The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00043

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
lewisfi Florid!i3i m
and MUM Alt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
16
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 9. 1972
Price 20 cams
locations Committee Members Named
obers for the
(id overseas di-
slocations Com-
bined this week
an, chairman,
(also announced
for meetings of each of these di-
visions during the month of
Jnne and a full session meeting
of all three divisions June 29.
The local allocations commit-
tee headed by Dr. Philip Wcin-
\t Jewry Issue' Was
issed, Kissinger Says
TA) President
issed the issue
with Leonid I.
try general of
lunity Party,
^isor Henry Kis-
ters here,
it we said we
rburg," Dr. Kis-
J. (In Salzburg,
the presidential
["over enroute to
ago, Mr. Kissin-
sn that the Presi-
for an oppor-
e the matter with
o meet in Mos-
er told newsmen
ever, "You have to
oblem of dlscuss-
srnal forum what
rds as an internal
Soviet security
ented Soviet Jews
from contacting President Nixon
and made it virtually impossible
for American newsmen to meet
or telephone Soviet Jews. As
a result, U.S. reporters and pho-
tographers covering the summit
conference gave up hope of ob-
taining interviews with Jewish
activists.
An example of the efforts
made by American correspond-
ents to contact Jews and he
fruitless results was the case of
one reporter who tried1 70 times
to reach seven people by phone
without obtaining a single re-
sponse.
In Leningrad three U S. news-
men managed to contact a local
Jew. He promised to meet them
in front of the New National
Hotel but never showed up. The
vicinity of the hotel for blo?ks
around had been sealed off by
Soviet security police.
Meetings Focus
Priority Concerns
_> areas of Jewish
[concern and respon-
at home, overseas
i-ael were the focal
some 250 communal
I Federation execu-
June 1-14 o.uarterly
national committee
the Council of Tew-
Btions and Welfare
(CJF) here.
bel. executive director
Hollywood's Jewish
deration, was among
tes from more than
bnities in the United
JCanada who discussed
[range of ongoing pro-
d proposals from
_ng throueh public re-
[social welfare needs
I for community and
pn and which ere goar-
ngthening Jewish eom-
prviee. In conlunction
sessions, the first
of the board of trustees
fcrentlv created Institute
|ih Life also was held.
. the highlights of the
Fconclave was an assess-
i estimated final results
|l972 campaign as well as
lary planning for the
npaien. Adiditiorally. the
i Services Committee
J the problem of "cover-
fthe campaign.
rial report to the Oer-
_. vices Committee on the
Mtion of Russian newcom-
flsrael was made by Louis
chairman of the Execu-
1 the Jewish Agency in
and the committee ex-
community action on the
problem of Soviet Jewry and
the recommendations of the Sub-
committee on Higher Education
in Israel. The board also received
a report from the CJF delega-
tion just returned from meetings
with community leaders in
Europe.
Delegates From 20
Nations Attending
WJC Council Meet
NEW YORKDelegates from
20 countries, including two So-
cialist states, are attending the
annual meeting of the Govern-
inc Council of the World Jewish
Congress (WJC) here this week.
The meeting opened officially
Monday evening with a session
addressed by Dr. Nahum Gold-
mann, president of the WJC.
Tuesday wm devoted to a
discussion on "The American
Jewish Community In the Urban
Crisis." Rabbi Arthur Hertx-
berg, newly elected president of
the American Jewish Congress,
and Dr. Seymour Slegel, Profes-
sor of Theoloev at the Jewish
Theological 8emlnary of Amer-
Ica, served as panelists. In the
evening, the Governing Council
hosted a dinner for Its chair-
man, Rabbi Dr. Joachim Prine,
to mark his 70th birthday.
Wednesday morning was de-
voted to the Middle East, with a
discussion following a briefing by
Gen. Itzhak Rabin, Israel's Am-
bassador to the United States.
stein Jr., includes Mrs. Francis
M. Briefer, Rabbi Avrom Draz-
in, Mark Fried, Barry Holeve,
Sidney Holtzman, Dr. Norman
Landman. Dr. Samuel Meline,
Dr. Jack B. MiUer, L. Paul Nes-
tel, Louis S. Rosen, Joseph L.
Schwartz, David Schwartzman,
Max Sloane, Mrs. Marsha Tobin,
Mrs. Philip Weinstein Jr. and
David Yorra.
The national committee, head-
ed by Dr. Joel Schneider,
includes David Aranow, Dr. Alex
Buchwald, Milton Forman, Mrs.
Caroline Honeyman, Joseph
Kleiman, Dr. Alex Kobb, Dr.
Meron Levitats, Louis M. Sha-
nok and Maurie Meyers.
James Jacobson, chairman of
the overseas committee, heads
a group including Mrs. Carolyn
Davis, Dr. Morton A. Diamond.
I. Abe Durbin, Rabbi Robert
Frazin, Meyer Kirsner, Sam
Perry, Dr. Robert Pittell, Mrs.
David Shapiro and Eugene
White.
The work of the Allocation
Committee is one of the most
important tasks of the entire
Federation program. It is their
Dr. M. Bernard Resnikoff, (right) director of the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee's office in Jerusalem, meets
with Moslem Judge Muhammad Hubaishi, newly ap-
pointed Kadi of Acco, to discuss Arab-Jewish rela-
tions in the northern section of Israel. The conference
was typical of the many efforts the AJC has under-
taken in recent years to help improve interfuith and
interracial relations in Israel.
function to assess the needs of
various prospective beneficiary
agencies and decide on the
amount to be alloted.
With each of the commit iocs
meeting separately, the initial
meeting of each group is given
over to the distribution of ma-
terial describing work of the
agencies requesting funds and
their current financial neecs.
The material is compiled from
facts given by the agencies them-
selves and material from the
Council of Jewish Federation
and Welfare Funds. Generally
speaking, each committee mem-
ber assumes responsibility for
the study of several specific
agencies.
At the second meeting, re.
suits of each member's study is
presented to the rest of the com-
mittee; discussion of how much
the agency should be allotted,
or in fact whether anything at
all should lie allotted, fo'lows.
The number of meetings depends
on the number of agencies ihat
t-ni'.st be considered anl the
amount of time devoted to dis-
cussion.
Through this very thorough
process, the money collected
through the months long cam-
paign is distributed. It is only
with the final allotment that
the work of the campaign is
finished.
HIGHLIGHTS OF JWF'S CAMPAIGN CLOSING MEETING
US -
M M
[ i
Dr. David Glassman (left) and Dr. Joel Schneider, members
of the Young Leaders Council of Jewish Welfare Federation
who received UJA awards for their participation in the Fed-
eration campaign, are shown here with their wives-
Maurie Meyers was chairman
of the Apartment Division of
JWF; Carolyn Davis wc3 chair-
man of the Women's Division.
Both divisions hit all-time highs
in funds received under their
leadership.
Aviva Baer, cochairman of the 1972 Wom-
en's Division, and Perle Siegel, president of
the Women's Division, were honored for
their participation in Federation's work in
1972.
Dr. Norman Atkin, campaign chairman for
1972, receives an award for his leadership
of the campaign from Jesse J. Martin, presi-
dent of Federation.


Page 2
*>JewistincrkUan
Seymour Mann Selected For
'72 Human Relations Award
Seymour Mann,
Beumn and civic
selected to receive
Hollywood hu*l
leader, has been
the 1972 Amer-
SlYMOUR muHM
Iran Jewish Committee Humnn
Relatiom Award for Brow aid
County according to an announce-
ment made hy Morton Abrwn,
I -i "ent of the Hroward County
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee.
Aivin Capp, ^ell-known attor-
ney and community leader, will |
make the presentation ta his I
friend '.'-'>" Mann at the Ciisp-f
ter'i annt.al dinner, which will be I
held at Pier 6>>, Kort I-auderdale. I
Sunday evening.
U.S. Congressman S. Herbert
Burke will lie cuect six-aker for
the evening. Attorney Morton
Abram, pretMent of the Broward
County Chapter, will be chairman
of the annual,meeting and dinner.
A ICommittee's honoree has had i
a long and diversified Dack^rounJ j
of accomplishment and has pro-
duced an extraordinary record of
public service. Honors eame early
to Seymour Mann. He attended
New York University and secured
his ISA. degree in economics there,
thi n went on to earn his M.A. de-
gree in the same field. During his
university career, he was listed
in "Who's Who in American Uni-
\> ndtiea" for two years in a row.
for he was a participant in many
activities.
A ler graduation, he went intoj
the textile tttM and became one;
Knhii-Ma'1-Marx, one of the !"ad-
in'_- textile firms. At the stuns
time his bite real In religion and
i rue affairs blossomed and
he became a member of the West
Side Institutional Synagogue in
New York City, and eventually its
vice president. __
In 1952, Mr. Mann moved to
Hollywood; joined Temple Sinai
and later became a member of
its board of directors. In 1957 he
was elected president of the con-
gregation. His wife, Mitzi, a jast
president of the Sisterhood of
Temple Sinai, is at present a mem-
ber of the Speakers Bureau of
"The Starting Place" and fills
speaking engagements in its be-
half.
Mr. Mann was instrumental in
forming the Broward County
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee and served as its first
president. He has also been presi-
dent of the Southeast Region of
United Synagogue of America,
which covers congregations in
eight states.
The winner of the 1970 Chai
Award Of Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion. When he has served on the
hoard of trustees for 18 years, he
is a vice president and member of
the executive committee, and has
also been active in its campa.gns
Mr. Mann, vice president of
Adobe Brick and Supply and nresi-
dent of the Florida Gypsum Deal-
er* Association, recently was made
chairman of the Industrial Zoning
Commission of the Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce.
The Manns' eldest son, Jeffrey.
is currently a member of the tem-
ple'-. i>oai-d of directors ami gnu
on the executive board of AJCom-
mlttee. He and his wife have one
son, Steve Noah. Seymour and
Mitzi have just returned from a
sightseeing trip to Israel and Iran
combined with a visit to their sec-
ond son, Bruce, and his wife. \my
who are serving in the P<-ace
Coips in Iran. Tommy, vheir
youngest son, is also married and
works for an accounting firm in
New York City.
Mr. Mann serves on the Cul-
tural and Art Board of the City of
Hollywood. His participation in
Civil Rights groups and aiding in
problems of the aged is 'veil
known. One of the most Import-
ant concerns for Sy is aiding the
exceptional child and lias helped
to establish camping facilities for
retarded children. He serves on
the national board of the TIK\ AH
Commission. Sy was also honored
by being selected to join the Coun-
cil for Economic Development for
the State of Israel.
Beth El Installs
Officers. Board
The installation of new officers
and board of trustees will take
place at Temple Beth El during
Sabbath services, Friday at 8:15
p.m.
Taking the oath of office will
l>e Ix-wis E. Cohn, president; Har-
vey R. Horowitz, executive vice
president; Jack J. Alexander, vice
presMmt; Robert M. Raer, vice
president; Dr. Rubin Kit in, treas-
urer; Samuel Kaltman, secretary
and Samuel Schwartzman, finan-
cial secretary. Serving one-year
terms on the board of trustees will
be Robert Baer, Dr. I/>uis Bennett.
Albert Haber. Dr. Stanley Harris,
Harvey Horowitz, Miltjn Jacobs.
Samuel Kaltman. Dr. Rubin Klein
Dr. Alvin Krasne, Dr. Daniel
Meister, James F. Miller. Samuel
Schwartzman. A. Pettie Weinberg
and Charles S. Wolfe.
Continuing in one-year terms
an- Jack J. Alexander. Mrs. H"nry
Cohn. Dr. Abraham Fischler, Jules
B. Gordon, Dr. Asher Hollander.
Myer Kirsner, David Megar, Al-
lan M. Orlove, Irvng B. Price and
Murray Howard.
New trustees include Dr. Rob-
ert Blank. S. James Cohen, Stuart
Kallm.tn. Dr. Stanley Kissel. Mrs.
Harold Firestone, Theo(\rc Lifset.
Mrs. Harrv Orringer. Robert May.
L. Paul Nestel. Dr. Philip Wein-
stein Jr.. and Dr. Marcus Zbar.
Honorary board members are
Joseph Gabel. Harold Epstein and
Mrs. Harold Zeitlin.
SPECIAL
DISCOUNT ON
Wedding Invitations
and Bar Mitzvahs
THE HOLLYWOOD
PRINT SHOP
117 S. 21st Ava.
Phona: 922-1967
WILL PROVIDE GOOD HOME
for elderly ambulatory fenrleman
(onility ok.) in need of protective I
cuitodial car*. 3 ofker gentlemen ill
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Auto and Truck Painting
GLASS REPAIR BODY WORK
Wrecks Rebuilt Fiberglass Repair
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5719 Plunkett St. (3 Modes east of U.S. 441)
Phone: 961-7005
Excellent Clothing
Alterations
Export Craftsmen
For Particular Men
& Women
HOLIDAY
CLEANERS
1813 Wiley St., Hollywood
923-9820
Friday. June 5. 1972
j
For Qualify Dry Cleaning
CALL LEWIS CLEANERS
rick-.p t Dllory Service
GREATER HOLLYWOOD
1406 N. DIXIE HWY. Donio Hollywood Miromar P.mbrok. Puiew
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fl AL ISRAEL AIRLINES
Special Florida Tour
SUMMER TOUR
ISRAEL ITALY ENGLAND
21 Days-July 18
Fully Escorted from Miami by
RABBI MILTON SCHUNSKY
Temple Adath Ye.hurun
North Miami Beach
FIRST CLASS PRIVATE BATH MANY MEALS
only
$1199.00
plus $3 tax
1602 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida
Phone: 532-5441
For the Special Tours
Call Suzanne at 945-7491
Your Israel-Europe Headquarters
BON VOYAGE TRAVEL INC.
1074-1076 Interama Blvd. North Miami Beach 33162
FRUIT SHIPPERS
WILL CLOSE JUNE 30th. WE WISH TO THANK
ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS FOR A
SUCCESSFUL SEASON. WE HOPE YOU ALL
HAVE A HEALTHY SUMMER AND WE WILL
SEE YOU ALL IN OCTOBER.
ANGIE ami AL KAUFMAN
J. S. A. WESTER, M.D., F. A. C S.
announces the association of
NORMAN L TALPINS, M.D.
Diplomate of the American Board of Surgery
in the practice of
GENERAL and VASCULAR SURGERY
at
5100 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021
Hours By Appointment
Telephone: 989-7172


Friday, June 9. 1972
+Jeisti Fkridimr

Mapping plans for the El Shalom teen tour are Sam Rosen-
cranz of Bon Voyage and Daphna Tours, (left) Dr. Samuel
Jaffe of Temple Beth El, Hollywood and Dr. Morton Malavsky
of Temple Beth Shalom, Hollywood. The group departs for
Israel and London via El Al and Eastern Airlines June 21.
^El Shalom7 Teen Tour
Leaving Miami June 21
Dr. Morton Malavsky, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Shalom.
Dr. Samuel Jaffe, spiritual leader
of Temple Beth El and Sam Ros-
encranz, travel consultant of Bon
Voyage and Daphna Tours have
completed the 'El Shalom' teen-
age tour of Israel for Hollywood
youngsters this summen. More
than 35 teen-agers have already
joined the group which plans a
three-week stay in Israel and a
week's visit in London.
-,v Overseeing the group will be
Shirley Goldman, youth coordina-
tor of Temple Beth Shalom; Ar-
\in Jaffe, Debbie Medanic and
Aaron Solomon will serve as ad-
visors. The group will leave Miami
Wednesday, June 21, and return
July 18.
During their three weeks in Is-
'* rael, the youngsters will stay in
modern guest houses which are
operated by kibbutzim near ma-
jor cities. From these headquar-
ters they will visit every major
university in Israel, spend time at
an archaeological dig, swim in the
Dead Sea, meet outstanding per-
sonalities, visit with mayors of
cities and other dignitaries.
Dr. Malavsky has extended a
special invitation to th group to
visit the Chassidic settlement
known as Kfar Chabad. Both Dr
Rent-A-Car
. LOW AS
$5 A DAY
Malavsky and Dr. Jaffe will spend
time with the group at highlights
throughout Israel. Arvin Jaffe wil!
be in charge of religious services.
The last week of the tour will be
spent visiting points of interest in
London.
This teen tour was made possible
by a subsidy provided through the
Israel Pilgrimage Fund of Beth
El and the Beth Shalom Sister-
hood, Men's Club, and the Jack
and Rachel Shapiro Endowment
Fund. Jewish Welfare Federation
also assisted in this endeavor.
Deborah Chapter Installs
Mrs. Reiser Guest Speaker
When the Royal Palm Chapter
of Deborah held its installation
and donor luncheon last week, Mrs.
B. Reiser, regional director of Deb-
orah, was guest speaker.
Dr. Robert Limber installed the
new officers, including Mrs. Irene
Sexton, president; Mrs. Myrtle
Devine and Mrs. Kay Sena, vice-
presidents; Mrs. Virginia Biirsels.
treasurer; Mrs. Cathy Cavacine.
secretary; Mrs. Rase Obenauf.
chaplain; Mrs. Carole Baciagalupi.
donor chairman; Mrs. Anna
Schwarz, Golden Book and Tree of
Life chairman, Mrs. Rose Kopelor,
telephone chairman, and Mrs. Jo-
sephine Steimet, coupon chairman.
Mrs. Janet Udell, Mrs. Hilda Cut-
ler, Mrs. Rose Dematti, Mrs. An-
nette Limber were installed as
board members.
Chapter Presents Plants
During its last meeting of the
current season, the Hallandale
Chapter, American Israeli Light-
house of Florida, presented a
Mother's Day program. As part of
the proceedings, a plant was pre-
sented to each member present.
The group's next meeting will be
held in September.
September Installation Set
The Sisterhood of Temple Solel
will install its officers at a spe-
cial meeting in Septi mbcr. The
slate includes Mrs. Mel Spencer,
president; Mrs. Stanley Seligman
Mrs. Alan Fiske, Mrs. Elliot Klei-
man and Mrs. Joel Mish, vice ares-
idents; Mrs. Myles Sher, recording
secretary; Mrs. Jerald Rubin, cor-
responding secretary; Mrs. Melvin
Yarish, treasurer, and Mrs. Jack
Packar, financial secretary.
OPENING SPECIAL
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REFINISH'NG-STRIPPING-ANTIQUING
Nolhing too small-but a large quality of workmanship
Call for any information
920-7122
Reasonable Professional
430 S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood
Problems with your Sliding Door?
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Pnone 923-8222
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Page 4
Jmisi> n&rMiati
Fridery Jaw 9, 1972
& Jewish Floridia in
4 OFRCE and PLANT--120 KB. 6th 5treet TELtpnoNE 373-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 920-6392
P.O. Box 2973, Miami. Florida 33101
Frfd K. SmociIp.t Selma M. Thompson
Editor and Publisher AssisUnt to Publisher
MARION KEVINS, News Coordinator a
The Jewish Fiondiip Doei Not Guarantee Tha Kaahntltl
Of Tha Merchandise Advertised In Ita Columna.
PiilWulird bVWee-sJv bv the Jewish Floriduin
Second-Claw PoMaRC Paid at Miami, Fla.
Jivish Welfare Federation op Greater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Willcns, Chairman; Rosa Berkcrman, Ben
Salter, Marion Nevin, Dr. Norman Alkin,
Tha Jewish Floridian haa absorbed tha Jewiih Unity and tha Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jevriah Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arta Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide Newa Service, National Editorial Association. American Aaaociation
f English-Jewish Newspspers, and the Florida Preaa Aaaociation.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year (2.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 2
Friday, June 9, 1972
Number 16
27 SIVAN 5732
It's Time They Faced Reality
If the summit meetings in recent months accomplished
nothing else they showed a troubled world that it is pos-
sible for powerful nations, believed to be implacable en-
emies, to engage in sincere negotiations despite their seri-
ous differences. They also proved that these necrotia'ions
are meaningful only when they are direct, face-to-faco
meetings.
The examples of Moscow and Peking is one 'hat
should not be ignored by Egypt as it continues to play out
its dream of eventual conquest of Israel. It is time the
Arab nations faced up to the painful reality as have the
great nations of accepting the real world and serious
negotiations for peace in the Middle East.
IRC Shows Rank Discrimination
The altitude of the International Red Cross toward
Israel's action in aborting the recent hijacking on its soil
comes as no surprise to those who are aware of the history
of Magon David Adorn and IRC
It should be known that Israel is not included in tho
115 countries affiliated with the IRC because it refuse? to
accept the IRC's condition that it change the name of the
Magen David Adorn to Red Cross. There is sound basis for
that refusal since 15 similar organizations in Moslem coun-
tries are permitted to use the name "Red Crescent" instead.
To insist that Israel abide by a rule that is breached in
other countries is rank discrimination, as is the position of
the LRC on this latest question of air piracy in which its
role was a peculiar one, to say the least.
A Good Point
The Hebrew day school i cvement makes a good
point, albeit a debatable one. That Jewish critics of public
financial aid for parochial schools have an obligation to
work for increased support from Jewish communal funds.
Some of the critics, of course, are opposed to parochial
education whether it is supported privately or publicly in
the belief that such schools create religious and racial
divisiveness.
Nevertheless, as was stated at the annual convention
of Jewish day school leaders, presenting guideline? for Fed-
eration support, as has been done in Greater Miami and
elsewhere, it is empty of real meaning without appropriating
funds to implement the guidelines.
Organizations Oppose Proposals
The major Jewish organisations, despite Jewish voting
patterns throughout the country, continue to maintain a
stand in opposition to anti-busing proposals, whether
through amendment of the Constitution or Congressional
legislation.
Most recently, nine of the religious and secular orga-
nizations presented the views of the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory Council in testimony before a
Congressional committee. As NCRAC sees it, the issue is
the twin objectives of integration and quality education
which are indivisible. Without busing to the extent re-
quired, those goals cannot be attained, in the view of
NCRAC.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON Even KMN
than Peking, the summit meet-
ing in Moscow was preplanned
In minute detail before the
Pivsident left Washington. Thus
one can already predict Ua>
stantially more Impressive re-
sults than most people expect.
Take the endlessly haggled-
over SALT agreement, to be-
ftn with. The members of the
American negotiating team
headed by Gerald Smith have
long been quite frankly con-
vinced that there was no hope
of any agreed limitation on nu-
clear submarines of tho type of
our Polaris-Poseidons and the
Soviets' Yankee class. The So-
viets would have none of it, or
so it appeared.
VET WHEN Dr. Henry Kis-
singer made his secret visit to
Moscow, hope for a nuclear sub
limitation agreement rather
abruptly dawned in the long
talks between Kissinger and
First Party Secretary Leonid
Brezhnev. It is not a sure thing,
as yet, but this kind of addition
to the SALT agreement is a
good bet.
Again, it appears all but cer-
tain that the President And
Brezhnev will announce an
agreed, mutual standstill on fur-
ther deployment of interconti-
nental ballistic missiles. Tnis
will remove the American con-
cern about continuing increases
in the formidable Soviet SS-9
system. As to antibatUstic mis-
siles, it again appears all but
certain that there will be agree-
ment on one ABM group in each
country.
IN KARUKB times, to be
sure, any such SALT agreement
might have been expected to
evoke a roar of outrage in this
country. In numbers of inter-
continental missiles, the expected
deal will leave the Soviets with
an approximate superiority of
1,500 to 1.100. Since the Soviets
are to complete their Yankee-
class submarines already under
construction, the expected deal
will even leave them with a
superiority here of 42 to 41.
But given the present peculiar
temper of America, the quite
unexpected comprehensiveness of
the SALT agreement will get
all the attention. If something
does not go wrong on SALT at
the last minute, in fact, even
the President's worst enemies
will have to applaud his im-
portant accomplishment, lar
greater than they had hoped.
TIIE SAME rules are even
more likely to hold true in the
area of trade. After returning
from his talks with Brezhnev,
Dr. Kissinger is known to have
reported to the President his
own perfect astonishment in this
connection. Kissinger had gone
to Moscow thinking that the
Soviets did not attach vast im-
portance to an ambitious trade
agreement. He came home con-
vinced that such an agreement
was one of their highest priori-
ties.
In Moscow, to be sure, even the
President and Brezhnev and
Alexei Kosygin, all working to-
gether, can hardly be expected
to work out details of the kind
of major deal that Moscow now
wants. The problems of credits,
trade terms and the like are
infinitely complex. Because of
the Soviet crop failure, there
will surely be a big, immediate
grain deal.
THERE WILL also be, one
may be pretty sure, an expres-
sion of agreement in principle
to expand U.S.-U.S.S.R. trade
most Importantly, and in a more
general way. But details likely to be left to a joint U.S.-
U.S.S.R commission on trade
that will begin sitting this sum-
mer.
Add some other agreements to
make day-to-day headlines on
such matters as space, cultural
exchanges and so on and on. The
President said about the Mos-
cow summit, in advance, that
this trip would be "primarily di-
rected toward subrtance" rather
than "cosmetics." If all goes as
preulanned. hr will come home
Co-tinted >tn Paaa
AM
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK. N.Y. -While Presk'ent Nixon is launched on
his seven days in Russia that may save his world, the three
major Democratic candidates will be moving heaven and earth
to save theirs. Wallace will probably do a bedside campaign
through taped talks. Humphrey and McGovern will be wrestling
in a strange debate.
Nothing has turned out as anyone predicted. The contest is
between three impossible candidates one who we all thought
was an Impossible man of the radical right, one who was an
impossible man of the radical left, and a man of the center who
was an impossible man of the past. So much for the arts of pre-
diction.and so much for politics as a predictable art.
George Wallace will doubtless be a presence at the conven-
tion whether or not he is there in person. With a bloc of dele-
gates bargaining chips the question is what he will trade them
for. Any Democratic Party which would give him the presidential
nomination would be split beyond recovery. But given his showing
in the primaries, he might drive a hard trade and hold out for
the vice presidential spot.
On the paralysis question, even if tho dark prognosis against
recovery should prove true, he would have the Franklin Roose-
velt Case as precedent. After he was stricken, F.D P. served with
vigor as governor of New York, before he ran for president.
Where Wallace differs from the Roosevelt case is that he hcei
the future with a double count against him his political ex-
tremism and his physical condition.
THE III-MPHRKV-MKiOl ERN twosome is as puzzling to
explain as the success of the solitary Wallace. McGovern has air-
vived through shrewd tactics and an image of forthrightness.
Humphrey has survived through vitality and an image of always
being there Humphrey because people remember him, Mc-
Govern because they feel they have discovered him.
It is an image campaign. Attractive, articulate, contained
McGovern's image has stood up well under the pitiless spotlight
winning a few primaries, emerging as a psychological winner In
the others by doing better than the form sheets called for.
Mostly he has gained strength from the vacuum of enthusiasm
Tor other acceptable Democrats and I don't count Wallace
here. McGovern has had the kind of support the voting and
talented which only the stars Roosevelt. Stevenson both
Kennedys. Gene McCarthy have had in the past.
His danger is that his followers see him as a gleaming St
George about to slay a monstrous dragon. The fact is that hi-
ts no St. George but a resourceful politician who has taken fer-
vent positions but will not be averse to tailoring them to gel a
broader appeal base.
1 knew about Hubert Humphrey's personal energy and
bounce, but had assumed that the Democrats would summarily
turn down a replaying of the 1963 Nixon-Humphrey performance.
We have learned that it ain't necessarily so. His buoyancy as
candidate and as man, has been one of the surprises of 1972.
Once known as the great civil-rights and welfare liberal, Hum-
phrey has been through all the wars political, military, ideo-
logicaland emerged battered and scarred, but still a warm.
scrappy, versatile survivor.
THERE ARE A FISTFUL of adjectives, but there is a fist-
ful of Humphrey to apply them to. If there were a Pulitzer
Prize for political resilience he would walk away with it, doing
handsprings as he carried it off. Humphrey fits the nonideologi-
cal mood of the present better than he did the frenzied confron-
tation mood of 1968.
For all his shifting stands on various Issues, Humphrey has
so long been part of the political landscape that he must rank
as a landmark. The intellectuals dislike him for trimming his
views, for not speaking out against the war as vice president,
for not cutting loose from L.BJ. in 1068. But at a time when
ordinary people feel they are victims of future shock, it would
be unwary to write off the chance that they will vote tor a
landmark.
One can see why Humphrey wanted the debate with Mc-
Govern. He was behind m the delegate count, fearful of Cali-
fornia and New York, in danger of slipping out of the primaries
and out of history. He wanted a chance to force the front-rnnner
into damaging positions, and took the risk of being damaged in
the process. But if so, why did McGovern accept? Because the
debates may help him do what he needs most to do broaden
his base, come across to the Democratic South and also to the
blacks, Jews and other city ethnic groups; not as a radical but
as a "dynamic center" Democrat. McGovern's problem now is
lea that of winning delegates than that of winning the party
pros, who still mistrust him. Hence his calculate risk.
They will both bear watching, to see which would make a
better president. And Wallace, who might play almost any role,
will be watching, too.
"


Friday, June 9, 1972
+JewistirhrkMan
Sum And Anna Blum Murk 50th Wedding Anniversary
*uge !
The 50th wedding anniversary or Sam and
Anna Blum of Miami Beach, who spent winter
vacations on the beach for many years ami
moved here permanently from Chicago in
iv>06, will be celebrated on June 18.
The gold.n wedding anniversary will be
marked by a cocktail party and buffet at the
Hollywood home of their son, Michael, and his
wife, Ceil. Following the event, Mike and Ceil
will accompany the elder Blums on a wvek-
long Caribbean cruise.
The Moms1 two (laughters Mrs. Gen
White of Chicago, and Mrs. Harriet Werner
>f Skokie, III. will come to Florida for the
occasion. Eight of the couple's 10 grandchil-
Iren will also be on hand for the affair: Joan
>nd Karen Werner, Andrea White, Air Corps-
nan Dana White, and Matt, Ronda, Lisa, and
^"heryl Blum.
Other relative* of the Blums wlio will be
dt tending from Chicago will include Mr. and
Mrs. Joe Eckerling, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Kurtzman.
3 Florida Women Receive Braille Association Awards
Thxy>e Florida women have been
honored for their services to visu-
ally handicapped people. Awards
vvere presented by National Rrailk
Association president France! So-
bel at the Association's annua
mretimr in Saddle Broik. N.J.
Certificates for 10 years of vol-
unteer service were presented to
Mrs. Maude Sheeran of Largo andf
Mis. Nat Schlossberg of Daytona
Beach, and a certificate for 3 .wars
service was awareed to Mrs. Don-
ald Fried o' West Palm Beach.
MR. and MRS. SAM BLUM
Nowlywecl Mark Safras Tour Israel On Honeymoon
Temple Sinai of Hollywood, was
the setting for the ceremony unit-
ing the former Clara Delovmi and
MRS. MAM SAFRA
Mark J. Safra Sunday, June 4.
Rabbi David Shapiro officiated at
the 5 p.m. ceremony, which was
followed by a dinner in honor of
the newlyweds.
On their return from a honey-
moon trip to Israel, the couple
will live in North Miami Beach.
For the wedding, the bride wore
a long, white lace gown and car-
ried white carnations. Attending
the couple were Mrs. Sima Dob-
kin, matron of honor, and Richard
Turbin, best man.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eman-
uel Goldblatt of 4C01 S. Ocean Dr..
.Hollywood, the new Mrs. Safrn
spent a year at Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem. She is a grad-
uate of Miami-Dade Junior Col-
lege and will attend Barry College
in January. She teaches at Hillel
Community Day School and Tem-
ple Sinai Sunday School.
The bridegroom is the son of
Dr. and Mrs. Jack Safra of 880 NE
155th Ter. He is a graduate of the
Hebrew Academy and is now a
senior at the University of Miami
Medical School where he was ac-
cepted after three years at Emory'
University in Atlanta. He is a
member of Phi Beta Kappa and
A.O.A.. honorary societies.
A surprising number
of professional investors
live at
Point
Maybe they know something
you don't know.
The successful investor has learned what to look
for: location, living space, luxury, quality construc-
tion and potential resale value.
That's Point II. Located directly on the ocean
at the Port Everglades Inlet. As for spacious luxury -
from oceanview balconies to all-electric kitchens and
laundries to custom fixtures and costly materials it's
hard to find a better investment in elegance. And the
construction is so sound (and sound-conditioned) that
you'll never know you have neighbors unless you in-
vite them over. Resale value? Our prices have risen an
average 15% per year. Our sales have risen, too. A lot
of successful people have seen the point.
Point II. A wise investment in the good life.
It's as far as you can go.
Morfeli open daily at 2200 South Ocean Lane. Fort Laudardala
Hii.' East to the and of the 17th Street Coutowtv. turn neht and 90 at fa' at you can go.
Bu'll uoil DevHoiied liy Gerw*,it BiH'i \Gftl uta/l Amntrin Soc F t jpiv
!
AIR AMERICAN
2807 S. STATE ROAD 7
HALLANDALE BCH. BLVD. .(441)
OHM 7 DAYS (M.M. II ML)
General Auto---------l*3?2Uc.
FREE Lube with I
Oil Fi Iter Change j
Se habla Espanol
10014
Caribbean cruise sensation
to be continued.
Florida's grand and glorious Nieuw Amsterdam
now cruises into summer and bevond
Rat.1 par person, bated on double occupancy mki
She's elaborate, engaging, and is she subject to aveiiebutv
, A_ z",,ir- ,.,'.,_ Hoirai.O America t_rul!
aver popular. So popular we ve ex-
tended our Florida Nieuw Amsterdam
10 day cruises through June. July and
all the rest of the year. There's little
wonder people have taken to the Nieuw
Amsterdam. She's a majestic ship.
37,000 tons, and every bit as palatial
as cruiseships ware meant to be. She
has balconies, terraces, the grandest
of grand ballrooms. She has the grand-
est service too, and no tips are required.
She is quite the majesty of Florida
cruiseships and now. lonawill she reign.
10-DAY CRUISES TO 6 CARIBBEAN
AND SOUTH AMERICAN PORTS
From Port Everglades to Aruba,
La Guaira (for Caracas).
Isla de Maraarita Martinioue St Thomas.
May 15, May 26, June 5, June 16: From
$265 to $785. June 26, July 7, July 17,
July 28, Aug. 7, Aug. 18: From $285 to
$895. Oct. 6, Oct. 16, Oct. 27, Nov. 6,
Nov. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 8: From $280 to $840.
We're Dutch and we want everything to be perfect.

Hoiwnd America cruises
Pier 40. N. Riv.r. N. Y., N. V.
TeJs (212) 620-5101
Gentlemen: Pleas* rush me free O Complete details
on Nieuw Amsterdam West Indies Cruises. Also.
Stotendarn Q 'Summer North Cape Cruises O Fell
Mediterranean Cruises.-
Name ,....................................
Address ....................................
City................
Travel Agent .......................
AH ships of Netherlards registry.
Zip
Holland
America
Cruises
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Page 6
****/$#> fhrMlan
Friday, June 9, 1972
Ronald S. Treshan Appointed
JWF Administrative Associate
Ronald S. Treshan, who has been
appointed administrative associ-
ate by Greater Hollywood's Tow-
he obtained his B.S. and M.A. de-
grees in education.
From September 1970 until Aug-
ust 1971, Mr. Treshan and his fam-
ily lived in Israel. He attended the
Intensive Language Training Cen-
ter at Mercaz Klitah. Carmel. and
later taught English there.
In 1963 he was the recipient of
a Rockefeller Foundation Fellow-
shio at Florida State University.
In his new post, Mr. Treshan
will work with the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council in Holly-
wood, and also devote time to
youth groups. His appointment is
effective July 3.
KOHALD S. TRESHAN
ish Welfare Federation, comes to
Hollywood from a position as ad-
ministrative assistant at the
Greater Miami Federation.
Mr. Theshan received most of
his education in South Florida.
He is a graduate of Miami Beach
High School and Florida Atlantic
University in Boca Raton, where
Sisterhood's Celebration
Marks Zimmer's Anniversary
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom held a special celebration
recently marking the 50th wed-
ding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Zimmer, both of whom are
active morkers for the temple.
Mrs. Zimmer is associated with the
Thrift Shop of the temple and its
Senior Friendship Club.
Musical entertainment for the
!>arty was provided by Larry
Stang, guitarist and singer, song-
stress Esther Agen and Dorothy
Kowitt, accompanist. Mrs. Jack
Shapiro, wife of the president of
the temple, was chairman of the
celebration; more than 250 rela-
tives and friends attended the af-
fair.
Hadassah Seeks Aid
For Soviet Scientist
By Special Report
NEW YORK The national of-
fice of Hadassah has appealed to
the director general of the World
Health Organization and to the
Soviet Union's minister of health
in behalf of a Russian woman phar-
macologist and her daughter.
Mrs. Michael Eppleman, head of
the Leningrad Hospital at Lenin-
grad, and Julia, 9, have been
separated from Mr. Eppleman, a
university mathematics lecturer.
He fled to Israel from an (ica-
demic conference in Sweden.
Mrs. Eppleman has been allowed
to keep her job, but has been pres-
sured by Soviet authorities to di-
vorce her husband. Instead, she
has applied six times to the pass-
port office for exit visas for her-
self and her daughter.
Her husband, in the United
States under the auspices of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, asked Hadassah for help.
Mrs. Faye L. Schenk, national
president, intervened and gained
assistance form the Albert Einstein
College of Medicine and the Inter-
national Union of Pharmacology.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
27 SIVAN 7:51
WWWWWWWW^^^**A**AAA^***AA>
Le Cafe de Paris
OPEN Alt YUK
Denis Is Here To S*rv* You~
400 E. Dania Beach Blvd.
24 HR. SERVICE
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2M0 SARFIELD ST.
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* SPECIAL FRAME SALE -:-
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DOCTORS ON CALL 24 HOURS A DAY
MARTIN STEYER
Administrator
SIDNEY M. LEE
Asst. Administrator
Phone 927-0508
440 Phippen Road Dania, FU. 33004
THE MALL THEATRES I & II
At the New Diplomat Mall E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale 920-5656
Selective Film Presentations
JOHN Z's ITALIAN CUISINE
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Maxt to PUIUX Cornar of 441 IN.W.199th Si.-624-9989


Friday. June 9, 1972
+Jenist) fh>rk1knr
Paqe 7
WW^^M^V.>ty
*^"W^A^WWMWy^
scene around
by MariOn Nevjns
: sr-^x-iis Sir r*wh h-v"
Lrd!ng !*P t0 the SUmmer season- al1 Hollywood organiza-
tions sent out notices listing their new slates ofTffieerTlrS
lanon meefngs have been the order of the day. ETSrtSS
of these are over, we take time to put our own desk in order
r JST T SPCnt reVising liS,S and we find tht our .single-
page-list of organ,zations from just a few years back has grown
We now have an 11-page list of organizations from whom we
* r\, WC tyP UP thC "a,nes of Presidents and
names of publicity people with whom we will be coming in eon-
tact we look forward to meeting new people and look back with
rondness to those who have helped in our work. We hope that we
won t lose contact with all those people we have known these
last few years.
Taking stock, we also think of many meetings, dinners and
luncheons which we have attended this year. Strangely enough
with all this talk of "women's lib," the deepest impressions were
made on us by female speakers. Two women and two meetings
stand out in our memory.
One speaker was an appealing young Israeli girl. Rina
Kishon. who told a tale of a young Rumanian girl brougnt to
Israel with help of American money. The other was Gerda K!ein.
a survivor of the Nazi concentration camps, who told of life dur-
ing that era. Thinking back, I would say that both of them had
quiet unemotional ways of speaking neither was an orator by
usual standards. But the stories they had to tell shall never be
forgotten by most people who were fortunate enough to hear
them.
And so the summer is just around the corner and meetings
will be few and far between. People will even hold off [rties un-
till the fail season comes around. Calendars will be blank.
Next step will come the EXODUS Hollywood version.
Our line of communication will be picture postcards from places
we'll never get to not this summer, anyway. Everybody
will be going somewhere and like they say, "Everybody's got to
be someplace" ... so I'll be here. Enjoying the peace and quiet,
and waiting for fall and then winter and the return of our friends
everywhere.
One of the nicer events closing the Hollywood season was
the campaign closing event of Jewish Welfare Federation. It
was nice because this campaign topped $1 million the first
time ever. It was nice because the whole group was nice to work
with.
The crowd was most satisfying with all divisions repre-
sented. On the dais were Jesse Martin, Norm Atkin. Herb Katz,
Joel Rottman, Maurie Meyers, Bobby Baer, Aviva Baer. Carolyn
Davis, Murray Smithline and Bob Kerbel. It was a festive eve-
ning, for awards were given out to leaders and workers.
to BITS AND PIECES: The Harry Zlmmers celebrated 50
years of marriage at a gay party at Temple Beth Shalom. Their
three eon9, Norman, Ramon and Marvin, will give them another
party when they visit them in Connecticut this summer. .
The American Israeli Lighthouse, which now has two chapters
in this area, held their first donor luncheon at the Beau Rivage
not long ago. This joint venture of the two groups was a nuge
success. The Hallandale group gave out plants to its members
at their last meeting of the season. That was certainly a novel
idea and one that the women can enjoy all summer. Ruth
Shapiro of the Royal Palm Chapter of Deborah back in action
again after heart surgery. __________^__
NOW IN HOLLYWOOD
RKG1STER NOW FOR KALI. CLASSES
NO NONSENSE Education
for Your Child
begins" with American Heritage's cur-
riculum concept. For average ami above
uveriigc children, grata I to 8. Bm
phaMN il placed <>n fundamental learn-
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Reading, vpellinf. arithmetic. English
an.l hhtor) are all laufkl a-, separate
MihR'flv American Heritage Schools in-
still leat ning habits that remain for life.
I his could oe the most important de-
cision you evei make lor your child*
future happiness and development
Telephone 961-3888
American Heritage Private School
or Hollywood. Florida
Fashion Show-Installation
Brunch Held By ORT Chapter
The Hollywood Hills Chapter of
Women's American ORT held its
annual installation brunch and
fashion show at Hillcrest Country
Club this week under the chair-
manship of Mrs. Richard Goliin.
Mrs. Edward Light, of the Brow-
ard Region, installing officer, ad-
ministered the oath of office to
Mrs. Norton Sinert, president; Mrs.
Lester Henry, membership vice
president; Mrs. Jerome Topping,
honor roll vice president; Mrs
Hana Rose, education vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Barbara Adelman, spe-
cial projects vice president; Mrs.
Julian Jacobson, recording secre-
tary; Mrs. Morris Seven, corre-
sponding secretary; Mrs. Eugene
White, financial secretary; Mrs.
Phillip Unger. treasurer, and Mrs.
David Sodowsky, parliamentarian.
Pepper Demands
Yiddish Program
Rep. Claude PpnTier and 15 other
members of the House of Repre-
sentatives have renewed a demand
that the Voice o' America initiate
a broadcast in Yiddish to Russia
The Florida Democrat and
others in the hinnrtLsan group saiH
they "will consider a move to
eliminate funds for all V.O.A.
broadcasts to the U.S.S.R. if thr
Yiddish program is not instituted."
Congressman Pepper said that
the spirit of the oppressed Jews
in Russia will be aided by an ac-
knowledgement from the United
States of this national language no
longer taught in the U.S.S.R.
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Taqe 8
+Jewist> fhrkttain
Friday, June 9. 1972
PERSONALITY PROFJtf
Arthur A. Frimet
'Israel, I fool, is in reality the
f mbol of the unification of Tew-
i miss,'' says Arthur A. Frimi"
ARTHUR A. fRIMlT
' 'II of in can identify svith it ant*
we are more cogntaant of at
; ultage."
Mr. Primefa fwltne on thh stih-
- t i< why he i< takinc a m*Vni
| it in tlio various facets of the
i irk of Jewish Welfare Fe/li ra-
1 ^i hem in Hollywood In addition
1 many other Involvement* ami
teresta,
a residenl of Hollywood tnce|
ning lo this ana from his hom i
ii. of N v York in 1!>5.'(, h,- re-
Ived hi- education al Coopei |
\ oion in Now York ami the Unfc
vi-iiy 1.1 Oklahoma, where he
received his B.A. degree. A prac-
t 'ins .i chitect, ho is president <>
ire Broward chapter of tho Amer
iran Institute of Architects, and I
irvmber of many local and na-
i iiul architectural associations.
As a long time resident arvl an
archieCt trained in the field of
city planning, Mr. Frimet is quite
concerned about the tremendous
(Urge of growth in Hollywood;, he
teals Rtrongly that an ovor-ali
plan Is needed. Although he con-
rdera dentlty control desirable, ho
ai'miis that it must be earelullv
planned and worked out so as to
prevent any upset in the economic
balance ol the community.
Mr. Frimet has bean a mem-
ber of the Hollywood Planning and
Zoning Board, a member of the
Broward County Ana Planning
Board and also a vice president for
Community Betterment of the
Hollywood Chamber of Commerce.
He is currently serving as ad-
visory chairman for the Area Plan-
ning Board's I-nnd Use and Uni-
form Zoning Committee. His views
on the subject of density have nol
always mot with complete ap-
proval, but his Integrity and strong
feelings on the subject have rom-
poled him to be outspoken in his
opinions.
rn tho personal side of his life,
be and his wife. Lois, are mem-
bers of Temple Beth El and Ar-
thur has been a member of tho
Men's Club. A former nember of
Vo'ine Leaden Council of Jewish
Welfare Federation, he is now
one of a group which servaa it In
an advisory capacity.
'I his year Mr. Frimet is serving]
on a newly formed Budget Com- ]
mittee for Federation whose pur-!
pose is to create a working bud-1
sat for th(' operation of the locai |
Federation office. In addition Mr.
Frimet Ls working on the Alloca-
lions Committee which ,-iecid -. on
the disbursement of campaign
funds. All his affiliations were
taken on, ha says because of his
stronu beliefs in the State of
Israel and liecausc he feels that
ita survival is necessary for the
presrvation of our Jewish faifh.
Dr. Weinstein
Attends Young
Leaders Retreat
Dr. Philip Weinstein Jr.. treas-
urer of Greater Hollywoo "s Jew-
ish Welfare Federation and a nom
ber of United Jewish Appeal's
Young Leadership Cabinet WB*
among the young men attending
the Leadership Cabinets annual
Retreat last weekend at Harrison
House. Glen Cove. NY.
According to Donald Benjamin.
chairman of the Young Leadership
Cabinet, the purpose of the gath-
ering was to provide an in-depth
view of some of the problems fac
Ing American Jewry "o'iv and
provide an opportunity for par-
ticipants to shari' views and expert
one- pointing up ways in which
young leaders can plav a more
effective role in local Jewish af-
fairs.
More than 100 young leaders
from across the nation partici-
pated in the retreat's seminars.
workshops and discussion groups.
Speakers included Israel's ambas-
sador to the United States. Yitzak
Rabin: Rabbi Balfour Brickner.
director of Inter-Faith Activities,
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations; Dr. Leon Jick, direc-
tor of the Institute for Jewish
Life: Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman
executive vice president of the
VJA. and I. L. Kenen. executive
director of the Ameri.'an-Israeli
Public Affairs Commit'ee.
Dr. Gerson Cohen Assumes
Total Seminary Leadership
r
By Special lb-port
Dr. Geeaoa D. Cohen, historian
t< 1 scholar, has been elected chan-
< ilor and proicVut of the facul-
ties of The Jewish TTvjolouical
S' minarv of America. On July 1
When Dr, Louis Finkelstoin be-
CXOTfja chancellor emeritus. Dr
Col. -n \\.'\ succeed him as chief
Btecutive officer of the Seminary.
Dr. Bernard Mandeihaum ha-
imitted bis resignation as p--esi.
dent, to take effect Juno 30, 1973,
after he returns from a year*!
*. bbatical. He said his reasons fo'-
resigning were "both administra-
tive and personal."
>r. Cohan Is the fifth person to
h' Id the position of chief extcutivo
leer of the Seminary, succeed-
Sabato Morals (1885-1807,
S lomon Schechter (1902-1915)
( niS Adler I191.V1940I an I Louis
r nkeistein 11940-19511. Dr. Fink-
-lein's title was changed to chan-
< .lor in 1951, and in 1966, Dr. I
Ifandelbaum became president
Mel en cutive offkk r.
Dr. Cohan, a noted historian, is
j. -ob ii. Schtfl professor of his-1
1 ry at t! Seminary, a post wMch
I will retain. He was ordained bv i
Seminary In 194H. end holds
bacbeiot and masters degrees
! Hebrew literature. Dr. Coher
also received a bachelor's dcirroe
with -special honors from City Col-
lege of New York, where he was
elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He
earned a doctorate in Semitic lan-
guages from Columbia University.

dk
1 9 i
j ^ i
1 +m 9i
t^jj^M t
Col. Yerocham Amitaj, 45, a
veteran Israeli Air Force com-
mander, has been appointed
director of the Israel Aliyah
Center of the World Zionist Or-
ganization, which has 14 of-
fices in the United Slates and
Canada. Col. Amitai succeeds
Col. Nahum Golan in the post.
^Matter of JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued f ram Pas* 4
fully justified in claiming reilly
major substance in tho results.
ONE MIST add ihat the
ironies of all this are consider-
able. The man who will be
bringing home the bacon fr>m
Moscow is leagues away from
the kind of Democratic po;itie-
ian who endlessly talks about
"relaxation of tensions."
On present prospects, the
President will also be making
so many agreements of sub-
stance against the backdrop of
his own extremely touch ac-
tions to contain the North Viet-
namese offensive.
IF ASKED for his opinion,
every single liberal Demo? rat
woul.l have predicted that min-
ing Haiphong Harbor would Inve
killed any chance of a summit.
Most of them would have pre-
dicted dire Soviet military re-
actions. In these predictions,
the academics and literal in-
tellectuals would have l>oen even
more extreme than the Demo-
cratic politicians.
But the President did not
nsk for views about his Hai-
phong decision. He did what ho
thought necessary. The sum-
mit plans wont forward, as be-
fore. A great many self- import-
ant |>eople ought to feel pretty
foolish, in sum.
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Friday. June 9. 1972
*JfwtsiifhrkMan
Paga 9
(A/hat 9 C_rccAS/i<
Bv RUTH siltKIS
Ice cream is one of the most popular foods. It Ls liked toy
jounK and old, and is welcomed any time of the year. There are
many ways to use the basic ice cream serving. Store-bought
lo cream can lie turned into ice cream cakes, cassatas, banana
splits, floats, malted drinks, you name it.
Hero you will find a recipe for a 'sundae." This one is topped
with hot fudge which you will be able to prepare yourself. It
may interest you to know that this delicious dish got its name
from "Sunday" -- the only day in the week on which Puritan
American pioneers allowed themselves to indulge. You too can
live a little, and not "only on Sundays."
HOT FIIXiE SUNDAE
For each person:
[Two balls of ice cream in different flavors
j Hot fudge sauce
[Whipped cream
[Chopped walnuts
|Cherry
Vafer
Put the two ice cream balls on ;. nice dessert plate, and pour
ome hot fudge on them. Put two tablespoons of whipped cream
on top. Sprinkle with chopi>ed walnuts. Top with a red cherry
ind a wafer. Serve immediately..
Mot fudge wiuee (4-6 portions)
[Two tablespoons butter
ounces unsweetened chocolate
)nc-ha!f cup sugar
irw-quartcrs cup light cream
fnc- teaspoon vanilla extract
Melt the butter and the unsweetened chocolate in a small
pan, on medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden
n. Add the cream and sugar; continue stirring and cook for
ther four or five minutes. The sauce should become very
and velvety. Add the vanilla extract and stir. Oool the
Efnce.a little, but serve it warm the warm sauce prevents a
Mold shock" in your mouth from very cold ice cream.
Keep left-over sauce In the refrigerator. Before using again,
HBnrm it over, .hot watr and not directly on the stove.
, if. it it
In the early 60s, when I was a novice hpusewife, right out
'Jt the university, I met Julia Child via the magic of television.
Jrr -French Chef shows on WGBH-TV Ch.,2 Boston, and her
Lacipes that api>eared in the Boston Globe, sparked my interest
H^cooking as a creative occupation. I still have clippings of
riiies from the Globe, and her book. "Mastering the Art of
ench Cooking," was my choice for a birthday present. I was,
I still am, fascinated by the wonderful cooking methods that
cit the best of even very basic ingredients.
, Her boo>:, 'The French Chef Cookbook" was a best-seller
(its hard-cover edition, and has now been published by Bantam
paperback. The book is as excellent as her shows. It includes
fctures that make it easier to follow the recipes. The pictures
re taken by Julia's husband Paul Child, who Is her exclusive
ktographer. 11 seems that he finds as much pleasure in his
(tographing hobby as she does in teaching the art of cooking.
[as not the only one to be influenced by the Child family. My
band, Rafael, followed Paul's example, and is photographing
dishes. You will have a chance to sec his work in my first
that is about to be published.
A sample recipe from "The French Chef Cookbook:"
OEUFS SUB LE PLAT (Shirred Iff!)
each serving:
e-half tablespoon butter
w two eggs
|lt and pepper
i Choose a shallow fireproof baking-and-serving dish about
Br inches in diameter. Place the dish over moderate heat or in
ban of simmering water. Add butter. As soon as it has melted,
rak in one or two eggs. When bottom of egg has coagulated in
dish remove from heat, tilt dish, and baste top of egg with
butter in the dish. Place on a baking sheet, and a minute
ore serving, set so surface of egg Is about one inch from red-
i. broiler element. Slide dish out every few seconds, tilt, and
Bte top of eggs with the butter in the dish. In less than a
nute the white will be set, and the yolk filmed and glistening.
nove from oven, season with salt and pepper and servo
ately. ______________;
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Temple Solel's Officers And Board Members Elected
By RABBI SAMUKL J. FOX
WIihI is the "HaskaUh .'"
The word "Haskalah" IBOI
"unclerstanding" or "enlighten-
ment." It Ls derived from the same
root as the word "Sechel" which
means intelligence.
The term "Haskalah" Ls usrd to
refer to a movement which began
in Germany in the 18th century. I
Us aim was to disseminate modern |
European culture amongst .Tews. '
Moses Mendelsohn is often referred
to as the "father" of this m >vc- :
ment.
Part of this movement resulted ,
in treating the Hebrew language j
and Hebrew culture in general
with modern critical approaches. '
At first it was not a movement of i
the masw lectual elite. It produced many
mat of Jewish letters, poets, phi- '
losophers, dramatists and others. '
Many of its adherents were not !
religious. However, in time, many
religious intellectuals were influ-,
eneed indirectly by this movement
and developed a critical, yet loyal
and fundamentalist approach to
Hebrew literature, thus availing
themselves of the advantage of
both the modern and the tradi-
tional.
The followers of this movement
were called Maskilin, a term coined
by Judah Jciteles in the 19th cen
turv.
What, in a "T!u The term Tzaddik" *s found in
the Bible where it refers to a
"righteous man." With the rise of
the Hassidic movement, this term
came to be used to refer to the
pious saintly leader of a Hassidic
group. Some followers considered
him to be sort of an intermediary
between God and man. People
would approach him asking him to
pray to God for them. His extreme
piety and saintliness is said to
provide him with this special abil-
ity to beseech the Almighty.
(c), 1972. Jewirii Telegraphic Agency)
Temple Solel held its election
of officers last month at II illy-
wood Hills High School Officers
selected for the coming year in-
clude Abe Durbin, president; I.nixy
Hunter, Herb Grossman and Milt-
on Rubin, vice presidents; Jack
Packar, recording secretary; Jack
Tobln. financial secretary, and
Stanley Klumin, treasurer.
Elected to the executive board
for three year terms were Sol
| Baxt. Steve Tobin, Mel Spencer,
Dick Finger, Jerry Blo-nn, lii.nl
Novick and Al Rose man.
Serving two years will be I.OU
Freeman, I^eon Ray, Homard Her-
man, Met Yarish, Jack Duckstrin,
Stove Taylor and Ronald Jacobs,
Named to_sen;e^onc jjjjtv terms
ineic Sam Green, Bill Ra>ins,
Robert Yanofsky, Robert Wblfoon,
Berate Sohroft, Ralph Muscat and
Arthur Kail.
Be sure to mention
9Jewis* Fhridian
when patronizing
our advertisers
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Page 10
+Jmist FtcrkttorJ
Friday. June 9. 1972
..;'; I '.!;; I
I Ml Mesw
;,.;.;------- i in, it,. ;,(.. i
IMRRH I :.tliili | MM I M
L_//ie rtabbi OpttMl jfront J he f^mpH
i
IHT'I' <..... :"l..... >t" II1...... I '..'!!, |
liCllii i Uil. ml ill .1 .... : .,!,. ,::.| i ill i
'i, Ml. Ml
i Mmi pr
Remarkable Interchange
Rabbi Kingsfey
By RABBI RALPH P. KIXGSI.EY
Temple Sinai of North D*ile
There is a remarkable inter-
change between Moses and God
in the portion known as '"Sh'lach
L'Cha that jears
comment.
Moses, the
great yet he-
leagured leader,
who had been
un<'er constant
attack by the
very people
whom, -so dili-
gently and faith-
fully he sought
to lead, inter-
cedes, as he had
done before, on
their behalf. He asks God to for-
give them for their impatience and
their rebelliousness with the
words: "Let the power of the Lord
increase, according to how You
have spoken saying: The Lord is
slow to anger forgiving iniq-
uity, transgression and sin."
What makes the Interchange to
unusual, among other things, is
the expression that Moses used'
"Let now the power of the J.ord
increase ." (Yigal koah Ado-
nail.
The insight seems clear. For-
giveness is no easy matter. It re-
quires extraordinary strength.
If God Himself must, so to speak,
increase his strength, perhaps we
can understand how difficult it i*
for a mortal of flesh and blood to
be forgiving when he has been
grievously wroneed.
And, going a step further, '.t is
perhaps equally dif*;-ult for a
human being to say I'm sorry.
Yet, what would ii.'e be lik if
there were no forgiveness? Would
there be the possibility of any hu-
man relationship? Would a .?hild
ever be able to relate to a parent
or a husband to a wife if the on-
could not say "I'm sorry" and the
other could not say "I forgive
you?"
It is only the possibility of for-
giveness that enables one to live in
a world of imperfection And if it
takes added strength on our part,
then let God Himself become our
model, and let us imitate Him.
For surely if God in his maiesty
can respond to the request of
Moses, answering with the words:
"I have pardoned according to
My word," then we in our finitude
ought be able to respond to each
other, and say "I forgive you."
Bar Mitzvah
JAY WOLF
Jay, the son of Mr. and Mrs
Marvin Wolf, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah at Temnle Sinai,
Hollywood, Saturday, June 10.
Cr -it -Cr
DAVID COHKN
David, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Morton Cohen, will become Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Isra.'l of Mira-
mar, Saturday morning, June 17.
b # -C*
WENDY SHAFRAX
Wendy, the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Seymour Shafran, will be-
come Bat Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Kl, Hollywood, Saturday, June 10.
conducting services and rea ling
from (he Torah.
The celebrant, a seventh grade
stur'ent at Olsen Junior High
School, is a member of the band.
Mr. and Mrs. Shafran will spon-
sor the Ones Shabbat in 'hei,-
daughter's honor. Amon;' RUBBtS
will be Wendy's i;ivat-i;randpar-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bloom
of Hollywood, grandparents Mr.
and Mrs. Kenneth Bloom, and Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Bloom .>f Chicago;
111.
Convention Committee
Appointments Announced
Ralph Rosofsky, chairman of
the Department of Florida Jewish
War Veterans' Convention to be-
held at the Americana Hotel ir.
Bal Harbour June 23-25, announc-
ed new committee appointments
including Herbert Gopman, jour-
nal chairman and Sydel Kahn, co-
chairman, Bessie Gibber chairman
of the luncheon honoring state
Auxiliary president Sally Levy:
Rickie Cohen, hospitality commit-
tee chairman; and Seema Lefko-
witz, who will be in charge of
souvenirs.
Mr. Rosofsky named Leon Sil-
verman as treasurer of the con-
vention corporation and Zeld.i
Glass as secretary.
Religious
Services
HAllANDAlE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Haobl Max J. Weltz, Cantor Jacob
Danzig*!-. 44
Friday services 8:15 p.m. followed by
Ineg Shabbat. Saturday services 9 a.m.
Kiddush reception. Dally Mlnyah 8:0
a.m. Mlnha-Maarlv f:S0 p.m. (Con-
servative) 416 N K. 8th Avo.
H0UYWOO0
BETH EL (Temple). 13S1 S. 14th Av.
Reform. Habbi Samuel Jaffa. 46
BETH SHALOM (Temple). 1728 Mon-
roe St. Conaarvatlva. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold 46
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapirc
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. 47
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal)
All future services will be held at
Sheridan Hills Elementary School,
liftfll Thomas St., Hollywood, every
Friday night at 8 p.m. Rabbi Robert
Frailn.
TEMPLE BETH AHM, 310 Southwest
62nd Avenue, Hollywood
Sabbath Eve services are scheduled
for 8:15 p.m. Friday. Sam Aboulafla
will conduct the services. The Sister-
hood will sponsor the Oneg Shabbat.
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple) 6920 SW S5th St.
Conservative. 48
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulke. 3?
Mrs. Foland To Preside
The Henrietta Szold group of
Hadassah will meet Thursday,
June 15, at 12:30 p.m. in the Mir-
amar Recreation Center with Mrs.
Adele Foland, newly elected presi-
dent of the group, presiding.
Friends and guests are invitod.
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Women's American ORTBroward Region Board Meet-
ing" 10 H.'rrt.' Rome FederarBldg"., "Hollywood
MONDAY. JUNE 19
B'nai B'rith Women of Hollywood 8 p.m. Home Federal
Bldg., Hollywood
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
Jewish Community Relations Council 8 p.m. Home Fed-
eral Bldg., Hallandale
/ il
Jewish Community Relations
The Jewish Community Rela-
tions Co-mcil will meet Wednes-
day, June 21. at 8 p.m. in the Home
Federal Building, 2100 Hallandale
Beach Blvd. All Jewish organiza
tions in Hollywood are invited to
have delegates and presidents at-
Council Meeting Scheduled
tend.
Business of the meeting will be
election of officers for the coming
year and selection of an executive
committee. Plans will also be for-
mulated for the annual meeting
of the Council, which is planned
for Oct. 21.
B0BBE Schlesinger's column, "Our Town,
will resume with the next issue.
II
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le 9, 1972
> kmvisit fhridttairj
Page 11
srael Satisfied
ith Communique
JALKM (JTA) Un-
rreaction to the joint
jue on the Middle East
JBt week at the Moscow
(talks was one of satis-
\n Israel but despair in
states.
sence of -any substan-
?ment between the su-
was welcomed by po-
ervers here but decried
bommentators as a sign
Idle East issue is of
importance to the
|tates and Russia alike.
rrpowm have appar-
il< (1 to let tin- lsrai'lis
Mttl.- their conflict
ll^mHrtves, Israeli ob-
luid. The.\ noted that
I'ommiiniqiH' con-
lly two major point*
Hiipport of lb-solution
[of the Jarring; mission
no nations.
pointed out that Reso-
Iho Security Council's
1967 resolution on the
past, has been accepted
lly all parties, although
^rpreted differently by
and Israelis and their
backers.
Ihe question of intrenre-
noi ai:.-M- in the Mos-
auniqne, It appeara
ftlllK Of sulistance WOK
It the summit coufer-
itmts said.
noted that the super-
Ish to avoid a controll-
er the Middle East may
Arabs who see war as
However, the main
|t is based on the arms
[Israelis pointed out, de-
iiat the balance must be
and should it shift,
sed immediately.
pres of U.S.-Soviet in-
the Mideast seem to
|n established, it was
nie Arab countries are
[as "gray areas" with
[delineation of Ameri-
piet influence and it is
likely that the Rus-
try to extend their
(there. The question is
Jnited States will re-
|i sources said.
commentators sprite
"isolation" and ob-
it Moscow's failure to
summit meeting
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after Mr. Nixon ordered the har-
bors of North Vietnam block-
aded indlcuted that the Soviets
were looking after their own *n-
terests and not those of their
"client' state*.
Some Jordanian newspapers
speculated that King Hussein's
proposal for a federation of the
East and West banks of the Jor-
dan may have been discussed
during the summit talks, but
most Jordanian commentators
said that Arabs should not at-
tach much importance to the
communique.
Commentators in Libya main-
tained that the only way to lib-
erate the occupied Arab terri-
tories is by war. The same posi-
tion was tak?n by the Cairo-
based El Fatah radio.
JDC To Transfer
>lalben Control
The Joint Distribution Commit-
tee next year will transfer its Mal-
ign institutions from JDC con-
trol to the Association for the
Planning and Development of
son ices for the Aged, a volun-
,ai? orSfVWtJ0? "Vj&rael....,,
Announcement of thi? shift of
more than 2.000 Malben beds from
the JDC. a major beneficiary of
the United Jewish Appeal to
Israeli control was made by Min-
ister of Finance Pinhas Sapir and
JDC chairman Edward Ginsberg.
The institutions, now open only
to new immigrants, will be avail-
able to all residents of Israel in
need of the service.
Numerous other homes for the
aged are supported in Israel by
Histadrut, both through its dues
and the Israel Histadrut cam-
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Page 12
+Jewlsli fhrkUar
Friday, June 9, 1972
s
d
V
e
o
a
This Week In History...
10 Years Ago This Week: 1962
The State Dept. noted "increas-
ed (SovietI sensitivity to charges
of anti-Semitism" and an attempt
"to counter recent foreign publici-
ty of deliberate anti-Semitic ac-
tions bv the Soviet regime."
Announcer Herbert Manning
sued CKGM, Montreal, for "un-
justified dismissal and character
defamation." When a caller had
said the Nazis killed millions of
Jews, he had replied: "Were you
there Madam, you're lying."
The Adele R. Levy Fund, named
for the late Julius Rosenwald's
daughter, gave $1.5 million in
modern art to 15 meseums.
The (Philadelphia) Jewish Ex-
ponent was 75.
Bulgarian Chief Rabbi Asher
Hananel, sentenced to 3% years
for "illegal trading," was released
after half a year for health rea-
sons.
Dr. Nahum Goldmann warned
that Algeria would soon become
the ranking Arab state.
West Germany reportedly loan-
ed Israel $25 million and promised
to double it by year's end.
"Generations are growing up in
Israel and in American Jewry
which are becoming alien and
foreign to each other, sharing no
memories, cherishing no common
dreams," complained Kducation
Minister Abba Fban.
Rowland Kvans, Jr., reported
that the Soviet government was
'pushing the Soviet Jew deeper
into the pit of second-class citi-
zenship," adding: "For most Rus-
sians, life is getting somewhat bet-
ter; for the Jew, it is becoming in-
tolerable "
The Zionist Organization of
America honored president Max
Bressler at 60.
One Israeli was killed and three
were wounded when Jordanian
troops suddenly fired near the
Mandelbaum Gate in Jerusalem.
The Housing Foreign Affairs
Committee was "disturbed" by
Arab discrimination against Ameri
can Jews and US tolerance of it.
"BREMEN West Germans
are forbidding their children to
watch television or films which de-
pict the facts of German history
under the Nazi regime, according
to the Bremen Radio and TV
Authority."
(From the files of the JTA)
DOMESTIC
TERRACE PAINT AND BODY
"VOU WRECK CM"-'WE MX' "
COMPLETE BODY & PAINTING SHOP
TERRACE AUTO FRAME SHOP
VOU BEND EMWE MEND EM
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W. HOllVWOOO
riA.
Rabbi Judch Nadich of the Park
Avenue Synagogue, who was
elected president of the Rabbini-
cal Assembly (the international
organization of Cons3rvative
rabbis) recently, was honored
by the Jewish Braille Institute
of America last month at a spe-
cial reception in New York.
Gerald Kraft, 40, of Indianap-
olis, Ind., has been named
chairman of the B'nai 3'rith
membership cabinet and will
direct a campaign aimed at en-
rolling 50,000 new members
this year. One of the youngest
men ever to hold a B'nai B'rith
national chairmanship. Mr.
Kraft began a tour of the na-
tion this month to organize
membership drives aimed at
the "under 40" age group.
S. S. Nieuw Amsterdam Sailed
From Port Everglades June 5
Floridians can cruise the
Caribbean on the "Ship o; De-
light" the S.S. Nieuw Am-
sterdamregarded by many as
the finest cniisin" ship afloat,
this summer and fall.
The S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam,
which will sail from Port Kver-
gladei, Florida, on 16 different
cruises between June 5 and Dec.
8.1972, is a beautifully designed
vessel, fitted out in a style of
restrained modernity that
shows a nice balance between
the neo-classic and modern in
her decoration.
She rated the lead article in
a national news magazine's sec-
tion on art which said: "The
work artists, the Nieuw Amsterdam's
public rooms and cabins im-
pressed U.S. travelers with the
uniformity of taste lavished on
all its cabins, regardless of
class. Solid, cleanly built furni-
ture, beautiful fabrics, opulent
rugs, plenty of light and unob-
trusive color harmonies of sil-
ver, beige and light yellow were
more important to the general
effect than the occasional mu-
rals and ornamental work in
metal, wood and glass fin-
est room: the theatre, designed
by Cornelis J. Engelen and Kli-
sabeth de Boer in the shape of
half an egg shell, with a rich
color scheme of old rose, cerise,
dull gold and red copper."
The dining room has a beau-
tiful sense of balance between
its blue, gold and ivory color
scheme, the lighting and its
mural decorations. The room is
dominated by Arcadian scenes
done on burned glass panels
near the entrance with eight
smaller ones around the sides.
This "vermurail" work has the
quality of a careful charcoal
sketch, and was done by an
annealing process using metal
oxides.
On tne walls of the room are
some 20 rose mirrors; at one
end is a magnificent gobelin
tapestry. Ornamented gold-
shaded Murano glassespecial-
ly blown in Venice conceals
the ceiling lights while the
shades for the wall fixtures are
done as scalloped sea shells.
The several pillars in thf room
are finished in varnished gold
leaf.
Another unique feature of the
Nieuw Amsterdam is the tre-
mendous amount of deck space.
And this may be of special
interest to the "joggers'' of to-
day. The ship offers passengers
a complete "boardwalk" all the
way around the vessel. Then.
too, there is the vast deck space
aft room for just about all the
passengers at ence should they
ever decide to sit in the deck
chairs and bask in the sun at
the same time.
One of the most (.triking
rooms is the grand hall. Con-
ceived as a subdued setting for
the various activities that the
room would entertain, i* is a
symphony in silver and gray;
it has a cast aluminum ceiling
which tells the story ot life
from childhood to old age in
molded half reliefs and also fea-
tures huge windows two decks
high which are framed in stain-
less steel and engraved with
heroic size figures.
Completely refurbished in
1961 and recently recarpeted,
the Nieuw Amsterdam is as
modern today as instant coffee
-but has still managed to re-
tain her Old World charm. She
is air-conditioned and stabilizer
equipped. The vessel has the
opulence of 25 different kinds
of hardwood, many with ex-
quisite designs, not to mention
the beautiful hand-rubbed pan-
els in the cabins.
The vessel offers passengers
all of the usual parties, sport9
activities, midnight buffets and
indoor and outdoor pools that
one expects to find on a luxury
cruise liner. But, in addition,
there are such places as the
jungle bar, the "most popular
bar afloat in the West Indies."
And the chefs of the Nieuw Am-
sterdam believe that "There's
more to it than just preparing
an array of the finest gourmet
food in the world when it comes
to a midnight buffet." The spe-
cialty is food, of course.
Many will want to sample
what the Nieuw Amsterdam
has to offer because from her
gracefully curved, flared br-.v,
to her streamlined rudder, she
proclaims her aristocratic
breeding. Every line of her
substructure sweeps 1 ack
with modulated, wanlike grace.
She sits comfortably in the wa-
ter, as though she were built in
it, and was supremely happy to
be ther?- -which she is. Her
stopping places this summer
will include:
ST. THOMAS (Charlotte
Amalie) This island i- known
as the "shopping paradise ot
the Western Hemisphere."
Leaving the pier in Char'otta
Amalie, you can drive to Blue-
beard's Castk. once a fortress,
now a hotel. Here you ca-i see
the tower, carefully restored
according to the original plans.
Leaving Bluebeard's you can
continue up Mafolie Hill to
Drake's Seat, a lookout roint
which gives you a lovely view
of Magens Bay and out across
Sir Francis Drake Channel to
the many American and Britisn
Virgin Islands nearby.
Then it's on to Mountain Top
Hotel where you can sample
the "specialty of the house"
their world-famous banana
daiquiri. Charlotte Ama'.ie'i
shopping area is next. It i.; dif-
ficult to mention the many
types of bargains available here
-- and most of them at duty-
free prices. And, don't forget
customs still allow an extra
$100 of duty-free purchases in
this port and you can bring one
full gallon of "spirits" as well.
MARTINIQUE (Fort de
France)Your shin then ar-
rives in Fort de France, the
capital of Martinique.
This island is the former
home of Empress Josephine,
wife of Napoleon, and Mt. Pe-
lee, the volcano that errupted
In 1902 and destroyed the en-
tire town of St. Pierre, leaving
30 000 dead- and one survivor.
Fort de France, a charmins;
city of yellow-tinted buildin:
offeis a number of sites for the
visitor si'ch as old Fort St.
Louis and the Cathedral with
its ornate, open spire. But
there's more to Martinique, too
high domed mountains, sup-
erb forests, vast sugar cane
fields, banana and pineapple
plan'ations and lush tropieiil
vegetation. As for shopping, in
Fort de France there are the
streets of Rue Victor-Hugo,
Rue Antoine Siger and Rue
Schoelcher where you can find
bargains in porcelain, crystal
and French perfumes.
VENEZUELA (La Gunira)
The Nieuw Amsterdam also
calls at La Guaira, the port city
of Caracas, the capital of Ven-
ezuela. This young and grow-
ing city is separated into two
distinct sectors the old area,
with its .harming Spanish aichi-
tectur and the new Caracas
with jnormous superblocks, reg-
ular squadrons of cement build-
ings painted in vivid colors,
spread over the hillsides.
The heart of the new Caracas
is the Centra Bolivar the
Rockefeller Center of Vene-
zuela an imposing group of
buildings culminating in two
32-story towers. And the city's
shops are comparable to New
York's Fifth Avenue. But Ca-
racas is not all ultramodern.
In the old section you can visit
Simon Bolivar's home where
this freedom fighter was born
and the National Pantheon, his
tomb. Also not to be missed is
the fantastic cable-car ride up
to the mountain range sur-
rounding the city. You may find
yourself engulfed in low clouds
at the top and the ride '-iown
is thrilling, with a marvelous
view of the city.
For complete information and brochures on the 16 Caribbean
cruises sailing from Port Everglades write: Holland America
Cruises, Department F, Pier 40, North River New York, New
York, 10014. or phone Fort Lauderdale 565-5586.


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