The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00044

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
'*Jewish Florid Ian
'Number 17
and SHQFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 23, 1972
Price 20 cents
FOR POSSIBLE NEW KAMIKAZE1 ASSAULT
11 West European Airports On Alert
!>ARIS (JTA) AH West
iropean airports have been
on a state of alert following
arts that a small group of
ppanese kamikaze volunteers
ore preparing an attack
gainst an Israel-bound plane,
was reported last week.
In Copenhagen, Danish au-
thorities were informed that a
croup of members of the Japa-
nese Red Army, three of whose
members were responsible for
the May 30 massacre at Lydda
Airport, were planning to attack
an Israel-bound plane at the
Copenhagen Kastrup Airport
In response to the threat, au-
thorities ordered armed guards,
police and soldiers stationed
along the tarmac and In the
Kastrup terminal building. The
Israeli ambassador to Drnimrfc,
Mi..hi' Leshetn, said In a tele-
vision interview that (oral au-
thorities were "fully aware of
the situation" and could handle
any danger.
At Paris' Orly Airport, h'in-
dre guards have been checking all
passengers and luggage. Passen-
gers are required to pass indi-
vidual personal checks during
which their pockets are searched
and luggage opened for exami-
nation
A JTA reporter who had
flown in from Geneva reported
that such checks were being ap-
plied to all Air France passen-
gers, including those flying Euro-
pean lines only. An Air France
official said these precautions
were considered necessary be-
cause passengers might board a
plane for a European destination
and transfer en route where they
will no longer be searched.
It was recalled that the three
Japanese gunmen who com-
Ambassador Rabin Denies
Washington Post Story
WASHINGTON (WNS) Is-
rael's ambassador to the United
States, Yitzhak Rabin, angrily
denied last week that he had ex-
pressed a preference for Pr, ll-
dent Nixon's reelection in an In-
terview broadcast over the Is-
raeli radio on the anniversary
of the Six-Day War. He said
his statements, which appeared
on the front- page of the Wash-
ington Post, were "misquoted"
and charged that the dispatch
by Yuval Elizur from Jerusalem
was an "effort to cause great
damage between the United
States and Israel, between the
American and Israeli people and
bit ween the Jewish communi-
ties in Israel and the United
States."
According to the Post story.
Ambassador Rabin had indicated
lhat he would tavor President
Nixon's reelection in November.
He was reported to have said.
"While we appreciate support in
the form of words we are get-
ting from one camp, we must
prefer support in the form of
deeds in the other camp."
Admitting that he had distin-
guished between supjwrt in
words and support in deeds, the
ambassador denied that he had
related them to either "camp."
Israeli sources here noted that
Rabin's interview ha* started
with praise for President Tru-
man's support for Israel.
Stressing that It was his gov-
ernment's Embassy's policy not
to interfere in any domestic af-
fairs of the United States, Mr.
Rabin added that in more than
four years as ambassador in
Washington he had pursued
that policy and would continue
so lone as he is ambassador.
Lawrence O'Brien, rational
chairman of the Democratic
Party who appeared on the ABC
television program "Issues and
Answers" that weekend, W8*
asked what his reaction to the
Post story was, and replied, "Z
can't believe that an ambassador
representing a foreign power
would become direct !y involved
in a presidential election in any
way."
mitted the massacre at Lydda
Airport boarded an Air France
plane at Rome, where there was
no eheck of passengers or luggage.
At Geneva and Zurich airports,
planes are now parked far from
the air terminals and passengers
are required to pass a metal
detecting device. Police armed
with submachineguns surround
a.l planes from the moment they
land until they take off. Cus-
toms officials and police search
all passengers and luggage at
Rome's Fiumicino Airport.
Stringent precautions are also
in effect at Athens airport where
jeeps with police .bearing ma-
chineguns at the ready patrol
the airport and soldiers are
guarding all planes. Armed
guards are stationed in the pass-
port control and luggage de-
livery rooms, and passengers
are being required to land or
board planes one at a time.
Jordan Rejects
Arab Transport
Union's Demands
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Jordanian Transport Union has
rejected a decision of the Arab
Transport Union headquarters
in Cairo calling on all member
states to take a united' stand
against the U.S. Pilots Associa-
tion if the latter carries out a
threatened air boycott of coun-
tries harboring hijackers, it was
reported here.
The Arab Transport Union
sent cables to all Arab member
unions for a counter-boycott of
U.S. air transport to and from
Arab States. In its reply, the
Jordanian union said it w ju'd
not take part in any such uni-
fied action.
The Jordanian union was ex-
pelled at a recent meeting in
Cairo after it had protested the
boycott imposed by other Arab
nations on Jordan and the dos-
ing of their frontiers with Jor-
dan which followed the crack-
down by King Hussein on ter-
rorists in his kingdom last year, s
The boycott was lifted and
then reimposed after King Hus-
sein announced his plan for a
federation of the East and West
Banks of Jordan.
FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF JOIVT TRADING COMPANY
Pact With Japanese Firm Signed
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's
largest industrial holding com-
pany, the Histadrut-owned Koor
Industries, has signed an agree-
ment with the giant Japanese
firm of Koichi Ishikawa for the
establishment of a joint trading
company to develop commerce
between the two nations and to
expand their commerce in other
parts of the world, particularly
Africa.
The contract was signed by
Meir Amit, general director of
Koor. and Koichi Ishikawa, presi-
dent of the Japanese concern.
Israeli circles hailed the deal
as a major economic and politi-
cal breakthrough for Israel.
The Japanese firm has con-
nections with large steel plants
and will enable Israel to import
steel at much lower prices than
it pays now. Economic circles
here said the agreement would
result in the doubling of Israeli
imports from Japan to about
$100 million as early as next
year.
Another immediate effect of
the agreement will be to Increase
the importance and hence the
development of Eilat, Israel's
Red Sea port and its major out-
let for trade with Africa, Asia
and the Far East. Eilat will
serve as the port of entry for
the re-export of finished prod-
ucts.
The Japanese connection is
also expected to assist the en-
try of Israeli products into the
Japanese market. Koichi Ishi-
kawa, which has commercial
outlets in 32 Japanese cities, is
especially interested in breaking
into African markets where
Koor industries already has sub-
stantial outlets.
Practically, the agreement
was seen here as oreaching the
Arab League boycott of Israel,
which has kept many Japanese
firms from entering into large
scale business relations with Is-
rael. Mr. Amit is a former
Haganah commander and for-
mer head of the Israeli Secur-
ity Services.
UAHC Demands Strict Gun Control Laws
NEW YORK (JTA) The board of trustees, Union of American
Hebrew Congregations has unanimously passed a resolution de-
manding strict gun control laws. The resolution calling for outlaw-
ing "Saturday night specials" (hand guns) and for control and
registration of all hand guns, rifles and shotguns, was for.vardej to
the presidential candidates, who were asked to make their views
on the issue known to the public and to members of Congress.
UAHC officials noted that statistics show that during this century,
civilian gunfire has killed over 800,000 Americans, more than all
the military fatalities in all wars from the Revolutionary War
through Viet Nam. "In 1970. hand guns killed only three persons in
Tokyo, where strict gun control is in effect. During the same period,
over 500 persons were shot to death in New York City," the board
reported.
Grant Relieves Tel Aviv University Crisis
TEL AVIV (WNS) An increased government grant, and the
university's decision to cut $1.8 million from its $27.3 million bud-
get, has temporarily relieved the financial crisis that threatened
to close Tel Aviv University. Faculty members and administrative
employees are now expected to receive their full salaries, thus
averting a strike. Deputy Premier and Minister of Education Y'gal
Allon, who said an additional SI 1 million is necessary to keep all
the country's universities open, has pro|x>sed the government ap-
point accountants to oversee the finances of all the country's insti-
tutions of higher learning.
Anti-Semitism Called 'Un-Christian'
PHILADELPHIA (WNS) The 12-milIion member Southern
Baptist Convention, the largest Protestant denomination in th"
U.S.A., unanimously adopted a resolution calling anti-Semitism
"un-Christian" and pledged to combat anti-Semitism "in every hon-
orable Christian way." In New York, the resolution was praised by
the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith as "another milestone
in Christian-Jewish relations."
Hope For Syrian Jews' Release
TEL AVIV (WNS) An official of Amnesty International
which works for the release of political prisoners, after spending
four days in Damascus with Syrian officials, has expressed hope
that four Jews imprisoned in Syria will be released. Meanwhile, at
the United Nations, a delegation of Canadian Jews met Syrian Am-
bassador George J. Tomeh for a "full and frank" discussion on the
situation of Syrian Jews. The delegation was headed by Sol Kanee,
president of the Canadian Jewish Congress,
Justice Minister Shapiro Resigns
JERUSALEM (WNS) Yaacov Shimson Shapiro resigned as
justice minister after the Cabinet approved the appointment or
Res. Mai. Gen. Meiz Zorea to head the Israel Land* Authority, a
division of the Agriculture Ministry which controls almost 90 of
Israel's land. Gen. Zorea was the only member of the three-man
committee investigating'charges of irregularities in the operation
of the government owned Native! Neft Oil Co. who called for the
resignation of Mordechai Friedman, general manager. Gen. Zorea
also objected to the size of the fees approved by Shapiro for attor-
neys who appeared before the committee. The fees were :ater
reduced.
Japanese Passenger Barred From Landing
HAIFA (WNS) A young Japanese tourist who arrived here
aboard the Italian liner Enotria was not permitted to disembark
when he aroused the suspicion of Israeli authorities. Tadashi Mishi-
murah of Osaka, boarded the Enotria in Cyprus after visiting Egypt.
He carried a Japanese passport which listed no profession and
claimed to be touring the world. But he had little money and no
return ticket. Meanwhile, tourists aboard the Greek ship Sonion
which arrived here from Beirut told newsmen that conditions in
Beirut seemed normal. They said their guide told them "Lebanon
wants to be neutral. We want peace with Israel. You can tell them
that."
Religious Zealots Protest 'Sex Boutique'
JERUSALEM (WNS)Rabbi Amran Blau of the Neturei
Karta led religious zealots in an attempt to break into the "Eros
Boutique," Jerusalem's first "sex shop." Police intervened and after
a period of pushing and shouting, the zealots were pcrusaded to
return home. No arrests were made.


Page 2
vJewist fhoridlai)
Friday. June 23. 1972!
ORGANIZATION RFPORTS
Broward Zionist District
rEOlTOrVS NOTE: Organization pre.- State of Israel. At this year*! -licet-
3%. hone J^JSSSSJLSTi "8 "< Ton,;,!, Sinai, Mine 425 per-
their groups tor the season just past I sons were present.
nd goals ot their orpanizations for I
the corning season, th.m ^ii^r -A lor i|^ |iii"iilv.i ..liin is ryin
ahall be published during the next r..rnori ., mna^ ,.,. ,.vvi-
tew months so that the community at ""'<*". MU pa.-s< Ml i.t\ I-
large will have knowledn* ot the pro. | o'.ls totnl, gaining almost 40'' lin-
g-.ims ot the various Greater
wood organizations.'
s.\>i j. pkrry. President
The Broward Zionist District i.
winding up its reason with the
test results since iis inception
This applies to .-ill phases of Zionist
programs, including public rela-
te ns, fund-raising and member-
ship.
In the fieM of public relations
we have brought our efforts to the
public through letters to the edi-
tor of the Miami Herald, Holly-
wood Sun Tattler, Hollywood Her-
n'd. Hallan."ile Dlgrot, Mir.irrmr
Mirror anil the Jew i~h Plorlrlian-
Sho'ar.
These letters have not only
pointed out Zionist principles but
have featured the needs of the
Hollywood Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion urging readers to help and
work lor its many obligations, in-
cludin-; the needs of Soviet Jewry
as well.
Tliis also applies to 'he many
news Items covering meeHn-js in
aP of the above me';a We have
had more general meetings d 1'"e past year than aver before
with sneakers from all pa't* of
the United States and from fsrae]
We conduct oni
Holly" j der the chairmanship of ftosi
l Perry membership vice president.
We now have the largest member-
ship In the history of Ih" Browan'
Zionist Hist id and are now plan-
ning our fall season
Mel Reiser, public relations \ Ice
president, accepted the chairman-
shta of the Nominating Committee
which includes Louis Garber. Nat
Wldtttz and Abe Zirn. They sub-
mitted the following slate for 1972-
7."?; Sam J. Perry president: Rose
Perry, membership vice presidest:
Mel Reiser, public relations vice
president; David M. Harris, fi-
nane'al secretary anr1 Isadore
Goldbere. recording secetary.
The Advisory Bo.iiti nominees
in-lude Rabbi Arthur AbnrfflB
Tennle Kmanu-Kl, Fort Lauder-
dale: Rabbi Akiva Brilliant. Ti'm-
ole Beth Israel. Fort I.auderdalc;
Orchestra Seeks
New Members Who
Can Read Music
The Greater Hollywood Sym-
phonic Mandolin Orchestra is seek-
inc now members who can read
fund-raisine j music. David Ornstein, director.
meeting cash year in Hollywood I will audition newcomers at 9:30]
on behall of the War Silver Agri-
cultural Institute in Israel; this
year, with the usual appeal bv
Rabbi David Shaoiro. the results
were the best in a long lime.
Since these lUOCMnssj are held in
the month of April, we usualtv
celebrate the anniversary of the
Rabbi Avrom Drnzln. Temple Is-
Miratnsr: and Mollywoud
t'tnplo iT^t-sHjiJatlve's Ralihi Roo-
it Ft a/in. Temple Sold; Rabbi
\ir. Samuel '/.. Jaffe.'Te.iiple Beth
Kl; Rabbi Dr. Morton Malavsky.
Temple Beth Shalom, an." Rabbi
Das id Shamro Temale Sinai
On the proposed board of direc-
tor* are Joseph Baum, l.co Beer.
Sam Bernstein, Sidney Burkholz
Dr. A. Colin. Peter BlUOSten, Paul
Cohen, Sol Cooper. Louis Garber,
Harry Indich, Nathan GrecnVre.
Abraham Karlin, Morris K'istal
Jack Shapiro, Max Sloane. ChaTlet
Plerson, Joseph Vernick, Oscar
Wachtel, Nat Widlitz and Abe
Zirn.
As soon as the above officers
are confirmed, plans will be made
for a dinner installation and na-
tionally known lear^ors in the Jew
ish and Zionist field will paitici-
pate. Regular public meetings and
board meetings are planned and
will be announced in due time.
The Broward Zionist District is
part of the Southeast Region ol
the ZOA. Its president, now be-
ginning his 10th year in the post,
is a member of the board of gov
ernors of the region and repre-
sents this district on ho i'resi-
j dent's Council of the Greater Mi-
! ami and Broward Districts.
Asurprising number
of professional investors
live at
iHMTTKianu
PoinUlL
Maybe they know something
you don't know.
The successful investor has learned what to look
for: location, living space, luxury, quality construc-
tion and potential resale value.
That's Point II. Located directly on the ocean
at the Port Everglades Inlet. As for spacious luxury -
from oceanview balconies to all-electric kitchens and
laundries to custom fixtures and costly materials -- it's
hard to find a better investment in elegance. And the
construction is so sound (and sound-conditioned) that
you'll never know you have neighbors unless you in-
vite them over. Resale value? Our prices have risen an
average 15% per year. Our sales have risen, too. A lot
of successful people have seen the point.
Point II. A wise investment in the good life.
It's as far as you can go.
Mod-li open daily l 2200 South Ocaan Lana. fort Laudardala
DtiH fait totht and ol lha 17lh Straat CauMwav. turn rtfht and ao ai fi' al you con 3).
B.p't and D-v.'tuif't l>v General B'jilil*" 3s^ti'.T**l A"wrM-an S'eck fc.rh*':.-

Wlll PROVIDE GOOD HOMf
lor oldorly ambulatory gentleman
lien lity o t ) in ne.d of protect**. I
custodial car*. 3 other gtl.m.n in
r.sid.nc. Total car. pkg. $1000 p.r
month firm prict Phono S93-0441.
AUTHOPIZED JOHNSON DFAIER.
We service all popular OUTBOARDS
and INBOARD OUTBOARDS.
BARRACUDA BOAT SALES
1314 N. Federal Highway
Hollywood 923-7SS4
a.m. Tuesdays and Fridays at the
Hollywood Recreation Center. 2030
Polk St.
The orchestra has oix-ning; for
hoth men and women who ,'n.ioy
playinc cood music in a profes-
sional style. The sroup. which re-
hearses at the center. |K>rforms in
Young Circle, Beach Theatre.
nursing homes, hospitals and
schools: the art of music U ex-
plained in detail by Mr. Ornstein
to the children.
Mr. Ornstein, a violinist with
many yean of experience as an
orchestra conductor in New York,
has toured the world wilh various
coni'tamc* performing Broadway
musicals.
The mandolin orchestra is spon-
sored by the Hollywood Ri crea-
tion Division. Further informal iop
can be obtained by attending any
if the rehearsal session;. Visitors
are also welcome.
AUTO AIR CONDITIONING
6 POINT CHECK UP
SPECIAL
ith this coupon
Offer good Ih
6/21 '72
Clean Condensor
Add Freon
Check Compressor
Add Oil
Check. Adjust Belts
Check Fan Clutch
a Check A/C Hoses
Caribbean cruise sensation
to be continued.
Florida's grand and glorious Nieuw Amsterdam
now cruises into summer and bevond
MSSS per person, bated on double occupancy ana
She's elaborate, engaging, and is she
ever popular. So popular we've ex-
tended our Florida Nieuw Amsterdam
10 day cruises through June. July and
all the rest of the year. There's little
wonder people have taken to the Nieuw
Amsterdam. She's a majestic ship.
37,000tons. and every bit as palatial
as cruiseships were meant to be. She
has balconies, terraces, the grandest
of grand ballrooms. She has the grand-
est service too. and no tips are required.
She is quite the majesty of Florida
cruiseships and now. lonawill she reign.
10-DAY CRUISES TO 5 CARIBBEAN
AND SOUTH AMERICAN PORTS
From Port Everglades to Aruba,
La Guaira (for Caracas),
Isla de Maroarita. Martinique. St. Thomas.
". June 16: From iM/00, HOllanCl
$265 to S785. June 26, July 7, July 17, ^ssssssssssssssjssss^ A .-.,o,. *,
July 28, Aug. 7, Aug. 18: From $285 to -^R^R^R^"^ MlTieriCcJ
$895. Oct. 6, Oct. 16, Oct. 27, Nov. 6, WlW f*rillC.BQ
Nov. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 8: From $280 to$840. VIUIOC3
We're Dutch and we want everything to be perfect.
object to availability. .
HolMi d Arnenca i_rulses
Pier 40. N. River. N. Y.. N. Y. 10014
Tel: (212) 620-5101
Gentlemen: Please rush me (re.: O Complete details
on Nicuv/ Amsterdam Weu I'vjies Cruises Also.
BlanncMtn ? 'Summer North Cap. Cruises D Fttf
Mtdit.rran.an Cruises.-
Name...............................,......
Address ....................................
City.......
Travel Agent ........................
AM ships ot Netherlands registry.
.Siais.......Zip
Hallandale Truck
S. Automotive
,f """iW. 4711 HALLANDALE 3CH.BLVD cG-1
?LeV y"^ HOLLYWOOD. FLOHIDA JJ0^3 !=C^
: **mmm\W Phone *B7 4847
mm shippers
W1U CLOSE JUNE 30rh. WE WISH TO THANK
ALL 0UK FRIENDS AND PATRONS FOR A
SUCCESSFUL SEASON. WE HOPE YOU ALL
HAVE A HEALTHY SUMMER AND WE WILL
SEE YOU ALL IN OCTOBER.
ANGIE and AL KAUFMAN
J. S. A. WESTER, M.D., F. A. C S.
announces the association of
NORMAN L TALPINS, M.D.
Diplomate of the American Board of Surgery
in the practice of
GENERAL and VASCULAR SURGERY
5100 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021
Hours By Appointment
Telephone: 989-7172


Friday, June 23, 1972
*Jew1sli Fkridian
rtage 3
Dr. Morton Malavsky
Awarded Life Tenure
By a unanimous vote of the I
oard of directors, the governing
3y of Temple Beth Shalom haa
M. MOWM MALAVSKY
Fiwarded life tenure to Dr. Morton
lalavsky, spiritual leader of the
tempi* since 1963, according to an
announcement made by Jack Sha-
piro, president, and Curt J. Sch-
kimer, past president and finan-
cial secretary.
In accepting the life tenure, Dr
lalavsky said: "I have worked
pry hard in the past nine years
knd I assure you that with yout
Cooperation and appreciative un-
irstanding, I shall continue to
vork even harder for our beloved
Tuple, our people and community,
pray for the wisdom and gui-
dance to continue leading my
lock in proper paths of righteous-
hess and peace."
Be sure ta mention
rJewist ftor Mian
when patronizing
our advertisers
It's really important!
SPECIAL
DISCOUNT ON
Wedding Invitations
and Bar Mitzvahs
THE HOLLYWOOD
PRINT SHOP
117 S. 21st Ave.
Phone: 922-1967
Rent-A-Car
^ BBB LOW AS
$5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXJC HWY.
920-414!
H0UTW0O0
45-54*1 Miami
Office I* -elected to serve -the
temple for the coming year in-
clude Jack Shapiro, president; Dr
Fred Blumenthal, Morton Levin
and Dr. Samuel Meline, vice presi
dents; Murray Cohen, treasurer:
Curt J. Schleimer, financial secre-
tary; Jack Berman, recording sec
retary; Edward Kaplan, corre-
sponding secretary, and Maurice
Segal, assistant secretary.
Serving on the board of direc-
tors will be Jack Alford, Morris
Aixnn, George Barron. Dr. Julian
Blitz, Louis Charnow, Harry Corn-
field, Aaron Cohen. Leon Cutler,
Herman Ernstoff, J. Leonard Fleet,
Jerome Friedman, Samuel Gar-
mizo, Leonard Grand, Walter Gray,
Irving Hirsch, Harry Indich, Doug
las Kaplan, Jack Kleiner, Milton
Klier, Dr. Norman Land-nan
Stanley Margolis. Richard Miller
Dr. Harold Nehleber, Herbert
Rabin, Abraham Salter, Seymoui
Samet, Reuben Schneider, Manuel
Solomon, Joseph Schwartz, Jamie
Shapiro, Dr. Jarry Siegel, Dr
Steven Weisberg, William Weiser
Dr. Sheldon Willens, Ted Task
and Ben Salter.
Seven Lively Arts
Officers And Board
Members Selected
The Seven Lively Arts Festival.
Inc. announced its new officers and
board, members at a "thank you
breakfast" for all the directors,
coordinators, press and .-ommittee
workers at the Hollywood Beach
Country Club recently.
William Horvitz was innounced
as president for a second term of
two years. Mrs. Thomas A. Thom-
as will serve as first vice presi-
dent for a second term; Leon
Yeuell, second vice president and
business administrator; Mrs.
Charles Adams, third vice presi-
dent and program chairman for
the 1973 festival, David Aucamp.
treasurer, and Mrs. Harry Or-
ringer, secretary.
New members of the board of
directors are Mrs. Orringer, Mrs.
Adams and William Foerst.
The board also includes Mrs.
Wilson Atkinson, William Bren-
nan, Miss Phyllis Dewey, Mrs.
Abraham Fischler, Patrick J. Hen-
eghan, Charles Lantz, Samuel
Sorin, Herb Tobin, Edward Went-
worth Jr., Dr. Ernest Sayfie, Ar-
thur Frimet and Jack Grant.
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430 S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood
NO NONSENSE EDUCATION
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Telephone 73I-.MW)
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To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
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Page 4
+Jewisti Fkridknn
Friday. June 23. 197?
# Jewish Floridian
-...i SHIH %M Mil IIH IMM II **,,
OFFICE and PLANT120 N E. 6tm Strebt Telephone 573-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 9:0-6392
P.O. Box 2973, Miami, Florida 33101
Far.D K. Snoc.irT Selma M. Thompson
Editor and Publisher Assistant to Publisher
MARION NEVINS. News Coordinator ,
' Tha Jewish Flondian Don Nat Guarantee The Kashruth
Of Tha Merchandise Advertised In Ita Columns.
Published BtWttk.lv by the Jewish Plondian
8ecocd-Clas Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish Welpare Fedfration op Greater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Aovisory Commit teeDr. Sheldon Widens, Chairman; Ross BecVerman, Bin
Salter, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atkin,
Tha Jewith FToridian haa abaorbad tha Jewiah Unity and tha Jawlah Weakly.
Membar of the Jewiah Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arta Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide Newa Service, National Editorial Aaaociation, American Association
f English-Jewiah Newspapers, and tha Florida Press Aaaociation.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 12.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 2
Friday, June 23. 1972
Number 17
11 TAMUZ 5732
No Simple Answers
Jewish participation in the movement toward greater
ethnic identification and, possibly, to greater ethnic seg-
regation, could have been expected in the light of tho
hostility toward Jews which was manifest in the rising
self-identity of other minority groups.
There is much to be said in favor of a course which
would redress what became an imbalance between the
traditional Jewish concern for universal values and con-
cern for solely Jewish problems. But a program, as advo-
cated by some responsible and radical Jewish leaders,
which would lead to Jewish segregation and. in the
words of a more moderate, "reduce America to a Balkan-
ized nation, rigidly segregated and ultimately enfeebled
by apartheid" is one which must be avoided.
There are no simple answers of right or wrong on
many of the issues which threaten tensions among various
minorities but we agree with Rabbi Marc Tannenbaum's
view that Jewish spokesmen who are urging the buildina
of a middleground position are not in any way comprisina
the legitimate interests of the Jewish community. Opposi-
tion to imposing quotas for jobs and schooling based on
race, sex or national interest is part of that middlegtound
because those proposals are reverse discrimination and
in the long run prove a disservice to those minorities which
might have a short-term gain. Yet, it must be recognized
that special measures are required to enable certain
groups to enter the mainstream of American society and
that it is in the Jewish interest to support those measures
One Of History's Great Ironies
The Soviet Minister of Culture, questioned by correspon-
dents about schools where children could be taught Yid-
dish or Hebrew, responded by pointing out that in the
United Slates there is little literature in Yiddish or Hebrew.
Her question, "Why do you reproach us when in your
own country it is worse than with us?,'' begs the issue, of
course. But it does raise for American Jews free to have
schools of their own where the traditional languages are
taught, free to develop a literature in Yiddish and Hebrew
the question of freely imposed neglect of Jewish culture
and education.
In a real sense, the government-imposed plight of
the Russian Jaws poses a challenge to those of us in the
free world. It would be one of history's great ironies that a
culture which has endured the oppression of thousands
of years would be lost because we are iree to take it or
leave it.
Restoration Slow But Welcome
When the largest and most prestigious Reform syna-
gogue in the world announces that it will conduct Bar and
Bat Mitzvah ceremonies, it comes under the heading of
important news. The custom was abandoned in 1875 by
New York's Temple Emanu-FJ and while its restoration was
a little slow in comparison with other Reform synagogues
there are only four of almost 700 in the nation which
still do not have Bar Mitzvah the recent action is to be
hailed as another evidence of the desire for more tradi-
tional practice in all our synagogues, although not neces-
sarily orthodoxy.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
sfftH I
. I ,1 (! i ,,...!-,.,
LOS ANGELES The mas-
terminds of Son. George Mc-
Govorns remarkable campaign
are feeling mighty pleased vvith
themselves. There is just one
name that cannot be mentioned,
however, without making them
look as (hough ghosts wore walk-
ing on all their graves.
Gov. George Corley Wallace,
in his hospital bed in Maryland,
visibly haunts the McGovem
masterminds with disturbing in-
sistency. And they are quite
right to be haunted.
THKY TELL YOf, if you ask
them, that the McGovem lead-
ers are :;oing to bend over back-
ward to be amiable to the Wal-
lace people at the Democratic
convention. But in almost the
same breath, as stated in the
last report in this space, the
masterminds also tell you that
they cannot prevent the Mc-
Govem delegates from doing
what they choose to Gov. Wal-
lace and his people. What Jhey
choose will be ugly.
Even so. the masterminds have
not yet taken the true measure
of their Wallace problem. In
particular, they keep saying,
hopefully, that Gov. Wallace
can easily run as a third-party
candidate in at least 15 states.
They mean that they are rely-
ing upon Wallace to take some
Deep South electoral votes away
from President Nixon in the No-
vember election. Their reliance
is sadlv misplaced, however.
IN KITH MATTERS, acts
speak louder than words. Gov.
Wallace would have acted long
since if he had ever had the
smallest Intention of resi>onding
to a hostile Democratic conven-
tion by launching another third-
party candidate. The first places
he would have acted, too, would
have been the five Southern
states Alabama, Georgia,
Mississippi, Louisiana and Ar-
kansas that he carried in
1968.
It is now possible to be nearly
dead certain that Gov. Wallace
will have no part of any third-
party movement because of the
situation in those five Southern
states. In Alabama, Gov. Wal-
lace's own office in Montgomery,
when queried, says 'There Is no
way the governor can get oa the
ballot here as an independent."
IN ALABAMA, to be sure.
Wallace might make a way to
get on the ballot by calling a
special session of the legislature.
So Georgia is even more inter-
esting. Here a petition of 100,-
000 valid voters signatures would
have to be filed by mid-June to
allow a repeat of the governor's
candidacy of four years ago.
To secure such a petition in
Georgia, Wallace would obvi-
ously have to pass the word from
his hospital bod tomorrow morn-
ing. Instead, during tho winter,
he let his closest friends in
Georgia know that this time he
was going "to send them a mes-
sage" without resorting to a
third-party movement.
IN MISSISSIPPI and Louisi-
ana, the Wallace leaders have
again had no orders to get him
on the ballot, although it would
l)e easy in these two states. So
that leaves only Arkansas, where
third-party preparations have in
fact been made without instruc-
tions from the governor, for lo-
cal reasons.
Most of the Wallac leaders
in the South who provided these
facts additionally volunteered
that they and their followers
would much prefer giving their
votes to President Nixon directly
if the Democratic nominee prov-
ed to he Sen. McGovern. George
Singleman, the chief figure in
the Wallace campaign in Louisi-
ana, has said roundly, "If the
party names McGovern. Nixon's
Cortinctd on Page
JM.S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK, N.Y. It is one thing to talk about what
measures can guard against other episodes like the terrorist
killings at Lydda Airport in Tel Aviv. (I write this before 'hen-
is any news about Israeli reprisals.) It is quite another thing to
try to grasp what tho killings mean for our view of man and
his potentials for evil. They oi>on up a mindless pit of possibility
for the future.
Little in recent history has been as depressing and dis-
gusting as the use of throe Japanese "Red Army" gunmen by
the Ilabasch band of Arab terrorists, based at Beirut, to attack
hundreds of innocent people at tho airjiort, killing more than
23, wounding some 70. The Arab loaders boast of their feat, with
the regret only that more were not killed. The targets wer.-
Israelis and Jews, but 16 of tho dead were Christian pilgrim
from Puerto Rico, If the aim was to stop the flow of tourists.
the evidence is that it will fail dismally.
The episods rolls up in a single bundle some of the wont fea-
tures of the human animal in our era. There were the haphazard
absurd deaths, the abundant ingenuity of the planning, the lack
of any feeling in carrying out, the bumbling negligence of
airlines and governments about passenger security, the pathetic
impotence that makes you feel more a man when you have a
machine gun at your hip spraying bullets, the sense that "any-
thing goes," the passion of an inflamed fanatic mind encascr"
within the deadness of an empty heart.
WK siioi i.i> l.OMi AGO have sensed the danger of eom-
miiment without limits. You can feel as deeply committed by
hatred as by love probably more so. The hashishin (whence
(Air word "assassin") felt committed when they were sent out
to kill, all hopped up with hashish. The men of the Inquisition
felt committed-. Both sides in every civil and religious war haw*
felt committed. Hitler felt committed. An extreme zeal has
never kept a man from murderousnoss, unless it is the zeal for
nonviolence of a Gandhi or a Martin Luther King. When we
ce'ebrate the dedication of men of sensibility, we lorget thr
desensitized men can take it over, too.
The question comes down to whether you set limits to your
passions or whether you let them go all the way, to murder
without limits. I don't take the Israeli government's view that
the three killers were hired gunmen. They must have known
they would1 die, one way or another. They saw themselves as
martyrs.
The idea of martyrs for hire is a contradiction in terms
They felt a mission for world revolution. This overlapped with
the mission of tho Arab terrorists who actually want to push
Israel into the sea but cover this under the language of revolu-
tionary nationalism. Frustrated and alienated from their own
country, the three Japanese were armed, equipped, trained, in-
doctrinated by their Arab terrorist comrades. In Japan itself,
tho Rod Army group had shown itself as eager to will its own
members for some slight infraction of discipline as to kill it*
enemies. The sole survivor told the Israelis that he feared them
far less than he feared his comrades.
I ADD A FOOTNOTE on the contrasting attitudes of the
Japanese and Lebanese governments the former expressing its
compassion and dismay, eager to take moral responsibility and
make amends, tho latter pretending to be uninvolwd with a
group to whom they give hospitality and who use Beirut as a
base for their murderous operations.
The Arab terrorists call themselves both Arab and Marxist.
But if you strip both ideas of nationalism and revolution
bare of the nourishing humanism that went along with them in
t heir early history, then all you have left is terror. Thomas Jef-
ferson, Giuseppe Mazzini, Theodore Hertzcl they were al!
nationalists but also humanists.
Marx himself, especially in his earlier phase, was humanist
So was Lenin, especially in his later years, when he began to
have doubts about the engine of absolute power he had built and
about how Stalin would use it. The Israelis nationalist as they
are. tough as they are in their actions and reprisals have not
foi gotten the humanist tradition from which they spring.
THAT IS TUB hkart OF IT. The passions are there, and
they move men's minds which is why we must set limits on
them. "Society cannot exist," wrote Edmund Burke, "unless a
controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere
and the loss of it there is within, the more there must be with-
out." This sheds light on why terrorists, who have no control
over their fanatic passions, submit to the coercions of their own
croup. They speak of fighting for freedom But to again quoU'
Burke: "It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that
men of Intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions rorge
" 11- i i fetters."
The pity of it is that tho movement of nationalism whir*
once started so bravely and so humanely should be reduced to
the terrorism of mutilated men who give their lives to mutilate
others.


Friday, June 2'J. 1872
TT
Awisti tkrHitr
Sale Of Beth Shalom
Property Announced
Jack Shapiro, president of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom, has announced
the sale of the temple property
I tit 1725 Monroe St. to American
Hciitajv- School.-. The transaction
Iwas handled by Jesse Martin, of
|J lolly wood. Inc. The temple will
[vacate the property Nov. 1.
SlrrlMltaneously. the governing
Ibody of the'temple has unanimous-
By approved the construction of a
blew sanctuary, social hall, school
Iwiii1; aiid youth wins at 4601 Ar-
Ithur St.
The plans, as c'rawn by Morris
iLapMus and A~-wiates. cover 30,-
fOO'i sq. ft., ami include a perma-
PATTERSON'S
Day I Night Plumbing S.rvic.
Repair, Alterations, Contracting
Dial 945-0J35
Dependable Service Since 1947
Covering Dade & Broward Counties
nent sanctuary of 500 seats and so-
cial hall seating 1.100. When the
combined area is used, .here will
be seating Cor 1,600 persons.
The building permit has been
applied for at City Mall and con-
struction is expected to begin in
the near future. Estimated time
for completion is six months.
The entire temple operation will
move into the present Arthur St.
facilities Nov. 1, until the new
buil.'ing is completed, according
to Edward Kaplan, building fund
chairman, who said ho is very
optimistic that both the member-
ship and the community at large
will cooperatively support and
heln with this very much needed
addition in Hollywood Hills.
Dr. Samuel Meline, membership
chairman, says that the growth ol
Temple Beth Shalom has been re-
markable an.' it is expected that
several hundred more families will
very shortly he added to the rotter.
I \^\DNUT MASTER]
75 V..-latin of Our L.i.-ut ( >.il
T*tin Sptcialitlng In Decorated A
Cadet All OccaiioAf ^
Ci'd atnlemd Service h Our Buii'mm
OWNER CHUCK WELSH
_______J0 IOMNSON MLW0.
989-9130
How to
make money
without
working
for it.
Make your monay go to work.
Bring it in to the Banks to Go With.
First National Bank ol Hollywood and
First National Bank ot Hallandate
Start an aasy. systamatic savings plan.
Than watch your monay grow
avan faster than you can savo it.
The First National Banks pay liberal
inlarast. And compound it ovary
quartar. You gat intarast on
your intarast.
Beiier start now Every day you
wait you're losing monay.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF HOtLYrVOOD
HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
1 20th AVE.
20-4JA7
EACH DEPOSITOR
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF HAL! ANDALF
1900 E HALLANOALE
BEACH BLVD.
920-4321
NSUREO TO $20 000 MEMBER FDIC
<*uqe S
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
Recreation Dept.
Offers Program Of
Varied Activities
The Hollywood Recreation De-
partment is offering a complete
program of many different 'vpes
of activities for adults this slim-
mer; they vary from craftv.wk to
many types of physical activities.
Registration for most of the ac-
tivities is taking place thus month.
For those interested in a bit
of exercise there will be swimming,
lawnbowling, paddleboard and
shufrieboard. David Park will bt
the site of exercise c'asses under
the guir'ance of Diana Montelbi and
Ruth Golden; Yoga classes will bo
held there every Thursday. Yoga
classes will also be conducted Mon-
days and Wednesdays at 10 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. at the Downtown
Recreation Center. 2030 Polk St
"Celestial Cooking" will he the!
title of a course given by Puttie
Minis of Florida Power and Light
Wednesday mornings at their kit-
chen on 21st Ave. between Lin-
coln and Buchanan Streets.
Classes in woodcarving. de-
coupage, bridge, fabric painting
and art will be offered. Chess and
checker enthusiasts will have an
opportunity to play weekly as well
as duplicate bridge tourneys.
My ma Toyen will instruct a
class in astrology and Jan Wola-
nek will hold training sessions for
the Hollywood Philharmonic Or-
chestra. Maestro Wolanek invites,
music students and amateur and
professional musicians to join him.
There are square dancing
classes and sessions led by Jav
Fcnimore and ballroom dancing
instruction with Art Bourbon. Kv-.
ery Saturday evening there will
be an adult dance with a live
combo, door prizes and a novel
theme.
There is a modest charge, for
all activities. Further information
may be obtained by contacting the
recreation office at 2030 Polk St.
where schedules for the entire
orograin are available.
VACATI0NIN6?
AVOID TROUBLE
LET US CHECK YOUR
CAR FIRST
BRAKES
TIRES
TRANSMISSION
TUNE-UPS
CAR B0RAT0RS
RACE CARS
F0RIEGN CAR'
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MOSS
RACING ENTERPRISES
5702 DEWEY ST. 917-1320

...JUST OPENED!
COME IN AND SEE OUR MANY SPECIALS..
MANOR KOSHER FOOD CENTER
4620 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
(Next to Win n Dixie)
Ur
vision of Orthodox
Vood Hoikothruth of
Florida.
RABBI SHBLDON
EVER, DIRECTOR.
Telephone 966-8155
YOU CANNOT BUY
A NEW FORD
FOR LESS... ANYWHERE
THAN
HOLLYWOOD FORD
1 200 N. Federal Hwy.
Hollywood 922-6721 Miami 947-3411


Page 6-
+Jewlst> fhrkHa*
Friday. June 23, 197:1 ]
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah Opening
Its Sixth Season Monday
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah will open its
sixth season Monday with the larg-
est enrollment ami the most diver-
sified program jn its history. The
camp, which is under the super-
vision of the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration of Greater Hollywood, is
the only one in Greater Hollywood
sponsored by the Jewish commun-
ity. Its director is George Kirn.
In preparation for the opening.
a full week of orientation has been
provided for the < ounselor staff.
Meitings have also been held with
the campers' parents. Counselor
orientation inclined a day to day
run-through of all the camp pro-
grams so that the counselors could
get a first hand picture of the vari-
ous activities before the young-
ster- arrived.
During this orientation period
Robert Kerbel, executive director
of Jewish Welfare Federation,
spoke to the staff shout the role
of a Jewish-oriented camp in the
community and the part that the
various counselors were to play in
it.
Esther I.owenthnl. exneutiv di-
rector of Jewish Family Service,
aKo -poke t" the members of the
staff ahout patterns of beh.ivior
that might posslb'y arise and how
best ti deal with them. A question;
and answer period followed each
discussion.
The program of the camp is
slarted so that the children car
learn something of their Jewish
heritage through their various ac-
tivitles. It is accomplished through
many different types of celebra-
tion.- and events, and through mu-
sic, song anil drama
This year three of the staff mem-
bers are college students who have
so. nt the past year studying in
Israc 1 am!' so can offer something
of their background and knowledge
to the campers.
The camp will once ngain use
the facilities of Temple Beth El
and those of the Hallandale pool.
Camp Clements, a Girl Scout camp,
will be used for overnight excur-
sions.
Camp director George Kirn re-
ports that because there seemed
to be a strong need for this type
facility in the community for chil-
dren of the Teen Traveler age,
(from sixth through ninth grade'
a third such group was added to
the camp this year.
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah is a non-
profit camp and no child has been
turned away because of their par-
ents' inability to pay. A number of
the children slated to attend were
granted scholarships after confi-
dential interviews with members
of Jewish Family Service.
Mrs. Philip Weinstein Jr. i>
president of the board of the camp:
board members inclucV Mrs. Rob-
ert Blank, Mrs. Myron Burnstein.
Mrs. Lewis Fineman, Mrs. Martin
D. Fleisher, Rabbi Robert Frazin,
Dr. David Glassman, Mrs. David
Goodman, Mrs. Herbert Katz. Dr.
Albert Kellert, Morton L^vin,
James Fox Miller. Mrs. Alan Podis,
Dr. Alfred Rosenthal, Dr. Joel
Schneider. Reuben M. Schneider
and Gerald Siegel.
THE MALL THEATRES I II
At the New Diplomat Mall E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale-920-5656
Selective Film Presentation*
JOHN Z's ITALIAN CUISINE
"CAT1NG FOR ALL OCCASIONS"
JOHN Z's ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL!!
$1.99 Complete Dintters ...
1450 N. Dixie Hwy. 929-6217
Sun. 2 till 1 p.m. Mon. thru Sat. 11-Midnite
"LET JOHN Z. PREPARE YOUR PARTY-
EAT IN OR TAKE OUT
WITH JEWISH SIGNIFICANCE
Vacation Landmarks
FRANK MURPHY
In the tiny town of Ellento-i. on
Route .301 just north of Braden-
ton, (in the Tampa-St.Petersburg
area> is the Gamble mansion, a
state operated historical site des-
ignated as the Judah P. Benja-
min Memorial.
Mr. Benjamin, one of the most
famous Jews in the south during
the Civil War, was a United States
senator and was successively at-
torney general, Secretary of War
and Secretary of State in the
southern government.
In t'.e north he was considered
"the brains of the Confederacy."
The Florida mansion became his
hiding place as he fled' from Fed-
eral troops after the disintegra-
tion of the southern armies.
With a price on his head worthy
of a high enemy official, Mr. Ben-1
jamin took refuge there, disguised I
as a French farmer until he could |
escape to England, where he be-
came a respected member of the
English bar.
NEW.
Acoustical Vinyl
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Le Cafe de Paris
OPEN ALL YEAR
Denis Is Here To Serve You*.
400 E. Dania Beach Blvd.
I Acron from (h* Jt-Alii PaUc)
Opening Special*
SPECIAL DINNER $495
OWNCft-CHfF "DENIS" f*t *"* C* H74724 M7-?17I
Today the mansion in which
Mr. Benjamin hid is perfectly pre-
served and houses one of the finest
collections of pre-Civil War fur-
nishings to be found in the south.
Admission is 25 cents. Guided
tours are available and picknick-
ing is allowed.
l_if AUTO |
JN-JL painting /
721
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SE If VICE
BODY WORK PAINTING* WRECKS REBUILT
2 MR. TOWING*MECHANICAL M'AIRS
WEE ESTATES I OOrt AOIO
N. DIXIE HWY.. HALLANDALE #AV"OZ I 7
BURDINE'S
semi-annual
bra and girdle sale
20% to 40% off
Choose from all the top makes. All the
most wanted styles. Shown: Vanity Fair's
Juliet* underwire decollete bra. all nylon
and Lycra* spandex. White, beige, black,
32-36 A. B. C. reg. S6. 4.96. Navy. blue,
pink. 32-36 B. C. reg. S6. 4.96. Vanity
Fair's Tulipette panty girdle of Curvalon*
nylon/Lycra* powernet. White, beige.- -
black, navy, s-m-l. reg. $8. 5.96.
Many others, so come see them all!
BPAS AND GIRDLES.
SECOND FLOOR DOWNTOWN MIAMI.
AT ALL BURDINE'S STORES


Friday. June-23, 1972
+Jmist) narkUati
Page 7
tv,wwvwww..................| | | | ^^ UUI|J|J|JL
seene around
by Marjo Nevjns
uraduation tirrv? is here apnin **a t
turcs of all those ^Tl^S^^T^ **#+
through thet its a Z\year sine! MY n ^ ^^ Shinin
mmMm
HrnS?rhW k' thCr J had had the fee,in that when my chil-
2S h mv ^ ^ ba"1 th*y WOu!d ,ake *** belong
wsorted paraphernalia *W around the house. John Kelln-r of
Hollywood Storage doesn't have as much staff in his warehouse
as I have in my so-called spare room.
So now it is spring cleaning time in my house and mother
has decided to d-clare her emancipation. No longer will I
shelter those fourth grade pottery ashtrays.....no longer will
I house the sneakers with South Broward High inked on the
*l\V......no Um""r <* x care to rival the Hollywood Library
v :th a collection of books ranging from Chicken Little to Chau-
cer. That record collection may have been great but I'm no
fonder of the rock of the -60s now than I was then. It's time
for mother to be free and you can hear the complaints up and
down Surf Road. They hold conferences and whisper ijehind my
back. I gather I hat the conversation content concerns my mean
qualities, il must admit to overt eavesdropping on occasion.)
However, I won't be swayed. Thrift Shope be on the alort-!!
I'm e'etermined that you shall be the possessors of my spare
room's contents for this mother is going to "hang loose" or
is that expression out of date like most of mine!!!
it ii ij
All the friends of Seymour Mann could fill a larce conven-
tion hall but a few weeks back, 125 of them got together at the
AJC annual dinner meeting at Pier 66 to confer upon Sy their
human relations award and to wish him well. We all "kvelled" as
Sy accepted the award from Al Capp and we laughed as he
opened his acceptance speech by saying, "Now that I've got this
mike, you know I won't let it go!" However his words were i.hort
and sweet and amusing.
I got an added thrill from watching son, Jeff taking the
pictures of his dad t*ceiviiig the award. He's a professional pho-
tographer heading his own People and Pictures photography
business.
Couldn't possibly even begin to mention all the people who
were there but to name a few.....there were Ester and Allan
Cordon, Leah and Sam Weinstein, Naomi and Stan Kurash,
Annette and Bemie Milloff, Sue and Harry Permesly. Naturally,
AJC president Mort Abram and Gladys were there and Sylvia
and Abe Salter, Anita and Stan Kessel, and Roslyn and Joel
Rcttman. Dorothy Fine was chairman of the dinner and of
course she and Jesse were busy until sitting down time.
Because I always rave about Dorothy's cooking she had pre-
pared a surprise package for me and had it at my seat. It was
billed with typical goodies of the "Fine" variety and I do mean
FINE.
Broward's Rep. J. Herbert Burk-? was the speaker of the
evening and his remarks were most interesting and heartening.
He said at the very beginning of his speech, "It is in the na-
tional interest of the United States to keep Israel strong." Good
words from an influential man.
LOW COST
BURGIAR ALARM SYSTEMS
Thi is the time of year with
Vacations and all to really
Investigate our Services...
FltEE ESTIMATES 98I-M0S
for Car, lurifMH efc-24 Hour Emergency
HOLLYWOOD LOCKSMITH
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> RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
> ROOF CLEANING & PAINTING
INSURED & BONDED
Using only the finest paints
ESTIMATES 966-5312
5104 GIANT ST. HOLLYWOOD
Rabbi To Honor
Temple Members
Friday Evening
Rabbi David Shapiro of Terrtpk
Sinai, Hollywood, will liono spe-
cial members of the temple during
services at 8:15 p.m. Friday.
Mrs. Harry Antebi, Mrs. Goklie
Schumacher and Mrs. Molvin Wal-
. at will be honored for helping
with special secretarial duties.
Members of the telephone, visit-
ing and good will committees wili
aho be honored. They include Mr
and Mrs. Sam Bernstein, Mr. and
Mrs. Irvin Block. Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Burd, Sol Cooper, Mrs
Anna Dehls, Mr. and Mrs. Ix>uis
Garber, Mr. Emanuel Goldblatt.
Jack Harari. Julius Harris, Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Horowitz, Dr.
Robert Jafff and Mr. and Mrs.
Daniel Janowsky.
Also Rev. and Mrs-. Morris Kan-
ter, Mrs. Martha Katz, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Knell ,Mr. and Mrs. ]
Benjamin I-azarus, Mrs. Lena :
Lightman, Mrs. Max Oberman, Mr. j
and Mrs. Leo Oppenh- imer, Mrs. ;
Harry Peck, Mr. and Mrs. Chirles
Pierson, Jack Price. M and M~;.
Israel Resnikoff, Jack Rogers, Ja
cob Scarr, M-. and Mrs. Sarrve'
Sisho'ce, David Soko'.ow, Iffra. Bir
ton Strauss and Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Tunkel.
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50
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The NEW "elura" Capless Wig $M
ALL COLORS AVAILABLE...........................*eg. $45 i^T
95


'age 8
9-Men i sit iJcrkfiftr
Friday, June 23, 1972
PERSONALITY PROFILE
Marsha Tobin
By MARCY LEVIN
When Marsha Tobin was a very
:->ung child, her grandfather be-
- in teaching hor that "there's sood
MARSHA TOBIN
i everyone even ciiminals have
t um good points." This credo, oft-
epeated throughout her childhood
: u bedn the yardstick by which
Marsha has measured her rela-
onshipi all her life. Her grand-
ither, ; Russian immigrant who
raduated with honors trom Au-
t urn University, also instill >d in
] larsha ;i great reaped for educa
1 on.
Marsfia attended Coral Gables
High School and the Lear School.
here she was president of th.'
class She received a bache-
lor oi el< ncntary education dearer
I om the University of Miami,
. here she served on the first Stu-
dent Union Board, and was named
in Who-- Who in American Col-
- an A past president of Alpha Kpsi-
.11 Phi .sorority, Marsha, who
i- now a member of the Bnwair1
County l'-M Alumnae Association
recently received Jewish Welfare
I ederation'a Award for Education,
4 >r her outstanding work in that
srea. IShe eochaired the highly
ilaed "Images" program held
i winter and Stop The Worl.'
1 Want To Get On" In 1071.1
I finally bond my niche in
Hollywood in Federation," says
active young woman. 'The
. location of women making
i lem concerned for th.'ir fellow
Jew ami eliminating their BPathy,
j- .i major conrern," she adds
Marsha's Federation activities in*
dude the successful 'Promise A
Day" asssaaa lac caaspaign. She
-rdso cofour.de' Hollywood's Teen-
age Youth Council with Mrs P.ob-
I I I'lttel,, and la currently a .nem-
Iber of Federation's local alloca-
I ens committee.
A pa--t vice president of Temple
Solel's Sisterhood and idvbor to
nai Biith GJrte Shim-on rhap-
i Marsha's interests extend to
any areas. "Judaism is a way
l life, rot only an organized re-
gion something to be practiced
i all your relationships. she ays
' bus, her activities include a great
< mcern for emotionally disturbed
i hildren. She is Interested In
nta] health program pro-
I ft them.
a- a former elementary ihool
1 a-Imt Mai-ha is concerned that
hers aren't -.hen tim
teach they're made '
., em tl and SUII
, em-.' she declares
lha i- that I'll
Floridian. She is an avid horse-
woman and enjoys neeclepoint and
shelling. Topping the list of her
many activities, however, is time
spent with her delightful 2,.a-year-
old, Jennifer.
The quality of time a parent
spends with a child is more im-
portant than the quantity," claims
this proud young mother, describ-
ing her daughter's ability to count
to 20.
Hardly the stcreotyivd Jewish
mother so visible in the mass me-
dia, Marsha's main desire is tha'
Jennifer's future Include what
TV's Skipper Chuck advocates:
"peace1 lose and happiness." To
that and good health, may Wl
ail I Amen."
Braille Class To
Begin In October
A c!a-s in transcribing Braille
Ls now being organized as par: of
the Services to the Blind" ol thr
Sisterhood of Temple Beth El
Mrs. Caryl F ldman. coordinator
of the group, announced. The 20-
week course will start in Octotjcr
with one session each week.
Mrs. Thelma Kurzrock. who has
been active in teaching Braille in
New Jersey, will conduct the ses-
sions. Students finishing the
course will qualify for certifica-
tion by the Library of Congress.
The course is open to anyone in
the community interested in learn-
ing Braille for the purpose of sup
plying material for blind students
and adults "to light a 'amu
m the darkness." Enrollment will
be limited, however.
For further information, con-
tact Mrs. Kurzrock or Mrs. Feld-
man.
xsftmiim of Jmt 4jP
JOSEPH ALSQP
Continued f ram Pag* 4
going to get every single elec-
toral \ote in the South."'
THAT IS NOT surprising,
either, considering ,the method*
employed in the South by the as-
tonishing McGovern organiza-
tion. In Louisiana, for instar.ee.
[ the McGovern organizers packed
i the district caucuses so effec-
tively that McGovern will have
the overwhelming majority of
the state's 47 Democratic con-
vention delegates.
The job was done by two
professors at Louisana State
University in New Orleans. Rob-
ert Denhardt and Jay Hakes.
To illustrate how it was done,
Orleans parish, which is the
city .if New Orleans, has 44.000
registered Democrats. Yet the
McGovern people took all six
delegates with 12."> itudentl end
other academic types a', the un-
attended party caucus. Among
the vast majority of New Or-
leans Democrats, the caucus-
packing tactics have understand-
ably left a bad taste.
ADD IP THE hatd facts.
j then. It is not easy to do in the
peculiar ntmosplnTe of the Cali-
fornia primary. But the hard
facts say tltat no amount of
brilliant organizing is going to
1 prevent Sen. McGovern losing
the South's 147 electoral votes
to the President, along with
I most of the border stote votes
as well.
You ask then the McGovern
masterminds what would hap-
jion in the North, if Wallace also
ended coming out for Nixon.
"That would be really had." they
say. And the facts indicate that
even this Ls an even bet.
Temple Sinai Club Planning Gala Ball
A gala ball will be held' in the
Haber Karp Hall of Temple Sinai
Saturday at 8:30 P-m. under the
auspices of the Temple Sinai Two
Hundred Fun Club.
Membership in the "200 Fun
Club" is open to every member of
the temple. Purpose of the club Ls
to provide outstanding entertain-
Temple Solel Opens
Office In Trailer On
Construction Site
Temple Solel has opened an of-
fice in a trailer on the the where
Its new sanctuary- will be con-
structed at 52nd Avenue end Sher-
idan Street.
Payment for the property was
made at a s|x>cial ceremony this
week with Abe Durbin. temple
president, boiling committee co-
chairmen David Novick and Mian
Fiske. Madelyn Weisz. religious
school principal, and Rabbi Rob-
ert Fra,:in. spiritual leader if the
temple, participating.
Founded in May 1970. Temple]
Solel now has a membership ol
more than 250 families, an n live
Sisterhood, and Men's Club and
youth groups.
At the present time, services
ne held in the Sherl an Hills Kle-
mentary School. Abe Durbin will
be tit" builder of the new struc-
ture,
ment to its members and at th<
same time assist the temple in its
annual budget.
Seymour Mann and Joel Rott-
man are eochairmen of the club.
Committee members planning the
affair are Mrs. Howard Fuerst,
Mis. Seymour Mann and Mrs. Al-
len Gorc'on.
JlevM
Jilemorial Chapel
"JEWISH fUNlBAl DIRECTORS"
LOCAL AND OUT Of STATC
ARRANGEMENTS
947-2790
1
* 13JSS W DIXIE MWV MM.
Palmers
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
4444921 444-0922
Open Sunday thru Friday
Personalized Memorial* Custom
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THE
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Ansel Insurance Agency f
Ansel Witfenstein Sf
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN
in)vamci conr*i
THRIFT SHOP
The following list of Thrift Shops will accept new and used
merchandise with the receipts from their yale going to the orga-
pi/ution running the shop. All donations to these shops arv tax
deductible.
HARASSAH 121 N; 19th Ave. (will move to 2042 Harrison
St. sometime before July 15) Open Monday through
Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
BETH SHALOM 2027 Tyler Street 9-4.30 Monday
through Friday
COUNCIL THRIFT SHOP 2039 Tyler St. Summer
hours 10-2 p.m. Monday through Friday
JEWISH HOMF FOR AGED THRIFT SHOP 7300 X\V
27th Ave., Miami Phone 696-2101 truck picks up in
Hollywood every Thursday (any merchandise, tun*
ture and appliances included, in salable condition'
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
Tlt Sl'cvl l ISMn Av*nu
Prwne 923-8322
SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
with
funeral Homo Contacts throughout
the United States
Funeral Director Available 24 Hours A Day
To Assist With All Faneral Arrangements
Hou.yrotnrs oi.vr.sr .. most lossiheheb
QTsmrsmr/ C&meJ, Grs/r.
140 Sa, Dbde Hhjhw.y rH. 23-*S*5
Hollywood, Florida 33020
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
\7empie &M&
Wtemoeial
(gardens
The only all-jew ish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923-8255 or write:
TEMPLE BETH EL~ '"""'
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: '______________________________________
PHONE:


Friday. June 23. 1972
MB I Mum i.
Jewisti fhricttar)
Page 9
By BOB KERBEL. Executive Director,
J.w.sh WeW.r. F^er.tior. of Gre.t.r Hollywood
There are many ways to view a
community. We can study
a- observe the wial cconomic O^ZHZZZZiTZ
ransr. th,.r occupations, the number of children per fam:"c"s
ZZZZ ut **institu,ions and ,h*r "555
I .should like to comment on the Jewish community of
Greater Hollywood in a somewhat informal sodolosicul frW
Most of us in Hollywood are new arrival* coming from else-
where, many of us from the "big cities" of the north. The oldei
ones of us have come to retire, to forget the pressures of the
las; 40 or 50 years of work, to leave the smog, the traffic the
crime, and the weather, and to move to an area of relative
peacefuliiess. comfort, beauty and relaxation. Florida is also a
mecca for those who are still of child-bearing age, or not much
beyond. They too have come to find their fortunes in an atmos-
phere of comfort and relaxation.
Most of us have left our families, our friends, our Jewish
institutions, and have come to this community without relation-
ship either to family or institutions. We come here seeking new
relationships, new patterns of identification.
Kmile Durkheim, the French sociologist, presented a term in
the early '30s called "anomie." In its simplest form, it means
"riormlwsncss." In hL> concept of community and soci-ty, rupid
changes- in society causes individuals and the society gen-
erally to develop an "in limb*)" attitude, not knowing where
they belong or what their responsibilities are to the society In
which they now find themselves. In this kind of situation, the
individual in terms of his own self-protection, begins to loo'< for
s. il-gratification and pleasure-seeking, and very oftrn begin*
grasping to find new relationships. There is little sense of be-
tongtng lo anything, especially the amorphous concept of "a
community."
A community is many things. It is a distinguishable net-
work of relationships among people. It is a society of human
beings who are arranged in patterns of inter-relationship de-
fined by a complex of standards, values, customs, habits, myths
and the material things which they share. Many of the new-
comers to this area see themselves as being from some place
else, without conscious awareness of the necessity of standards
and institutions where they are now.
The effect of this development Is demonstrated in lack o!
family stability, acting out behavior, searching for new cul-
tures which have no relationship to the culture and traditions
of our past. In our haste and insecurity, we desire new rela'kms
to provide a new security, and quite often unconsciously reject
much of what we have had in an attempt to begin again.
To have the security of knowing who we are so. that we can
become ndividuals of integral strength, there needs to be an
identification with an ideal role model. With some, 'his model
is a parent, a teacher, a friend or even a national here. In our
complex society with multiple technological changes and mass
movement of people, and at the same time the fear of destruc-
tion by the "bomb," it is difficult to develop these kinds of models.
One concept which can be effective is that of "the commun-
ity" as a model. The development of a role model which car
provide traditions, new means to understand and accept tradi-
tions; new and different institutions which can bridge the gar
from past to present, can aid in establishing a stability through
a model concept.
Outgoing Officers,
Directors Honored
By Temple Israel
Temple Israel of Miramar hon-
ored the outgoing offices and di-
rectors of the temple and Its vari-
ous arms during services Fridav
evening, June 9. Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin conducted services, is-ist-
ed by Cantor Abraham Roster.
Awards were present r'. by the
following presidents: Seymour
Goch for the temple; Jackie Rosen
for the Sisterhood; Frank Turner
for the Men's Club. Max Shevtn
for the Golden Age Club, and Perry
Segal for the Youth Commission.
Receiving awards were Frank
Alborn. Allen and Alic Abrams,
Ahc Bernstein. Hyman B-ick. I
Claire Brown, Fred Bimin, Wil-!
liam Belcove, Harold Chick. Mae
Concessa. Charles Cohen, Phyllis
Drazin, Shirley Dovis, Marvin Ed-1
ebtein, Lou Finkel, Adeie Foland.
Bertha Frit;'man. Prank Firpo. i
Myron Fisher. Arnold Feiner,
Jerry Fine, Sam and Sadie Fried-
land, Frances Gladstone, CWald .
Gubnitsky, Marshall and Joyc<
Goldberg. Seymour and Fileen
Goch. Ruth Goodman. Sol Gang
Mary Gilbert and Klissa Horowitz.
Also Ruth Hoegger. Libby ITach-
enburg. Josenh Jacobs, Sam Jaf-
fee, E.'ylhe Jacques, Ilene Joenh.
Fannie Klincer, Sam Katz, Max
and Kate Kalter. Harold and Shir-
ley Kravitz, Frank and Sharon
Lerner, Rose LeRoy, Dr. Morris
I.inn. Sue Leiba, Marvin and Jo-
Ann Lee, Sam and Prances Lanes-
hard, Saul Larrk. Sam I.avinsky,
Ona Meyers and Esther Majzel.
Also Florence N'oviek. Frank and
Lillian Offsey, Patricia Porner,
Norman and Evelyn Prafin. Celia
Perlnvutter. Donald F. Powell.
Harry and Jacqueline Rosen. Syl-
via Rich. Elyse RaJ(von. Ann Reich.
David Rosen. Donald Reisner.
George Seftell. Mvron and Rita
Shupler, Max and Blanche Shvin.
Perry nd Frances Segal. Lster
Schindel. Mel Stewart. Ralph
Schnccweiss. Edward Shankman,
Barry Schiff, Herman Shane.
Esther Schantz. Ida Turner. Gol-
die Wilkenfeld. Shirley Wcissman
Sidney Wein, Dr. Oscar Winkel-
stein, Meyer and Esther Waldman.
Seymour Zcidman and Harry and
Edith Zuckerman.
Community Calendar Lists Dates
Of All Meetings and Special Events
A Community Calendar listing dates of all meetings and
Special events to be held by Greater Hollywood's various orga-
nizations is maintained by Jewish Welfare Federation. Th<- pur-
pose of the calendar is to avoid any conflict of dates.
Organization representatives are asked to telephone or
write to Jewish Welfare Federation, 1909 Harrison St.. Holly-
wood. 1927-0536) and give them the dates of their meeting-, just
aa soon as they are decided upon. In this way, possibility of ha\ -
ing to switch a date may be avoided.
The events on the Community Calendar are also listed in
the Floridian-Shofar in the issue just prior to the date.

.
-.
Mollye Ginberg Delegate To
Mollye A. Ginberg, past presi-
dent and counselor of 'he Hallan-
dalo- Chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women, served as delegate to the
June 17-20 32nd annual conven-
tion of B'nai B'rith Women Dis-
trict Five in Washington, D.C. ac-
cording to an announcement made
District 5 Convention
by Mrs. Edward Sherman, presi-
dent of the chapter.
B'nai B'rith Women is an inter-
national Jewish service organiza-
tion of 140,000 members engaging
in civic, educational and philan-
thropic programs throughout the
world.
CUFF LORING DESIGNS
Custom Creations in Wood & Mica
613 S 21st A ye Hollywood
(Mem. Designers & Decorators Guild.)
Phone 920-7177
Beverly Hills Chapter
Installs Its Officers
The Beverly Hills Chapter of
Deborah officers for the coming
year include Mrs. William Dectcr
president; Mrs. Irving Sachs, first
vice president: Mrs. Philip Singer
second vice president: Mrs. Abe
l.emborger, treasurer; Mrs. Ben
Weiss, financial secretnry; Mrs.
John Kazzc, recording wcretary:
Mrs. Nicholas De Maria, social sec-
retary, and Mrs. Ida Zinamon, cor-
responding secretay.
The slate was installed by Mrs.
Daisy Brooks, assistant regional
director of Deborah, at a sp-eial
installation last week. Invocation
was by Mrs. Blanche Reiser, re-
gional director of Deborah. Enter-
tainment at the function was pre-
sented by Mrs. Harry Fink, who
sang Deborah lyrics written by-
Mrs. D. Brooks. She was accom-
panied by Mrs. Dorothy KoWitt
FABULOUS
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
INVESTORS WANTED
ACTIVE OR INACTIVE
FOR NEW WHOLESALE
DECORATORS MART
OF FLORIDA
T E. Las (Mas Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale
524-2038
MR. JUIES
COZE BEAUTY SALON
Specializing In Wsmeit'*
and Mwi't Hair Styling
and Mir-Comhi
3001 S. Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Galahad Hall Nwtfc 27-5162
A ** Charter Rental
W Aircraft Air Ambulance
[ Air Haarsa Flight School
Hi-friority Cargo
Aerial Photography
24 HOUR SERVICE
BELLAERO INC.
3415 SW 9 Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale
Phone 525-1493
FACT:
A minimum of ohe million dollars
a day is needed to provide toe
70,000 oew immigrate to fardel
with vital hurnon'ifanan services.
Remember For Parties and
4th of July Treats ...
MR. M's SANDWICH SHOP
5709 Hollywood Blvd. 981-4767
Specializing In...
SUB SANDWICHES & CORN BEEF SANDWICHES
ANNOUNCING THE ARRIVAL...
OF A BRAND, SPANKING, NEW
TAXI COMPANY IN HOLLYWOOD
ARNY'S TAXI
MOBILE SERVICE
527-9730
Proprietor Arnold rVeiner
Hollywood Resident Sine* 1947
JIM RICHMAN'S
PAINT & BODY SHOP
301 N. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HALLANDALE
GET YOUR ESTIMATES THEN COME SEE US.
AUTO BODY REPAIR SPECIALISTS
Phone: 923-3669
PALM MOTORS
COMPLETE TRIM SHOP
Domestic & Foreign Cars 4 Trucks
Auto & Truck Towing
Iniurance t stimof ei Wracks Rebuilt framt Ittfirt
fiberglass testy/ing Vinyl Tops Seat C.ers
"VIC WEIGER"
5650 PLUNKETT STREET, HOLLYWOOD
Phone. 983-2046


Page 10
+Jew 1st thx-klton
Friday, June 23, 1972
Religious
Services
HALLANDAIE
HALLANOALE JEWISH CBNTER
Rabbi Max J. Weitt, Cantor Jacob
Danilgar. "
Friday Sabbath Service* are dlwmi-
tlnued during June. July and Auit.
Saturday Sabbath services will con-
tinue and begin 9 a.m. Sexton Ben
KallHh will aaalat the Cantor. Dally
Mlnyan 8:30 A.M. Sunday through
Friday. Mlncha-Maarlv every day
Marl* 6:30 p.m.
HOUTWOOD
BETH EL (T ample). 1S51 S. 14th Av.
Reform. Kadoi Samuel Jaffa. 40
BETH SHALOM (Temple). 1728 Mon-
roe St. Conaervatlve. Rabbi Morton
Maiaveky. Cantor Irving Oold 46
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnaon St.
Conaervative. Rabbi David Shapir;
Cantor Yehuda Hellbraun. 47
Seymour Mann, (right) past president of AJC and vice presi-
dent of Jewish Welfare Federation, received the Broward
Chapter AJC Human Relations Award for 1972 from Morten
Abram, president of the chapter.
mm. eiAiNt baitm
Mrs. Baxter Is
New President
Of Hillel PTA
Elaine (Mrs. Harvey) Baxter
(MM beri elect< d president of the
Hillol Community Day School PTA
for the coming year.
Serving on the slate with Mrs.
Baxte- wii! he Mrs. Terry Drucker.
Mrs. Shelly Lipson and Mrs. Raquel
Scheck. vice -presidents: Mrs. Al-
vina Duffnor and Mrs. Pearl Cohen,
secretaries, and Mrs. Joanne Solo-
mon, treasurer.
Mrs. Baxter ie a member of the
National Council of Jewish Women.
Women's American ORT and the
Beth Torah Sisterhood board.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal)
All future service* will be held at
Sheridan Hills Elementary School,
5001 Thomaa St.. Hollywood, every
Friday night at 8 p.m. Rabbi Robert
Frazin.
TEMPLE BETH AHM, S10 Southwest
2nd Avenue, Hollywood
Friday 8:15 p.m Norman Pra/ln will
conductthe Services assisted by Lay
Ixader Herbert Smith Sisterhood will
sponsor the Ones; Shabbat.
MltAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple) 20 SW 35th St.
Conaervatlve. 41
NODTH MIAMI BIACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingeley. Cantor Irving
Ehulkee. 87
Bar Mitzvah
TODD KVVAITT
Todd, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert Kwaitt, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah Friday evening, June 23
and Saturday morning, June 24 at
Temple Solel (Friday evening
Sheridan Hills Elementary School.
5001 Thomas St., and Saturday
morning at Emerald Hills Coun-
try Club).
* -ir it
Lee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Firpo, will celebrate his Bar Mitz-
vah at Temple Israel of Miramar
Saturday morning, June 24.
ij. i> JJ.
BOB'S COLD COAST TEXAC3
!.
FOR CREATIVE
UPHOLSTERY
Cz!l John W. Puorlo
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Hallandale
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_ I
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M
Rabbi Jaffe New President
At the annual spring meeting of
the Broward Board of Rabbis. Di
Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual leader
of Temple Beth El, Hollywood
was elected president for the com-
ing year. Serving with him will
be Rabbi Arthur Abrems- of Tem-
ple Emanu-El. Fort Lauderdale
vice president, and Rabbi Avrom
L. Drazin of Temple Israel, Mira-
mar. secretary-treasurer.
Of Broward Board of Rabbis
The Broward Board of Rabbis
comprised of Jewish congroga-
tions in Broward County, encom-
passes Orthodox, Reform and Con.
servative rabbis. The chaplaincy
program at South Florida State
Hospital is served by the bnani,
which also coordinates religiotai
activities of the Jewish community
at large.
Operation Joshua' Tours For College Students Only
special
Operation Joshua, a
group of tours in Israel for college
students only, is sponsored by the
Student Coordinating Committee
for the Israel Emergency Fund. It
is designed to give students an op-
portunity to visit places and to
meet with people they normally
would not see.
Tickets for the tours must be
purchased in advance either in
Tel Aviv at Egged Tours, or in
Jerusalem at the Israel Ministry
if Tourism. Individual trips run
each day, Sunday througn Wednes-
day, from July 9 through August
23. College students are invited to
obtain details regarding these trips
upon their arrival in Israel.
VACATION
Bobbe Schletinger whose "Our Town" appears in
Th Jewish Floridian and Shofar
is on a brief vacation.
Her column will be resumed upon her return.
For Quality Dry Cleaning
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(305) 989-8888


Friday, June 23. 1972
*Je*isttkriiar
Page li-
ny K AJ1M SAMIEL 3. FOX
What I* the derivation of the
Word Bible?"
Originally, the Holy Scriptures;
| were referred to by a plural name
I "Seforim." in Hebrew, and *vhe:i !
I the Bible was translated into
|deck, the Greek name was Billion
(Hi" plural expression for I
"Books.")
The Knglish term "Bible" Prob-
ably comes from the Greek singu-
: lar "Blblia" probably meaning "thy
Book," since the Bible came to bt
I known as the Book of Books.
This Greek term is traced back
to one of two words. It may eoniv
from the name of the Phoenecian
city of Byblus which was an im-
portant trading center in ancient
lime;, and a place where one could
acquire the papyrus plant used in
making paper. It might also be
1 raced to Bublos, a plant in the
form of a reed from which the
I paper is made.
To this day Jews usually refer
to the Bible with a plural expres-
sion such as "Kisvei ha-Kodesh"
(the Holy writings) or "Tanach"
I *an abbreviation for Torah, Proph-
ets and Writings). Sometimes the
scriptures are referred to as "Mik-
Ira" (reading) because the scrip-
j tures were books which were
I' read" in public.
Why Is the Hebrew Bible re-
l erre.:l to iis the Old Testament?
The Expression 'Old Testament"
I is not one classically used by Jews
to refer to the Hebrew scriptures.
This appelation was one given to
these scriptures by Christians. The
I word testament is a Greek and
I-atin translation of the Hebrew
"Berit" which means covenant.
Generally speaking, the Hebrew
scriptures convey the idea that a
covenant existed between the Al-
mighty and the Jewish people.
The scriptures, as a whole, de-
velop the idea of the history of
that covenant, its relevance to
mankind as a whole, the incidents
through which the covenant ex-
ist ed and the events which showed
both loyalty and disloyalty to the
covenant.
Not being able to persuade the
Jews to accept the tenets of
Christianity, Christian leadership
developed the idea that a new
covenant was made between those
who accepted Christianity and the
Almighty. Thus Christian snip-
lures are referred to as the New
Testament" as compared with llv
original Hebrew scriptures which
are referred to as the "Old "Testa-
ment.*
President
Did Discuss
Soviet Jews
NEW YORK (WNSI Her-
bert Klein, the White House di-
rector of Communications, said
on a local radio program here
that President Nixon "did dis-
cuss the issue of Soviet Jewry
and American concern was made
known to all top Soviet leaders
and those on lower levels" dur-
ing the. Moscow summit talks
last month.
In Moscow, the President's
advisor of national security af-
fairs, Dr. Henry Kissinger, had'
told newsmen that the President
had "mentioned" the issue dur-
ing the summit talks.
Sen. John V. Tunney, Calif) speaking at a UJA din-
ner in Seattle last week, said,
"It does not appear that the
President even raised ;he Issue
of the treatment of Jews by
the Soviet government." If the
President did raise the issue, "he
has kept it a well guarded se-
cret," he said!
Holland America's S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam anchors off one of the South American islands as colorfully dressed native
fishermen watch with undisguised curiosity. f
Florida Tourists Never Had It So Convenient
Between June 5 and Dec. 8,
Florida's Port Everglades will
be the port of departure for 16
Caribbean cruises aboard the
S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam.
Each of the new cruises, with
the exception of the one on
Sept. 27, will be 10 days Ions
and will follow identical itiner-
aries. Ports of call are varied
and feature some of the most
interesting islands in the West
Indies and South America.
Among these will be Pampatar
on the island of Margarita, a
new port of call this season for
the Nieuw Amsterdam.
Margarita is a resort island
off the coast of Venezuela that
the Venezuelans have been try-
ing for years to keep to them-
selves. Serene and steeped in
history < it was one of the origi-
nal outposts of the Old World
in the new), the island is re-
garded by the Venezuelans as
a South American Tahiti. Otl.er
liorts included will be Oran-
jestad. Aruba; La Guaira (for
Caracas), Venezuela; Fort de
France, Martinique; and Char-
lotte Amalie. St. Thomas.
Prices, which vary according
to the season, start at $265 to
$310 and' range upward to $785
and $995 for deluxe cabins.
And we know of no other type
of arrangements which include
in one price air-condi-
lioned shipboard accommoda-
tions, all meals, entertainment,
other extras and all gratui-
ties alraard ship.
The exception to this new
series of cruises is the one of
Sept. 27 which will be eight
lay* long. It will call at the
ports of Charlotte Amalie. St.
Thomas; Philinsburg, St. Maar-
:en; and San Juan. Puerto '.iico.
Rates on this cruise start at
$210 and range upward to $610.
Cnr'se dates to mark on your
calendar for the "Friendship"
Nieuw Amsterdam are: Juno
5, 16 and 26; July 7, 17 and 28:
Aug. 7 and 18; Oct. 6. 16 and
27: Nov. 6, 17 and 27; ~nd Dec.
8, 1972.
A cruise on the Nieuw Am-
sterdam is, simply, just rlain
fun. Completely refurbished in
1961 and recently rcearpetcd.
the vessel is as modern today as
instant coffee but has still
managed to retain her Old
World charm. She is air-con-
ditioned throughout and stabil-
izer equipped. The vessel has
the opulence of 25 different
kinds of hardwood, many of
which have been created into
exquisite designs, not to men-
tion the beautiful hand-rubbed
panels in the cabins.
Although the Nieuw Amster-
dam is a beauty in the classic
sense, she is just as much of a
fun" ship as her sailing com-
panions, the flagship Rotter-
dam and S.S. Statendam. Be-
sides her ballrooms with soaring
ceilings, balconies, and spiral
staircases, right alongside is a
little discotheque for people
who are under 30 or want to
be. The ship has the great ad-
vantage in that it lets passen-
gers choose their own era.
The vessel offers passengers
all of the usual parties, sports
avtivitics. midnight buffets and
indoor and outdoor |>ools that
one ex|>ects to find an a luxury
cruise liner. Over cocktails the
"first night out" you'll meet
new friends before going to the
dining room to select from the
many fine courses offered. Next
morning you can have break-
fast in bed' or in the warm
morning sun on deck.
The rest of the day is yours
to soak up the pleasure of ship-
board life. Sit and do absolutely
nothing at all. Or join ;n a
game of deck tennis, shuffle-
hoard, miniature golf or tran
shooting. An experienced cruise
staff is right there to keep
things running smoothly.
If you prefer you can work
out in the gym, take a swim in
one of the pools, or unwind
with a massage, sign up for a
dance lesson or see a first-run
movie in the Nieuw Amster-
dam's theater. There is some-
thing to do every minute if
you wish and somehow the
days will seem too short.
In addition to the ship's many
colorful lounges, dining rooms
and cozy bars, other facilities
include a beauty parlor and
barber shop, swimming pools,
drug store, gift shop, turkish
baths, a fully equipped modem
laundry and pressing service
and an experienced medical
staff.
Many first-time passengers
(and re|>eat passengers as welli
will still want to sample what
the Nieuw Amsterdam has to
offer because from her grace-
fully curved, flared bow, to hei-
st reamlined rudder, she pro-
claims her aristocratic breed-
ing. Every line of her super-
structure sweeps back with
modulated grace. She sits com-
fortably in the water, as though
she were built in it. and was
supremely happy to be there
which she is.
Now, aboat those ports. On
Ihe Nieuw Amsterdam's 10-day
cruises the first stop after leav-
ing Port Everglades will be
Aruba. Newest of the Carib-
bean resorts, Aruba is one of
the principal islands of the
NdlicrJands Antilles group.
Your cruise wtli call at th"
capital city, Oranjestad. This
is a quaint, tidy Dutch city.
splashed with gay colors of the
Caribbean. In fact, local tradi-
tion dictates that no home be
the same color as its neighbor.
The resulting' kaleidoscope of
pastels is one of the most
charming facets of the island's
unique atmosphere.
A walk through cewntown
Oranjestad offers exciting shop-
ping possibilities. Fine products
from the worM over are avail-
able at free-port prices. You'll
also want to see Queen Wil-
helmina Park and Fort Wilhelm
III. which was built in 1798.
All of Aruba is easily acces-
sible from the city and the
island's peculiar windswept ter-
rain offers many an intriguing
sight. One of the most interest-
ing of these is the divi-divi *rce.
Sculptured by the constant
trade winds, thus tree defies
nature's norms by growing -ide-
ways.
From Aruba the Nieuw Am-
sterdam then sails Cor La fJua-
ira, the port city of Caracas,
the capital of Venezuela. It is
separated into two distinct sec-
tors the ancient city, with
its charming Spanish architec-
ture, and the new Caracas with
enormous superblocks. regular
squadrons of cement buildings
painted in vivid colors, spread
over the hillsides.
The heart of new Caracas is
the Centro Bolivar the Rock-
efeller Center of Venezuela
an imposing group of buildings
culminating in two 32-story
towers, and the eight-lane
Avenida Bolivar, which paMM
through the center. But Carac-
as is not all ultra-modern. In
the old section you can visit
Simon Bolivar's home where
this freedom fighter was !>orn.
and the Nathional Pantheon,
his tomb.
The cruise next calls at I'am-
patar on Isla de Margarita
which Is only 24 miles off the;
coast of South America. Some
say that Margarita is truly th-
last of the undiscovered Caiib-
liean islands. To ecstatic Vene-
zuelans, who regard the island
as a South American Tahiti, it
has lieen a familiar place al-
most since Columbus discovered
it. But for Americans, Marga-
rita remains uniquely unknown
and untouched. The fishing and
snorkeling off its shores are un-
beatable and its beaches are
excellent and virtually unused.
Pampatar, where 'he Nieuw
Amsterdam arrives, has a fam-
ous colonial church and the
Castle of San Carlos Borro-neo.
a jewel of colonial architecture.
Not far away is Poiiamar, the
island's largest city, which has
an interesting open-air market.
Here you'll find odd-slwped
natural pearls since the island
was once the world's major
source of these lovely items.
After, prowling through gentle
Margarita's quaint villages,
you'll probably decide that there
is no better place to absorb the
sun. sand and sea.
Martinique Ls next where the
ship arrives in Fort de France,
its capital. This island is the
former home of Empress Jo-
sephine, wife of Napoleon, and
Mt. Pelee, the volcano that
erupted in 1902 and destroyed
the entire town of St. Pierre,
leaving 30,000 dear* and one
survivor.
Fort de France, a charming
city of yellow-tinted buildings,
offers a number of sites for the
visitor such as old Fort St.
Louis and the Cathedral with
its ornate, open spire. Bui
there's more to Martinique, too
high domed mountains, su-
perb forests, vast sugar cane
fields, banana and pineapple
plantations and lush tropical
vegetation. As for shopping, in
Fort de France there are the
streets of Rue Victor-Hugo, Rue
Antoine-Siger and Rue Schoel-
clier where one can find bar-
gains in porcelain, crystal and
French oerfume.
Next you arrive in Charlotte
Amalie on St. Thomas, the
"shopping |radise" of the
Western Hemisphere. Leaving
the pier you can drive to Blue-
beard's Castle, once o fortress,
now a hotel. Here you'll see the
Tower, carefully restored ac-
cording to the original plans.
Leaving Bluebeard's you can
continue up Mafolie Hill to
Drake's Seat, a lookout point
which gives you a lovely view of
Mageni Bay and out across Sir
Francis Drake Channel to the
many American and British
Virgin Islands nearby,
Then it's on to Mountain Top
Hotel where you can sample
the "speciality of the house" -
their "('Id-famous b:inana dai-
quiri. Charlotte Amalic's shop-
ping Center is next. It's diffi-
cult to enumerate the many
types of bargains available -
and most of them at duty-fre-
prices. And, don't forget -
customs still allow an extra
$100 of duty-free purchases in
this port and you can hrin1;
one full gallon of "spirits" back
duty-free as well.
Although St. Thomas is the
last port of call, the adventure
is not over yet. There are sev-
eral more days and nights at
s absorb what has been seen and
to exchange experiences with
fellow passengers and new
friends.
Finally, when the Nieuw Am-
sterdam sails into the harbor
at Port Everglades, your Carib-
bean cruise may be over, but the
happy memories will linger on
for many years to come.
For complete information and brochures on the 16 Carib-
bean cruises sailing from Port Everglades, write Holland
America Cruises, Department P, Pier 40 North River, New
York, New York, 10014, or phone Ft. lauderdare 565-5588.


Page 12
+Jewistncri Whata
i
Friday. June 23, \m


Your car's only worth two-fifty, but I'll
give you six for it"
If I made everybody a deal like this, we'd
be out of business in a month!
He said twenty-five sixty? Ill sell you
the same car for two thousand!
Just to move this car off the floor, you
can have it for a hundred-fifty below cost;
They're the oldest lines in the business. And believe it or not,
some of the car dealers in this town still use them. If they ever
try to hand you a line like that, turn around and walk out.
Presented as a Public Service by The Big Ten Ford Dealers.
We sell Fords from Pompano to Perrine.
DADE: Tally Embry Ford. N.W. 90th Street and 7th Avenue, Miami Friendly Ford. 163rd Street and Biscayne Boulevard, North Miami Beach
Johnson Ford. Palm Springs Mile, Hialeah Courtesy Ford. South Dixie Highway at 156th Street, South Miami Dtti Motors. LeJeune Road at
U.S. 1, Coral Gables Austin Ford. N.W. 38th Street at 27th Avenue, Miami. HOWARD: Luke Bolton Ford. North State Road 7, Plantation Holly-
wood Ford. 1200 North Federal Highway, Hollywood Terry Ford. 1000 North Federal Highway, Pompano Beach Powell Motor Company.
1300 Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale.


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