The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00046

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Florid lain
Voiume 2 Number 19
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
_________________Hollywood, Florida Friday, July 21, 1972
Price 20 cents
Executive Committee Meets
To Plan Next Year's Drive
Campaign leadership and plans
for the coming year's campaign
will be the order of business it
Military's Deviations
Called 'Regrettable9
JtSSt MARTIN
a meeting of the Executive Com-
nittee of Greater Hollywood's
i-h Welfare Federation
Thursday, July 27.
Although work is contmuing
in efforts to reach people still
unsolicited in this year's record
campaign and to collect on the
pledges already made, this mat-
ing will be devoted to discus -i
the campaign needs for the com-
ing year and the boat possirne
way to respond to those needs.
Information has already
reached the local federation of-
fice from the national United
Jewish Appeal office which indi-
cates that financial requirements
in Israel and calls for help for
Soviet Jewry will be bigger than
ever as time goes on this yeir.
In this first six months of
1972, 15,554 Soviet Jews emi-
grated to Israel. This figure
compares to 1,000 who emi-
grated in 1970 and 12.000 thit
arrived from the Soviet Union
in 1971.
It costs approximately Cl.~>6
for a Jewish person to get a
visa and to nay for transpo-'.a-
tlon out of Russia. Upon arriv-
ing in Israel, $15,000 is needed
to settle the average family of
four. All these figures point up
the tremendous need for the
local federation to share these
burdens.
Although no definite plans
have been set for the 1973 cam-
paign as yet and no goals hive
been cited nationally, the .-' >-
gan will continue to be, "Ke?p
The Promise." The words a.e
being retained because it is
felt that in spite of the treme-i-
dous success of last year's ca"i-
paign, the promise has still not
been kept and efforts must con-
tinue to be made to fulfill it.
Contemplated needs on the lo-
cal scene will also be reviewed
at the Executive Commit'ce
meeting. According to a state-
ment by Jesse J. Martin, presi-
dent of JWF, it Is recogni/'d
that in these times of inflation,
Hollywood's local beneficiary
agencies have increased needs
and increased expenses.
The growth of the Jewish po>
illation of the area has also
been a contributing factor in
taxing the facilities of many of
these local agencies such as
Jewish Family Service and t'-.e
Jewish Home for the Aged.
This planning meeting is ex-
pected to be one of the most
important sessions of the year;
the results of discussions he'd
July 27 will hold the key to the
conduct of 1973's campaign it
was pointed out.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pre-
mier Gold Meir t-'d Sunday's
Cabinet session that "regretta-
ble deviations" had taken place
in the handling of two cases re-
garding military authority in toe
occupied territories. She laid
that she hopes officers handling
such issues in the future will be
careful not to overstep the
bounds of their authority.
Mrs. Meir was referring to
the spraying of 125 acres of
Arab crops with a poisonous
substance near the village of
Akraba in the West Bank, and
the removal of Bedouins from a
large tract of cordoned-off land
between the Gaza Strip and
Sinai.
Her comments were made in
anawer to a question raised by
Minister of Health Victor
sht-iiiiov of the Mapam Party
and directed to Defense Minis-
ter Moshe Dayan.
Gen. Dayan admitted that he
thought the spraying of the
West Bank crops was a wrong
decision, but stressed that the
spraying, which was carried out
in April, had been done with the
approval of "competeni military
authorities."
Gen. Dayan, who explain d
that the aiea in question had
been fence*, off soon after the
Six-Day War as a military
training area, said that he per-
sonally disapproved of the
spraying when h- heard of it,
but that it was the particular
method and not the basic deci-
sion which he disapproved of.
In reference to the Gaza Strip
Incident, Gen. Dayan denied
that the Bedouins removed from
tin- area had lieen barred from
tending their crops during the
daytime. He admitted, however,
that the decision to move the
Bedouins and tc.ice off their
land had beer, taken without
the authority oi the Army Gen-
eral Staff and that the officer
involved had been reprimanded.
The question of comjiensation
for the Akraba villagers was not
brought up at the Cabinet meet-
ing.
PFLP Planning Another
Cabinet Permits NRP To Abstain Parcel Bomb Campaign?
From Vote On 'Who Is A Jew' Bill
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
1 abinet disposed of one as>t
a looming government crisis
last week when it was a-;r ad
to allow the National Religious
Party to abstain when the Knes-
-'i votM on an amendment to
the Law of Return specifying
< inversions for prospective .:n-
migrants.
But the major test facing Pie-
rr.ier Golda Meir's coalition i;>v-
irnment is the Independent Lib-
eral Party's limited civil mar-
riagei bill. The Labor Party and .
the NRP indicated today that
they would rely on their major-
ity in the-Knesset presidium to
postpone a vote on the contro-
versial measure. But the ILP
said it would press for a vole
before parliament recesses at the
end of this month, even if it
means appealing to the Supreme
Court
The difficulties with the NRP
were solved following a five-
hour session last Thursday
when the Labor Party agre-d
to authorize Premier Meir to
allow the NRP to abstain.
The Religious Party insisted
that it could not possibly op-
pose the measure introduced by
Agudat Israel MK Shlomo Lor-
incz, which contains the phrase
"according to halacha" (religious
law). The measure is popularly
known as the "Who Is A Jew?"
bill. The NRP leadership an-
nounced however that the
party's 12-man Knesset faction
would abstain when it came to
a vote.
The Cabinet has voted down
a proposal by Tourism Minister
Moshe Kol of the ILP that all
coalition party MKs be per-
mitted to vote their conscience
on the Lorincz bill.
Mr. Kol was backed by Ma-
pam ministers Victor Shemtov
and Nathan Peled. Ills bid would
have created a precedent for the
civil marriages bill. One of the
main problems facing the Labor
Alignment Is to convince Ita
Mapam constituents to support
the government In opposing the
latter.
Mapam is still committed by
a majority decision of its politi-
cal bureau to vote for the meas-
ure introduced by former Attor-
ney General Gideon Hausner.
The veteran Mapam leadership
is trying to persuade the party
memliers to observe coali'ion
discipline. But younger, more
radical elements have appar-
ently taken the helm.
Labor Party circles said th.it
while Mrs. Meir is prepa-ed to
tolerate absention by Mapam,
she could not agree to their
total defiance of the govern-
ment implicit in a vote for t'ne
Continued on Page
Kahane Sounds Alarm
AtZOA 75th Convention
TEL AVIV (JTA) The 75'h
jubilee convention of the Zion-
ist Organization of America
was enlivened this morning by
the appearance of Rabbi Meir
Kahane, leader of the Jewish
Defense League, (JDL) and a
spirited rebuttal by ZOA presi-
dent Herman L. Weisman of
Kahane's warnings of an immi-
nent holocaust In the United
States. Weisman categorically
rejected Kahane's thesis that
American Jews must emigrate
to Israel en-masse to save tlvlr
lives.
Last night the convention w.is
addressed by Israel's Foreign
Minister Abba Eban and heard
a message of greeting from Gov.
Nelson A. Rockefeller, of New
York, who was to have delivered
it in person but cancelled his
trip to Israel because of a death
in his family.
The JDL leader who wanted to
be heard at the conventio i's
opening session in Jerusalem
Thursday night, agreed to par-
ticipate instead at this morn-
ing's session here devoted to
aliyah. Earlier, Kahane was criti-
cized obliquely by Foreign Min-
ister Eban who chided "those
who think that by smashing
glass in the U.S. they will help
bring Russian Jews to Israel."
Kahane's remarks today we--e
a repetition of his familiar theme
that American Jews face a new
wave of anti-Semitism. He
claimed that a deteriorating eco-
nomic situation in the U.S.
coupled with political unrest will
turn the population against
Cent mood en Page 5-
JKRUSALEM (JTA I Police
Superintendent Mordechai Tavor,
who warned that Israel may ' facing a new wave of parcel
bombs mailed by Arab terror-
ists to prominent persons both
here and abroad, said a booby-
trapped parcel bomb that was
defective may have caused the
explosion that killed Ghamn
Kanafani, a spokesman and
propagandist for the Popu'ar
Front for the Liberation of Pal-
estine, outside his home in a
Beirut suburb Saturday.
Mr. Tavor said the PFLP, an
extremist terrorist group whose
most recent outrage was IM
May SO Lylla Airport massacre.
may lie planning a repetition of
their parcel bomb campaign o'
sit months a^o. At that time an
Israeli policeman was kill !
opening; one of IS parcels ma'.< -d
from Europe to people in Israel.
Mr. Kanafani was killed is
he entered his car. The b'a.'t
also killed his niece. Superin-
tendent Tavor said his parcel
bomb theory was based on the
discovery by Beirut police 3f a
slip of paper near the wrecked
car with the inscription, "Com-
pliments of the Israel Embassy
in Copenhagen." He said the
terrorists affixed such slips to
their booby trans to make sure
the recipient would open the
parcel.
Mr. Tavor said the slips wc-e
printed by the thousands and
were easy to come by, and noted
that Kanafani's wife is a Dane
and his brother, a press photog-
rapher, lives in Denmark.
The Israeli ambassador hi o-
penhacen. Moshe Leabem, dis-
missed as "rldk-ulou* and ab-
surd" claims by the PFLP that
his embassy had anything; to do
with Kanafani's death. "Some-
body hi trying to divert atten-
tion from the real guilty part ,"
Ambassador Leshem told Dsa-
ish reporters.
El Fatah Chief Yassir Arafat
threatened "terriHtf venggnoe
against bra for Kanafani's
death this week. Speaking chairman of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization in Beirut,
Mr. Arafat said. "The enemy
should bo hit with blows to
shake the onths* 'Zionist entity."
The PFLP denounced the BBC
eorres|>ondent in Beirut as an
"employee of Israel" for hav >.g
suggested that Kanafani's kill-
ing may have been an assassina-
tion stemming from internecine
strife between the PFLP and
ri\al terrorist groups.
Relatives Of Bomb
Suspect Arrested
TEL AVIV (JTA) Security
forces have arrested the father
and brother of Emile Joumaa, a
25-year-old terrorist who was
badly burned last week while
assembling a bomb in the pub-
lic lavatory at the Natanya bus
terminal.
The arrests were made after
a search of the Joumaa home in
Tulkarem yielded explosives and
detonating devices. Police have
released 39 suspects detained at
Natanya after the incident.
Mr. Joumaa. who recently
served six months of a two-year
prison sentence for El Fatah
activities, was rushed to a hospi-
tal Jury 4 after he ran from the
bus terminal with bis clothes
aflame. He was identified as a
terrorist from papers found on
him which included Instructions
on how to make a bomb.
Police said he was planning to
plant a bomb somewhere in the
bus terminal when the powder
caught fire, igniting his clothes.
Damage to the lavatory was
minor.


Page 2
PlAwirf flcridlari
Friday. July 21, 1072
Jewish Education Reaching
Very Few, Studies Reveal
The results of community stud- Aijor appraisinc results of these
ie< made by a sub-ccaftimitt .; ol studies, the committees announced
the Local Allocations ComniitW > thiit tt was their considered judg-
ment that it was a community
function to provide services when
they were lacking. They expressed
the opinion that the costs of these
services should be borne by the
temple congregations, the pavnts
and Jewish Welfare Federation.
A recommendation was ni-td<
that the Jewish community, under
the ponnrtMp of Jewish WVliarc
Federation, develop a Judaica |>"o-
gram for Jewish students past BfcJ
Mit/vah age and through high
school. The program. pianiW so
that it will avoid competition with
already existing programs, should
be developed in cooperation with
all temples and Jewish educational
facilities already available, they
said.
Chairman of the Special Al'o'a-
ti'tis Sub-Committee. Mrs Phi.li'i
\V( instein Jr.. announced that the
commit*ee's plan is to have pro-
grams on courses which will iio'
point tin the ideological .'ifferc-.iees
but rather areas of common ran-
Cern such as social i-sues and
Jewish values, the Jewish com-
munity of the United States, the
holocaust, the history' of Zionism.
lews in Russia. Jewish musie and
dance, Jewish identity "rap" ses-
sions, weekend Shabbatons irvl
Ulpan and conversational Hebrew.
MK. PHILLIP WEINSTtlti, JR.
of Greater Hollywood's Jewish
Welfare Federation, the Commis-
sion on Jewish F.du:*ntion and a
group c.: leading Jewish educe' rs
in the area were male nuhli this
. They shone' that Jewish
education for youth past Bar M'tz-
v; munity teen-agers.
JWV Post Wins 4 Out Of 5
Department Of Florida Awards
Victor B. Freedman Post 413*
Was the winner of all five avaud*
given by the Department of F'.or-1
Ida JWV at the convention h*M|
here recently. This was the fi'-st f
time in JWV's history thai a post
Via- been so honored.
Announcement of the awards
was made at a banquet giv ,i to
honor outgoing Department Com-
mander Peter Bluesten, a chapter
memnei ol the post.
Awards given to the ]iost \ ere
the Harry Mazey Award, for out-
standing individual work for hos-
pital veterans, ESdward Rose; the
Historical Award, won by Wil'am
SchoenfeM; the Victor B. F.
man Award given to the post which
ha- exhibited the greati st "\"el-!
lence in the past year, and the
Community Activities and Civic
Affairs Award.
In addition to the presentation
of awards, detriment officers foi
the coming year were also eltvted.
William Schoenfeld of Post 13
was elected unanimously to the
post of judge a.'vocate.
Members of Post 613 attending
the convention included Mr. Blue-
sten fourth regional commander,
Jack Berman, post commander.
Herman Muransky, Arthur Sherry.
Herman Zweihach, Mike Bogia-
noff, Hy Spigel, Bill Hoffheims.
Samuel Klein, Ja?k Rogow. So'
Heller. Milton F.icnitz. Bill Scnoen-
feld. Al Freeman, Vic Silverman,
Bill Sonn. Milton Miller, Sid Cin-
gold and Rose Berger.
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Friday. July 21. 1972
*Jel Page 3
No Change In French
Mideast Policy Seen
PAtflS, France (JTA) There
seems to be little, reason ton*-.,
pect that France's Middle East
policy will change in the co.-n-
ing weeks after the creation of
the new French cabinet, headed
by Premier Pierre Messmer, po-
litical observers said. The actual
power, according to the French
constitution, still lies with Presi-
dent Georges Pompidous, who
is thought to be the moving
spirit behind France's Middle
East policy over the past few
years.
Premier Messmer, who served
as defense minister in a previ-
ous cabinet, was the man who
officially made the decision to
embargo all arms deliveries to
Israel at the time of the Six-
Day War. A further element
suggesting no change in French
Mideast policy is the fact that
all the other cabinet mini'"-s
- particularly Foreign Minister
Maurice Schumann are keep-
ing their posts, at least for the
time being.
France's new premier was de-
scribed by an Israeli Cabinet
minister as one of the tow
Frenchmen thoroughly acquaint-
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KRAFT FOODS
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Booklet rawfsvrittf qvesfiens mmd
answers en rreefftioaef Jtwish IHt
sssflaw,
Far Ira* cosies far yea er yeei
rjanixatian (limited te 75 ceeies)
Writes
BUTT MOM (Deal YJM)
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^re"ee^BjeRe**j^e#f %>> SaY*^r^sW^SF^ssr
ed wiUi the Middle East. That
r rente**, fty. {Ts^qsots* Alialstw
Shimon Peres at a meeting: of
the Israel-France Friendship
Association in Haifa was the
first assessment of Messmer by
a member of the Israeli guvi-rii-
ment.
Mr. Messmer is described in
the French press as "an ortho-
dox Gaullist," meaning a hard-
line follower of the late Presi-
dent Charles DeGaulle. His last
known declaration on the Mid-
dle East, was made Sept. 11,
1967 on the occasion of the visit
by Gen. Zwl Tzur, Israel's dep-
uty defense minister, who came
to ask him to lift the embargo.
Mr. Messmer was reported to
have told Gen. Tzur that he, as
defense minister, could not lift
the embargo and that the re-
construction of the Arab air
forces destroyed by Israel, could
not be considered an escalation
of new weapons to the region.
He rejected at that time in
Israeli protest against French
Mirage iet deliveries to Leba-
non on grounds that Lebanon
did not participate in the Six-
Day War.
Rabbi Returning Aug. 4
Mrs. Martin Weisz, principal of
Temple Solel's Religious School
and Mrs. Daniel Sokol, Hebrew
teacher of the Bat and Bar Mitz-
vah classes, will conduct Fridav
evening services July 21. Rabbi
Robert Frazin, spiritual leader of
Temple Solel, will return to the
otilnit Fridav. Aug. 4.
B'nai B'rith Post
Is Not An Official
B. B. Publication
The publication using the name
"B'nai B'rith Post" which is pres-
ently ^so^citing advertising and
6usTness iniJjis area is not affili-
ated with nor in any way tpoo-
sored by the B'nai B'rith Lodges,
according to an announcement
made Jointly by Howard Sea,
president of the B'nai B'rith Coun-
cil of South Florida Lodges, and
Bert Brown, president of the Flor-
ida State Association of B'nai
B'rith.
Neither the state association iior
the local council has an official
publication, and advertisers should
not be misled into believing that
the publication in question has any
official standing, the two oresi-
dents said.
According to informants, the
"B'nai B'rith Post" is being pro-
duced by New Vista Associates,
publishers of the Jewish Home For
The Aged Voice, Disabled Ameri-
can Veterans' Voice and the Flor-
ida United Labor Digest, which is
operating out of offices at 1175
NE 125th St., North Miami.
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Page 4
+Jewist>Ik>r/cUar7
Friday, July 21, 1972
^Jewish Meridian
rf %MM 4N VI MltMH MN4t*M
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Volume 2
Friday. July 21, 1972
Number 18
10 AB 5732
Mergers A Sign Of The Times
For most synagogues this is the time of the year when
there are stirrings of interest in affiliation despite the.
summer doldrums. The past several years, however, lnve
not been happy ones for reasons that are not as yet cUmt.
Diminishing membership and increasing deficits are plain
for far too many.
A sign of the times is that establishment of new Con-
servative and Reform synagogues in the United States is
virtually non-existent and that the merger of an increasing
number of synagogues a new development in American
Jewish life has been taking place in recent years Not
only is the synagogue building boom of the last two
decades over, but actual attrition in their number is tuki.ig
place as the result, it would seem, of a shifting population
and the pressure of economics inflation and unemploy-
ment.
One of the unusual features in the merger development
is that several have involved Conservative and Reform
congregations and a number of others cutting across what
would seem to be ideological grounds are in the works. Ic
has been apparent for some time, even among some of thft
rabbinate, that the new generation of Reform and Conserva-
tive Jews are not as concerned with denominational dif-
ferences as their forebears. It is too early to forecast a trend,
but those interested in the future of liberal American Juda-
ism are watching the signs with great interest today.
Religion Issue Plagues Government
While public opinion surveys reveal that a larqp
majority of Israelis favor civil marriage where the Orthodox
rabbinate refuses to perform a marriage ceremony because
of religious tradition, the issue remains a sensitive political
one that threatens the unity of the country. Involved are
not only the religious parties but others in the coalition
which see the legalization of civil marriage as a matter of
principle which can no longer be put aside.
The entire issue of religion in Israel, particularly the
rights of Conservative and Reform rabbis, is one wh'ch
continues to plague the government at a time when its
attention must be devoted to more critical problems. Some
how and soon intelligent Jews must come together as
a people to whom survival is more important than power.
Mid East Platform Plank
As was expected, the 1972 Democratic Convention
adopted without significant opposition a powerful platform
statement on the Middle East that is the strongest statement
of support for Israel that either political party has ever
made.
It calls for carrying out a firm public commitment tc
provide Israel with the armament it needs to preserve her
deterrent strength and at the same time pledges to seek to
bring the contending parties together in direct negotiations
for a peaceful settlement.
An historic switch from official U.S. policy is the call
to recognize Jerusalem as the capitol of Israel and a de-
mand that the U.S. Embassy be moved from Tel Aviv to
there.
With the agreement of the majority of the McGovrn
forces, the military aspect of the Middle East plank was
made more forceful by an amendment which, in effect,
pledges the presence of the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediter-
ranean a a counter-force to Russian naval pressure on
Israel.
Despite the usual State Department pressure, it is not
expected that the Republican platform on this question
when it comes before the GOP Convention here next month
will be different in any important degree.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON The chair-
man of the Senate Democratic
campaign committee recently
subjected the Senate Demo-
cratic policy committee to what
Is beginning to be called the
"McGovern shock." He warned
his colleagues bluntly that the
Democratic Party could very
easily lose control of the Senate
as the first price of a race be-
tween Sen. George McGovern
and President Nixon.
To be sure, the campaign
committee's chairman, Sen. Fur-
riest F. Hollings, comes from
South Carolina. But "Fritz"
Hollings Is an able, moderate
man with many friends in all
factions of his faction-ridden
party. His warning was also
based on the most exhaustive
soundings in all the states in
which control of the Senate is
nt stake.
OOD KNOWS, it is entirely
riossihlc that Sen. Hollings is
dead wrong. There are two
brand-new factors in this elec-
tion. Sen. McGovern has a quite
unprecedented nationwide or-
ganization. Then, too, there is
the great increase of young vot-
ers whom the McGovern or-
ganizers count for their own.
With two such novel factors in
play, none but fools can be cer-
tain of the outcome.
The real question about Sen.
Hollings' warning, if you get
right down to it, is whether the
normal |>olitical storm signals
are still dependable.
8FPPOSE, however, that all
the experienced Democrats in
all the key states are still able
to judge their own constitu-
encies. On that supposition the
Hollings warning to the horri-
fied Senate Democratic policy
committee has to be taken most
seriously.
The painstaking soundings
taken by the people working-for
Sen. Hollings show no less than
eight currently Democratic
Senate seats in different degrees
of danger. Some are Just in dan-
ger. Some are In serious danger.
For some, it is deadly danger.
THE RIGHT scats arc those
in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Ala-
bama, Georgia, North Carolina.
Virginia, Rhode Island and Mon-
tana. In the present composition
of the Senate, moreover, a net
Republican gain of only five
seats will be enough to produce
a 49 to 49 Republican versus
Democratic split.
In those circumstances. Con-
servative Sen. James Buckley of
New York would surely vote
with the Republicans, while In-
dependent Sen. Harry F. F3oyd
Jr. of Virginia would probably
vote with the Democrats. The
Vice President whoever he
may be would then have the
casting vote. Son. J. William
Fulbright, among many others,
would therefore cease to be a
committee chairman.
IF YOU read the roster of the
Democrats' endangered states,
you will find that Hollings and
his investigators have in fact
found evidence of a tremendous
sweep for President Nixon in
the Southern and Border states.
The one Northern Democratic
seat in danger is that in Rhode
Island where Sen. Claiborne
Pell is being challenged by the
tremendously popular former
governor and secretary of the
navy, John Chafee.
The endangered Senate seats
were by no means the end of
the grim Hollings report to his
party's Senate policy commit-
tee, however. In a normal elec-
tion, the swings can easily make
up for the roundabouts. In other
words, a party can afford eight
seats in varying degrees of dan-
ger if the same party can ho|x
for four or five seats gained
elsewhere.
OF SUCH predicted Demo-
cratic gains in the Senat;. how-
ever, the list is now sadly short.
Rep. James Abourezk, Minding
for old Karl Mundt's seat in
South Dakota, Is a modornatc
bet In Sen. McGovern'> own
state. But other possib'. win-
ners, like ex-Sen. Wayne Morse
in Oregon, are now thought to
be carrying a dreadful handcap
by the political profcssio-.ils.
The Democratic loss in the
House would have to be much
heavier to produce a change in
leadership there. Yet the shrewd
and courageous speaker, Carl
Albert, is known to be appre-
hensive. An even worse, indeed
really unheard of sign. U the
number of Democratic commit-
tee chairmen In the lion who
i would cheerfully chang their
party tomorrow if they could
only retain their present sen-
iority.
FOR THE Democrats suffer-
ing from McGovern shock, the
choice ahead is in fact appalling.
They can run on their own, os-
tentatiously disregarding their
party's presidential candidate
as all of them now plan to do.
But they will then incur the da-
maging hostility of the AIcGev-
ern extremists and of the Mc*
Govern organization, too.
To repeat, the Democratic
professional politicians, as re-
flected by Sen. Hollings. may
have misjudged an entirely al-
tered outlook. But it is also pos-
sible that the Democrat., will
lie envying the lemming- come
next November.
Copyright 1972, Los Angeles
Times.
PART 1 OF A FIVE-PART SEMIS by Max terrier
What Happened To The Revolution?
NEW YORK, N.Y. It is
now roughly a decade since the
revolutionary changes of the
early '60s began in earnest.
Poised as we are for the final
phase of the election content,
this may be a good time to ask
what has happened to the revo-
lution and strike its trial balance.
Til Mil-: ARE broadly two
contrasting theories. One is that
all the chaos of changes adds
up to a disintegration of Amer-
ica, not immediately but before
the end of the century its en-
ergies run down, its values cor-
rupted, its unity split, its will
to survive stymied.
I take this view of American
decline seriously, and I tried to
deal with it in a series of arti-
cles last year ("Is America
Doom. But I am not con-
vinced. The events of the inter-
vening year the new mood on
the campus, the slowing down
of the black revolt, the qu'eter
atmosphere in the courtroo>ns,
the new climate in the relations
with China and Russia, the ac-
tivism of the young inside the
party system, the sense of n">w
political stirrings have con-
firmed my skepticism about the
disintegration theories.
THE OTHER theory is that
America is going through con-
vulsive, dislocating char,.;s
which lead to many discontents.
that the civilization may well
fall \icttm to those changes and
discontents, hut that there is a
good chance it will survive them
and emerge a stronger ratlvr
than a weaker civilization.
I can't prove this view, nor do
I discount the opposite one. My
trial balance is firmer than in
1971 or 1970. There is a law of
acceleration and deceleration :n
history, which we understand
only vary murkily. Social arxi
cultural changes seem to speed
up suddenly, then slow down,
but it takes considerable arro-
gance to be sure you know the
sources of either proc>.--.
FOR EXAMPLE, L.B.J.'s es-
calation of the war violence
brought on violent antiwar dem-
onstrations and also helped ihe
hard-core revolutionaries. But
while President Nixon continues
the war escalation, the revived
antiwar protest which followed
the mining operation has died
down. The mined harbors stay
mined, more bridges, rail '.ines
and industrial sites are bombid.
but the efforts in America to
break the power structure lan-
guish.
We must seek the reasons in
the governing facts of the 'ile
of the young. American soldiers
continue to be withdrawn, the
draft's impact is light, the proo-
lem of jobs and careers is -eil.
Those felt subjective factors
more than the condition of the
war itself evidently gove.n
the actions of the students.
SOMETHING of the sane
sort holds for the black and
other ethnic rebellions. The ad-
ministration policies have iis-
mayed many blacks and the ur-
ban programs have largely fin
out of money and steam. Y"dt
the mass support for militant
movements, whether of the
Black Panthers or the Black
Student Unions, has all but van-
ished. No separate political black
party has emerged, nor does a
separate black state get talked
about.
The clue to the current mood
'ics in the consciousness of the
large mass of the blacks, wh'ch
is reflected on the campus as
well. They feel surer of them-
selves, prouder of their skin and
identity, more confident tint
they can make gains as a people
and that they can be hammer
as well as anvil in the years
ahead.
WHILE THE power phases >t
the revolution whit'.' and
black alike have slowed down.
the cultural phases cor.tin le.
The explosions of ideas continue
in the new books, especially n
the social sciences. Experimei.ts
in education are moving faster,
not slower. The revolutions in
language continue, sometimes de-
basing, sometimes enriching it.
The drug revolution kee;*
shifting its emphasis, but tie
drug mystique still shows
strength. There is turmoii in re-
ligion, both inside and outs le
the churches.
In the arts, the breaking of old
forms spares no area films,
painting, architecture, the expert
mental theater. The erotic revo-
lution, which no longer need* to
show its muscle in pornogrio'iy.
has reached into the actual Uwi
and shifting codes of people
not only the young but the older
people, too. The women'., revo-
lution gathers strength; so do
the new forms of open and gro'ip
marriage and of diverse partner-
ships: so do the movements for
control of population growth.
IN PSYCHOLOGY and psychi-
atry there are new formulations
of what is healthy or unhealthy,
normal or abnormal, sane or in-
sane. The movement of group
therapy and of growth centers
for human potentials remains
strong. The values of revolution
must still be reckoned with.
It Is growing ever clearrr
that if civilization survives,
new form of personality u Iik> l>
to emerge in it. And I strongly
suspect that, for better or wo"-e,
the innovations are coming from
America, and whatever happ>>n-i
to America is likely to Kapuvn
to the worl-4
Copyright 1971. I-o* Angle* Tlmw



Friday. July 21. 1972
+JewistinorMton
Page 5
PERSONALITY PtOFflf
James Jacobson
"My community interests ""re
mostly of a local nature,-' siy:
James Jacobson, vice presid-mt
tAMIS IACOBSON
for Special Projects for the Ydunji
leaders Council of Jewish Welfare
r'edci&tion. "For instance, I g;ew
up in Miami Beach and used lo go
to the old Community Center or
West A.e. I remember how much
I not out of it and I'd like to see
the same sort of a center I ere
for mj own kids when they prow
up."
The kids" are Jody, almost Tour,
ami JiMin, two. Mr. Jacobson and
his wife, Marty, met when he was
at Duke University's law school
and -he was an undergrariua'? at
the university. They mani.si in
their last year of school and cnm<
back 10 South Florida where Jim
had been raised.
His birthplace was Brooklyn but
James moved to Miami Beach with
hi- family as a very young chikL
lli< early education was acquired
in Miami Beach schools aod he
!>ent three years at Emory Uni-
vi ixity, leaving when he received
early accept a nee at Duke Univer-
sity's law school.
Three years ago the Jaeoi'vms
moved-to Hollywood and Jim ha-c
heerj involved with the Yoim?
LeadjOM Council ever since. His
first year of service was devoted
lo the Telephone Committee dur-
ing the campaign and acting a* a
member of the Allocations f> m-
mittee at the termination of *he
campaign.
This year Mr. Jacobson was
chairman of the Overseas Commit-
tee for allocations. "I truly enjoy
this work," he says. "Spending thr
money Is more interesting to mo
than gutting it and the way
the campaign money is allotcd is
-ertainly most important. This
yenrthf Entire prWs*rt6f "AffiR&i
tions seemed to go more smoothly
than ever, i attribute it to the
fact that every mem her of I he
various committees seemed to be
well prepared."
Material is prepared by the lo-
eal federation office on every r.o
tential beneficiary agency. Thrt
material is secured from the agen-
cy it-elf in addition to other
sources available to federation.
Members of each allocation .->ib-
committee are assigned one or
more agencies to research, nsing
the material supplied, and af'er a
personal investigation a recommen-
dation is made to the committee.
"For example." said Mr. Jac >b-
son, "I know that many of he
members of the committees per-
sonally visited or called sonv oi
the agencies involved. All of uf
really spent time looking into our
parHeular agencies and evaluating
their nee.'s. That aopears to me
to be the reason things went so
smoothly when the final decisions
were made.
'Right now, I believe that the
goal of a community center is
keeping me involved. All of :is on
the Young Leaders Council ire
hopeful and optimistic about our
plans for the coming year. We
feel that they will produce defi-
nite results and will get the thin"
started. I'd like to see the tenter
finished in time for my own chil-
dren so that they can enjoy it and
meet other youngsters there front
similar backgrounds."
Mr. Jacobson believes tha' the
eommunity-at-large shoul.J be *d*
vised of the many protects that
federation undertakes. Many peo-
ple, he feels, think of the cam-
paign only in relation to reiving
money for Israel and overlook th<:
local aspects.
Mr. Jacobson is a member of the
various bar associations, and he
and his wife are members of Tem-
ple Setol. Marty, who taught in
the religious school for a while
was a political science major at
Duke University and taught at
Miami Senior High School until
their first child was born.
"Marty is the one you should
be writing about." says Mr. Jacob-
son proudly. "She really has a
wide range of interests and is
now working in the Women's Di-
vision of Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion. She manages to co everything
well. She was even named "Cook
of the Week" by the Hollywood
Sun-Tattler recently."
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ZOA Hears
Kahane Talk
Continued from Page I
Jews. He mentioned President
Nixon's adviser. Dr. Henry Kis-
Justice and U.K. Ambassador
Arthur Goldberg and New York
Sen. Jacob K. Javits as Ameri-
can Jews prominent in puh'ic
life who allegedly would be made
scapegoats for economic and po-
litical distress in the U.S.
Replying to Kahane, Weisman
declare.-1 that "Aliyah from the
United States is not based on
fear but on the love of Israel
coupled with the opportunity to
share in building and safeguard-
ing a society where a full Jaw*
i.-h life can be lived." He s lid
that "spreading fear and panic
can do nothing but harm to six
million Jews in America, can
embargoes Israel and can cast
a shadow on the Zionist move-
ment."
Eban. in his remarks, reit-
cratt _' that Israel will not re-
turn to the old armistice lines.
On the other hand, lie said. Is-
rael takes no rigid .Hand as *o
where its permanent borders
must be but Ls prepared to nego-
tiate that question with her
neighbors. Eban said that con-
trary to some opinion abroad,
time is working in Israel's favor.
He said the military picture was
much better for Israel now than
two years ago, especially in view
of the arms supplies coming from
the United States.
National Awards
Won By Students
At Hillel School
Two students nt Hillel Commun
ity Day Schooi have received
awar .- in a national content of
creative writing sponsored bv Riad
Magazine which is printed; by the
Xerox Corporation through thejr
department of American Educa-
tion Publications.
Andrea Weiss. 13, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Mel Weiss. 1321 NW
176th Ter., who has completed her
second year at Hillel. and Jeffrey
Newman. 12, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Newman of 655 NE 180th
St., North Miami Beach, who ha*
completed his first year, weK
named national winners prior to
the closing of the school year.
Their modern verse and euay
were submitted unknown to thorn
by their language arts instructor
Mis. Norman Mussman, who ij
also the student council advisor.
Both Andrea and Jeffrey have
been instrumental in the forma-
tion of the Hillel Student Co'inci!
which has been in effect for one
year. Andrea served as its fins!
president and helped to form its
constitution. Jeffrey served as ;..
vice president.
3 Year Expansion Plan
Is Drawn Up By El Al
A three-ytar expansion prog.im
involving the acquisition of three
more jumbo jets has been drawn
up by a commitJteflJjjxpeiits ap-
pointed by El Al, and will be sub-
mitted to the government in the
near future.
The company already has an
option for one jumbo set, which
could be used to prepare for the
1973 tourist season. The other two
jumbos should be ordered for de-
livery in 1974 and in 1975.
The cost of these planes may
top $100 million but the outlay is
expected to prove worthwhile even
at a conservative estimate of a [
10r; annual growth in tourist traf-
fic to Israel. The average growth
rate in the past five years has
been tt%.
Meet of the required financing
will be shouldered by El Al itself'
helped by long-term credits |
from the Eximbank though it
will also have to increase its capi-
tal.
The expansion program was dis-
closed by M. Oarmel. El Al chair-
man, and Mordechai Ben-Ari,
president, at a press conference
making publication of the com- ,
oany's balance sheet for 1971-
72.
The airline's revenue increased j
jver 40';, but its net profits de- I
dined and it will need utmost cau- j
tion to avoid slipping into the red I
in the current year. Mr. Ben-Ari j
said.
Mr. Ben-Ari stressed that El
Al's small net profit follows ample
allocations for,,re^rygs, and that
the financial results reflect the
extra costs which the company -
company had to bear in putting |
the first two jumbo jets into serv-
ice.
El Al also bears heavy security) ,
expenses though part of these '
osts are borne by the govern-
ment. The safety regulations on -.
planes leased by El Al are the
same as on the company's own
planes, he pointed out.
Mr. Carmel said that El Al'*
share in Lod air traffic has dec-
lined much below the 50'i which.
a national airline should maintain.
The decline derives from the com-
l>any's shortage of planes which,
prevents it from carrying all the
passengers wishing to avail them-
selves of its services.
Plans are under way to c.\|>and>
El Al's routes abroad, and service
to Argentina may be inaugurated
in the near future through Ar-
gentina's national airline may be
the first to establish a link be-
tween the two countries.
Negotiations on landing ri are also proceeding with several *
countries in the Far East. All ef-
forts to obtain landing rights in
Japan have met with an adamant
refusal by the Toyko authorities.,
.Mr. Carmel said.
NRP Allowed To Abstain
From Lorinez Bill Vote
( outiiii
from Page 1
measure. Mrs. Meir has said she
would c'iMHolve her government
in that event, precipitating early
cleoticns.
Xeilfet-r the Hammer nor the
torinc* hills are conid>red likely
to- ***. Bet according to Aha-
ron Yadlla, the Labor Party**
!M-cmtary griwrul, Mapam sup-
port Of tile Hausner bill would
destroy Mi.- coalition. The bill
provide* for civil marralge* In
case* where religious marrigr
I* denied by the rabbinate on
halaehlc ground*.
Yitzhak Golan, an ILP Knes-
set member, said that Premise
Meir ba> tried to justify hoe
appeal to the ILP to agree t> *
postponement on the grounds
that by the time the Knesset -e-
convenesnext fall. Rabbi Shloiio
Goren will have been elected-
Ashkenazic chief rabbi and would
solve pressing halachlc ppjh-
lems such as those of urunarri-
ageaWes. But his party is not
convinced.
"Nobody can be sure that Rab-
bi Goren will be elected or thit
In- will be able to withstand or s-
sure from other rabbis even if
he is." the MK said.
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"
CARL S. FRIEDMAN. D.D.S.
Announces the opening of his
office for the practice of
GENERAL DENTISTRY
at 1724 N. University Drive
Pasadena Plaza Pembroke Pines, Fla.
Telephone 966-7771 Office Hours by Appointment
YOU CANNOT BUY
A NEW FORD
FOR LESS ... ANYWHERE
C^*^ THAN CH-
HOLLYWOOD FORD
1 200 N. Federal Hwv.
Hollywood 922-6721 Mian
Miami 947-341 1


Page 6
9-k^lstncrktkvi
Friday, July 21. 1972
Question
Box
By Rabbi Dr. SAMUEL J. FOX
Why Is Uw nJnety-scrond
P*u*lm utuiient'd for special read-
ing on the Sabbath?
The rabbis in the Mishnah
(Tamid 7:4) say that this Psalm
is the one which refers to the
eschatalogical period in the future
of the world when all will be
peaceful and fulfillment will be
reached.
The rabbis are quoted as saying
that if the people of Israel would
observe two consecutive Sabbaths
the golden age of the future would
arrive. Hence, the universal ob-
servance of the Sabbath is the
pre-requisite of the achievement
of the eschatalogical period in his
story. Thus we see another con-
nection between this Psalm and
the Sabbath.
Why was the Hebrew school
of olden time* referred to as a
"cheder?"
In Jewish tradition, the Sab-
bath is a weekly sample which the
observant Jew is given to taste,
resembling this future state of af-
fairs in the world. The future
state is described as a world in
which every day will be like the
Sabbath. Thus this Psalm has
been assigned for special recita-
tion on the Sabbath day.
In olden times, children were
often sent to the home of the
teacher who would teach them
either privately or in groups. The
teacher obviously lived in most
modest circumstances and either
his whole abode consisted of one
room or he would use his one
available living room for the room
to teach the children. The place
where the children were thus
taught became known as the
"cheder" which mians "the room."
Why do same Kravestoae*
have the emblem of the seven-
branWied candelabrum engraved
on them?
The seven-branched candela-
brum, known in Hebrew as the
Menorah, was the foremost sym-
bol of Jewish identity. Putting it
on the stone would symbolize the
Jewish identity of the deceased
who lies buried under that stone.
Furthermore, the light which
the Menorah characterized was
representative of the soul of the
deceased which was supposed to
be immortal and everlasting like
the light of the Menorah which
traditionally was never exting-
uished but kept burning always.
The candelabrum thus symbolized
the eternal light of the soul.
Vaughn Monroe
And Band Here
Sat. July 22
Vaughn Monroe, one of the coun-
try's leading bandleaders, will be
here, for one night only, Saturday.
July 22, at Dania Jai-Alai Pa'aee.
Alan Grant, formerly with
WABC-FM in New York City .ind
now heard daily on WMJR-FM In
Fort Lauderdale from nine to mid-
night, is hosting this third in the
series of big bands dance extrava-
ganzas.
Vaughn Monroe and his orches-
tra will play from eight to one a.m.
with another band alternating.
General admission tickets may be
purchased at all Jordan Marsh
stores, but reservations may be
made only at Dania Jai-Alai Pal-
ace box office.
During the '40s and early '50s,
Vaughn Monroe was one of the
top artists on the RCA-Victor
Records label. His deep baritone
voice was featured on records
which sold over 70 million copies
including 4 million singles, amnn?
them "Ballerina," "Ghost Riders
in the Sky," and his theme sang.
"Racing with the Moon."
This Week In History...
(From the files of the JTA)
10 Years Ago This Week: 196J
Dr. Abraham Granott, Bessara-
bian-born Jewish National Fund
president, died in Jerusalem at 72.
Four and possibly six more So-
viet Jews got death sentences for
"economic crimes."
"LONDON Egypt's two top-
most leaders. President Gamal
Abdel Nasser and War Minister
Abdel Hakim Amer, announced
boldly in Cairo that the rockets
fired by the Egyptians and other
armaments exhibited in a Rev-
olution Day' parade were being
amassed for a war against Israel.
'I want the world to know,' said
Nasser, 'that we will not allow
Palestine to remain in the hands
of Israel.' Amer declared: "The
United Arab Republic air force
has full command of the skies in
our area. Its armed forces are the
strongest in Africa and the Mid-
dle East." "
"NEW YORK The JTA
opened its first directly operated
radio-printed circuits from Lon-
don to its headquarters in New
York and to its affiliated Israeli
News Agency in Tel Aviv."
The Knesset, 42-15, banned pig-
raising in Israel except for Naza-
reth and six other Christian cen-
ters.
A non-Jewish Montevideo youth
was^BVanSM twrh'"an!wastika In
continuing anti-Semitic violence.
Samuel Saltzberg, who survived
Nazi camps while losing his wife
and children, was beaten to death.
Heese's administrative court
removed civil servant rights from
those who concealed participation
in Nazi mass murder.
Israeli President Ben-Zvi fought
a Knesset committee move to
treble his $1,500 salary, same as
his chauffeur.
The (Conservative) Cantors
Assembly of America protested a
judge's ban on cantor-performe i
Illinois marriages.
Raymond P. ISolan, M.D.
Ronald H. Woody, M.D.
Michael B. Demel, M.D.
Joel D. Sehrain, M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
AT
3711 GARFIELD STREET
HOUYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
HOURS Y APPOINTMENT TELEPHONE 961-8303
Save 20% With Thi* Ad
on Drapes .
Reg. $1.75 per panel now $1.40
(Brought into the Stora)
Reg. $2.50 per panel now $2.00
(Picked up. Cleaned ft Rehung)
Just west of
City Hall
Washington
****
Federal
? *
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BEACH
NOW IN HOLLYWOOD
AT 450 NORTH PARK ROAD (Just across from the Hollywood Mall)
Phone: 981-9192 Also four offices in Dade County to serve you.
INTERNAL MEDICINE
ASSOCIATES OF FLORIDA
is pleased to announce the
association off .
STEVEN Y. GURLAND, M.D.
For The Practice Off
INTERNAL WOKIM
750 S. Federal Hwy.
Hollywood, Fla. 33020
BRET L. LUSSKIN. M. D.
ANNOUNCES THE ASSOCIATION OP
PAUL S. BAXT. M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY
AT
THE HOME FEDERAL TOWER
1720 HARRISON STREET
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Houm sv AeotmNT nliphone- isosi mt.im*
DR. ESTHER SNYDERMAN M.D.
And
DR. MAURICE C. TEPPER M.D.
Announce the Opening of Offices
For The Practice of
Internal Medicine
AT THE BEACH MEDICAL BLOC
2511L HaHMO* Beach Mil
(former, Raws Mescal .)
HaHe-oak Florid.
PHONE 52*7000
Jack O. Gordon
Pnpdtnt
Arthur H. Courshon
Chtiimtn ol Ihi Botrd
.
NEW FLORIDA ROOMS
ADDITIONS BEDROOMS BATHS
-DETACHED GARAGES-
Residential Commercial Office Bldg.
State UsemU and Fully Insured
20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Prints and Permits Included
DADE: 949-3945 BR0WARD: 925-5648
LOUT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY
2548 Arthur St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33020


Friday. July 21. 1972
+Je*ishTlorkik*r
Pago 7
scene around
by Marjo Nevms
^M^MMMMM^M.M,........., .....^nmMMlwWjL
I found the perfect cure for a bad back.. Now vrn .
v^estmg that it wi work for everyone but fo7 me my
\ v ,hW'S T?, 8t th fabuIous Fourth of July pa"v
K.ven by Lather and A.Ian Gordon at their lovely M S
1h ; Twnt T6 Whether ,0 "'"* the cure to the
armth of Esther and Allan as hosts or to the absolute? perfe*
, Z ,Cy.K ^ P'anned fr the *> Whtever it was I
limped into the party anO practically danced out!!! |!
. FI,Te'.lhCr.gai!ty f th* evcning s,arted right at the
outran* to the Gordons grounds when I met Mitzi and Z
Mann and Gloria and Norman Wrubel and we followed the red!
t ^UeuP8th- b0rdt'ring the side oS the house until we
a,T,ved at the beautifully decorated lawn overlooking the lake
Th.-re were tables and chairs, and stands dispensing every typ, of
food and drink you can think of. Center of the scene was a sort
c. chupah semi-covering a dance floor. This, too was done in
patriotic colors with the swingiest dance band around adding to
the gaiety.
The atmosphere was relaxed and fun and casual anc> the
crowd of people dancing, laughing, wandering, eating and just
generally whooping it up were enjoying. Doctors, lawyers and
I think even Indian chiefs were represented.
I saw Gloria and Stan Greenspun. who arrived by boat (and
what a boat!) Florence and Howie Fuerst. Annette and Betiie
Milloff. Dorothy and Mac Kline. Nancy and Norm Atkin Abbey
ar.d Rubin Klein. Carolyn and Milt Caster. Spoke to Bill Horvitz
and Cinde and Jesse Martin. Bobbe Schlessinger was telling me
about the building plans for their new home. Younger set mom-
b-rs Margie and Chuck Rowara and Fran and Herb Tobin were
there and plenty more of their confreres. Couldn't overlook
the. rest of Esthers family, her mother, Mary Zinn. and her
sister Rita Illowit. Mary always manages to took as young as
her daughters.
ft ft
I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me ."
and that is a tiny Yorkshire terrier with the giant name of
Maximilian Marmaduke or known to most of us as "Duke."
When I say "moat of us." I include everybody but Dr. Dave
Stiechler, veterinarian, because from the very first time that
Tave saw Duke, he decided that the tiny dog lookeO more like
a Max" and to that's the name that has appeared on any
communication from those quarters ever since. Tm not sure
whether this confuses Duke or not but I DO know he's not
turned on" with his visits to the Broward Animal Hospital.
Right at this stage of my life, being home very seldom ind
v. ith no children around, poor Duke must find it very lonesome-
arv* the thought has come to mind that he would be happier in
a household with more activity. Finding a suitable home for him
would be rather difficult as Duke is pretty old. Animal ceme-
t ries are a thriving business but so far no one has come up with
an animal nursing home or medicare assistance for their later
J ears.
From London where I originally purchased him. homo on
Iht Queen Mary with a short atop at the Hotel Elysee in New-
York where we were evicted because the maid thought this
pound and a half pedigreed' puppy was a rat. and on to Florida
Duke and I have had a long life together. But perhaps for him,
deener grass may lie in someone else's yard in the future.
it it -tr
THOUGHTS WHILE WORKING I'll know I've arrived
"hen someone sends me an original copy or a first carbon of a
press release. It isn't that it disturbs my ego to know that I am
fifth or sixth on the list. It's just that the copies get fainter and
fainter with each increasing carbon copy I have tried everything
from contacts to tri-focals and I still struggle to see those Bot-
tom of the barrel copies. Don't get me wrong though keep
idling I'll keep squinting. Now that I've complained.
fay I say that one of the plus features of my job is that my
e is almost adjacent to Valentine's Book Shop. When I'm In
a hurry for a word meaning or biographical data, Dorothy Mar-
tin makes life much easier with her help.
BITS AND PIECES The Hollywood Scholarship Founda-
I in received one of the awards from the United Clubs of Brow-
s'd Caunty. Sarah Keating accepted it for the foundation. .
Hadassah openec their new Thrift Shop on Harrison St. rrnd
1 nets Briefer was there working to get it set up. They're
'king forward to bigger and better business in this new and
<"largd shop.
by Cory Lardas
RESIDENTIAL a COMMERCIAL
a ROOF CLEANING & PAINTING
INSURED i BONDED
Using only the finest paints
ESTIMATES 966-5312
5104 GIANT ST. HOLLYWOOD
Operation Joshua
Begins 3rd Year
Thousands of traveling college
students wi'.l have an opportunity
to learn about Israel and her peo-
ple in depth this summer wlien
they join "Operation Joshua."
A unique summer program m
Israel run by and for college
students. Operation Joshua began
its third year this week.
A soecial project of the S'ud -n!
Coordinating Committee for the
Tsrael Emergency Fund (a divi-
sion of the United Jewish Appeal),
the Operation Joshua tours take
college Itufwnts to kibbutzim al >ng
the Beit Shean Valley, to immi-
grant absorption centers, develop-
ment towns, and other areas in-
dicative of Israeli life today.
For just a little more tha>i $3
any American college student vis-
iting Israel can join a day's tour.
which includes transportation and
lunch. The one-day trips are con-
ducted Sunday through Wednes-
day from July 9 to Aug. 23
and originate from Tel Avtv and
Jerusalem.
Once a student has nrrlved In
Israel, h< can obtain more infor-
mation or register for a trip by
visiting the Government Youth
Hostel, 2 Agron St.. Jerusalem or
Kgged Tours, 59 Ben Yehuda St.
Tel Aviv.
Youth Group Plans Aug. S Splosh Party Ana1 Salt
The Youth Group of Tempi*
Solel is planning a Splash Party
at Emerald Hills Bath and Tennis
Club Saturday, Aug. 5, at 8 p.m.
The evening's activities will in-
clude a book sale, a cake sal?, a
plastic trash bag sale and winJow
washing. Hamburgers, french fries,
cake and soda will be served.
Tickets can be obtained by calling
Donna Smith or Michel.- Roseman.
RESTAURANT
Bakery Appetizers Caterers
* Specializing in Custom Catering
* Turkeys Sliced ft Framed
* Meat Platters Artistically Decorated
* Smoked Fish Platters "^
"No forty Too Small or Too Large"
HOME COOKING OUR SPECIALTY
POST HASTE SHOPPING CENTER
(Sheridan St. at 46th Ave.)
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK)
961-4070
BURD I NE
the summer shirtdress
in Celanese* Arnel*
Light as a puff of air. Shirter
by Leslie J. in a pongee fabric
of Celanese" Arnel" triacetate and
nylon. Bow-neck with swing skirt.
and its own Dutch blue acrylic
sweater vest. Paprika dots with
bands of blue print.
Sizes 6 to 14. $56.
POINT OF VIEW. THIRD FLOOR
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
AND ALL BLRDINE'S STORES


Page 8
+ knist Hcridiar
Friday, July 21. 1972
SUBMITTED BY HHSIDIHTS
Organization Reports
COITOS NOTE: Organization i
presidents have been invited to sub-
mit reports on the accomplishments of I
tnetr groups for the season just past j
and goals of their organizations for >
tie coming y+r. These reports will
be published during the next fev*
months so that the community at |
Urge will have knowledge of prg-
grams of the various Greater Holly- '
wood organizations )
Hollywood Chapter
of Hodassah
Bj SYLVIA SAI.TER. Preid"nt
The Hollywood Chapter of IU-
lh now has a membership of
-> to l.r500, with six in "ivHaai
s-roups Henrietta Szold. Slia-
lum. Mt. Scopus. Hi!V?rest. B- aeh
and H'AtidL Ewn durinc the sum-
ni-r these groups are having m -m-
h:;> ti i>.
The last President's meet'ne
v as a luncheon at my home. At
that time, plans were made for
1hi 1972-7.1 MM at the ehaoter
level. Our fir-t affair will he a
paid-up membership tea in No-
vember f tional speakii.
On Dee. 12 we will have our
Ami Luncheon. This, of course, is
ei honor of tho-^k woircn who
pledge to donate $110 to Hada-sah
this year, thus becoming an Ami
..r "frtt'lBT* to a child in Israel.
Jan. 1H is the date for our nn-
1 .ml Youth Aliyah Pledee I.un-h-
. m. All monies plc^i-d at this
1 fair and others all over 1)-
(Jilted States are earma-ked soe-
1 .lieallv for the use of Youth Ali-
.. 1I1 projects and kibbutzim in
Isttael.
Fib. 20 will be Kdueation Pay
We are very excited about this
project: We are hoping to have
Dr. Abraham Kischler of Nova
University and Dr. Robert Frarin
of Temple Solel as the speakers
The topic will be one which toucT--
on youth and education here and
fn Israel.
March 27 marks tht culmination
<..! our year of work ar.d effort. 11
is the date of our Donor-Reward
Luncheon, a zala dress-up affair
>\ juti awitrc'.s, honors and entcr-
l.iinment.
All of our proups cooperate in
the planning and carrying through
these events, as well as dorm*
their own individual fund-raising
AIL' group presents are plnneing
to attrnd the national convention
1 New York in August.
Hadass;ih affords an excellent
> iportunity for women to enjoy
gtlfnulatiJ .; diions and ae-
ti\itii.s. We offer many social oc-
casJotBt, including somethin:; '.'01
ihe athlete our Thursday morn-
ing bowling league.
Even non-athletes are invitee".
OUT iKiwlin^ is really more of
a fun league rather than a pro-
--ioiial one. All activities, we
'' I. can l>e enjoyed by all women
ft ft ft
VWWWVMMWMWWIMM^MAMil
E.J Wentworth. editor-in--hie.'
Holhwood Sun-Tattler tell mem-
bers of his trip to Israel, with
films, slides and pictures, rhe
theme of this non-Jewish fill ill of
Israels presentation was, "Israel
As I See I'." In March. Rabbi
David Shapiro, spiritual leader ol
Temple Sinai, addressed the lodge
on. "The American Jew. 20 Y.ars
from Today."
In April the lodge installed its
new officers, with Alfred Gor.'on.
Di-trict Grand Lodge deputy aet-
;nu as Installing officer. Ins' iii.-ri
as offici is wi re Hob Hoffman, re-
elected as president: William Hro-
der, Sol Cooper. Jack Fogcl. Ar-
thur Leaar, TWnjhui Marlowe. Saul
Steinwei>s ar.d Max To;/litz. vie-
presidents; Sam Goklner. chap-
lain; Arthur Rubin, financial s re-
tan.-: R''n Miller, reelected as
treasurer; Mike CJiarmat/. re-
elected as corresponding anJ re-
cording secretary-, and William
Barnett. warden.
Another big cultural and fund-
raising event, "A Night of the
Dance." was held in May in th<>
Tobin Auditorium of Temple Beth
El, when a cast of dancers from
Impel ial Studios of Ballet. F">rt
Laudcrdalc performed classic bal-
let, flamenco, Israeli and modern
jazz numl>ers. At its May me^tng.
the lodge heard an address by
attorney Richard Kssen, on the
theme. "Youth Looks at B'nai
B'rlth."
Tlie final meeting in June, at-
tended by an overflow audience
featured a recital bv Stephen
Dubov. tenor, and a talk by Ho'Jy-
wood attorney Lewis H. Cohen on
the subject. "How To Avoid Fro-
liate of your Estate." At ag 20.
Mr. Dubov is the youngest can-
tonal soloist in Florida.
At several meetings during the
year. Jack Solot. chairman of the
boar.! of directors and editor of
the lodge's monthly "Menorah."
delivered talks involving B'nai
B'rith. Jewish affairs and Israel
All general meeting programs w>re
arranged by Joseph Perlstein with
the exception of its June mee'ing.
which was under the supervision of
the lodge's new program chairman
Stephen Marlowe. The fund-rais-
ing programs were arranged by
Lou Cuttner and Arthur Le/ar.
membership chairman who assisted
to an important degree in 'he
lodge's programming.
Although the lodge holJs no
general meetings during July
August and September, efforts to
reach the 500 membership mark
will continue through the summer
It is now the largest lodge in
Broward County with 450 mem-
Ixi-.
tykes,
TeEnS and
TWENTIES
Carrie Handel, a senior t
South Broward, is taking part
in a student exchange program.
She's living with a family in
Belgium and then will travel
with a group including all the
host families. This is part of
the Experiment of International
Living program.
Cathy Gro-wman is a staff
writer on the-Miami Herald.
Hal Jacob-ton of Hollywood
Hill- High School was one of
the students honored by the
South Florida Dairy Industiy
in their Salute to Youth pro-
gram. Hal. a member of the
National Honor Society, was
president ot the Student Coun-
cil at Hollywood Hills.
Understand there will be cook-
ing classes offered for youth at
Temple Beth Shalom in the fall.
Miriam Klalnmn is now r
Spain studying the language.
She got a summertime scholar-
ship.
Janet Ilratiit held a meeting
of the youth group from Tem-
ple Solel at her home so that
they could plan for their com-
ing Splash Party Aug. 5. Call
Donnn ^mith or Mlrh*le Rod-
man if you want to join th'-in.
All young people who have
l>een in Israel during the last
few years are asked to contact
Rob Kerbel at the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation office.
WITH mm SIGMIfKANCE
Vacation Landmarks
A crumbling sugar mill in the
midst of a quiet moss-covered for-
est Is the only remains of David
Levy Yulee's 3,200-acre planta-
tion. However, much of the an- j
cient machinery is still intact in
this idyllic spot owned by the
first Jew active in public life in
Florida.
The mill is located on Rout" 480
in Old Homosassa. which is north
of Tampa on the west coast o'
Florida.
David Levy, one of Florida's
first U.S. Senators was the first
.lew to sit in that august body.
Mr. Levy, who had his name
changed to Yulee by an a;t ot
Florida's legislature, was acti... ;n
many i>hases of development in
the state. He was a ratttuej
owner ari' also owned si'vral
other plantations besides lh. on
at Old Homosassa,,
Judge Tyson Announces
Bioward County Judge Roberl
W. Tyson Jr.. of Fort Lauderilal..
will seek election to the ciieuit
court in the Sept. 12 primary A
graduate of the University of
Florida School of Law and the
I'nllegi- ol William and Mary, he
is a Court of Record judge, as aim-
ing the bench in 1968.
i in ill IB ii
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
T,l*f St'* 119th J
Pnon2].S722
^
Hillel Launches
Travel Club
The Hillel Community Day
School is sponsoring the Hillel
Travel Club under the cochair-
man of Raquel Seheck. Diane
Frankel and Harvey Baxter.
The first trip panned is a 16-
day European vacation leaving
New York on Sept. 2 which will
visit England, France, Holland
ami Denmark.
A second trip to Athens,
Greece will leave New York on
Oct. 20 and return on Nov. 4.
SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
with
Funeral Home Contacts throughout
the United States
Funeral Director Available 24 Hours A Day
To Assist With All Feneral Arrangements
OOCtl fOOtTS OI.DtST ., MOST IMMUDKmMO
: G&r.
Heril Lodge,
Bjf BOB HOFFMAN. I'rrside.it
At its January' meeting. Herzl
Lodge, B'nai B'rith. started its
1972 year by hearing an address
bj Florida's State Attorney, R "h-
-.-. <\ v.. Gerstein, on the sublet
The Law I- Alive But Not W< il."
It first fund-raising event of ih'
year am- "A Night At The Op a."
lea, held at tin
Karp Hall of Temple S iai
1 Hollywood; this wai a sell-otrl
The rj meeting h nvd
insure-A-car
of Florida
AUTO
INSURANCE
ALL AGES
0 Homeowners
Fire
Liability
S.R. 22s Filed
Monthly Payments
Evening Appointments
961-0705
1309 So. State Road 7
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Hollywood
Palmers
Miami Mtiumtmt Cammmny
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Open Sunday thru Friday
Personaliied Memorial* Custom
Crafted Is Our Own Worluhee.
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Hollywood, Florida 33020
JZeviil
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"JtWISH fUNERAL D/croS"
10CAL AND OUT OF STATE
AMMANGIMENTS
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13385 W DIXIE HWV N M.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
\7mjU 3etkl
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Tlic only all-jrwish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923_825Sor write: _
TEMPLE BETH EL ~
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please sand me literature on the above. .
NAME: _____________________________________,_
ADDRESS:
_ PHONE:-----
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
Ansel Insurance Agency~4
Ansel Wittenstein
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
JMVMXCl Conr-n,


Iridoy-. July 21, 1972
+J1st>fk:rScUar7
Pag fl

ly Ml KftMl. fMCvfir* Mrtet*r,
Jfwfafc W.t FWtJ*i ., Cr^Nr NMyW*W
In the tMtafta J.ws of America wore bombarded by m-v
articles dramhrhs the fear or the disappearance of Ameiican
Jews throuKh assimilation. Treatises were presented on the
alarming rate of IntermarriaKe. low birthrate and non-invole-
ment or the American Jew In attempting to perpetuate Jud**nt
As a matter of fact, these articles Indicated apathy and lack o'
concern about Judaism or about being Jewish at all.
Two events occurred in the late '60s which changed the
focus of our thinking: One. the Six-Day War in 19S7 and two
a much less dramatic event, the General Assembly of 1969 Most
p. ..,>ie know about the war and the dramatic up-surging of n
f. .ling of the American Jew to support Israel's survival, but Jew
P -ople in addition to those of the "in" group have heard of the
Gi neral Assembly, let alone know what occurred there.
The General Assembly is tlie annual meeting of the Jewish
leadership of the Jewish federations throughout the country
held under the auspices of the Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds, coordinating body or the organized Jewish com-
munities or America. At the Boston General Assembly in N'o-
v.mber, 1969, hundreds or Jewish college students, uninvited.
came to protest Jewish leadership. They were received some-
what kindly and paternalistieally, rather than with any real
interest in what they had to say. This group of youngsters asked
for really demanded things of the Jewish community
which we had talked about in large general meetings, but had
not really implemented.
What did they protest? What did they have to say? They
demanded greaier Jewish community participation in Jewish
education and better education. They asked for a voice in Jewish
<-.immunity concerns. They begged for means to create greater
Jewish identity and awareness Tor all children. They plrcdcd
for help in aiding Soviet Jews to emigrate rrom the U.!=.S.R.
These were committed Jewish students, few in number com-
pared to the total number of students on campuses, who realized
that they did not speak for all Jewish students, but for a small
ii .nority. But, they emphasized that unless more is put in by the
Jewish communities, there would be even fewer of them. On
the positive note, they felt it vital that more Jewish youngsters
aid college-age stueents become aware of the importance of
.! idaism to their own lives. They requested the leadership to
cliange and up-date their priorities.
In three short years since the 1969 General Assembly, fed< ra-
tions have significantly increased their support, sometimes five
ami 10 fold, ctf Jewish education,, day schools, HlUel fornda-
tions and of Jewish programming for the community. Thore
are now Jewish stur'ents on boards of directors of federations
and on various committees. There is now a viable program for
skiing Soviet Jewry. There is development of a new national
commission on Jewish identification which hopefully, will hive
Far-reaching effects on the future or American Jewish comnu ni-
t u.
As I write, the Democratic Convention is taking placo h-;re
in Florida. Kighty per cent of the delegates have never before
l >n to a convention; they are new to the process. I cannot pre-
dict results of the convention or its platform, but there are
p ople involved, whether we agree with them or not, who ire
interested in making America a better place for all people. Our
Jewish students want Judaism to become a viable source in th<
ItVW of Jewish i>eople in America.
Today, in Greater Hollywood, committees are meeting to
develop increased education, cultural, recreational and s-ia!
program for our Jewish youth.
When it is time for us to make a decision of what kind of
.'< v we shall be or whether we shall be a Jew, is it not bottei
lor us to make this decision based on knowledge and not on
ignorance?
THE MALL THEATRES I & II
At the New Diplomat Mall E. Hatlandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale- 920-5656
Selective Film Presentations
CNC PAINTERS & CONTRACTORS
By Cory Lartkn
For That New Look give your house a paint job.
looks Nicer- Sells Better
FREE ESTIMATES
966-5312
5824 Grant St., Hollywood
CRIME RATE UP 17%!
BURGLAR Fill PERSONAL
ALARMS A DEVICES
cJj &*J ^Mlartn S>uilemS
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HOMI ARTS SUSWUSS CARS.
P.O. mx ear
NOUYWOOO. ha. isoaa
'Salute to Israel'
On 25th Birthday
In Variety Show
The 25th anniversary of the
State of Israel will be celebrated
with a large variety show,- called
"Florida Salutqc Israel'' at !the
,M{ami Beach Auditorium. Sun-
day. Sept. 24, at 8:30 p.m., it has
been announced.
The Israel Tourist office. Kast-
em Air Lines, Kl AI Israel Air-
lines, and Foreign Tours groups,
under the sponsorship of the Jew-
ish National Fund, have combined
to bring some of the top talent
from Israel here under the direc-
tion of producer Shmuel Fershko.
The show will feature Arts San
and his group, the Yemenite Trio
with Sara Avlani. and Dahlia, the
"Spirit of Israel."
Tickets may be obtained at the
Jewish National Fund office, 420
Lincoln Rd.
> I

CCAR Elects Rabbi Jaffe
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe of Terr-pie
Beth El, Hollywood, has :>een
, elected as a national board mem-
I her of the Central Conference of
I American Rabbi*, the rabbinic
1 association representing 1,100 ie
I form spiritual leaders in N'orth
America.
Celebration Attracts Crowd
The July 4th celebration an:l
meeting held by Meadowb-ook
Towers Chapter of Women's Amer-
ican ORT attracted more than 160
persons, according to Harriet Sdot,
program and publicity chairman.
The event was held under the
chairmanship of Sally Markman.
Kleanor Goldstein is the cha.K t's
pre.-ident.
I
Building ... To Building
They'c holding a golf clinic at the Parker Plaza these days
with one of the tenants, Dr. Louis Sacks, doing the instru'*;. kg.
Both men and women residents are taking part and bmshin? up
on their strokes.
.'/..., ,.. "..... i... .. .' >
Ah in Hess or Hillcrest gave the sermon at Temple Sol-I a
tew weeks back, Mr. Hess has also been holding rap session* for
college-age youth at different times curing vacation. He's in
charge of the temple's youth piogram.
At the Presidential Towers, Helen Schulkind became Mrs.
I. R. Wolfe recently. The Jack Gilberts or the Diplomat
Towers recently had their daughter and son-in-law and grand,
children visiting them.
Galahad South boasts one or the best libraries or any at he
apartments. Frank Mandell is in charge of it and spends hours
arranging and rearranging. Paul Bamett and1 Sol Kitzis help
him. Hedy Weinberg. atai or Galahad South, a>k.s that yon
heap all your greeting cards so that she can take them to the
Sunland Center in Miami. The ictarded children enjoy culling
out the designs on them and (Misting them on blank cards. Call
!.': and she'll pick them up and see that they get to the childien.
The .Social Club at Imperial Towers West is planninc i
weeks' cruise some time in November and it's hoped that every-
one in the building will come along. Irma and Joe Fischer ot
Meadowbrook Towers celebrated their 50th recently with a big
party. There will he Muzak in the recreation area at Plaza
Towers very soon.
The group at Ini|ierial Tower-. Kast is planning to attend
tho Arthur Fiedler Concert at Marine Stadium Aug. IS. Arthur
Bane and Dr. I.eichtcr are in charge of tickets. Ditto the
group at the Hollywood Towers.
President Joseph D'Apice ol the Broward County Condo-
minium Owners Association and Lillian Mantel and Irvin Nack
representatives or the association tell me that they are holding
a meeting July 25. Sen. Lee Weissenborn, House member Sher-
man Winn and State Senate candidate Bill Zinkel have bean
in\ ited.
9J2 ?6fc5
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THE HEMISPHERES YACHT CLUB
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Short Dinner fr only S2.00 extra


Page 10
+Jewlst> fkrknaf)
Friday. July 21, 1972J '

9^" \AJnat a \soobing By KITH 8IBKIS

There are many surprises in store for an American tourist
in Israel. One of them is in the food department. The tourist
will not find "Jewish Food" in Israel! The food will be kosher.
all right, but not the type that is identified here as such; namely
the food' that is offered in "Deli" shops of Jewish neighborhoods.
Even the well-known combination of Lox-and-Bagel is not at
a1', known in Israel, and not easily available, which only indi-
cates that there is more to Jewish food than meets the eye in
the nearest "Deli."
We have a very fine and versatile cuisine, influenced by
Fest Europe and the whole world. The Sephardic Jews, who lived
ir. Spain and other Mediterranean countries, have a rich heritage,
in cultural terms and in culinary terms as well. Sephardic di^nes
are delicious and distinctly different from Ashkenazi ones The
recipes for those delicacies were generally handed down from
mother to daughter and stayed in the family.
Now, as a result of the efforts of a Sisterhood of a Sep-
harttc temple in California, many of these recipes are eom-
piied in a lovely book called. "Cooking The Sephardic Way" put
out by Temple Ti'Vreth Israel, 1561 W. Santa Barbara Ave., Los
Angeles, Calif. 90062. One can find there how to make Borekas
and rritadas, sopas and ensaladas. main dishes and sweets. The
variety is big and tempting, Hire is one recipe from the boon.
IMMIF.NTONF.S REYKNADOS DE QFESO
(Stii(Iid hell pepper* with cheese)
4 large bell peppen 3 oz. prated Parmesan cheese.
1 cup mashed | iota toes 3 eggs, beaten
1 lb. hoop che.se 2 this, oil
'4 lb. Feta (Greek che.-se) Salt to taste
Wash and split peppers in halves, remove seeds and stems.
Place peppers in a mvased baking pan. Sprinkle with salt ind
bcke at 350 degrees until tender. (appro.\imatelyl5-20 minute*)
Ilemove from oven and allow to cool. Mix the potatoes, hoop
Cheese, Feta choose and half the Parmesan cheese with the exzs
Add salt to taste. Stuff each pepper generously and pour a bit
o! oil on top. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan cheese Bak.' at
3f>0 degrees approximately 30 minutes or until cheese is gollen
brown.
Serves 6 8.
Religious
Services
HAUANDAlf
HALLANPALE JEWISH CENTER
(Coneervative) Jacob Danzioer.
cantor.
Friday Sabbath aervlres are dlBcon-
tlnued during Junr. July and Aukum
Saturday Sabbath aervlcea will con-
tinue and beejln 9 a.m. Sexten Ben
Kaliah will aaalxt the cantor. Daily
Minyan 8:30 a.m. Sunday throuxh
Friday. Mincha-Maarlv every day
.'turn- 6:30 p.m.
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (Temple). 1S61 S. 14th Awe.
Reform. Kabbi Samuel Jaffe. 46
--------
BETH SHALOM (Temple). 1728 Mon-
roe St. Coneervative. Rabbi Morton
Malaveky. Cantor Irving Qold 4S
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapirs
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. 47
July 7 Rabbi Michael Elnhorn er-
monette: "(jumt For Security." Can-
tor Sidney Heilhraun.
July 14 Kabbi Martin W. Smith, j
Cantor Plnke Halpert.
c
omwMM/
*
L--a/cM
(Thin calendar, which lists dales of all meeting* and ape.lul
events held by Greater Hollywood's various organizations,
is maintained by Jewish Welfare Federattan. It* purpose is
to note events for those who wish to attend and to avoid
any conflict by setting up dates on the calendar considerably
in advance. Organization representative* are asked to
notify the Jewish Welfare Federation of dates of their meet-
ings as soon as they are decided upon so that the necessity
of switching dates may be avoided. Events will be listed In
this paper just prior to the date.)
FRIDAY, A1IO 4
Hallandale Chapter Women's American ORT Rummage
Sale All Day 805 Glenn Parkway, Hollywood Sale
will continue Aug. 5
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal)
All future seivlceH will be held at
Sheridan HIHh Klementary School,
5(101 Thomas St.. Hollywood, every I
Friday nicht at 8 p.m. Kabbi Robert
Krazln.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 Southwest
62nd Avenue, Hollywood
Friday 8:15 p.m. Norman Prafln will I
conduclihe Services anslM^d by I,ay |
leader Herbert Smith. Sisterhood will i
tpoaaor the One* Shabbat.
MltAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple) 8920 SW S5th St
Coneervative. 48
NORTH MIAMI BIACM
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingeley. Cantor Irving
Shulkei. 37
Hollywood Federal Savings
Appointments Announced
James If. Blanz, president o'|
Hollywood Federal Savings & Loan
Association, has announced th"
appointment of the opera'i ffial
stall of the association's n-.-w l'm-
crald Hills office located a
Sheridan St.. Hollywood.
M< mbers of the Emerald Hilli
office staff arc Clay Covingt3d
assistant vice president man-
Betty Ann Orr, asslstanl
secretary asslstanl manager, Us
Layman, head teller: Clary Covale-
ski. teller; Linda May, teller an-"
Claudia Hootman, mortgagi
r< tary.
Mr. Covingtoi), originally
Cross Plains, Term., has been H
resident for 14 years ami w*th
Hollywood Federal for 10 yean
He was previously the asso liati n's
personnel officer, and is a member
of the Masonic LodfTe.
Mr. Covaleski, a native of New
Britain. Conn., has lived in Flor-
*r>r>*r>*r<**r>r>r>*r^S%AA1
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
10 AB 7:52
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SHIP YOCR CAR
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KAV RATES
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Olficc All Major ("iein V. S. A.
rhnmr 'r linmid'tntr Rmlt Quoit
AAACON
Al TO IRANSI'ORT, INC.
IMI l C0HDIII0HI0
Waldman*
H0IU
STRICTLY KOSHER CUISINE
Series' is the WALOMAN Meaner
undi Sueervijiea
Enjoy the
1111:11 HIILY 11A S
With the Waldman Family
Traditional Holiday
Services on Premises
Conducted by
Prominent Cantor
RESERVE NOW
1776 S Yo.i.i(j CW-
-92S-1261
Liz layman
Oaf Covingfon Cory Covafeski
Mrs. Orr, a native of Phila lel-
phia, Pa., has lived in Florida for
19 years. She has 16 years ex.->?ri-
anoa in the financial field and iia
been with Hollywood Federal 13
years. She attended Weatebettcr
Sta'e Teachers College in \V ist*
Chester, Pa., awl lives in Hilly-
wood with her husband, William
daughter, Kim, and sons David
and Mark.
Mrs. Layman came from T^rre
JHaute, Ind., and has lived in
Florida for three years. A mem-
ber of the American Savings anc"
Loan Institute, she lives in Holly-
wood with her husband. Roliert
and daughter, Libby.
da for 14 years. He attt n !e:l
Broward Community College.
Miss May. who has been w.th
Hollywood Federal for two years,
has lived in Florida for 10 yean
She attende.' the University oi
Miami and is a member of Delta
Zeta sorority.
Mrs. Hootman. who has been
.ith Hollywood Federal for 15
yearn has SB years expertwee in
the financial field. She is a ia-
tive of Dilliner, Pa., and has
l.vi (I in Florida since 1957 She
: currently raaMea in Hollywood
with her husband, Jim.
The association's new offi^, lo-
cated in the Post Haste Shopping
Center on Sheridan St., had its
formal opening July 3. The office
will offer a wic> range of cus-
tomer services and will cat*r to
the savings and loan needs of the
Emerald Hills community area,
according to Mr. Covington.
HOLLYWOOD SECURITY SYSTEMS INC
PROTECT NOW
NOT AFTER'!
Burglar Fire and Hold-l'p
Protection for
BOATS BUSINESS HOMES
SWIMMING POOLS AND
VEHICLES
Frtr Eitimaln
SriMl In. .mr In P. O. Boi lleiltmwd! F'. "Zip" !*('?0
Mil ha 17 Pi Sew.ie Ft l*i---7>5-6040
ALL THIS FREE!
Appropriate Entertainment
TV in Every Room
Private Beach, Pool
Phone: 538-5731
OCEAN AT 4378* ST.
MIAMI BEACH
301 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Miami
Beach.
JWV President Starts Club Year
Lillian Schoen, newly-elected l at the Jefferson National I
Ladies Auxiliary president of the
Department of Florida, Jewish
War Veterans, will host a brunch
Sunday noon for Ladies Auxiliary
presidents and officers. The affair
will be held at 4801 NW 22nd Ct.
(Lauderhill).
Thursday, July 20. at 7:30 p.m.
Mrs. Schoen will preside at the
first Council of Administration
meeting of the current club year
RESERVE NOW FOR
THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
The Famous
1007 OUR CANTOR
LEIB RASKIN
Formerly of
Ml. EDEN Center
t Bronx. N. Y
Will Officiate at the.
HIGH HOLY DAYS
W SYNAGOGUE ON PREWStS
I ocated on the Ocean
t 21st St., Miami Beach
PLANNED ENTERTAINMENT
FREE PARKING
FREE CHAISE LOUNGES
I Reserve for Synagogue
Services & Holiday Meals
Finest KOSHER cuisine served
is our Ocssnfront dining room
I Under (u) Supervision
Where Every Mssl it a Banquet
HIGH HOLY DAYS
PACKAGES AVAILAB
3
(
For Reservations
Phone: 538 6631
and enjoy the holidays with the
BERKOWITZ FAMILY
C-s'o-i '.'ede
DRAPERS
and
BED SPREADS
INTEKIOR 0ICO8ATIN0
FASHION FABRICS
805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HAILANDALE. FLORIDA
Fhone: 9230564
JHADES
SUP COVERS
UPHOLSTERY
Bl
Ti
tc
k.
ti.
in
la
as
Ft
DC
ar
n
th
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pr
krii
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if
ad
1
let
tai
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BH
will
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si'li
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ro:i
are*
bait
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cula
is (
thai
up
evi'i
COZE BEAUTY SALON
Specioliiing In Women's
and Man's Hair Styling
and Air-Cawbim
3001 S. Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Oalohad Hall North 927 5162
FOR CREATIVE
UPHOLSTERY
Call John W. Puorto
113 W. Dixie Highway
Hallandale
Phone 822-7780
s4cCt6* Paint & Body
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR
AIR CONDITIONING TUNE-UP
922-4360
20B N.W. 0tm ave.
HALLANDALE. FLA.
ARMY'S TAXI
. serving the Greater Hollywood-
Hallandale area. "Airport service
oar speciality."
CALL 527-9730
WHl PROVIDI OOOO HOME
(eoffilny o.k.) hi ned of p.otxH.o t
cuMocUol cat*. 3 orher peaHemaa let
Total can p*. $1000 pae
prke. Ptsooa 8W-044J.
Wrfy
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Branch office: 7991 Johnson St.
966-9300 or 947-3332 (Toll Free)
Stanley S. Kurash Our Larjje Staff
Naomi R. Kurash and Qualified Associates!
Ready To Serve Yo*
III
l M(


972>
Friday, July 21. 1972
ill
Am
Bank,
Miami
fS
OH
i
tr
l
>
ENT
vJewisti rkrkiian
Pag. 11
Rabbi Goren Favorite In
Chief Rabbinate Election
ed
ict
u
Iht
By DAVID LANDAU
(.ITA Jennalem R1lren.11)
Shlomo Goren, Chief Rabbi of
Tel Aviv who is widely favored
to win the post of Israel's Ash-
konazi Chief Rabbi in the elec-
tions to be held later this sum-
mer, fjalhed nationwide jxjpu-
lurity during his dashing career
.-is Chief Chaplain of the Armed
Forces for over 20 years.
More im|>ortant, he has the
hacking of both the Labor Party
anil the National Religious
Party in his attempt to topple
the present incumbent octo-
genarian Chief Rabbi Isser Ye-
huda I'nterman.
Rabbi Goren's popularity,
however, is not universal. The
orthodox right wing both in Is-
rael and in the United States,
broadly represented by the
Aguda Party, is solidly against
him. They accuse him of deli-
berately creating the impression
I hat he can solve all flalachic
noblems whereas in truth he
knows that he cannot If he
s to remain within the confines
if traditional halacha (religious
aw).
The rightist* therefore threw
Uicmaelveii behind the aged
i.ibbi I'nt <-r ma it. urging him to
and for reelection and awtur-
Inc him of their unewervlng sup-
port. Kill.hi I'liti-rinaii air
imoneed recently that he has
-iiiTiunhed to thin premure and
will indeed stand again.
This situation has its bizarre
ride: Throughout his long life.
Rabbi Unterman has been the
bogey man of the Agudist right,
was too 'Zionist" for them.
Now he is to be their saviour
igalnst the greater evil- Goren.
The Chief Rabbinate election
comes at a time of crisis in the
precarious state and religion
balance, and the political sup-
port for Rabbi Goren, >rti-
cularly from the Labor Party,
i< given on the understanding
that once installed he will come
up with the solutions to please
everyone.
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HOllTWOOO. HA "Iir' SMI*
z
The Labor Party, and parti-
cularly Mrs. Melr herself nr*>
the case of Hanoch anil Miriam
I-anger, the brother and sister
who were adjudged mamzerim
(illegitimates) by a religious
court and are therefore not al-
lowed to marry ordinary Jews
under the halacha and hence
under Israeli law. (Marriage
and divorce law in Israel is gov-
erned by halacha.)
Also. Gideon Hausner's civil
marriage hill has focused public
attention on the problem of the
( <>b. ns and divorcees, who are
forbidden to marry each other
under halacha.
Rabbi Goren maintains that
the Langers are not "mamzers"
under halacha. He says he can
solve, halachically, at least 90%
of all cases of "mamzer" which
could arise. (Such cases are
very rare a "mamzer" is the
product of adultery or incest.)
But he has not pronounced on
the far more common but
less severe problem of Cohen
and divorcee.
Rabbi Goren strongly denies
the persistent reports that he
has made a "deal" with the
Prime Minister to "solve"
thorny problems. How could he,
he says, make any deal which
would involve his stepping out-
side the bounds of halacha?
Halacha does not have the ans-
fJSSg*0 y*b*!unV he admits,
though it has to most things.
Mrs. Melr and other Labor
leaders have said privately, how-
ever, that Rabbi Goren's elec-
tion is in effect trie last chance
of averting a religious kultur-
kampf. Only he, they say, with
hit unquestioned halachic author-
ity and lenient approach, which
takes into account the best in-
terests of the State and the na-
tion, can bring about harmony
between religious and secular.
Some circled In Israel oppose
Rabbi Goren's election for fear
of what the more adventurous
side of his character might lead
him to do. In 1967 It was only
a direct order from Moahe Say-
an himself which prevented him
from holding a prayer service
on the Temple Mount.
As Chief Rabbi it is feared,
he might refuse to take orders
from anyone, and by worship-
ping on the Temple Mount, poi-
son Israel's relations even fur-
ther with the entire Moslem
world.
If elected, Rabbi Goren says
he will call an international
conference of Rabbis a body
akin to the Sanhedrin of old,
though without the same format
or halachic powers to discuss
all the religious problems of the
70s.
(ACT:
70.000 new Immigrants
are expected to cn-rive
in Israel in 1972.
ARGON AK0MER, AID.
Wishes to announce the opening of his office for
the full-time Private Practice of Psychiatry.
6249 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida
Hours by Appointment 989-4743
GARY L. GOLDFADEN, M.D.
Wishes To Announce The
Removal Of His Office To
THE ACADEMY PROFESSIONAL BLDG.
3816 Hollywood Bldg.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021
Practice Limited to Dermatology
TELEPHONE 966-5409


BERNESS
ACCESSORIES
(Klever Kasuals)
217 N. Federal Hwy.
Hollandale, Fla. 33009
Telephone: 920-7281
CLEARANCE
All MerchandlM Reduced!
Handbags Costume Jewelry
Beits Gift Hems
Jewish Agency co^fe -foV- .
health,, service hdv/e k-atfc&ei
-ftom ^79 575.000
to $81395 238.
LINOLEUM CITY
FlOOft f NOW
LARGEST SELECTION IN STOCK
* CARPET REMNANTS *
* ODD-LOT TILE *
* NO WAX CONGOLEUM CUSHION *
.as."-""" tfgL,
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CAR HOME APT. BUSINESS A CONDOMINIUM
LOCKS
SOLD REPAIRED INSTALLED
24 Hr. Service 5916 Hollandale Beach Blvd.
981-9305
SUMMER SPECIAL'
3 PI* PaHTS..................$1.79
1 HM............75* WHITE EXTRA
MAN'S SUH.....................$1S
DRESSES PLAN...........$1,59 8 DP
Executive Cleaners
nil S. OCEAN DRIVE
HOLLYWOOD 927-3604
MASTERCRAFT CABINETS
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
CUSTOM
KITCHENS BAM
COMMERCIAL OFFICE
AIRCRAFT
I. MARINE
925-2819
2IJ N.W I AVf HAlLANOAlt
PUMPS tLlCmiC MOTORS
, SALES SERVICE REPAIRS
Z SmcJbJM on WATER PUMPS SWIMMING POOLS SPRINKLERS
ALL PUMPS REBUILT TO ORIGINAL SPECIFICATIONS
. COMUlTt STOCK Of HJMf SEALS
1922 N. DIXIE HWY.
lob Lloyd
call 23-3331


Page 12
+Je**lst> rtcrfctiar
Friday, July 21.
What a
ft


a*
_
'Your car s only worth two-fifty, but I'll
give you six for it!'
If I made everybody a deal like this, wed
be out of business in a month.
He said twenty-five sixty? Ill sell you
the same car for two thousand!
Just to move this car off the floor, you
can have it for a hundred-fifty below cost:
They're the oldest lines in the business. And believe it or not,
some of the car dealers in this town still use them. If they ever
try to hand you a line like that, turn around and walk out.
Presented as a Public Service by The Big Ten Ford Dealers.
We seH Fords from Pompano to Perrine.
DADE Friendly Ford. 163rd Street and Biscayne Boulevard, North Miami Beach. Johnson Ford. Palm Springs Mile, Hialeah. Courtesy Ford. South
Dixie Highway at 156th Street, South Miami. Deel Motors. LeJeune Road at U.S. 1, Coral Gables. Austin Ford. N.W. 38th Street at 27th Avenue.
Miami. TaHy Embry Ford. N.W. 90th Street and 7th Avenue, Miami. MOWARD: Hollywood Ford. 1200 North Federal Highway, Hollywood.
ferry Ford. 1000 North Federal Highway, Pompano Beach. Powell Motor Company. 1300 Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale. Luke often Ford.
North State Road 7, Plantation.


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