervls are invited.
JleviH
memorial Chapel
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Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: ______________________________________
ADDRESS:_______________________
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES


= iFriday. August 18, 1972
Th. J.wi.h Flsrldi.n Sho'., of Hollywood
Paga 9
. .,

&4s 3 *See St
r > KUUL, f jctcoffve Mrecfer.
Jtwfcft rVeWer. Fee-eref ien ef Creefer No/fyweed
Ju,t a few week., ago. 30 Jewish Welfare Federation execu-
tive, and their WtVW met at a conference in a beautiful settinK
overlooking a lake m Wfawnrin. The purpose of this ta*ltS
to evaluate what we have been doing, to learn what we
should have done and to plan for the future.
Agency executives learn by discussing their problems and
accomplishments. It was booed that the executives would insti-
tute action in their own communities from what they learned
There were papers and discussions on the current status of
Soviet Jews. Jewish education, the Jewish Community Center
movement, community relations and campaign procedures.
These men are highly trained, well motivated and highly
intelligent people. They have been running program* and raising
money in their communities for many years. Many of them have
be. n executives in federations since the 1930s. They are prag-
matic planners and community organizers, and yet they ieel that
it Is now time, not to turn back the clock, but rather to replace
an ingrevlient in Judaism which had been displaced.
Surprisingly, all the professionals came to the same con-
elusion about Judaism i:i America. There is the need to reiiisti-
tute emotional Judaism in our present day environment. Why
tru sudden shift?
In Eastern Europe, where most of their own families had
origiaatad, Judaism was a living force. Jews gathered and gained
trenfth from their synagogue. The Jewish community was a
protective force to insulate them against pogroms and the anti-
ftailllilill ot the day. As they feared annihilation, pillage, and
rape, tlwy sang with fear in their eyes and yet with joy in their
voices in the name of their beliefs. They were Jewish for many
reasons and clung to Judaism as their security. They expected
and treated Judaism, by and large, not as an intellectual study.
t lather an emotional experience.
In our dispersion to other lands, places of freedom and de-
mooBfccy, Jews no longer needed the all-encompassing security
that the concept of "pcoplchood" offered us. And so, we defined'
J-'dafem as 'Just a religion." We became "caught up" in the
emotionalism of freedom and the new opportunities of the new
world. As we became more rational and educated in the secular
v.orid, we discarded traditional, emotional aspects of Judaism.
uv- argued that these things were no longer relevant to Judaism
In an open society. We could be Jewish without learning how to
pray or knowing our language, understanding our history, or
ringing songaV And besides, who had time to go to synagogue
t .vice a day. seven days a week?
We began studying and developing the new universality of
J .aistn. We developed rational approaches to explain our moral.
i thalcal and justice issues. To the new generation and even to
li ot the old, lighting candles on Shahhat or hanging mezuzah
< our door post, became old-fashioned ideas. Interestingly
Igh, however, lighting Chanukah candles became very im-
po:nant. (I imagine the latter is something that we had manu-
factured, because of our need to give our children a Jewish
O.ristmast.
The Jewish agency executives are seeing that in more and
more of their communities there is a beginning movement back
towards tradition, sometimes taking new forms, sometimes
catering to the old in its complete sense. These high level pro-
t .--ionals agreed that this new movement should be encouraged,
m1 strengthened in every possible way. The momentum of this
n. wly reemerging sense of peopiohood and tradition is In part
a->ociated with the living Judaism as seen in Israel; the upsurge
trength and new courage of the Soviet Jews; and the nega-
factors caused by the assimilation of the American free
. ty. Ethnicity is now in. and with it comes the spirit of the
of being and knowing who you are.
One of the first things the pragmatic, reasonable and cau-
> community leaders are going to do, is .o Join together to
an emotional, and moving Shabbat, where as executives
can share the Emotionalism that has been lacking. We are
poing to take a trip into Judaism. Would you like to join us?
THOMAS A. RODENBERG, AA. D.
AND
DAVID E. LESSIN, M. D.
ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
ARTHUR S. RUBIN, AA. D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
AT
ACADEMY PROFESSIONAL BUILDING
3816 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florid* 33021
telephone: 969-3300
HOME FEDERAL SAVINGS BUILDING
Suite 407
2100 Et Hallandale Beach Boulevard
Hallandale. Florida 33009
Telephone: 920-3301
.-'.'
tykes
TeEnS and
Twenties
Sense Jueolw has been chosen
for listing In Who's Who Among
American High School Students
The American. Cancer Society
is trying to get young iwople
interested in helping to make
the public aware of ways to
fight in the battle against can-
cer. They're planning a "rap ses-
sion" among young i>cople. You
can help by contacting them
and |articipating. They have an
office locally .
Viewing for interest at the
Temple Solel Splash party at
Emerald Hills were the swim-
ming activities and the Dolphins
football game, which was being
shown on TV in the snack bar at
the club. Whatever their in-
terests, everyone seemed to
have fun .
Young people are heading
back to town, as school starts
on Aug. 28. Of course, those at
Nova, will have had almost a
month's head start; they began
work on the last day of July...
Tom and Laura Katz are back
after a trip to Israel with their
folks.
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Sheldon J. Goodman, D.D.S.
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PERI0DONTICS
EXECUTIVE SUITE
2331 N. State Read 7, No. 114
laaaerkill, Fia.
Telephone 733-4060
Major Jewish
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looking for
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Areas include Palm loach, Bocc
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and Miami loach. Mary open
Submit resume to M.J., Box 2973,
Mtami Fl._________________
BuildingTo Building
At the Beverly Hills apartments, they are spending Sundays
with all kinds of entertainment, including games or sometimes
even movies. Saturday nights they have li-'e shows witfi local
talent starring Oxford Towers Social Club has elected its
i, iwtw ofliqers.twr th president; Helene Silverman, vice president; Bill Kamen, treas-
urer and Flora Kent, secretary. This is one place where the
women really hold the reins Helen Simons is the new presi-
dent over at the Galahad North Women's Chib. This group has
bridge games eveiy Wednesday evening. Charlotte Stone con-
| ducts them.
The Harker Plaza Social Club held a talent show recently
with Dr. Sacks, Herman Silver, Lionel Zeiff and Hy Levitan put-
ting it on. It was a great success and the crowd voted it the
baU show of the year Harry Tollin, the entertainment chair-
man at Sherwood Park Apts. also put on a great show at bis
Eden House there. Ann Swartz was in charge of refreshments.
Officers of the social club there are Ralph Benveniste, presi-
dent; IUrry Tollin. vice president. Charles Stulz. treasurer and
Ziril Tollin, secretary Irma and Joe Fisher at the Meadow-
brook Towers celebrated their "fiftieth'' by playing host at one
of the monthly parties there.
At the Gulfstream Ganlens. they are welcoming back
Frances and Lou Stolper and Syhia and Oscnr Friedman. They
a!i went to the Orient this year Anne and Mendel Birnbaum
of the Imperial Towers made a round the world tour Jerry
Rubinstein, president of the Men's Club at Fairways South is
also home from a vacation trip Riviera Apts. just formed
a Women's Club and elected Mrs. Nathan Schneir president;
Mrs. Ann Miller, vice president; Mrs. George Karp secretary
and Mrs. George Margohs, treasurer.
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Page 10
The Jewish $Ww Me*ywe4
Friday, August 18. 1972
Religious
Services
HAUANDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
cantor.
Friday Sabbath eenrlcee are discon-
tinued during June. July and August
. Saturday Sabbath services will con-
! tlnue and beln 9 a.m. Sexten Ben
! Kali.sh will assist the cantor Dally
Mlnyan 8:30 a.m. 8uliday throuKh
Friday Mlncha-Maariv every day
| starts 6:30 p.m.
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ava.
rteform, KaDDi Samuel Jaffa. 40
BETH SHALOM (Temple). 1728 Mop-
roe St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
MalavaKy. Cantor Irving Gold 4o
Taking part in the groundbreaking ceremony launching
construction oi Temple Beth Shalom's new facilities are
(from left to right) Maurice Segall, assistant secretary; Dr.
Fred Blumenthal, school board chairman and vice presi-
dent; Dr Morton Malavsky. rabbi; Jack Shapiro, president,
and Curt J. Schleimer. financial secretary.
\x *r ft
Construction Under Way On
Beth Shalom's New Complex
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnaon St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapirs
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. 7
July 7 Kabbl Michael Einhorn ser-
monatte: "Quest for Security." Can-
tor Sidney Heilbraun
July 14 Rabbi Martin W. Smith.
Cantor Plnke Halpert.
J.K.F. Development Corp. is the
'milding contractor for Temple
iall. youth lounge and school
ving, now under construction. The
10,000 sq. ft. complex was design-
ed by Morris Lapidus Associates.
Immediately arter ground
creaking, a concerted effort was
nade to expedite construction of
he school wing which will con-
ain four large classrooms and a
iew youth lounge with all neces- !
.-try facilities and youth office.
' 'rejected completion date for this
.ddition is October. 1972. al- j
hough the space will be usable
fore then. This addition has
<-en reinforced for a second story
<. be added later.
The social facilities will contain
ball room accommodating 1,000
. 4-rsons auditorium style, and
eating 500 for a dinner. The
itchen plans are presently being
li awn by an outstanding kitchen
irm and will feature the latest
*)u'pment. The sanctuary, al-
though modern, will be of a tra-
il tional decor.
When completed, the sanctuary
% ill seat approximately 500. There
:\\\ be a folding door separating
i from the social hall, so that
.\hen completely open, there will
be a seating capacity of over
1,500. The dail/ chapel will hold
over 100 worshippers and is being
built together with a bride's room
and proper facilities for weddings
and other affairs.
Connecting the marble entrance
with the rabbi's study will be an
art gallery and a Sisterhood gift
shop. Adjacent to the Cantor's
study will be a music room lead-
ing to the choir loft. A complete
suite of offices in front of the
building is being built, together
with a board room. Projected
completion date for this portion
is February 1973.
Spiritual leadt-t of the temple is
Dr. Morton Malavsky, now in his
tenth year of ministry to the con-
gregation. During his tenure, the
temple has grown to include more
than 500 families. According to
Dr. Samuel Meline. membership
chairman, the projection is ap-
proximately 750 families during
1973. Jack Shapiro is president of
the temple; Dr. Fred Blumenthal
is school board chairman.
It is the feeling of the officers
that the new Temple Beth Shalom
will be of greater service not only
to the membership but to the com-
munity generally, since its facili-
ties will be extremely functional.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5001
Thomat St., Hollywood. Rabbi Rob-
ert P. Fraiin.
Service* are held each Friday at 8
p.m. In the Sheridan Hill" Klementary
BdMML
TEMPLE BETH AHM, S10 Southweat
2nd Avenue, Hollywood
Friday 8:15 p.m. tforman Prafln will
conuuetthe Servlcea assisted by Lay
l--.i-l.-i Herbert Smith. 8lterhood will
sponsor the One* Shabbat.
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple). 6920 SW 35th St.
Conaervative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Hotter
NORTH (MIAMI Bf ACM
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADK
18801 NE 22nd Ava. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingtley. Cantor Irvine
Shulkee. 87
rV^rMlF>FoA*0S*FAr*FlA CANDLEUGHTING TIME
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C0ZI BEAUTY SA10N
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K^sommumty y^-^alendc
at
81'XDAT. AUGUST ** 4
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood Spaghetti Dinner and Fash-
ion Show 5 p.m. Temple Beth Shalom, 4601 Arthur St.
. MONDAY. AUOVST 81
B'nai B'rith Women Hollywood Chapter 725 Luncheon
and Card Party Noon New Sweden House
TUESDAY, AUGUST 2S
Senior Friendship Club Temple Beth Shalom Meeting
Noon Social Hall, 1725 Monroe St.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 24
B'nai B'rith Women Hollywood Chapter 725 Board Meet-
ing 7.T0 p.m.
Temple Solel 2nd Annual Dinner-Dance 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, ANGI'ST 26
Hillcrest Country Club
MONDAY. AUGUST 28
B'nai B'rith Women Hollywood Chapter 725 Membership
Meeting 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 29
Sisterhood Temple Sinai Splash Party 12:30 p.m -
Home of Mrs. Joel Rottman
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Office Hours
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THOMAS A. RODENBERG. M.D.
AN9
DAVID E. LESSIN. M.D.
ANNOUNCE THt ASSOCIATION OF
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FOR THt PBACTICC OF
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972
iday. August 18. 1972
Th. JwMi FforMian 1 SWar H.llrw..d
Pago 11
israel newsletter
By Carl Alpeii
Jew's Poison Pen No Less Venomous
TWO VKARS AGO Israel's Cameri Theatro.prcr
tented a controversial play by the talented young
writer, HaiKMh Levin. It was "Queen of the Bath-
tub," billed as a political satire.
The play ran for some weeks,
during which audience reaction be-
came increasingly hostile, antag-
onistic and finally even violent. As
a result the play was finaJly with-
drawn, despite protestations of
"censorship."
"Queen of the Bathtub" was
frankly allegorical. It portrayed
Israel as a people who not only
murder their neighbors, but also their own sons by
sending them off to war. Critics and public figures
mounted a rising storm of protest. The play was
termed "Ugly, false, despicable, and a sabotage of
Israel society on the pretext of freedom of speech."
Among the tasteless scenes which shocked the
public was one in which an Israeli soldier, killed at
ihe front, accuses his father of sending him to his
i Lth. This came at a time when Israel was sub-
t- d to the War of Attrition along the Sue/ The
Kern wounded deeply the sensibilities of many
itricken famines.
Defendants of the play maintained that it was
not meant to wound, but to strike at mug self.
latitfactton, chauvinism and Israels self-justifying
polltks, It exaggerated, perhaps, but that is the
11 lit of satire.
At any rate, the whistles and boos and finally
the audience violence killed the play. It seems even
i ho actors became disgusted.
That was two years ago, and Hanoch Levin has
now come along with a new and successful play.
It now begins to appear that Hanoch Levin has
iyed a huge joke on the Israel public and under
.over of his harmless social satire he has once again
.. called "T&jng.'J.Jj.has b^ep, dra,\vin2,,.capaty audi-
ences throughout Israel. Critics and spectator
alike have found it a humorous but biting satire of
Israel social life, at times burlesqued, at times diffi-
cult to understand, often slapstick, but cutting in
its apparent criticism of human relationships in the
Israel milieu.
day's Thought:
By DR. SAMUEL SILVER
-
A Masterpiece
tor LIKED "Fiddler on th Roor." you'll love "Sho-
bm," a musical play depicting the life of Sholom
"hem Written by Jacob T. Pincus, of Highland Park,
A lawyer who has given decades to
synagogal life, Mr. Pincus wrote this
stirring musical extravaganza to help
his temple, Nbrthshore Congregation
Israel, celebrate its 50th anniversary.
Although he knows little Yiddish, Mr.
Pincus dexterously picked out those
highlights in the life of the great Yid-
dish writer which grip the heart und
trum the heartstrings.
sholom Aleichcm was one of 12 children. Poor and
yful though precocious, he became a tutor of a rich
111 daughter. She fell in love with him and they married
very little. Attempting to become an expert in finances,
ilomon Rabbinowitz lost all hi-! money.
His wife studied dentistry and. helped to support him
he ground out stories which became popular But
binowitz wanted to be- a playwright and actually had
" plays open simultaneously in New York. The critics
the Yiddish papers panned them not because they
p'e poor but because their editors were feuding with
" writer, who had contracted to write for one of them.
hi his play, Pincus sees the ttps and downs in the
of Rabinowitz as the pattern of Jewish life per se.
<" have troubles but we remain indomitable. We have
licuhios hut we maintain our morale.
The Pincus opus is embellished by lovely songs, wrH-
1 by the author and, scored by Baron Mom, a splendid
mposer.
Your congregation or society will on joy either reading
Muging the Pincus production. Or if you are a Chi-
s'oan, yau can go to that nightclub called "The Happy
"'""in" and watch it being enacted If you want more
,a- Write Mi. Pincus. 1963 York Lane. Highland Park.
4s Wt Wtrt Saying: ly ROBERT E. SEGAL
A Rapidly Changing
U.S. Supreme Court
IF YOr ARE PL'ZZI.KO as many are by re-
cent decisions of the changing Supreme Court,
just wait till next year. In that court season, we
may have opinions on such issues
as abortion and obscenity; and our
surprise and puzzlement may
reach new heights.
There are flickers of hope for
those who have been warmed by
monumental decisions affecting
equality of opportunity and the
keystone protections of liberties
enshrined in the Bill of Rights
over the years of the Wan-en court. The new rays
of optimism stem from the Nixon court's stunning
8-0 division critical of government electronic sur-
veillance, without court order, of those considered
domestic radicals. Judge Lewis F. Powell Jr., who
was placed in the late Justice Hugo L. Black's seat,
wrote that opinion, letting the executive branch of
government know that it cannot play fast and loose
in spying upon people whose ]>olltical views it op-
poses. The new court also has come down with
strength on the side of the indigent and helpless,
holding they are entitled to counsel except in very
sharply-defined circumstances.
Some are cheered further by the 5-4 ruling on
capita! punishment. Before examining the decision
carefully, they seem to have concluded that the
dealh penalty perse is outlawed. But the next day.
on closer examination, they realised that the court
was actually saying tnat the death penalty, as pres-
ently imposed, is unconstitutional. Only two jus-
tices were willing to rule out the death penalty, re-
gardless of the crime. And while 73 condemned- per-
sons now awaiting execution in 31 states will not
be put to death, state legislatures and Congress it-
self may. if they desire, write laws calling for the
death penalty. But such drastic laws will have to be
written with great care and administered in a way
that a\oids penalizing unequally the poor man and
the scorned.
Other recent opinions of the court are heart-
breakers for many who loathe all forms of dis-
crimination and cherish the guarantees of the first
10 amendments. Those who have struggled hard to
lift the chains of discrimination from the arms of
Jews, blacks, and members of other minority groups
will come in time, if not now. to see in this decision
a return to the temper and thought of America's
19th century prejudices.
Similarly, a new court ruling says in effect that
if people want to pass out leaflets in a shopping
center urging Ihe purchase of certain detergents or
better breaks for utliity companies or more taxes
for the middle income and low income peo|>le of the
neighborhood, that's not objectionable, white a
spirited advocate of a quick ending to the war in
Vietnam now faces arrest if he tries to pass out his
literature in th>.-e sacred new precincU of lOO'o
Americanism the shopping centers or the super-
markets.
Such a ruling vitiate* the First Amendment.
But it is a mild irritation comptVed with the new-
court's decision that the news media has no con-
stitutional privilege to protect the sources of it*
information from a grand judy. even when such
information is obtained in confidence. Fortunately,
even that part of the pre** operating well right of
center is screaming with indignation over this blow-
to freedom. And among the estates of government
and opinion in this country, the fourth estate is a
powerful ally.
One of the new Supreme Court justices. William
H. Rehnquist. h quotec as saying: "In the long run.
it is the majority who will determine wluit the con-
stitutional rights of the minority are." This ominous
statement chills the hearts of free men. And those
who are free will pray now that the new court will
come in time to iierfom in the manner of wise, |uat
and merciful men
. atamiil H IiHIi i and even obnoxious att
rael's values and standards, chiefly its attitude
toward the Aral*. Now that the play has been seen
by thousands, the clue to Ihe allegory' la being
leaked.
Israel, or the Israeli, is this time portrayed in
the person of a young and beautiful girl. She is
petulant, infantile, hypocritical, cruel to everyone
to whom she is close. Thing" is a helpless man who
lives with the family. He is degraded, humiliated,
dehumanized and finally led to commit suicide with
a helpful push from the girl. He is. of course, the
Arab people.
The play is a sickening expression of self-hate
and sell-contempt by an Israeli angry' young man.
Levin has had a wond-rful time playing his joke
on the public, but it is interesting to note that the
performance I witnessed, here in Haifa after its
Tel Aviv success was received with a scattering of
boos. The public here certainly does not believe in
censorship, but neither will it silently tolerate gro-
tesque falsification of Israels character. Der Stue-
mer's insidious caricatures of Jews were one ex-
ample of unlimited freedom of expression. The
poison is no less venomous because it comes from
the pen of n Jew.
BOOK REVIEW
By Seymour B. liebmon
Excellent Books
T",s PAST Jt'NK we were is England. Spain and
Portugal. In every bookstore and in every language,
we saw prominently displayed O leriiNiIrm by Larry Col-
lins and Dominique Lapierre i Simon fc
Schuster, $131. I looked forward with
little relish to reading it. The battles of'
Israel* War of Liberation had been
well reeaunted by Netanel Lorch in his.
M'ur l Iiuleftemleiicp and told at greater
length by Dan Kurzman in Geanatti
1&4H.
To my very pleasant surprise. I found
the thrice-told Sties reported brilliantly,
thi stories of the battles held me is suspense and tho
charm of excellent journali-tir writing made the familiar
co'iie alive There are moments of displeasure for both,
Jews and Arabs. The authors narrate the history without
apparent bias. If there is any. it may l>e attributed to
the parasa or persons whom tin-y Interviewed, Human,
memories are not infallible in recalling events of 20
years ago. When blame is placed on Arab propagandists
for setting the stage for the MM dramatic flight of the
Arabs, the Israelis will cheat. The A raits will gloat with
glee over the Drir V.issin account. We recommend the
reading tf page 58-1 as an integral part of this account.
The Arab slaughter oi 75 Jewish men and women who
came to Israel to heal, not to kill, is rarely mentioned by
Israeli propagandists. One can indicate fauHs and several
Statements require elucidation. The book, however, oa
luiiance, is a stirring account that will form a part of the
di finitivp history y t to he written. Till then, this will da
Meyer Levin's The Settler* (Simon & Schuster, $10)
U the crowning achievement of a magnificent story-
teller. The book is epic In scone and size. It Ls told with
tenderness, compassion and a knowledge of "binyan ha-
baretz," the building of lite land, by tho Second Aliyah.
It a tour de force. Levin is a Jew writing about Jews
with whom he empathizes. He explores the gamut of
their emotions as if he had been a chaluta and had shared
their trails and tribulation.- The breadth el his knowl-
r details and the dramatis personnae, corapa*'sMe to Was
east Peace, are so skillfully woven together that one is
more conscious of watching a stage-play unfold than read-
ing a book.
a
While the chalut/im were working in Palestine, a
young Immigrant to these shores di often tud himself to.
Tenth and the rejuvenation of Orthodoxy. Bernard Revet
by Aaron Roihkopf (Jewish Indication Society. $6) is his
biography He brought the Yeshiva University to Ha
place of dominance as a college of orthodox education.
The author has creditably evaluated in depth one of th*
major personalities in modern American Jewish life.
.
-4


Page 12
Th. JwU 'WrMiM t Shefar Holtywooo'
Friday. August 18,
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