The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00047

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
mJmisii floncli&n
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
2 Number 19
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 4, 1972
Price 20 cent*
Film To Highlight Meeting
Of Young Leaders Council
Young Leaders Council
. ?ater Hollywood's Jewish
re Federation will meet
DAVID GOODMAN
sday evening at the home
Ivid Goodman, programming
president. Subject of the
titute Names
'isory Panel
YORK (JTA) Five
Inent academicians and com-
ity service experts have been
to serve as an advisory
to the newly created Insti-
lof Jewish Life tttvisjon. of
pouncil of Jewish Federations
f Welfare Funds, it was an-
ced by Irving Blum, chair-
' of the institute.
be Institute of Jewish life,
headquarters in Wellsley,
. was conceived to foster and
^lop innovative programs and
anstratton projects designed
Enhance the quality of Jewish
in the United States. It was
illy established at the CJ-
TT General Assembly in Pitts-
teh last November and became
|v operational May 15.
he members of the advisory
hel who will work closely with
km and with the institute's di-
Itor. Prof Leon A. Jick of Bran-
Is University, are Dr. Walter
Ikerman, of Los Angeles, dean
fc professor of education at He-
pw Teachers College, University
Judaism; Dr. Leonard Fein, of
altham, Mass. director of the
^njamin S. Hornstein Program
Brandeis University; Dr. Herzl
[>iro, of New Brunswick. NJ..
ofessor of psychology and com-
munity medicine at the Rutgers
Bental Health Center; Sidney Z.
fincent, executive director of the
ewish Community Federation of
tleveland. and Irwln Shaw, exec-
|tive director of the Jewish Com-
nunity Center in Detroit
Aeir Challenges Sadat
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pre-
[mier Golda Melr challenged
I President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
I to prove his peaceful intentions
when she delivered a political
analysis of last week's events to
the Knesset Wednesday. They
said Mrs. Meir's speech will be
Israel's official response to
Sadat's expulsion of Soviet
military advisers from Egypt.
She will ask the Egyptian lead-
er to show that he wants peace
l>.v agreeing to negotiate with
Israel without preconditions.
program will be Soviet Jewry.
A highlight of the evening will
be a new film entitled "Let My
People Go." This documentary
picture depicts the conditions
under which Soviet Jewry lives
today. It includes conversations
with various members of the So-
viet Jewish community, who tell
of their life, their hopes and de-
sires for the future. The film
showing will be followed by an
open discus--ion of Its content.
The Young Leaders Council's
officers for the coming year are
Dr. Samuel Mellne, president;
Errol Rosen, David Goodman,
Mark Fried, Joseph Schwartz
and James Jacobson, vice presi-
dents; Dr. Joel Schneider, treas-
urer and Barry Holeve, secre-
tary.
Work is going ahead on a
complete programming schedule
for the coming year with a vari-
ety of subjects being considered
for the monthly meetings Mr.
Goodman announced.
Errol Rosen, membership vice
president, is currently meeting
with prospective young leaders,
familiarizing them with the
work of the organization. Young
men interested in learning more
about the group are invited to
contact Mr. Rosen.
Renewal of Hostilities
Is Possible In Wake
Of Russian Pull-Out
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
Cabinet minister told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency last week
that the government still lacked
clear information on several
aspects of the pull-out of Soviet
personnel from Egypt, ordered
by President Anwar Sadat.
The Cabinet bad spent four
hour* Sunday discussing the de-
velopment. Assessments were
made by Foreign Minister Abba
Eban, Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan, Chief of Staff Gen.
David Elazar and Gen. Aharon
Yariv, head of military intelli-
gence. The Defense Minister's
special assistant Zvi Tsur also
participated in the discussion.
But the government continued
to maintain official silence
pending Premier Golda Meir's
address to tne Knesset.
The JTA learned that one
possibility raised at the Cabinet
meeting was a renewal of limit-
ed hostilities along the Suez
Canal by Egypt. This was con-
sidered possible in view of popu-
lar dissatisfaction in Egypt with
the "no-war-no-peace" situation
and Sadat's need to bolster his
position. The departure of the
Russians may mean that the
Soviet restraints on the Egyp-
tian military may have been
loosened, sources here said.
The Lebanese newspaper in
Beirut reported that Syria was
planning to follow the Egyptian
lead and expel Soviet advisors
attached to its armed forces.
Israeli military sources believe
there are no more than 1,000
Soviet advisors in Syria. There
has been no confirmation of the
Beirut report.
At the recent Colloquium of International Jurists held
at Uppsala University, Sweden, on the subject at the
universal right to leave one's country and to return,
Jerome Shestack, (left) of Philadelphia, chairman of
the committee on International Organizations of the
American Jewish Committee, and Bertram H. Gold.
(right) AJC's executive vice president, confer with Prof.
Rene Cassin, Nobel Peace Prize winner and president
of the International Institute of Human Rights, as they
examine the Declaration on the "Right to Leave and
to Return," adopted by the colloquium. Mr. Shestack
was chairman of the committee mat drafted the
declaration.
JWF President Announces
Sandi Katler's Appointment
Sandi Katler, executive sec-
retary of Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation, has
SAHDI KATUK
been appointed associate cam-
paign chairman for hiph rises,
according to a statement this
week by Jesse J. Mirtir. presi-
dent of the organization.
Mrs. Katler, who will assume
her new responsibilities while
maintaining her present duties
as oftice manager, has been as-
sociated with Federation (or
four years.
Dr. Norman Atkin, 1972 cam-
paign chairman and president-
elect of JWF, commented, "Last
year during a time when we at
Federation were operating with-
out the services of an executive
director. Mrs. Katler stepped in
and lent her abilities to th<- con-
duct of the campaign. Her
knowledge of campaign proce-
dure obtained during her years
with Federation was most im-
portant to all of us. She has
worked closely with all the lead-
ership of the High Rise Division
and with the tremendous growth
of that group, her knowledge in
the field will be most helpful in
our coming campaign."
Mrs. Katler spent her early
years in Atlanta, Ga., and came
to this area with her parents at
the age of 16. She attended
South Broward High School,
where she met her husband.
Jack, who was one of the foot-
ball stars. The Katlers were
married while he was serving in
the army.
Following Mr. Katler's army
service, the couple managed and
resided in a motel on Hollywood
Beach owned by Mrs. Katler's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Stark. Mr. Stark, who has since
passed away, was a well-known
property owner here. The Kat-
lers have three daughters. Mar-
de. 12; Terrt, 9, btxI Lara. 4.
Tekoah Decries UN Action
Demanding Return Officers
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The Security Council's second
call on Israel to release one
Lebanese and five Syrian offi-
cers captured during a foray
against terrorist bases in Le-
banon June 21, was described by
Israel's Ambassador Yoscf Te-
Koah Sunday as "the tradition
of unbalanced texts." The reso-
lution adopted by a 14-0 vote
with the United States abstain-
ing, requested the Secretary
General and the Security Coun-
cil President to renew efforts to
free the "abducted" officers in
the shortest possible time." Is-
rael, insisting on a general POW
exchange, boycotted the meet-
ings leading up to the new re-
solution.
The new resolution repeated
the request for the release of
the captured officers that was
contained in the Council's June
26 resolution censuring Israel
for its attacks on terrorist bases
in Lebanon. The U.S. abstained
on the earlier resolution on
grounds that it did not consider
Israel's right to defend itself
aeainst terrorist incursions. But
Panama, which was the only
other Security Council member
to abstain in the June 26 vot-
ing, cast its vote for the
resolution asking for the release
of the prisoners. The Panaman-
ian Ambassador, Didimo Rios,
explained that his foreign min-
istry had instructed him to vote
for the measure this time on
grounds of principle.
Jarring Mission Unaffected
By Withdrawal Of Soviet
UNITED NATIONS (JTA
U.N. Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim said In Vienna that
the withdrawal of Soviet per-
sonnel from Egypt had nothing
to do with the peace mission of
U.N. Mideast mediator Gunnar
V. Jarring, it was reported here
last week Dr. Waldheim made
the remark to an Austrian
Press Agency correspondent
when he arrived in Vienna from
Moscow. The correspondent had
asked him if the Jarring mis-
sion may have been made some-
what easier by the develop-
ments in Egypt and whether
chances for an interim settle-
ment proposed by U.S. Secretary
of State William P. Rogers had
become more favorable.
Waldheim said the events in
Egypt were a matter concerning
the two countries involved and
unrelated to the Jarring mis-
sion. He said the Jarring mis-
sion was based on Security
Council Resolution 242, would
continue on that basis and the
U.N. would make every effort
to contribute to a solution of
the Middle East problem.


Page 2
*kishthrkiiftn
Friday, August 4, 1972
letters to the editor
EDITOR. Thr Jewish Florldian:
I have read your issuevof July;,
21 with a great deal of Interest
because it Nan to me that it con-
tained se\ eu*L0jtems that ueiv,
rVfirly related. I would like to
name them with some comments,
rot neecwtly in the order of,-
their importance.
Firt item give-- some ideas per-
ta line to the plans for the 1973
campaisn of the Greater HoMy-:
woo'' Jewi-h Wi'lfare Federation.
Sivond was the planning of the;
cieiimittee to develop a Judaica
program for Jewish students past
Bar Mitzvah age. also under the
sponsorship of the JWF, Third;
was the lead editorial covering ili-;
imnisiiing membership and in-
creating defici's for many syna-!
rociip*.
I have put them all together be-1
CSUC* it seems to me they all'
coma uncK>r one b' ading --- "fund-!
raising." Let's refer to the first |
item.
|\lthouctfi the 1972 camvaism ',
was a reoor' breaker, the needsi
for 1973 will be greater hfOQIHIT1
the financial requirements in Is- \
Net I and the needs of Soviet Jewry |
will be bigger as the year goes on..
The local needs will be greater due i
to the growth of the Jewish i>opu-
!:! ion.
The second part also calls for a
tremendous increase in funds be-
caitaa ihere is no question that
our youth end their affiliation
with temples and Jewish orga-
nizations b>cati*e there is no cen-
tral organization designed to bring
them together and prepare them
to continue their Jewish identity
when they reach college.
As for number three referring
to your editorial covering c'imin-
ishing membership and increasing
defieiU for many synagogues. This
might be true from a national
standpoint but I do.it believe it
applies to this area yet. We
have more synagogues in Broward
County than we had a year or so
ago and most of them are plan-
ning buildings and more construc-
tion to meet the growth in mem-
HI AS Helps 3,000
Settle In United States
NEW YORK (WNS) The
United Hias Service helped 3.-
174 Jewish immigrants from
Europe. North Africa, the Mid-
dle Eant and Latin America set-
tle in the U.S. in 1971, Gaynor
I. Jaoobson, executive vice
president reported. More than
45.000 other Jews with problems
related to immigrant and reset-
tlement, were also helped. Gay-
nor said 265 Jews from the
Soviet Union were aided by Hias
with 214 settled in the U.S.. 24
in Canada, and the balance else-
where. Hias, he reported, has
a current caseload of 5,000 Sov-
iet Jews who wish to join their
relatives in the West. Also aid-
ed in 1971, Gaynor reported,
weie 800 Jews from Iraq.
THOAAAS A. RODENBERG, M. D.
AND
DAVID E. LESSIN, AA. D.
ANNOUNCE THE ASSOCIATION OF
ARTHUR S. RUBIN, AA. D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
AT
ACADEMY PROfESSIONAl BUILDING
3616 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florid* 33021
Telephone: 989-3300
HOME FEOEKAl SAVINGS BUIIDING
Suit* 407
2100 East H.ll.ndele teach BowUvcfd
H.lland.le, Florid* 33009
Telephone: 920-3301
HOURS BY APPOINTMENT

HILLEL COMMUNITY
DAY SCHOOL
F N. IME Ml S. IMWMI COUNTIES
now recited e
i*cjynsU.at212$l.
(icr.ll rrw. SeMttreaeO
A new luxurious and spacious building
ready for the opening of school on Tues-
day, September 5, 1972.
Registration is still open in most classes.
Call 922-3464 or 922-3465 immediately
to insure the correct placement of your
child.
A new fully licensed staff under the
supervision of Principal, Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick.
REGISTER NOW
for our New 8th grade and 7th grade
departmental classes!
NURSERY REGISTRATION STILL OPEN
CALL NOW ACT NOW
for the best possible JEWISH & SECULAR
EDUCATION IN DADE COUNTY!
Secure the future for your child in the
wonderful world of learning.
REGISTRATION MUST CLOSE IN SOME
GRADES by Aug. 15.
Call HILLEL at 922-3464!
bcrship. This calls for financirv
increases for teachers and othe;
professional leaders. Also a great
increase in salaries for busines-
help and maintenance.
The question anso-s ''\Vh'i trier
aie we drifting?" Is every syna
sjoptie increasing the number of
youth that are affiliated and what
is the p-jtential in this growing
area of senior citizens? Seems to
me that all our Jewish organiza-
tions, temples and the JWF should
get together and remember that
our hopes lie In the jjrowlh and
survival of Jews here, in Israel and
abroad.
Ml J. PERKY
Hollywood
BUY OR SELL YOUR HOME!
Call Anytime Day or Night
966-9133
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She is quite the majesty of Florida
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We're Dutch end we went everything to be perfect.
, Aug. 7, Aug. IS: From $285 to
$895. Oct. 6, Oct. 16, Oct. 27, Nov. 6,
Nov. 17, Nov. 27, Doc : From $280 to $840.


Friday, August 4. 1972
*Jewlst fhwkHan
Page 3
Youth Group's
'A Wonderfu
Thrilling," fantastic" and'ex-
citing" are words that are used
over and over again in describing
the resMNtHottywoo* young poo- (.at
pie's tour to Israel. They are used
often by Shirley Goldman, youth
director of Temple Beth Shalom
who was the official tour leader,
Rabbi Morton Malavsky, spiritual
Jeader of Temple Beth Shalom and
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual
Jeader of Temple Beth El.
The Rabbis both spent a great
deal of time with the young people
over there and agreed that the
trip was a wonderful experience
for them as well as for the young
people.
Mrs. Goldman, who shared the
excitment of a first trip to Israel
with the young people, felt that
the most wonderful thing these
young people learned was hnw to
Jive together. "Besides the Judaica
lhat these youngsters learned, they
! cliques no shutting out of any-
one within 48 hours they de-
veloped a closeness with each oth-
er and a concern for each other.
They became almost like broth-
ers and sisters." she said.
Mrs. Goldman reported they had
been wakened to climb Massada
at 2 a.m. so that they could be
there for the sunrise services. The
Israeli tour guide, a fourth genera-
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Experience'
Major Jewish
fund-raising
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looking for
experienced
fund raiser,
preferably with New York expert
ence, fer campaign in Florida
Areas include Palm Beach, Becc
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and Miami leech. Salary open
Submit remme to MJ., lax 2973,
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It's really important!
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young people a picture of Israel's
history as well as today's condi-
tions, she said.
She expressed their amazement
at the spirit of the Israelis as ex-
emplified by the sight of a family
building a house right on the border
where they were planning to live
and raise their family.
Just before their return home
Mrs. Goldman asked the teen-
agers what they felt was the most
important thing they had gotten
out of the trip. The words of a
young girl imprewed her deeply.
"I really felt that being a Jew was
qutte before I made this trip. Now
I understand and I'm happy that
I'm Jewish," she had replied.
Another youngster Mrs. Gold-
man found sitting by herself out
In the starlit evening of their last
night in Israel said to the tour
leader, "I just want to look at the
Jewish sky one more time. I feel
that I want to come back and that
I will come back."
When the group recahed London
after leaving Israel, they attended
services at a synagogue. After the
services one of the young people
said, "Now I know that when Jews
go to temple and say Shema
Yisrael, they are one with Jews
all over the world and that must
be what has made us survive."
Rabbi Jaffe, who called it "an
exciting and stimulating trip for
these young people," sad, "Rabbi
Malavsky and I gave a brief pray-
er services at Tad Va Shem and
when we all got back in the bus
there was absolute silence. It was
an overwhelming experience."
Rabbi Malavsky. who also led a
tour of 32 adults through Europe
this summer, declared, "It was an
unbelievable experience for all of
these young people."
Beth El Women
Petite Luncheon
To Aid Sightless
Temple Beth El Sisterhood will
hold a petite luncheon and card
party. Monday. Aug. 14, at 11:30
am., in the temple auditorium.
1351 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood Pro-
ceeds will be directed to the com-
mittee for "Service To The Blind"
headed by Mrs. Caryl Feldman.
This service is manned by a
group of women, including both
members and non-members of the
Sisterhood. They work as Braille
writers, recorders, and binders to
produce books and talking records
for the sightless. Women interested
in Braille transcribing are Invited
to join a class now being formed.
Tickets for the luncheon mav
be obtained by calling the temple
office or Mrs. Bernard Price,
luncheon chairman. All members of
the community are welcome.
MILTON FORMAN
INSURANCE CONSULTANT
lormtrtf ol Cwcrf**" lMtf>rwrrtnF lit
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And all Cemeteries
in Israel
RIVERSIDE only can offer this service:
Enroute to Israel
within 24 hours
Strict adherence to Halacha and Minhagim.
Arrangements made during lifetime
with no obligation.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16400 H.E. 19th Avenue
920-1010
19th and Alton Road: 1250 Normandy Drive:
in the heart of Miami Beach
Miami: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street
Manhattan Brooklyn Westcheeter Bronx Far Rockaway
Murray N. Rubin, F.D.


Page 4
9-JmUHtorkMlarj
Friday. August 4, 1972
wJemsfiFlcridiian
--- Ml *SM SUM IMHnw
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.E. tm Stkebt Thlepmonb S7J-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 920-6391
P.O. Box 2973, Miami. Florida 331CI
Fpd K. Siioc.iet Selma M. Iiiommoh
Editor and Publisher Assistant to Publisher
MARION KEVINS. Nw Coordrnator
Tha Jewish Ftontftan Dl Net QvannUi The Kashrwth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In its CeUsmna.
Published Bi-U, er^ly b\ the Jewish flondtan
8ecotJ-Cla.-j 1>Atar Jbwijh Welfare Federation op Create* Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Wiflena, Chairman; Ross Bcc-kerroan, Ben
Salter, Marion Kevins, Dr. Norman Atktn,
Tin Jawiah Flaridian hat absorbed tha Jawiah Unity and tha Jawiah Weekly.
Member of tha Jawiah Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arta F**tvrm Syndicate.
Wondwida News Service. National Editorial Association. American Aaaaciatien
f Engliah.Jawiah Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSO*
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00
Out of Town 'Jpen Request
Volume 2
Friday. August 4. 1972
Number 19
24 AB 5732
'Attitudinal Reconditioning' Needed
A change in Jewish attitudes toward non-professional
jobs will be necessary il Jewish youth are to find satis-
factory work in the future. This somewhat revolutionary
forecast is based on a slower rise in professional and tech-
nical job opportunities in the next decade.
Close to 80% of our young people go to college with
the result that Jewish men have tended to move into the
professions one of five, according to government figures,
as compared with one of 10 men in general. The conse
quences of fewer jobs are obvious.
Experts in the field are making the wise suggestion
that Jewish organizations consider more emphasis on voca-
tional guidance and placement in view of the changing
social and economic conditions. In addition, and probr.bly
even more important, is what one calls the need for "atti-
tudinal reconditioning." More simply put, a more positive
view of non-professional work like the crafts which w
know today provide satisfactory income and careers.
Dialogue Has Wide-Ranging Agenda
In recognition of the revolutionary political changes
which are taking place in this country ond elsewhere, the
10th annual American-Israel Dialogue this year will ex-
plore the relationship between Jews and those foices.
Sponsored by the American Jewish Congress, most of
the American-Israel dialogues have contributed materially
to world Jewish thought, particularly in bringing into the
open the different approaches to Jewish continuity ex-
pressed by the participants. A wide-ranging agenda deal-
ing with problems in Latin America brought about by
revolutions, and those directly involving Israel, the United
States and the Soviet Union with which we are more
familiar, indicates the depth of the debates and formal
papers which will be presented during the four-day session
in Jerusalem.
Decision Another Victory
Another victory against government inteiference with
religious freedom is seen by Jewish and Protestant bodies
following a Federal Circuit Court decision which has hold
compulsory attendance at chapel by cadets at U.S. serv-
ice academies to be unconstitutional.
Through the Synagogue Council of America, and 13
secular organizations, the American Jewish stand against
government surveillance of religious worship was upheld
again despite the long tradition of compulsory chapel that
has prevailed ir the academies. That 41 Protestant denomi-
nations joined in the suit is further evidence that the wall
which our constitution has placed between government
and religion is one which neither Christian nor Jew wishes
to see breached.
Another Civil Liberties Landmark
The right to wear T-shirts bearing the words "Save
Soviet Jews" in Chicago's Field Museum falls under cmr
sacred First Amendment's umbrella of faee speech, a Fed
era! Court has ruled. The barring of young people who wore
these shirts in a demonstration was challenged by the
American Civil Liberties Union and the American Jewish
Congress and another civil liberties landmark was attained,
unimportant as lettered T-shirts may seem.
WASHINGTON It is time
to.itkm quite seriously. wtelbjar,
Dr. Henry A. Kissinger may not
be the secretary of state in the
second Nixon Administration
assuming there is a second
Nixon Administration, as most
!*" pic now do.
It is a point that has been
idly discussed before now. Given
Dr. Kissinger's role in foreign
policymaking. a good many poo-
pic have said that he really
ought to be presiding over the
state De|artment. Some have
added: "Why not?" But the
answer has always been rela-
tions with Congress, and all the
obvious other complications of
the ease.
FOR A LONG time, nonethe-
less, Henry Kissinger has been
used by the President as secret-
ary of state in all but name. He
is in Peking at the moment, ne-
gotiating on the President's
behalf with Premier Chou En-
lai.
The SALT agreement is also
before the Senate, and the Pres-
ident and Kissinger were the
joint architects of the skillful,
long-headed diplomacy that
produced a SALT agreement in
Moscow only about a fortnight
after the blockade of Haiphong
Harbor. When the House and
Senate committees came to the
White House to be briefed on
SALT, it was again Dr. Kis-
singer whom the president de-
puted to do the detailed brief-
ing.
He did a dazzling job of it.
too, according to no less an
authority than the lonely SALT
critic. Sen. Henry M. Jackson.
In sum, the work that Dr. Kis-
singer is now openly doing has
certainly ceased to be the work
of a hidden though powerful
member of the White House sec-
retariat. And he is doing that
work to steadily mounting ai>-
plause.
KV'EN HO, the question in the
first paragraph would hardly be
worth asking if it were not for
some new developments, m tri-
vial seeming they have not been
noticed. It is balderdash that for-
eign policy has never been made
in this manner in our govern-
ment. Colonel Edward Mandell
House under President Wilson.
Harry Hopkins in the war years
under President Roosevelt, both
enjoyed situations almost iden-
tical with Dr. Kissinger's today.
In theory it could go on for-
ever, or at least as long as Pres-
ident Nixon himself goes on. In
practice, however, one has to
begin to think about other pos-
sibilities in view of the small
but fairly eyebrow-raising signs
above-mentioned. One such is
the novel relationship between
Kissinger and the prickly chair-
man of the Foreign Relations
Committee. Sen. J. William Ful-
bright.
TIIK FIRST meeting on the
level of what might lie called
coziness was arranged by a
charming woman, Mrs. Thorn is
Braden. But that initial lunch-
eon has been followed by at
least one other, reportedly sug-
gested by Sen. Fulbright himsHf
when Dr. Kissinger asked ,iow
and where he could brief the
senator on events in Moscow.
It is the sort of thing one
never absolutely knows about.
Yet consider Kissinger's intense-
ly confidential situation in the
White House. In view of that
situation, it is hard to imagine
him moving to establish a per-
son*] link with Senator Ful-
bright, without the express ap-
proval of the President for such
a move. It looks, in short, as
though the President had here
begun testing the water on
Capitol Hill.
THKRE IIA8 been another,
even more significant episode
of the same sort, and still more
recently, too. In brief, there was
a serious question in the White
House, reportedly, about wheth-
er Dr. Kissinger would discard
the protective cloak of executive
privilege. The idea was to have
him appear before Sea, Ful-
bright's committee. If nol
others, to expound the SALT
agreement as only Kissinger
seems to be able to do.
The idea obviously originated
in Kissinger's four bravura on-
t he-record press conferences
during the Moscow tripamong
the most extraordinary and suc-
cessful feats of exposition the
U.S. government has seen in de-
cades. But the point is. again
reportedly, that the Idea was
President Nixon's, and fiat the
arguments against discarding
executive privilege were appar-
ently made by Henry 'Kissing, r.
These latter proved decisive in
the end, of course.
YET IF you think about it a
little, there are only two pos-
sible deductions one cm draw
from the fact that the Presi-
dent even gave temporal y
thought to such a thing, which
could only have been a begin-
ning of Kissinger testimony.
(Me deduction Is that Richard
M. Nixon sees Henry A. Kis-
singer's White House usefulness
coming to an end at the close of
the present presidential term.
That is what will happen, be-
yond doubt, if former Secretary
As to the other possible de-
duction, it is that President
Nixon is already thinking of
making Henry Kissinger go
public for good by naming him
secretary of state, while John
Connally moves into the Vice
Presidency. Stranger, more ir-
rational things have happened.
PART II THE PASSIONATE MOVEMENTS
What Happened To The Revolution?
By MAX I.ERXER
NEW YORK, N. Y. The
three passionate movements of
the 1960s -the antiwar marches,
the black movements, the
campus revolts still evoke
deep feelings but no longer hold
to the center of the stage. Kach
of them aimed at a radical
change in the power structure.
Each tried to use the students
to that end. Kach stirred up the
dust, each achieved some imme-
diate objectives, none got its
long-range ones.
As for the hard-core revolu-
tionaries, they stopi>ed at noth-
ing in either aim or means, and
achieved nothing. I include the
SDS, the Weatherman, Yippies,
Black Panthers. They fed on the
antiwar mood, the frustrations,
the enragements, the absolutes.
Their tactic was to identify with
each passionate movement
blacks, the students, militant
women, the march on the Pen-
tagon, the Chicago convention
demonstrations- and push it to
extremes.
IN A TIME of violence, they
increased the violence they fed
on. They developed a mystique
of violence, as if there were
something cleansing in it of
and for Itself. At one point, in
the case of the Weatherman,
they even used the terrorism of
bombing, in the tradition of the
Russian nihilists.
It was a short-lived, if lurid,
chapter of the '60s. It got no-
where. Its extremism boome-
ranged ami made every militant
movement harder. Partly it fell
victim to a policy of contain-
ment by the authorities which
at times became repressive, but
which never reached a full-scale
repression. Mainly it ran afoul
of the rage it set in motion
among the large mass of ordi-
nary people.
THE ANTIWAR movement
hasn't ended the war. but It
kept L. B. J. from running
again, put Nixon on I he defen-
sive and helped McGovern on
his road to the nomination.
Mostly it siiarked the other at-
tacks on the |x>wcr structure,
gave a special passion to the
passionate movements and
served as their accelerator and
multiplier. Its chief effect, how-
ever, was the erosion of author-
ity all through the society, for
war itself is actually the enemy
of all authority, and eats away
respect for law and the social
fabric.
The movement of the blacks
(and this applies to some other
ethnic movements as well) had
three aspects. One was revolu-
tionary nationalism. It exploited,
if it didn't s|>ark, the inner city
riots. It hurt itself badly by a
violence of brother against
brother. There seems to be a
law of fractional revolutionary
politics that the violence turns
inward and becomes fratricide.
In the end, the black jieople
themselves reiected it.
A PROFESSOR of |n-Afri-
can studies. J. K. Obatala, wrote
recently in the Los Angeles
Times that "there never was a
black revolution" in the '60s,
that it was mostly radical rheto-
ric and symbolism and that "the
campuses continued to be train-
ing grounas for the traditional-
ly conservative Afro-American
middle class."
This strikes me as too sweep-
ing. It doesn't do justice to th?
second aspect of the black move-
ment the prideful assertion
of black identity, which doesn't
I have to be either separatist or
' violent in order to have meaning
for young blacks and give them
i a new sense of self-confidence.
; Malcolm X and Martin Luther
King Jr. became folk heroes not
because one was a revolutionary
and the other a champion <>f
; nonviolence, but because both of
them touched a deep even re-
ligious pride of identity in
their people. To call that "middle
I class" is to narrow it unneces-
sarily.
THE THIRD aspect is the
concrete; gains that the black
movements have made econ-
omic, legal, political, educa-
tional. As I interpret what en-
grosses the black students today
in their studies, it is not to be-
come "middle class" or "con-
servative" but to consolidat'!
these gains and push them all
the way to a de facto equality
in the whole of American lift.
For the students as a whole,
white as well as black, the col-
lege revolution brought some
concrete gains in a constitu-
tional restructuring of power on
the campus. But when the dis-
ruptions of college life by a mi-
nority became extreme, the
large student majority got
either angry or bored with them
or both.
The thrust of reality reas-
serted itself. The students know
that if they want to do some-
thing with their liveswhether
to find good work or raise good
children or lead a good life,
whether to transform society or
themselves they must pre-
pare themselves by studying
what nven have done in the past
and what they can do in the
future.
Copyright i72. Uoa Angle* Tlni.'S
^_


Friday, August 4, 1972
-Jenlstncridlan
Page 5
I Temple Solel Purchases
Site For New Sanctuary
Trmp'e Solel. whch was or-
ganized just over two years ago.
lias purchase^ a two-acre site on
Sheridan Street 'art 52nd'Avenue
a'h'd will begirt building a sanctu-
ary anil religious school in Janu-
ary 1973. Temporary temple of-
fices already located on the site.
The Liberal congregation which
hecan with a handful of families
now has grown to a membership
of 200 families with a religious
school registration of 200 children.
Durint: the first year of its exist-
ence, the board of directors of
the congregation voted to engage
Rabbi Robert P. Fra/in as their
spiritual leader. With the com-
pletkB of the sanctuary, a full
time cantor and choir will be
hired,
I Hiring the coming year, board
members anticipate a large in-
crease in membership and plans
are being made for religious
m hiMil-i.uisery ichool and kinder-
garten taciliti.-s for 700 children.
The education board, under the
chaiimanshp of Herbert Gross-
man, has obtaned a tull compli-
ment of teachers. Mrs. Mat-tin
COZE IEAUTY SALON
Specialism; In Wmnm'
and Men's Hair Styling
ami Air-Cemfcing
3001 S. Ocmn Drive
Hollywood
Galahad Hall North 927-5162
Weisz is principal of the school.
The Sisterhood of the temple is
under the leadership ot Mrs. Stan-
: lejo Blumin and life, Men"s*hib is
i Headed by Jerry Bloom. Both
j groups have made sizable contri-
i buttons to the Temple.
Temple Solel's Youth Group is
| extremely active. They have pre-
pared and presented creative wor-
; ship set vices many Friday even-
, ings. Bar and Bat Mitzvahs are
| observed on Saturday mornings.
j These boys and girls are encour-
I aged to continue their education
! through confii maton and post-
confirmation.
IJberal Judaism as defined by
i the board of Temple Solel is a
blend of the traditional with the
modern. They associate them-
selves with the Reform movement
and philosophy and use the Union
I'layer Book, The wearing of Yar-
mulkas at services is mandatory.
\ Tallit is worn by men on Sat-
unlay nloi nngs and holidays. Two
days of Both Hoshanah are ob-
served as well as two days of
other holidays such as Succoth
and Pesach.
As Hollywood's newest congrc-
;ation, the building program
ibout to commence will mark an-
other milestone in Temple Solel's
growth.
Abe Durbin. president of the
temple, has held this post since
the temple's inception.
DRAPERY CLEANING SPECIAL
token down cleaned decorator folded
Iw.ik Km W ri|l 1
with each order
1 Bedspread cleaned
FREE
Draw Drapes I Carpets of S. Flo.
927-7008
1020 HARBISON ST. HOLLYWOOD
PROTECT YOURSELF
with
CANCER INSURANCE
UP TO $50,000.00 MAXIMUM
NO AGE LIMIT
DETAILS BY MAIL OR TELEPHONE
NO SALESMAN WILL CALL
P.O. BOX S7J2
HOLLYWOOD HI LLS STA. 33021
JOHN J. WHITE, AGT.
Ml-6915
HOLLYWOOD LOCKSMITH
ALARMS
CAI HOME APT. BUSINESS A CONDOMINIUM
LOCKS
SOLO P AIRED INSTALL!D
24 Mr. Service 5916 Hollandale Beach Blvd.
981-9305
CLIFF LORING DESIGNS
Custom Creations in Wood & Mica
6)3 S. 2 1st Ave. Hollywood
(Mem. Designers & Decorators Guild.)
Phone 920-7177
ABE DUKBIN
m^L PORTRAITS
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II W PROOFS
& KNI.AKC.KMKNTS
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MIAMI GARDENS PLAZA
47th AVE. t 183rd St. PH. 425-9453
Arab Saboteur
Bolts Prison
TKL AVIV (JTA) A young
Arab saboteur who escaped from
a maximum security prison on Mt.
Carmel last week was captured
two days later when he hitched
a ride in a car that happened to be
carrying a prison warden. Bassem
Hammed, 19. who was serving a
10-year sentence for espionage
and sabotage, was the object of
a massive manhunt involving hun-
dreds of police, civilian volunteers
and helicopters during the 28
liours that he was at large.
The prisoner escaped by scaling
i perimeter fence while on gar-
bage disposal detail. HLs luck held
out until he thumbed a ride in a!
car not knowing that a prison i
official was one of its passengers j
The young man's ragged con-
dition and bruises on his legs
aroused the suspicions of the war-
den who questioned him, learned
his identity and handed him over
to police.
ENGLISH FISH & CHIPS
HOT DOGS SANDWICHES
HAMBURGERS
EAT IN TAKE OUT
4235 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
11 A.M.-8 P.M. DAILY
RESERVt NOW FOR
THE. HIGH HOLY DAYS
The Famous
lOOZOtEft CANTO*
LEIB RASKIN
Formerly of
Mt. EOEN Center
M Bronx. N. Y..
_| Will Officiate at the
HIGH HOLY DAYS
SYNAGOGUE ONPREMSES
I
Located on the Ocean
t 21ft St., Miami Beach
PLANNED ENTERTAINMENT
FREE PARKING
FREE CHAISE LOUNGES
Reserve for Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meals |
Finest KOSHER cuitine terved
in out Oceanfront dining room
Under Supervision
Where Every Meal it Banquet
HIGH HOLY DAYS
PACKAGES AVAILABLE
For Reservations
Phone: 538-6631
' and enjoy the holidays with the
BERKOWITZ FAMILY
YOU CANNOT BUY
A NEW FORD
FOR LESS... ANYWHERE
^*?^ THAN Q%*7)
HOLLYWOOD FORD
THAN <
HOLLYWOOD FORD
1 200 N. Federal Hwy.
Hollywood 922-6721 Miami 947-3411
MEW FLORIDA ROOMS
ADDITIONS BEDROOMS BATHS
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Residential Commercial Office Bldg.
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20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Prints and Permits Included
DADE: 949-3945 BROWARD: 925-5648
LOUT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
2548 Arthur St.
Hollywood, Flo. 33020


Page 6
^.Bmisti fkrMtor
Friday. August 4. 1972

South Broward Salute
To Israel Set Sept. 5th
of representatves of all of the
area's Jewish organizations acts
as a coordinating group.
Other speakers, both Christian
and Jew, are expected to appear
on the program, and the entire
community is invited to attend.
There will be no charge for adms-
There will be no harge for admis-
sion and no solicitation of funds.
Sisterhood Holding
Membership Coffee
A membership coffee will be
held by the Sisterhood of Temple
Solel at Emerald Hills Country
Club Thursday, Aug. 10, at 8 p.m.
Joint chairmen for the event are
Jill Hunter and Jerry Bloom.
The second annual dinner-dance
of the temple membership will be
held at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
26 at Hillcrest Country Club. Joint
chairmen for this event are Myles
Star and Mel Spencer.
Reservations for both events
may be made through the temple
office.
"South Broward Salutes Israel"
is the title of a program to be
presented at Temple Beth El
Tuesday. Sept. 5, at 8 P.M.
The program, part of the Flor-
ida Salutes Israel program which
is being sponsored by the Israel
Government Tourist Office. El Al
Israel Airlines. Foregn Tours In-
ternatonal and Eastern Airlines,
will be sponsored locally by the
Jewish Community Relations
Welfare Federaton of Greater
Hollywood.
The occasion for the program is
the 25th anniversary of the State
of Israel. Guest speaker for the
evening will be Benjamin Bonney,
Consul General of Israel for the
Southeast area.
Mr. Bonney has been Deputy
Director of the Department for
International Cooperation in the
Ministry for Foregn Affars and
has also served as Press Counselor
at the Israel Embassy in Rome.
Italy. He was Consul General for
the Southwest area until his re-
cent appointment to his present
post.
The Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council, which is composed
-
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tykes
TeEnS and
Twenties
Andrea Weiss and Jeffrey
Newman, (both of Hi I lei School)
were winners in a creative writ-
ing contest sponsored by Read
Magazine.
David Mumnsky. a recent
graduate of the University of
South Florida. Is the tennis pro
at the Sheraton Beach Hotel in
Miami for the summer.
Temple Solel Youth group is
having a splash party at Emer-
ald Hills Aug. 5. Ninth through
12th graders welcome. Same
group is planning a book sale
for October. They'll take any
kind of books and will even pick
them up if there are too many
for you to deliver to them at the
temple office.
Ai\in .lair.-, who just return-
ed fmm assisting in leading a
teen tour to Israel, will be go-
ing to the University of Penn-
sylvania in the fall.
ALADIN
EMPLOYMENT
AGENCY
EST. 1953
WHERE
EXPERIENCE COSTS
NO MOIE
PROFESSIONAL TRADF"
CLERICAL- SALES
TECHNICAL
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JjSm\ AT 450 NORTH PARK ROAD (Just across from the Hollywood Mall)
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Jack O. Gordon
President
Arthur H. Courshon
Chturmn or the Bond
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Friday, August 4. 1972
I
vJcwUbfkrkfctr
Page 7
vr~r.
"**********************************>
\f
i
scene around
by Marjo Nevins
FltoU^............. n innrmnr^xiuuuu:
miss them. How many of u* gripe all year about the chiHrcn -
k L ; many f Krips a" year "bout th- children -
wh ?L ST f ,hC thi"BS thCy d and then T void
when they no longer grace the table. "Grace" may not be ex
5I Ch.6 T7L theyre "k my ki he table at them eat.ng I often wonder what happened to all
rSLTV SPw "UVing ****"* I refute those psy
ssEfit: K.r uving habits arc formed -* JE
How come that my kids feel a need to smell food before
~LT, J*-? ',? Ca" yU PictUFe the sniffin the dishes are
passed? Did I ever condone that? You better believe I didn't
So how come? '
How come both of my sons have to have chocolate pudding
at every meal? And how come one of them has to touch the top
of the pudding first to test its consistency? Didn't I supply a
food? liSt f deSSerU and ** I eVCT encourage their touching
How come they now put a large bottle of Coke on the table
with one glass which they pass around? Weren't they supplied
with individual glasses of milk for years?
And how come two of them insist on hiding a single green
pea on the plate of the one who gags at the sight' of if Did I
really encourage that kind of humor?
It doesn't matter, though they've only been gone a week
and I even miss their laundry!!! My office phone only rings half
a; much right now as they usually check in at least once during
the day. Sometimes they seem like pests but now the silence is
deafening. I can get along without them but who wants to???
"fr -Cr &
BITS AND PIECES Mr. and Mrs. Nat Greenberg who
were Broward delegates to the Zionist Convention in Israel
brought back a picture of the plaque dedicated to Rose and
Sam Perry in the Town House in Tel Aviv ... A day of golf is
being planned for the benefit of the Hallandale Civic Centre on
Sunday, Aug. 13, at Hollywood Lakes course, so call up and get
your tee-off time for this worthy endeavor Gloria Yanofsky
is busy embroidering an Oneg Shabbat tablecloth for Temple
Solel. You can have your name put on by calling her Leah
Solomon did it for me. She sent me an original copy from Temple
Beth El Sisterhood. I guess I've arrived with Leah, anyway.
. Shirley Goldman, just back from touring Israel with a group
of youngsters, will conduct a USY camp for pre-teen-agers dur-
ing August Lillian Kaplan of Jewish Family Service and
hubby Nick just returned from a month's trip through Canada
and parts of the United States. Lillian tells of the experience
they had in Manitoba, when the motor on their little boat
conked out in the middle of an electrical storm. They finally
rowed to shore and walked miles for help. They ate fish all
freshly caught by them every day for a month and came
back trim and fit Camp Ka-Dee-Mah having a carnival for
all campers and visitors Friday, Aug. 4.
Whitney B. Williams
Professional Psychologist Consultant
MARRIAGE COUNSELING
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DAVID E. LESSIN. M. D.
ANNOUNCE TH1 OCIATION OF
ARTHUR S. RUBIN. M. D.
TOR THE PRACTICE O ?
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
*' HOMI HOCL ?VING lOUr'HI
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MOC"> arrOINTMrNT
Organization Presidents Report
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Organisation
presidents have been invited to
Obmit report! on the accomplish-
ment! of thair groupa for tha sea-
aon juat paat and goal* of thair
organizations for tha coming yaar.
These reporta will be publiahed dur-
ing tha naxt faw montha so that
the community at large will have
Knowledge of programs of the vari-
ous Greater Hollywood organiza-
tion a.)
HOLLYWOOD SECTIOM-NCJW
By LUCILLE ALEXANDER
The following is a resume of the
nrojects and activities of the Hol-
lywood Council of Jewish Women.
A new and most important proj-
ect is its support of Vista Vision,
I oth financially and through serv-
ice.
Vista Vision has a completely
equipped van which travels to vari-
ous neighborhoods in South Brow-
ard, and is manned by a staff of
doctors who give free dental and
eve examinations to needy peo-
ple. Dental work is done in the
van; eye examinations are also
given, and if necessary, glasses are
prescribed and provided free.
Council women make appoint-
ments, do the necessary clerical
work and give every possible as-
sistance.
The most widelv publicized proj-
ect of Hollywood Section NCJW.
and the one with the greatest im-
pact on the general public is the
annual Mental Health Forum. For
the past 13 years, in cooperation !
with the Broward County Mental j
Health Assn., this forum has been >
held every January. An all-day |
program of lectures and discus- !
sions with prominent psychologists, j
psychiatrists, doctors, religious
leaders, judges and laymen on top- |
ics which concern the mental wel-
fare of people and families in all |
phases of life, from youth to old i
age, the forum usually draws an
iii tendance of 1,000 or more from I
the general public. We consider i
this a most important contribution
to the community. No charge is j
made for attendance.
Hollywood Section also supports
local education through scholar-
ships, and for the year 1971-72
contributed a full scholarship to a
worthy student at Broward Com-
munity College.
Other local projects where Hol-
lywood Section provides both
woman power and financial assist-
ance if needed, are Carver's
Ranches Day Care Center and
South Florida State Hospital.
Hollywood Section supports
council's newly established Center
for Research in the Education of
the Disadvantaged in Israel, to
which the national organization
has pledged $1 million over the
next 10 years.
We also support and contribute
to council's Ship-A-Box project,
and send many boxes of toys, edu-
cational material, sweaters (hand
knit), clothing etc., to the needy
children in Israel.
The necessary funds to support
these projects is raised through
contributions and by our Thrift
Shop at 2039 Tyler St.
BETH SHALOM MEN'S CLUB
By JOEL s. MARKS
As the newly elected president
of the Men's Club of Temple Beth
Shalom. I would like to announce
the new slate of officers for the
coming year: Dr. David Ehrlich,
vice president in charge of pro-
gramming; Peter Bower and Mort
Katz, vice presidents in charge of
fund-raising; Jack Kleiner, vice
president in charge of member-
ship; Harvey Sogoloff, secretary,
and Dr. Steven Weisberg, treas-
urer.
The first event for the coming
year will be the barbecue to be
held Labor Day at T-Y Park. All
paid-up members and their fami-
lies are invited and there will be
no charge for the event
Our entire efforts are being de-
voted to the youth of our temple.
Last year we were successful In
raising over $600 lor the youth
programs of the temple.
A concentrated program to in-
crease our membership has already
begun. The slate of officers has
met a number of times in recent
weeks to promote unity of pur-
pose. ,j
The Men's Club has its general
meeting once a month Sunday
mornings. Breakfast is served and
a program is presented. All men
interested in temple activities are
invited. "We Need You" is our
motto.
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Facje 8
+Jewist> fhrktlam
Friday. August 4, 1972
Jews Played Major Role In McGovern Triumph
Ml AM' BEACH Jewish poii-
tl leaden received prominent
rules with high visibility in Sen.
George McGovern's successful
campaign to be the Democratic
Party's candidate against Richard
M. Nixon in the presidential elec-
tion Nov. 7. Sen. and former Qqh.
jI Connecticut Abraham Ribicoff
nominated his "old and k friend" McGovern at the party's
convention.
Ribicofl, lonp a stalwart for li-
i. ralism. is regarded generally as
a le.niiii proponent for social le-
_ -station by the Senate, particu-
larly on education and welfare.
Of the IS s|leeches putting six
candidates into nomination before
the 3016 delegates. Ribicoff's
alane referred to Israel. The New
Knglander said McGovern's "lead-
erehlp in ending the tragedy of
Vietnam has not reduced his de-
termination to protect the real
interests of the United States in
Europe and the survival of Israel
in the Middle Bast." No one men-
tioned Soviet Jewry, skyjacking
or genocide.
Before the balloting began on
the third night of the convention.
Maryland Gov. Marvin Mandel de-
livered a slashing 30-minute at-
tack on the Nixon administra-
tion's record.
That Mandel was selected for
this role was construed by some
as a bid to attract attention to
direct opposition to the President
I by a leading Jewish politician.
I Both Ribicoff and Mandel were
mentioned in gossip at the beach-
! front hotels as among possible
choices by McGovern to be his
! running mate.
After McGovern triumphed on
i-tiw*ist tiallnt. Jlibieotf-and Man-
del were announced as members
of the party's official delegation
to formally inform McGovern of
his nomination.
Ribicoff is one of only two Jew-
ish Senators, and the only Demo-
cratic one. Mandel is one of three
Jewish governors, all of them
Democrats. (The others are Mil-
j ton J. Shapp of Pennsylvania and
| Frank Licht of Rhode Island.)
Licht was chairman of his
state's delegation, which cast all
of its 32 votes for McGovern.
Previously, it also upheld the seat-
ing of the full California delega-
tion committed to McGovern in
the floor fight on its credentials.
Mandel also [>ersonally headed
the Maryland delegation, but it
failed to deliver a majority for
McGovern. giving him 13 votes to
38 for Alabama Gov. George C.
Wallace.
Pennsylvania's delegation gave
Sen. Henry M. Jackson 86'2 votes
and McGovern 81. Maryland and
Pennsylvania have large Jewish
communities. California, whose
Jewish population is about one
million, half of it in Los Angeles,
started the McGovern triumph by
Visiting
Camp Ka
They were all there from tiny
babies sitting in strollers pushed
b\ their young parents to older
jeeople easily identified as grand-
parents by the beatific expressions
on their faces as they looked at
their unnii'.children.
It was visiting day at Camp Ka-
Deo-Mah and the faces of the
.voting campers showed their joy
at the \isits of their families and
yet sorrow (hat this first three-
week period of camp had come
to aii end,
"This Ls really the greatest
camp." said one young mother.
"They oiler just about everything
you could want in a camp for your
children. You know, my children
had been to other day < a nips be-
fore this but I found that they
were just places for the children
t day trips and cook-outs and all
kinds 01 interesting planned ac-
ti\itics. It's an exciting experi-
ence for them."
ALL CANDIDATES A6REE-.
ZIP CODE SPEEPS
HOLIDAY MAIL
Day At
Dee-Ma h
"What I like about it," said an-
other mother, "is the fact that
my kids are learning so much
about their Jewish heritage. They
seem to know more than I do now.
When I was their age, it was a
drag to go to Sunday School. After
last summer at Camp Ka-Dee-Mah,
my children actually push to go to
temple school each week. I think
it's most important in these times
for them to have this feeling of
identity."
Many similar comments were
heard as the visitors watched the
friendship circle being formed at
the end of the afternoon. Earlier
in the day the guests had visited
in the individual classrooms and
then gathered in the auditorium
to view a playlet entitled The
Mystery of the Missing Challah."
(The mystery was solved when the
ineptitude of the youngest child
in the family caused the missing
bread to be knocked from its hiding
place on an upper shelf.)
George Kim, director of the
Camp, presented the swimming
awards. Beginner Awards went
to Laurie EggnatZ, Maureen Gi-
lick, Cherie Fisher, Brad Fleisher.
Michelle Kirn, Jennifer Podis and
Eric Lift Advanced Beginner
Awards were given to Mitch Ber-
ger, Debbie Dranit, Lucy Feidler.
David Kevelson and Barri Stew-
art. Nanette Badger, Mike Baer,
I_uric Bert, Jastm Dubow, Mike
Eggnatz, Rich Eggnatz, Bruce
Gordon. Mindy LIff, Scott Nadel-
man, Michelle Rosenstein, Min.iy
Royce, Bryan Zeldman and Brad
Kirn received Intermediate
,',u ards.
There will be a carnival Friday,
Mr. Kirn announced. Campers
from both wssions of the camp
are in* iled
easting all 271 votes for him.
New York, which gave McGov-
ern 888 of its 274 delegates, has
more than two and a half million
Jews. Massachusetts and New
Jersey, both with large Jewish
communities, went for McGovern
too, the Bay State giving MBWjH.H
102 \ntes and New Jersey a big
majority, 89.
Robert Abranvs. Bronx Borough
president, who joined in speaking
on behalf of a Jackson-s|>onsored
amendment to the platform's
plank on supiiort of Israel against
possible Soviet pressures. Identi-
fied himself in announcing New
Vtork'S big vote for McGovern.
These two actions also in-
creased Jewish visibility in Mc- '
Governs camp. An indication of I
OOBCero by the Democratic Na- '
tional Committee over possible de- i
fection to President Nixon of nor- |
mally Democratic-supporting Jew-
ish voters apiieared with the
announcement of a meeting of
Jewish delegates to the Demo-
cratic Convention to a seminar.
Ribicoff, Rep. Sidney Yates of
Chicago, and Howard Metzen-
baum of Cleveland, who had cam-
paigned as a Democratic candi-
date for Senator from Ohio,
addressed the seminar. The an-
nouncement said more than 300
Jewish delegates were attending
the convention. According to the
announcement, the iheeting was
planned to "quell the widespread
efforts to use the question of
American-Israeli relations to
cause iiolarization among Jewish
voters."
The purpose also was "to fully
elucidate the |iosition of the
Democratic nominee on issues of
direct concern to Jewish voters."
"Issues ranging from the Nixon
administration's Middle East pol-
icy to crises facing American
Jews on the domestic front will
be discussed," the announcement
said.
Jews and blacks worked closely
in the McGovern campaign and
particularly in the party's admin-
istration machinery which set up
the platform. After Ribicoff nom-
inated McGovern, a Jew and a
black seconded. They were Mrs.
Valerie Kushnei of Virginia,
whose husband is missing in ac-
tion in Vietnam, and the Rev.
Walter Fauntroy, the District of
Columbia Representative in Con-
gress who was a leading sponsor
of the Congressional Black Caucus
statement strongly supporting Is-
rael after the National Black
Political Convention in Gary, Ind.,
last March adopted a resolution to
dismember Israel.
Jewish Officials prominent in
the party's administrative ma-
chinery at the convention included
Han-art--Prof.-"Richard NWfctadrV
chairman of the 150-member
Platform Committee, who led the
defense of the platform during the
all-night discussion.
He was the chief architect of
the platform. Also on the podium
during the long debate was the
Platform Committee's executive
director. Philip F. Zeidman, who
was born in Birmingham, and now
practices law in Washington. The
general counsel of the party's
legal staff Ls David Ginsburg, a
Washington lawyer.
Broward Zionist District
To Install Slate Sept. 26 V
The Broward Zionist District
will hoi" a dinner Tuesday, Sepfc
28 at the Reef Restaurant In Fort
Lauderdale. The installation of
officers for the year 1972-73 will
take place; Sam J. Perry will be
installed as president for the 10th
Consecutive year,
r JfrlJ^s*rjj*W'' man: Peter Blues ten will be mas-
ter of ceremonies. Many rabbu
will participate in the program;
entertainment will be provided by
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun of
Temple Sinai.
ARNY'S TAXI
. serving the Greater Hollywood
HallandaU oreo. "Airport service
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SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
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Funeral Director Available 24 Hours A Day
To Assist With All Funeral Arrangements
HOLLYWOOD'S OLDEST MOST LOSSIDF.IUD
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SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES


Lugust 4, 1972
+Jewisli ikrkttan
Page 9
y MM MVtn, f xtcurkrc Mracfar,
Jtwfa* Weffor* flwlffl-i < Create, HWlyw**4
tic calendar is a very complex and precise instrument. It
1 of man developed through the observation of the lim-
it is related to a concept of time, and rime is relative,
the day begins is different for Christianity and for Ju-
I. Even New Year's is celebrated on different days in vari-
uliures.
pme does many things. It helps us to glorify the past it
Us in being nostalgic about our memories, and permits us
(get the unfortunate events of the past. When we talk about
good old days" we so often remember the good and glorify
d it is only when we are pushed do we begin to remember
cgativc aspects of what has occurred.
lugust 12. 1972 is an anniversary. I wonder how many will
I that date 20 years ago. On that day, 24 leading Jewish
s. writers and intellectual public figures were executed in
basement of one of Moscow's notorious prisons. These were
Random executions, but a culmination of a calculated cam-
to eradicate Jewish life in the Soviet Union.
would have forgotten this date completely except for a
[pamphlet which has just been published by the National
erence on Soviet Jewry. "August 12, 1952 The Night of
lurdered Poets." The pamphlet states in one of its opening
rks:
|"The paradox of the Aug. 12th massacre is clear.
Poetry is. by its very nature, immortal. Once a
poet has committed his words to paper, or whis|iercd
them to another, he has secured a place for his
ideas, his beliefs and his convictions."
hr pamphlet gives examples of the imetry of those who died
nat fateful night. I would like to quote just one stanza from
[Jew It/ik Feffer:
I AM A JKW
The wine of countless generations
Has strengthened me in my wandering.
The angry sword of pain and sorrow
Could not destroy my existence
My people, my faith, and my flowering.
It has not chained my freedom.
From under the sword I shouted:
I am a Jew! Why now have I pulled this date out of the so many signi-
knt ones in the history of the Jewish people? Only 24 died
e. not 6 million. Is this as important a date as the June 1967
pr in Israel? How about all the other dates that are Jewish
secular?' T*>f all of them, why this one?
A day in time is only as important as we wish it to be.
k. as Jews, it seems, should become increasingly aware and
pwlcdgcable of the happenings of the past, so that we can
(more secure of what we are, where we are, and then maybe
I able to determine where we are going.
Reproduced with the permission of the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry.
Copies of the pamphlet mentioned above eun be ordered
ngh the Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood.
(Infant & Children) and Adolescent Medicine
At Parkway Professional Bldq.
Suite 215 6151 Miramar Parkway
Miramar. Flo. TsL 966-5700
Office Hours By Appointment
Hallandale Civic
Centre Benefits
Robert Greaver. a prominent and
active civic leader in Hallandale.
has arranged a day of golf for the
benefit of the Hallar'ile Civic
Centre Fund Sunday, Aug. 13.
The goif course beirr? used is the
Hollywood- Lakes Count rv Club
course, 14800 Hollywood Blvd.
Green fee*, electric golf cart, buf-
fet luncheon, door prizes and win-
ners' award* are all included in
th:* price of admi^on. Calloway
scoring will prevail.
Time resist ration may be ma V-
by calling the Pro Shop at the
club. Golfers are invited to get up
twosomes or foursomes. Tickets
may be obtained by calling the
Chamber of Commerce or the Hal-
landale Recreation Centre.

DIXIE CARPET 4
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HANS I Announce* Office F P .1 T or ED f. ( he 1 Thi IAT OHM, M. Dpeninq C Practice RICS M An Of
BuildingTo Building
The Jade Winds Golf Club Is planning a weekend at the
Doral Country Club with chairman Beniie Pearbnan. vie*'
chairman Artie Greenman and committee members Irving Adler.
Sid Solmor and Harry GoJr'man taking care of arrangements.
Tlie Social Club at the Sea Air had several events plann-'d for
July,- amaPE them an all-day boat ride.
A fishing trip was a big hit at the Hemispheres during July
with Bill Weiss, the sports chairman, in charge. This group is
gnbig to Disney World in October.
They are going to attend Aug. 3 and 9 concerts at Marine
Stadium.
A few \\"-ks back an Art-Boutique Caravan a novel way
of bringing art and artists to high rise occupants appeared at
the Hemispheres. The caravan featured both lo~ai and national
artists and many of the local artista were on hand to discuss
their work with the residents not only of the Hemispheres
but ol .ill the other buildings in the area. Invitations had been
extended to everyone.
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Page 10
+Jelst> fhrldlan
Friday, August 4, 1972
c
\tu {calendar
omnium
(This calendar, whbh lints date* of all meetings and special
v.iils In-Ill by i.rcut.r Hollywood's various organisations Is
| nmlntiilnrd by Jewish Welfare Federation. Its purpose Is to
note events for those who wish to attend and to avoid any
conflict by settluK up dates on the calendar considerably In
advance. Organisation representatives are asked to notify
the Jewish Welfare Federation of dates of their meeting*
as aeon as they are decided upon so that the necessity of
switching dates may be avoided. Events will be listed In this
paper Just prior to the date.)
SATTRDAY. VKilsr 5
Hallandale Chapter Women's American ORT Rummage
Sale All Day 805 Glenn Parkway, Hollywood.
Temple Solel Youth Group Splash Party 8 p.m.
Emerald Hills Bath and Tennis Club.
WEDNESDAY. Al'GUST 9
National Womens Committee Brandeis University Holly-
wood Group Meeting 10 a.m. Galahad South.
Young Loaders Council of Jewish Welfare Federation 8
p.m. Home of Da\id Goodman
TIIFKSDAY. Al'til'ST 10
Sisterhood Temple Solel Membership Coffee 8 p.m.
Emerald Hills Country Club.
S1NDAY. AI'Gl'ST 13
Haliandale Civic Centre Fund Golf Day Hollywood
Lakes Country Club.
MONDAY. AFGI'ST 14
Temple Beth El Sisterhood Service to the Blind Luncheon
and Card Party 11:30 a.m. Temple Beth EL
Till RSI)AY, AFGIST 17
Broward County Regional Board ORT Meeting 10 a.m.
Home Federal Building Hollywood.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
24 AB 7:45
*
Religious
Services
MAUANOAIE
HALLANDALE JBWI8H CfNTEH
(Conservative) Jacob Danzig".
cantor.
Friday Sabbath services are discon-
tinued during June. July and Aua-uxt.
Saturday Sabbath services will con-
tinue and begin S a.m. Sexten Ben
Kalish will assist the cantor. Daily
Mlnyan 8:10 a.m. Sunday through
Friday. Mlncha-Maariv every day
Harts 6:30 p.m.
Nourwooo
BETH EL (Temple). 1SS1 8. 14th Av*.
rteform. Haobi Samuel Jaffo. 4S
ETH SHALOM (Temple). 172S Mon-
roe St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold 44
s-------
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Contervative. Rabbi David Shapirs
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. 47
July T Rabbi Michael Binhorn ser-
monette: "Quest For Security." Can-
tor Sidney Hellhraun.
July 14 Rabbi Martin \V. Smith.
Cantor Plnke Halpert
Question Box
By Rabbi SAMFEL J. rX>X | Actually, the dead are the most
Why .. the Yiddish tan* laStftfttg^J8?"
sometimes referred to as "JJar-
Konr"
forbidden by Jewish law to ever
leave a corpse unattended from
J the moment of death until the ac-
The term 'Jargon coming ^ ^^ dumber of
from a French word, generally .. .? '
refer, to the vernacular or the ^Kes ,n ,he Blb,e h-
COlloqui-J as compared to the li- ,7^"*^7Z TTZ&Z !aken
terary phase of langu.Re. During \ ,B^h a 2^ J^' '
the period Of the Haskalah when J"**' Ja*- f""1 "H "ST!"
the scholars were attempting to w'ifh ?T w !" '"v. *** B"*'
do what they died "to purify" "'!* s,omefh *""' Moses "
the Hebrew language, they l,ked S !? f* ^Pons.b.lity of
down .., the Yi.l-tish language as ^v ? ,LT'*'^ "" ^
a very impure language because S,^8 'h U1 J"
... Its mixture of German. Slavic *'.'iTTinH Ef *">' ,0 *' 2"
and Hebrew. They somehow i*-; v"n^,Va|h?.T^ "." a ,im
ferret! to it as a Jargon collo- m^J,a,1J,he ac,ivJ" the com-
quia.ism ami vernaculaV instead < "L >'^l^TT*?-?* ^
of a literary language. Thus Yid- f^^ral %,?">' ** "J^'
d.sh came to be known as a Jar- nahh,*fKIt 2 ? a ,Spwal "
ROtV Actually, i, should be ad- deiase hi n ^ t*", ^
nutted that some fine literary j ^*V!* u J ,"* !"* S
works were written in Yiddish. ^.^tm,Z-- l^ Called
Yiddish is taught today at a num- I thV*amTw ^ TT-
ber of universities as a literary rJ^STsEi? ^Lf thf dfa?\
language Basically, such concern displayed
Why does JewM. tradition 1 JLTS'-IJS 'T* "! hUmU1
place so moch emphasis upon *'"8 J f"01^ K the seem-
the honor being paid to the V- '"f h*?. ***** ******* *"
ceased person* c ly ,he ufoless booy* was af-
The more helpless a person is (^ *^ nor o as to empha-
the more emphasis Jewish tradi- I "* .'J* ^"f*11 by Jew1sh
t.on placed on the importance of \ "T ," ,h* body ** weil M
coming to his aid and actually be- I "* **" f ever> numan-
ing with him as much as possible. I ,c,. i,T.. j,Wi.h Teiesraphic Agency)
Pres. Nixon, Meir Converse
Ma link-Up With Satellite
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal)
All future services will be held at
Sheridan Hills Klernentary School,
5001 Thomas St.. Hollywood, every
Friday night at S p.m. Rabbi Robert
Kraxin.
JERUSALEM .JTA Presi-
dent Nixcn and Prenser G1da
Meir spoke last Tuesday on the
occasion of Israel's hnk-up with
the international satehte com-
munioatHins s\-stem Their ov>nver-
satx>n was part of the ceremonies
inaugurating Israel's new satelite
ground communications center at
Kmek Haela in the Judean h.lls
near Jerusalem. They exchanged
MBErtes for the benefit of the
new communications media but
ii. in't BOaWana on political issues,
sources said.
LVan Burch, chairman of the
Federal Commun.cations Comm.s-
s on. rej'resented the Fnited Stat-
es at the ceremonies He said he
had been summoned to the White
House prior to his departure to
receive a personal message from I
the President for Mrs Meir. He
would not risdose its contents.
The announcement of the Nixon-
Meir telephone conversation was
unexpected. The White House had
, previously decllnert to make such
a call on grounds that it would
set a precedent for all countries
joining the satellie communica-
tions system
Premier Meir's secretary had
announced Wednesday evening
that the conversation would be
held if technical facilities are
ready in time. Technicians were
then feverishly to ensure that they
will be.
Shmuel Almog. director of the
Israel Broadcasting Service, an-
nounced that an agreement has
been made with the French news
service for nightly- newscasts to
be beamed to Israel from Paris
via satellite.
The arrangement will go into
effect after the High Holidays la
September. At present TV news-
reels are Down to Israel and the
news is often stale when it gets
there.
TEMPLE BETH AHM, S10 Southweit
*2nd Avenue, Hollywood
Friday 8:15 p.m. Norman Prsfin will
conductthe Service* assisted by Lay
leader Herbert Smith. Sisterhood will
sponsor the Oneg Shahbat.
IMtAMAI
ISRAEL (Temple). SSM SW SSth St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Koster.
NOaTR MIAMI If ACH
SINAI (Temple) or NORTH DADE
1SS01 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingtley. Canter Irving
Shulkee. S7
~~"- ii. %
Sports Complex
At Temple Sinai In
Memory Of Lip mans
A new sports complex is being
erected on the grounds of Temple
Sinai through the generosity of
the I.ipman family, including Mr.
and Mrs. Abby Lipman. Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Lipman. Mr. and Mrs.
William Lipman. Mr. and Mrs. Sol
Brody. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Fradin
and Mr. and Mrs. David Harris.
The complex will initially con-
sist of two tennis courts, a basket-
ball court, three shuffleboard
courts, and a paddle court. These
facilities are being constructed for
the temple's youth groups, but will
also be available for adult mem-
bers. It will be located irrtmedi-
ately to the north of the Lipman
Youth Center which was endowed
by the IJpman family five years
ago.
This sports playground is being
presented to Temple Sinai in mem-
ory of their parents. Max and Ella
Lipman. and other members of
then- familv Gert Lipman Brody.
Ariene Lipman. and Jeff Dessak.
the son of Mrs. William Lipman.
who was aboard the ill-fated plane
which crashed In Spain last'
January.
The entire sports complex, and
additional parking, will be ready
for use by the beginning of the
school year in September.
-Tmo so*
lax Lerner
n
WASHINGTON 'Anwar El
Sadat's slap at Russia's face
was a surprise to politicians and
diplomats here, yet it flows di-
rectly from Great Power poll-
tics as practiced by the Nixon
Administration and Nixon will
doubtless be getting credit as
well as satisfaction from It.
Put It this way. The dynamism
of the Nlxon-Kisslnger moves
toward stabilizing Great Power
relations with China and Russia
was bound to have repercussions
among the allies of each. One
result of Nixon's Peking trip
was the choice of Prime Min-
ister Tanaka and Japan's new
policy of making a deal with
China on its own. Nov a second
result this time of Nixon's trip
to Moscow is Sadat's declara-
tion of self-reliance looking to-
ward the ousting of Soviet ad-
visers and some technicians
from Egypt.
In both cases there was a
wave of nationalist feeling mild-
er In Japan's case than in
Egypt's but a resolve in both to
follow national interest rather
than dependence on America or
Russia. As the great superpow-
ers (America and Russia and
America and China) are
brought together in a concert
of powers seeking to prevent
suicidal confrontation with each
other their allies must rely more
on themselves and re-orient
their policies. Japan's move was
healthy in every way and didn't
trouble the United States much.
Egypt's move is a blow at So-
viet prestige and influence and
a gain for America's. We won't
know how much it will shake up
the Middle-East situation until
the dust settles a bit.
The roots of Sadat's disaffec-
tion with Russia run deeper, of
course, than Brezhnev's agree-
ment with Nixon. They run to
Russia's crucial dilemma: It
wanted to arm Egypt In order
to gain power and influence In
the Middle ast. but it didn't dare
unleash Egypt's arms and thus
get involved in a showdown con-
frontation with the United
States.
The Russian generals and
proconsuls, and flyers, techni-
cians and advisers, acted with
considerable arrogance in
Egypt, just as the top people in
Moscow acted with little fidel-
ity. It was fortunate for the
world that they didn't give
Sadat the unleashing of new-
fighter bombers and surface-to-
surface precision missiles for
bombing Israel. But since they
knew that In the end they
couldn't, whv did they promise?
Why did the all-knowing Rus-
sian leaders get themselves in-
to the Egyptian quagmire a
quagmire almost as bad as
America's in Vietnam?
't was the Egyptian press and
students and army who sensed
Egypt's impossible position be-
fore Sadat did, and forced him
into his present move which
may prove real or'dhly a gej.
ture. We commentators tend to
assume that a nation's leaders
can act In a vacuum, as if they
were making moves in an al.
most sealed room on the Fish-
cher-Spassky chessboard t
Reykjavik. They can't. Egypt's
people and soldiers have their
national prides. They called an
end to being pawns. Sadat, who
has some skill at the politics of
surprises, made his move with
characteristic suddennes. But
he had little choice.
He has bought some freedom
of movement, but not much. He
doesn't dare break wholly with
the Russians. The song he sings
to them, to an Arab tune, is "If
We Can't Be the Same Old
Sweethearts, Let Us Still Be the
Same Old Friends." He may get
rid of advisers and some tech-
nicians. He doesn't dare get rid
of at least a few thousand Rus-
sians performing strategic mis-
sions in Egypt on the MIGi
and with the missile complexes.
There may be a shift of control
to Egyptians, but the dilemma
of decision Is still there.
There were three course*
open to Sadat war, jieace
and neither-war-nor-peace. He
thought Russia would enable
him to make war. It didn't. He
can't go on long with the
neither-war-nor-peace double-
talk and doubethink. He must
now choose between fighting
and negotiating, with as much
military help as Russia will still
give him and as much diplomat-
ic help as America will.
He flexes his nationalist
muscles and says that the Kcyp-
tlans now own ..everything and
run everything. But does that
mean a capacity to make war
for this year or the next? I
doubt it. For to make use of (he
planes, missiles and precision
technology the Russians have
given him. Sadat needs an Kgyp-
tian force saturated (as Israel
is) in the Western tradition of
science and technology. This is
exactly what Egypt lacks. In its
national socialism, its socialism
is arid and lacks the scientific
humanism of the Western so-
cialist tradition, while its na-
tionalism is new and narrow.
There was a chance at one
time that Russia would be ad-
venturist enough to ease
Egypt's path into a war wit*
Israel. Maybe Sadat believed it,
and maybe even the Russian!
half-believed it. But the Israels'
didn't quake, tlie Americans be-
gan delivery on the planes If
rael needed, and then Nixon*
talks with Brezhnev in Moscow
put the final seal on that epi-
sode.
Which may be why the If
raells feel so affirmatively
about Nixon's policies and are
shaky about a change. And also
why Sadat will have to start
thinking again about direct or
"proximity" negotiations wif>
Israel.
ucatm STSTists
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..


Friday, August 4, 1972
*'Jevisii rhrkHan
Pagall
Bv Haskeil Cohen IfWS IN SPORTS
Chaim Glovinsky, Mr. Sport Of Israel
in. 110, Jewloh Tetearaphlc Acency)
rtN,'v T,IE R*bbeno' Shole-
lcm knows when the squab-
bling will cease. I'm not
referring to the war between
Israel and Its Arab neighbors,
but the constant strife that goes
on between Israeli sports clubs.
Spawned by political parties, Is-
rael's complete sport structure
is built around four major
groups: Hapoel, Maccabi,;Eny.ur
and Betar.
If it's a question between club
iwrticipation and national com-
petition, the athlete here
chooses his club. Until such a
day as this thinking changes,
Israel is bound to be a second
rate Internationa) sports conten-
der albeit there are seveiai ath-
letes who, with training irad
coaching, can become top class
internationalists.
An event took place here a
couple of months ago that saw
Mr. Sport of Israel, Chaim Glo-
forgotten and the Olympic Com-
vinsky, on his 70th birthday
For once, club allegiances were
mittee threw Chaim a bash
which was attended by sports
officials from all over the coun-
try, as antl-as -by governmVnt
members and visitors from
abroad, who flew here to join
in the happy occasion. To write
about what he means to sports
in Israel would take at least one
volume of tight prose. To try
and do him justice in one col-
umn borders on the insane.
Chaim Glovinsky came to
._.,*.,, itvi -- it);
Palestine d2 years ago at the
age of 18, from I>xiz, Poland.
Always a sport* follower, he
managed to combine his work at
Solel Boneh, the government
building arm, with his work in
sports administration. Had he
desired, Chaim would have gone
far in politics
As We Were Spying? By ROBERT E SEGA1
All Honor To The Pilots
IF VOU THY lo keep fairly close tabs on the ac-
celeration of the skyjacking menace the killers
who sneak through, the death machines on board,
the planes snatched, the passen-
gers and members of crew threat-
ened, wounded, and killed, and the
scores of proposals for curbing
outrages aloft you will soon find
that you have a strenuous and de-
manding hobby. Air hijacking is
40 years old. The horrifying prac-
tice got fresh impetus 11 years
ago when homesick Cubans began
to hijack American planes on Miami-to-Key West
flights. And today, with pilot associations taking
the unpopular role of leadership against air terror-
ismeven if that means paralyzing air traffic
temporarily opinion seems certain to harden.
Four years ago, when Arabs stole a $6 million
El Al plane on a regularly scheduled flight, it was
the International Federation of Airline Pilots Asso-
ciations that demanded the release of the-plane, her
tew of 10 and her 12 Israeli passengers', held
aptive m Algeria while non-Israeli passengers
*-cre flown on to Parft. The pilots were furious
over this example of Arab racism and reacted as
(tpt and brave men are expected to act. Today, in
ISRAEL NEWSLETTER
the courageous stand of Captain Ola Forsberg,
president of the same top pilots' groups, we are
seeing continuation of a laudable thrust agai-ist
injustice.
Once more Algeria is in the hijacking news.
and on the wrong side. Algeria stood by the Arab
pirates in the 1%8 incident and now seems drier-
mined not to extradite William Holder, who, with a
woman companion, snatched' a Western Airlines
plane out of Seattle recently, picked up $500.00') in
ransom and found what seems to be a hero's wel-
come 7,200 air miles later in Algeria.
So the world should by now have received some
idea of the identity of those individuals and nations
participating in and condoning modern sky crimes.
Applause for the aggressions, shelter for the plane
stealers and1 gloating over such murderous business
are recorded time after time.
Much in mind currently is the example of
Radio Cairo and two major Cairo dailies Al Ahrim
and Al-Goumhuria. in calling the May 30 asassina-
i ions of 1* Puerto Ricans and 12 other travelers at
Lydda Airport, Tel Aviv, "a brilliant feat." Egypt's
Premier, Aziz Sldky. saw the Lydda massacre only
as a daring operation, proof certain that the Arabs
could lick the Israelis.
By Crl Alpwl
German-Arab Relations
|N MAHCH 16, IMS, the Knesset voted to accept
Germany's offer of diplomatic relations with
Israel, and five months later the first German
ambassador presented his crcd-.*n-
] tials in Jerusalem. Arab reaction
| was quick. Nine Arab states (ex-
cluding Morocco, Tunisia, Libya
land Kuwait) at once severed their
diplomatic relations with Bonn.
Quiet, patient, persistent Ger-
man diplomacy since then has
brought about a gradual restora-
i tion of ties. First Jordan, and then
p'' men, and later Algeria and Sudan and Lebanon
Wumed their diplomatic relations. Only Egypt,
ISyria, Iraq and Saudi Arabia still turn their backs
"i Germany, but there is little doubt that these
|tw. one by one, will reopen relations.
New winds are blowing in German-Arab affairs,
and a quick look through recent German periodicals
provides some typical pointers. The Bonn Foreign
lOffi,-,. |las -conjc t0 a welcome understanding with
|th(- Arab world," says a commentator in the "Han-
|novcr. sche Allgcmelnc."
It is not an easy course which Germany is try-
ing to steer. On the one hand it has strong moral
fnd i>olitical reasons for maintaining the best of
plat ions with Israel. And on the other hand it is
*"ekin<; to restore a long-standing, traditional friend-
J*>ip with the Arab world which goes back to the
)- of Berlin to Baghdad.
Economic factors also play their role. In the
[Arab market, first place is held by the United
*<*''<, and this despite America's support of Israel.
Srt'am and France follow, in that order, Germany
is fourth, and Russia has just edged i.p into fi.ih
place as supplier of the Arab world's normal com-
mercial purchases.
There are political elements as well. The rew
Germany, genuinely chastened after the .lebac'.e of
the Third Reich, nevertheless aspires to a place ot
dignity and leadership in the world. The recent
treaties with Warsaw and Moscow are inportan'
steps in that direction. And Germany feels that it
has a role to play in the Middle East as well, no less
than Britain, France and Italy, as the "Frank-
furter Rundschau" points out.
As a matter of fact, the Aral) slates too have
much to gain from restoration of ties. After 'he
1M8 break they forfeited much valuable economic
aid and1 lost out on trade credits as well. It was a
case of stubborn Arab pride asserting itself even at
the exiiense of their own best interests.
From the Israeli point of view, the warming up
of German-Arab relations is not necessarily bad. It
is not being done at the expense of Israel. Germany
insists on making it quite clear that there can b-
no question of its "balanced policy" in the Mtdrtt-
Fast, and for the Arabs to accept this is in itself
great progress. Balance means unquestioned giod
relations between Germany and Israel. Certainly
we have never required of friendly states that they
must be enemies of our enemies.
And a final factor of interest. Heinrich Ena. a
German diplomat turned academician, makes a
hard-headed real-i>olltik analysis: "In the pad
I*rael may have hampered the west in the Arab
world, but in the event of war it would be a poten-
tial western bridgehead."
This, of course, is a chilling prospect at best.
Members of the Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine exulted; which obviously has been
reluctant to root out Arab guerrilla nests and out-
law training grounds for skyjackers, had to start
thinking about reprisals from an out.-aged Israel.
After the men who fly planes in international
traffic give the world the proper example for mo-
bilizing opinion against skyjacking, what hope is
there for improvement? The best hope is for mire
determination on the part of the International Civil
Aviation Organization, affiliated with the United
Nations. At the same level, an anxious world looks
on IKK. Secretary General Waldncim to stop quib-
bling In his negotiations with the pilots and to try to
wade through Arab and Russian intransigence in
the Untied Nations to obtain agreement on sanc-
tions against pirates in the sky and murderers who
fish weapons out of their luggage in airports.
The boycotting of airports in nntions abetting
hijackers, drastic proposals such as that now before
the U.S. Congress calling for the end of U.S. aid to
any country harboring terrorist.groups. th training
and use of hundreds of additional sky marshals, and
a stepped-up search for weapon-detecting Seviccs i'J
airports should help.
Meanwhile, all honor to tBe pilots. They s.^cm
best to understand the immorality and unacccpt-
abillty of the practice of killing innocent air travel-
era crimes committed by contemptible national-
ists who mix a mad brew of international politics
and terrorism in a dangerous age.
ssMBMMaBMaaMasmNam.f jaaai
Btwtm rwwalte By BORIS SKIOUK
The 'Jewish Vote'
WARIOIS si'RVKTS durhnr ttw last years have
established that the majority of Jews in this
country regard themselves as political independents.
They generally resist voting "Jew-
ishly." The "Jewish vote" of 50
years ago is now widely disposed
among many candidates, in both
[Mtlli parties.
There are still Jewish voters
who during the time of elections
are inclined to ask whether this
or the other candidate is "good for
the Jews." By and large, however,
the Jewish electorate today is deeply concerned
about Issues such as Vietnam, pollution, inflation,
unsafe streets and social welfare. It Ls only natural
for the Jewish voter to be concerned also about
American policy In the Middle Fast.
Nevertheless, it is quite clear to the leaders
of both political parties that in the forthcoming
presidential elections, each of the competing candi-
dates will be judged by many Jewish voters on the
basis of his attitude toward Israel. The fate of
Israel is very much on the minds of Jews in this
country. They do not want 3 million Israelis an-
nihilated by the Arabs aa Hitler did to 6 million
Jews in Europe
The Democrats will cite support given to Israel
by Presidents Truman. Kennedy and Johnson. They
will point out that this was not the case under the
Eisenhower administration, when John Foster Dulles
was Secretary of State and made no secret of his
hostile attitude toward Israel. The Republicans
will emphasize that President Nixon has kept all
his promises with regard to Israel: and that upon
his return from Moscow he stressed, in his address
before the Congress, the U.S. obligation to keep
Israel secure.

,


ftjge 12
tJewtstifhrMtor
Friday. August 4, 1373
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