The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00037

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
I
& Jewish fiendi&n
Volume 2 Number 10
and SIIOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
___________________Hollywood, Florida Friday. March 17, 1972
Price 20 c
Apartments Division Past Half-Way Mark
The Apartments Division of
Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wel-
fare Federation has passed the
$250,000 mark, according to a pro-
gress report issued by Maurie
Meyers, campaign chairman. This
figure represents the achievement
of more than 509? of its goal, set
by the Campaign Cabinet of Fed-
eiation.
The hard work we have done
in the last several years, organ-
izing the high risesboth old and
newin our area is beginning to
show results for us," Mr. Meyers
said. There is an increased aware-
ness of the needs of Israel and the
plight of the Soviet Jews which
has created a desire in us to do
all we can to help get them out
of Russia and safely settled in
Israel. We know it all takes money
and the high rise tenants are show-
ing their willingness to help by
giving."
Dr. Norman Atkin, campaign
chairman for JWt, reported that
the solicitation is continuing with
a mail campaign in the apartment
houses intended to reach every te-
nant. In addition, the regular
"face to face" solicitation and
building meetings are being con-
ducted.
Dr. Atkin said, "1972 is a year
of decision It is expected that
40,000 to 70.000 Jews from the
USSR will arrive in Israel. The
cost of rehabilitation, resettle-
ment, and all the other services
needed will be $200 million dollars.
This is in addition to the other
economic needs in Israel. And of
course, we in this area must also
recognize the increase needs of
the local agencies that we are
pledged to support. For all these
reasons we need every single per-
son's help."
Working with Maurie Mayers in
the Apartments Division campaign
are cochairmen Mclvin H. Baer
and Murray Smithline.
Ruling Circles Differ On
Solution To The Conflict
Envoy To Be Asked For New
Formula Leading To Talks
JERUSALEM (JTA) Ma-
jor differences within Egypt's
ruling circles over a solution to
the conflict with Israel emerged
last week.
Mohammed Hassanein Heikal,
editor-in-chief of the influential
Cairo daily, Al Ahram had hint-
ed in his signed column that
Egypt would uo well to aoanu^.i
its insistence on a prior Israeli
commitment to withdrawal from
the occupied territories as the
price of peace negotiations.
But the official government
newspaper, Al (iumhurlya, criti-
t/'cl Heikal, without mention-
ing him by name, for suggesting
to the Egypt inn people that th >
have any alternative but force
in dealing with Israel.
Heikal. nevertneic-ss. is con-
sidered a close confidant of Pres-
ident Anwar Sadat, a rolation-
-hip that he also enjoyed with
the late President Nasser, and
his column in Al-Ahram has fre-
quently reflected government
views. Observers here said it
was unlikely that his latest
article was published without
the prior approval of Sadat or
someone acting on Sadat's be-
half.
In the column, Heikal dis-
missed as "childish" a political
solution "which is based on in-
sisting on the last step even be-
fore the first step has begun."
The phraseology was seen as a
hint that Egypt may be willing
to drop its demand for an Is-
raeli withdrawal commitment as
a prerequisite for either an over-
all settlement under the aegis of
United Nations mediator Dr.
Gunnar V. Jarring or an Amer-
ican-sponsored interim accord
to reopen the Suez Canal.
Some observers believe Hel-
kd's suggestions represented a
trial balloon and Al Gumhurlya's
criticism of It a way ont for the
government should public reac-
tion be unfavorable. Al Gum-
huriya referred obliquely to
"persons who might spread con-
fusing ideas among the Egyp-
tian people" and warned that
such persons who are obviously
not sufficiently familiar with
events thouM refrain from lead-
ing the Egyptian people Into be-
lieving that there are several
alternatives.
According to the government
newspaper, there is only one so-
lution to the Middle East con-
flict which has already been laid
down: "What has been taken
by force can only be retrieved
by force. There is no uifferc-nce
of opinion about this,' the paper
said.
Heikal, on the other hand, dis-
carded military solutions or dip-
lomatic efforts through inter-
national law and U.N. resolu-
tions. He wrote that a revolu-
tionary scientific solution is the
only acceptable solution," and
defined a "revolutionary scien-
tific solution" as one which em-
ploys all available means dip-
lomatic, economic, armed forces
in accordance with modern cal-
culations, and enlightened prop-
aganda which gains the maxi-
mum amount of support for this
conflict, and stands based on
principles which guarant?e the
broadest front cf friends and
allies to prevent the enemy from
imposing his will."
Heikal claimed that such meth-
ods were being utilized by China
to regain sovereignty over Tai-
wan and by the Vietnamese rev-
olution to achieve the complete
withdrawal of I '.9. troops from
the whole of Indochina. Achieve-
ment of a political solution has
failed in the Middle East con-
flict "because we have forgotten
I will not say have, neglected
to utilize the other methods,"
he said.
President Sadat was report-
edly scheduled to tour sevral
Arab countries to discuss means
of strengthening the Arab posi-
tion against Israel in the wake
of Israel's actions against Leba-
non and Syria.
Schary Publicly Deplores
Mosley's Presence In U.S.
NEW YORK.(JTA) Sir Os-
wald Mosley's presence in the
United States is "against the pub-
lic interest" and should be de-
plored, Dorp Schary saiJ on the
David Frost Show" recently.
Speaking of the 75-year-old Brit-
ish politician, who headed the
Fascist Party from 1932 to 1940,
has been in the United States to
publicize his autobiography, "My
Life," Mr. Schary, honorary chair-
man of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, declared:
"I believe he represents a totali-
tarian concept, and there's been
no recanting in terms of his atti-
tude about Jews, Hitler, World
War II and about what it meant."
Mr. Schary charged that Sir Os-
wald "questions the validity o! the
charge that six million Jews were
killed" deliberately by the Nazis,
preferring to call them "war crim-
inals."
Calling Mr. Schary's charges "a
whole tissue of false statements,"
the Britain retorted: "I attacked
some Jews because they wanted
a war. And he has not refuted
that in any way."
Mr. Frost, himself British, ob-
served: "What you're saying is
like saying T am not aga'nst Jews.
I am only against people who at-
tend Bar Mitzvah's.' "
Sir Oswald replied: "I had Jew-
ish candidates in my movement
before this quarrel arose. I have
Jewish colleagues and collabora-
tors in great constructive policies
today. ... I had a quarrel with
some Jews whether there should
be a war or not and I charged
those Jews with putting the in-
terest of their community in Ger-
many above the interests of the
British people. And that was a
legitimate charge, and if Jews
are to be immune from all criti-
cism where are we coming to?"
Later on, calling it "ridiculous"
to debate a "40-year-old question"
in light of current problems of
poverty and war, Sir Oswald told
Mr. Schary: "You'd think the only
thing that matters in the world
were Jews."
The Jewish leader replied: "The
only thing that matters to me is
intolerance and hatred, and I be-
lieve you stand for intolerance,
and you have expressed hatred."
Fatah Agrees To Suspend
Activities From Lebanon
JERUSALEM (JTA) Cairo
radio reports that El Fatah has
agreed to a request from Leba-
nese authorities to temporarily
suspend their terrorist activities
against Israel from Lebanese
territory in order not to sub-
ject Lebanon to further repris-
als from Israel.
According to Cairo. El Fatah
announced its decision follow-
ing a series of meetings with
Lebanese officials Including Pre-
mier Saeja Salaam.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Is-
rael is preparing to take the of-
fensive toward reactivating the
Jarring peace mission by press-
ing the United Nations envoy
to adopt a formula that can
lead to resumption of talks, in-
formed sources say.
The first step will be to ask
Dr. Gunnar V. Jarring in cflect
Submarines Ordered?
No Comment
On Report
LONDON (JTA) A Foreign
Office spokesman declined to
comment on reports that Israel
has ordered two submarines for
its navy from British shipyards
but stressed that there was no
embargo on military sales to
Middle Eastern countries.
According to information f;-om
highly reliable sources, negotia-
tions have been conducted for
the construction of one large
and one small undersea craft for
Israel. The Israel Embassy here
does not discuss arms deals or
negotiations for arms deals, how-
ever.
The Foreign Office spokesman
said, "We never comment on the
purchases of arms by other coun-
tries but we can say that there
has been no change whatsoever
in British policy regarding the
supply of equipment for Mi idle
East countries. Our poliev is to
consider each individual deal on
its merits."
Hadassah Marks
60th Anniversary
NEW YORK (WNS) At its
annual Mid-Winter Conference the
National Board of Hadassah an-
nounced it had voted $1 million
to establish a Department of clin-
ical Pharmacology at the Hadas-
sah Hebrew University Medical
Center in Ein Karem. Jerusalem.
The new department will central-
ize testing, teaching and research
on humans. At the School of
Pharmacology, researchers work
with animals
The National Board also voted
to set up a blood bank to provide
fractions (red or white cells) as
well as whole blood. When blood
is fractioned one pint can often
serve three or four patients.
The conference marked the or-
ganization's 60th anniversary.
to dissociate himself specifically
from the Egyptian-inspired Gen-
eral Assembly resolution of tut
December which called on Israel
to make an affirmative reply to
his aide memoiro of Feb. 8,
1971 asking Isiacl for a commit-
ment to withdraw prior t? peace
negotiations.
Dr. .Jarring will he asked to
make this repudiation In the
form of a letter to Foregn Min-
ister Abba Eban stating that he
is not bound by the (ieneral As-
sembly's resolution but solely by
the iiini', C'ounril Resolution
242 of Nov." 22, 1967 from which
his peace mission derives its
mandate, the sources said.
Dr. Jarring will also be asked
by Israel to suggest an ag?r.da
for the resumption of his mission
that docs not contain reference
to his Feb. 8 memo. It is be-
lieved here that Dr. Jarring him-
self may feel that his demand of
a year ago need not stand in the
way of a resumption of his peace
m'ssion at this time and that
other subjects could bo brought
up first.
Israel's ambassador to the
U.N. Yosef Tckoah, is oxpected
to resume contact with Dr. Jar-
ring along these lines in the
next few days in New York.
B'nai B'rith Taps
First Woman As
Commission Head
Bv Sjiert-U Report
WASHINGTON, D.C. For
the first time in the 128-year his-
tory of B'nai B'rith a woman has
been ch^sci as chairman of one
of its agencies.
Mrs. Louis L. Perlman of High-
land Park. III., was selects', as
chairman of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Commission at its annual meeting
here. Mrs. Perlman. a former in-
ternational president, of B'nai
B'rith Women, succeeds Jack J.
Spitzer. Los Angeles savings and
loan executive who will now head
the B'nai B'rith Fund campaign
cabinet.
Though she has served as 9 vice
president of the Leo N. Levi Hos-
pital in Hot Springs, Ark., a vice
chairman of the anti-Defamition
League of B'nai B'rith, and re-
ceived the Hillel Honor Key from
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
at the University of Illinois. Mrs.
Perlman's major interest during
37 years of B'nai B'rith service
has been its teen-age youth move-
ment.


Page 2
* Jew is* Ik rid kin
Friday, March 17, 1972
Hadassah Honoring Charter
Members At Donor Luncheon
Mrs. Abraham Saltcr. president
of the Hollywood Chapter of Ha-
dassah held .a. president's meetm.,
recently to discuss the final ar-*
range-merits for Tuesday's 25th
annual Donor Luncheon at the
Diplomat Hotel. Mrs. Molly Lewis,
Regional Area Advisor of Hadas-
sah. was present to answer ques-
tions concerning procedure and
tradition.
Representing the six Hadassah
Groups in Hollywood were Mrs.
Karl Heichen, Mt. Scopus; Mrs.
Harry Bernstein. Beach; Mrs. Flo-
rence Novick, Henrietta Szold;
Mrs. Joseih Feldman. Hillcrest;
Mrs. George Seftel. H'Atid; and
Mrs. Samuel Hutter, Shalom; Mrs.
Gladys Palant. recording secre-
tary of the Chapter, ami Mrs.
Herbert Sonnenklar, publicity
chairman, were also present.
A new dimension was added to
the Donor Luncheon when plans
were made to honor the Charter
members of Hadassah who are
still living in the Hollywood area.
At the organizational meeting,
held 25 years ago at the home of
Mrs. Fannie Matz. Mrs. Ann Gold-
en, now deceased, was elected
founding president.
Others who attended the first
meeting an I are still active in
Hadassah are Mrs. Mollie Padow.
Mrs. Jeanette Kalinsky, Mrs. Lena
Silverman. Mrs. Betty Manzer.
Mrs. Lillian B. Harris, Mrs. Claire
Joslin, Mrs. Minnie Robinson. Mrs.
Ida Baum, Mis. Shirley Flacks.
Mrs. Anne Feingold and Mrs.
Helen Brown. From this small l>e-
glnning in 1917. the Hollywood
Chapter has grown steadily. Its
present membership is 1.212.
Guest speaker Cor the luncheon
will be Mrs. Charles .1. Werner, a
member of the National Service
Committee of Hadassah. and a
former elected National Board
member. Mrs. Welner, a ist'pres-
ident of the Southeast Region,
time, has been signed foi the 18th
now active innjany. civic organ-
izations including The Reil Cross,
American Cancer Society and re-
tarded children's drives.
A member of the Board of Di-
rectors of the Atlanta, Ga.. Com-
munity Council, she is also on the
For Quality Dry Cleaning
CALL LEWIS CIEANERS 922-Oft??
rick-* Dnf sic ffcfc VU&J.
GREATER HOLLYWOOD
1406 I. OIIIE WT. *0lir*003
Nina* fnrtnte pan
Board of Directors of the Atlanta\
Youth Commission, and a member
of the Atlanta Zionist Federation.
yftftfihlrier, a cferfegate to the
26th World Zionist Congress, will
describe her experiences there.
Kntertainment will be provided
by the Tel Aviv Duo. an interna-
tional song and accordion team.
75% Increase In
Women's Division
Contributions to the Women's
i Division oi Greater Hollywood's
i Jewish Welfare Federation have
leached $60,000. a 75't increase
over last year, according to Mrs.
: Carolyn Davis, Women's Division
. ('ampaign chairman. Records
show that over half the gifts are
first-time pledges.
The success of the 1972 Wom-
' _>n's Campaign is indicative of the
Beth Shalom's Passover
Seder At Diplomat Hotel
Temple Beth Shalom's Passover
1 Seder will be held on the firs'
' night of the holiday. Wcdnes
March 23, at the Diplo-
mat Hotel. Dr. Morton Mala\ sky.
spiritual leader of the temple will
officiate with Cantor Gold assist-
ing.
The Seder will be open to n.em-
ber- and non-members of Temple
Beth Shalom and a gourmet-type
Kosher meal will be served. Res-
ervations are being accepted foi
groups and tickets are now a\ail-
able at the 46C1 Arthur St. office
oi the temple. Call Mrs. Bill Gor-
don for reservations and additional
information.
trend today for women to stand up
and be heard," said Mrs. Davis.
Women want to do their share
liersonally to help their less for-
tunate fellow Jews," she con-
tinued, "and the needs of deprived
people have stirred them to give
what they can."
The Women's Division, which
has sponsored a series of lunch-
eons for contributors of from $25
to $500. now plans a series of cof-
fees for small groups, where the
work o; the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration will be explained.
Promise-A-Day" commitments,
or small daily contributions, will
be part of this next phase of the
drive. Keep the Promise" is the
iheme for this year's United Jew-
ish Appeal campaign.
rKobert J INCOME TAX SERVICE
CAll FOR AN APPOINTMENT Oft WALK IN TODAY!
CAll: 966-TtN fORTY
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Small Business Bookeeping
Medical Management Service
Investors Accounting Service
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JOHN Z's ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL!!
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OUR FOLDERS LIST HOIEIS AND ClASS, DAY-BY-DAY TOURS. MEA $
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WE HOtO CONFIRMED AIR AND HOTEL SPACE IN ISPAEl AND EUROPE
OUR TOURS ARE PUT TOGETHER Br EXPERTS OUR PRESIDENT. SAM R"
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IN ADDITION TO OVER 150 MONTHLY GROUP DEPARTURES TO ISRAt'
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DIRECT FROM MIAMI VIA BOA C.
I. SPRING SHAVUOTH TOUR,
//AY 8, ISRAEL IN DEPTH INCLUDING
EILAT, DELUXE (Israel Hadassah Cancer Fund!.
2 SPECIAL SUMMER TOUR TO GREECE, IS
RAEl, SWITZERLAND, SPAIN. FIRST ClASS,
JUNE 21. FULLY ESCORTED BY RABBI DR. M.
MALAVSKY, TEMPLE BETH SHALOM HOLLY-
WOOD AND PHOTOGRAPHER .
3. NON-WALKING LEISURE TOUR. LIKE NO.
2, JUNE 21. FIRST CLASS. FULLY ESCORTED
BY RABBI DR. M. MALAVSKY, TEMPLE BETH
SHALOM HOLLYWOOD. ACCOMPAINED BY
MEDICAL DOCTOR AND PHOTOGRAPHER
$1,250
$1.W
$1,249
All TOURS PLUS S3 00 TAX
OUR OWN FASHION CONSULTANT FOR TRAVEL & CRUISE WARD
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YOUR ISRAEl EUROPE HEADQUARTERS
Le Cafe de Paris
Stop By Before Jai-Alai
Denis Is Here To Serve You
400 I Dania Beach Blvd.
(Across from tht Ji-Ali Plca)
Opening Special
SPECIAL DINNER $j95
BEFORE THE GAMES "
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WXER CHEF "DERIS"


Fiiday. March 17, 1972
vJewisMorkfian
Page 3
Workers And Leaders
Invited To Breakfast
JeesM J. Martin, president, and
Dr. Dr. Norman Atkin, campaign
chairman of Jewish Welfare Fed-
HSSt J. MAffTIN
eratton of Greater Hollywood have
invited a number of Federation
workers and a select croup of
community leaders to breakfast at
9:30 a.m. Sunday at Emerald Hills
Passover Seder In
Hospital's Chapel
Monday, March 27
A Passover Seder will be eon-
ducted for the Jewish patients at
the South Florida State Hospital
Monday, March 27 at 7 p.m. in the
chapel.
This special event is gpoMored
annually by the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Greater Hollywood
and the Broward N'oi-th Dade
Council of B'nai B'rith Women.
Rabbi Arthur Abrams, spiritual
leader of Temple Kmanu-Kl, Ft.
l.nuderdale, and representing the
Broward Board of Rabbis, will of-
ficiate at the Seder. An arrav of
traditional foods including gefulte
Fish, matzos. and an assortment
ol othed delicacies will be served
in observance of the holiday.
Broward-North Dade Council of
B'nai B'rith Women sponsors par-
ti's commemorating the various
Jewish holidays throughout the
year at the hospital, under the
c hairmanship of Mrs. Lillian Kap-
lan of the Hollywood Chapter. Mrs.
Kitty Baumohl of the Sunshine
Chapter is cochairman. Also parti-
cipating in these parties this year
are representatives of Aviva, Hal-
landale. Hollywood, Moorings.
N'>rth Dade, Sky Lake and Sun-
shine Chapters.
The Jewish Federation of Great-
er Hollvwood has arranged the
distribution of sufficient matzos
in the various dining areas at the
hospital, where they will be pro-
vided to any Jewish patient re-
uucsting them for the duration of
Passover.
Country Club.
The purixise of the meeting is
to broaden the base of the current
campaign by enlisting the guests'
;eration in s o Jii c i t i n g other
pros|>ects.
The 1972 Federation Campaign
is now at about the halfway mark
time-wise and pledges have ex-
ceeded those secured in any pre-
vious year in a similar time pe-
riod. However, because of the
tremendo"sl" inTM>"d >oo,".. in
Israel, due in part to the influx
of Soviet Jewry, the cooperation
of every Jew in the community i.s
being sought.
Kach worker who attends the
breakfast meeting will be ex-
expected to take between five and
ten names for personal solicita-
tion. With this additional impetus
to the campaign, it i.s expected
that the 1972 goal will more easily
attained; thus Federation's obliga-
tions to Israel as well as to local
and national agencies can be met
uith in the time allotted.
John Miller Guest Speaker
John C. Miller, well known lec-
turer from the Florida Power and
Light Co. was to be the guest
speaker at a meeting of the Hen-
rietta Szold Group of Hadassah
on Thursday. His topic of discus-
sion was to be The Uses of Elec-
tricity."
MASHGIACH
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Call 565-6689
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Ph Broward Zionist District
Appointments Announced
Mrs. Sam J. Perry, membership
vice president of the Broward
Zionist District, has announced
the appointment of Mr. and Mrs.
fsadorc Goldberg as associate
chairmen, and the appointment of
Mel Reiser as membership chair-
man for Hallandale.
Mr. Goldberg, a former presi-
dent of the Rotary Club, is pres-
i ently serving as recording s< cre-
| 'ary of the District. He an.! hi*
I wife are members of Temple Beth
] Shalom, Hollywood. Mr. "Reiser
serves on the board of Broward
Zionist District and Temple Sinai'
board of governors.
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Paga 4
+Je*lsiinork0ar
Friday. March 17, 1972
fcJemsti Flcridliaur]
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.E. 6th Stueet TeLrritoNE J7J-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 920-6J92
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Jewish WlLFAU Federation op CREATfii Hollywood S^opar Editorial
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Salter, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atkin.
T Jewish Floridian has absorbed tha Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weakly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arta Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, Amsrican Association
of Engh.h Jewish Newspspere, and the Florida Preaa Aeeoclatlon.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 12.00
Out of Town Upon Requeat
Volume 2
Friday, March 17, 1972
Numbar 10
2 NISAN 5732
I
Security Council Blind To Facts
It wculd seem to be more than coincidence that the
Arab terrorists, quiet for so many months, began new
actions just as United Nations negotiator Gunnor Jarring
initiated efforts to develop dialogue among the contending
forces in the Middle East. The terrorist organizations have
made it plain for a long time that they will not accept a
peaceful solution, only the dismantling of Israel, and on
other occasions have demonstrated their intentions through
attacks on Israel territory and people.
By some magic that only diplomats can explain, how-
ever, the U.N. Security Council does not recognize the
existence of Fatah and other terrorists so that it can
with all good conscience, we presume pass resolutions
condemning Israel for going into Lebanon and Syria in
self-defense moves against the terrorist strongholds.
While the Security Council cannot see, Lebanon evi-
dently knows the facts and, like Jordan before it, is moving
against those who have no desire for a peaceful solution.
For they threaten the government of Lebanon as much as
they do Israel. When the Security Council learns this lesson,
it is possible Gunnar Jarring can accomplish more than he
has in the past.
Carrying On A Great Tradition
The rapid development of the Bahama Islands in re-
cent years has brought to our off-shore neighbors a large
number of Jews, both from this country and from England
With their permanent settlement assurred, they are now
preparing for the ground-breaking of the first synagogue
ever to be built in the Bahamas.
The slogan of the Freeport Hebrew Congregation.
which has been meeting in a hotel for several years, is
"Preserving an Ancient Past with an Active Future". The
members are carrying on a great tradition that deserves
the recognition and cooperation of all of us.
An Important Breakthrough
The American Jewish Congress has shown the way
for others in selecting Mrs. Naomi Levine to succeed Will
Maslow as its executive director, for she will be the first
woman to head a major national Jewish organization.
A staff member for 21 years, Mrs. Levine was not
chosen to succeed one of the leading figures in American
Jewish life because she is a woman, for she brings to the
post a record of accomplishment that was deserving of
recognition. Nevertheless, her appointment marks an impor-
tant breakthrough for those who believe in equality of the
sexes as well as the races and it is only fitting that Con-
gress, devoted to civil rights and civil liberties in all its
aspects should be leading the way.
Why Did They Wait So Long?
Recognizing the inevitable trend in Jewish life, the Board
of Governors of the Jewish Agency has approved the
creation of an institute in Jerusalem to train fund-raisers.
In addition to their talents in getting money, candidates
for the institute training would have to havu a background
in Jewish studies and a knowledge of Israel. Our only ques-
tion is: how come the Agency waited so long to como up
with such a logical program?
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSO*
WASHINGTON The c*id
thing* adventure in China is that we
cannot tell whether he has
really succeeded, or has failed.
As these words are written (be-
fore release of the climactic com-
munique), it appears the Presi-
dent has achieved a fairly glit-
tering short-term success.
VI-.T WHAT the Pi-sM-nt
11 ally wanti is a long-term suc-
Tha Chine have the same
prime aim. Ironically, how.it.
it will take two years or more
:. 1 .I.- Richard M. Nixon and
Chou En-lal can possibly Judge
whether they have got what
they want.
Their Joint primary aim. to
put it bluntly, has been to '.Mi-
ll)'- Sovietl from undertaking
the nuclear castration of China.
The United States was brought
into the equation by the Chi-
nes*, precisely because the Chi-
nese greatly fear a Soviet pre-
ventive attack, aimed to destroy
their own nuclear program.
And how can one tell whether
deterrence has been successful
except by the passage of time?
AS TO the reasons for the
Chinese fear, they are bleakly
simple. As long ago as 1969, the
Soviets came very close to nu-
clear castration of China. They
even asked the United States
government about it because
they were not fully ready then.
In the end, the Soviets held
their hands because they got a
sharply negative reaction from
President Nixon, but above all
because they were not ready.
The Soviet military preparation*
on the Chinese border were by
no means halted in 1969, how-
ever.
The preparations have gone
forward relentlessly, year after
year. Last summer saw a fur-
ther Soviet buildup equal to any
in the previous years. Some 200
additional attack aircraft were
added in forward positions,
among a good many other de-
velopments. As Chou Kn-lai has
repeatedly said, the Soviets now
have about a million troops on
the remote Chinese frontier.
The figure is about accurate,
too, if border guards, support
troops and Mongolians are in-
cluded in the total figure.
SO YOU have what may be
called a John-and-Mary situa-
tion. You cannot logically say
that John is absolutely certain
to dine with Mary on Thursday,
even if John has made the date,
bought a new suit for the occa-
sion and is well known to be
dying of love for Mary. Either
John or Mary may fall ill, or
something else may happen to
prevent the dinner.
By the same token, howe> er,
it is even less logical to say
that John is absolutely certain
not to dine with Mary, despite
known love, the purchase of the
suit and the date on John's cal-
endar. This second fault of logic
is still being committed by a
good many Americans, in and
out of government, with respect
to the Soviet preparations
against China. But it is not be-
ing committed by the Chinese
leadership.
As to how the President and
Prime Minister Chou may get
the long-run result they want,
that again is at least fairly sim-
ple. The timing of the Chinese
nuclear program will probably
force a Kremlin decision to
strike or not to strike at some
time in 1973 or 1974. After that
the risks will change for the
Soviets.
WHEN THE time comes for
the final decision, the men of
the Kremlin will surely be di-
vided. All governments are al-
ways divided about very pain-
ful decisions. The new relation-
ship between the United States
and China must be seen in Mos-
icow as another new element of
frisk It will stro/gthen the op-
ponents of an attack on China
The opjionenta will then be more
likely to win the argument in
the Kremlin.
As to why the President
should desire 'his result, that is
also fairly simple. In iww.-r
v
terms, the Soviets, the United
States and China may be con- ,
ceived as alpha, because the S 1-
viets are substantially the
strongest in strategic weapons;
as beta,' because the Ui
States is still pretty itr
and as gamma-minus-mitri
Continued an Page it
/\s
Max Lerncr
Sees It
NEW YORK, NY. Pity poor Hubert Humphrey, who in a
moment of candor blurted out a secret to a huddle of govern
a hotel room, and will be riddled for it. it was the not so .
c"nt seen t that a volcanic explosion over busing Is hot upon
and that the liberals who don't heed the rumbling will soon bo
covered with lava and mummified in their lofty stance
This is all helping George Wallace, who delightedly eat--
agonized liberal senators and governors every day. using hi- .
ion of the busing story to fry them in public. The antibusing
fury may well give him the victory in the Florida primary, but
it goes well beyond the southern battles and has become the
rallying cry in a national war. Obviously it suits Wallace's rtyl -
of fake populism, and will be used by many nationally as a popu-
list cop-out. to scrap the whole movement for school integration
But It would be foolish to dismiss it as a weapon for Wallace
and a cop-out for the fainthearted. Sens. Mansfield, Scott, Javit*
and other architects of the recently passed Senate amendment
on busing took the anti-busing movement seriously enough to
design a tactical retreat in order to head off a more damaging
constitutional amendment. I raise a cheer for their bill, however,
feebly. Sometimes a tactical retreat is the only fragment of vk>
tory you can salvage from a strongly running tide against you.
THE PIRPOSE OF the Mansfield-Scott addition to th*
education bill should be clear enough. It tells the federal courts
that Congress doesn't want them to order further busing, that ir.
effect it wants busing to be a local option of the school districts.
A constitutional amendment would outlaw it altogether, and not
er.iy shut off the future but roll back the pastwhich could
mean the start of resegregation.
Have Mansfield, Scott and the liberal coalition beaten a
craven retreat, as Sen. Ribicoff insists? This depends on how
strong the antibusing tide is. My own view is that it isn't a die-
hard fanatic movement limited to racists, but that its fpringi
are deep and its appeal widespread. What triggered it wa
federal court decision In the Richmond case, but the sources o?
its explosiveness reach far deeper than Richmond.
Every passionate movement involves an enragement which
says. -You have driven us too far: From this moment n
fight back, at whatever cost." The rage in antibusing is again-*
something vaguely called the "liberals." especially the federal
courts, and the ideas they get from the liberal intellectuals ami
press. The American character is a melange of the sentimental
and the violent, sometimes a dangerous combination. There are
few sentiments in America stronger than those about children.
In this case the sentiment is the feeling that the children are
being shortchanged and victimized by being bused long dis-
tances, sometimes into crime-ridden areas, and torn away from
their neighborhoods, and that the end product is worse education
for many, and confusion for all.
IS THIS A TRUE or false picture? The fact is that student t
if education just don't know, because the evidence Isn't in. But
whether true or false a strong majority of Americans today
pretty much believe it U true. I don't doubt that some of them are
moved, more or less consciously, by racial fears and prejudice*.
But they don't form the majority, which is made up of people
who whatever their unconscious drives consciously feel tha'
busing is the breaking point, and rationalize their rage by their
belief that their children (and indeed all children) are letting
the short end of the stick.
There are two ways of meeting this, and countering the
constitutional amendment which could mean resegregation.
One is to meet it head on, use the Title VI weapon of the denial
of federal funds to resisting school districts, egg on the federal
Judges, clamp down in a liberal version of law-and-order consti-
tutionalism and try to shame waverers and defy the rebels. This
is the battering-ram method and it works only if the fortress is
clearly one of prejudice and blindness, weakly held by a few die-
haids. I suspect It would lead very quickly to a chain reaction
r,f open rebellion against the law. a deep crisis of the judiciary
and some pretty dangerous outbrusts of social hatred.
The other way is that of the more tough-minded Senate
liberals, who won't lay down their arms but are ready for a pause
to consolidate the gains of two decades of liberal court deci
If the nation uses the time thus gained to turn its social Imagina-
tion and inventiveness into opening both the Inner-city ghetto-
and the suburbs, changing the residential patterns of both, an!
improving the quality of schooling in both, it won't be lon^ be-
fore the drive toward equal education can be completed.
HHH


Friday. March 17, 1972
^Jewisti IhrkMan
Pago 5
i.'-. j .
GIVE AND ENJOY PASSOVER
Barton's Passover Continental chocolate and baked
specialties bring delicious and festive accents to
holiday entertaining and gift-giving.
JM's enticing selection includes:
Chocolate Matzo Balls, box of 24, 2.35
Passover Petit Fours, 40 piece Parve, 3.35
Seder Mints, 9 ounces Parve, 1.69
Jerusalem Assortment, 1 pound Parve, 3.25
Miniature Layer Cakes, 12 pieces, 2.75
Passover Cup Cakes, 13Vi ounces Parve, 2.49
CANDY, at all jm stores except pompano



Tcge 6
Jewisiifk>ridUan
Friday. March 17, 1972
WORKERS' MEETING PARTICIPANTS
A special guest at the recent Workers' Meeting, held in con-
nection with the Jewish Welfare Federation's 1972 cam-
paign, was Zvi Kolilz. (seated, center) a well-known author-
ity on the situation in the Middle East. Federation vice presi-
dent Herbert Katz is seated at left; at right is Jesse J. Martin,
president. Fiom left (standing) are JWF treasurer Eh. Philip
Weinstein, Jr., Max Sloan and David Harris.
Howai d Liff, Dr. Karl Morgenstein, Sam Finkelstein
Harry Shaikin, Larry Hunter, Dr. Sam Meline
Morton Abrarn, George Bursak, Vic Gross
10 to S p.m.
983-2808
VISIT AIL THE MAJOR
WHOLESALE FURNITURE SHOWROOMS
CALL MAX MOFFET
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AFTER 7 p m
961-0662
Youth Railv At Temple Emami-El Sunday Evening
The Broward Youth Rally for All Broward youth, whether af- be arranged For furtherInform*
J5 5rryl stLsored by" the Ciliated or U^ftHtoted,^tarttod "" <^ ^ *** <>r
Bruv.ard Board of Rabbis Sunday
at 7 p.m. in Temple Kmanu-Kl, Ft.
Lauderdale, is beine coordlnate b) Shirley Goldman, Youth Direc-
tor of Temple Beth Shalom, Holly-
wood -and ArnflM Pakula, Youth
Director of Temple Beth Kl. Hol-
lywood.
Speaking at the rally will be
Dennis Prager. 23. an outstanding
young speaker who has earned an
international reputation as a
S|>okesman on behalf of Soviet
Jewry. A graduate student of the
Russian and Middle East Instit-
utes Mr. I'ragcr is a fellow at the
School of International Affairs of
Columbia University.
The day bctore the rally, a
joint effort of all the Jewish youth
groups of the Broward area, will
view the movie "The Fixer"
at Temple Beth Kl at 2:30 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. in conjunction with
the event. Susan Starshefsky and
Robin Berkowitz, folk singers
from Stern College, will also en-
tertain.
to attend. Bus trans;>ortation will
Arnold Pakula.
Sisterhood Holding
Square Dance And
Chuckwagon Dinner
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom will hold a Square Dance
and Chuckwagon Dinner Satur-
day at 8 p.m. in the temple's social
hall at 1725 Monroe St.
Neil Blanchard. professional
square dance caller and his troupe
of t in square and Israeli dances. One
of the features of the evening will
be the awarding of an original
Grandma Moses painting as a
door prize.
Mrs. Peter Bouer is chai-man
for the evening funr'.ion. Mrs
Morton Katz. Mrs. Sherwin Gol-
den. Mrs. Philip Levins end Mrs
P'ter Bouer are in charge of dec-
j' ations.
Reservations may be made by
"ontacting Mrs. Zina Richman at
the temple office.
The Sisterhood is taking orders
for Carmel Kosher Wine from
Israel for the Passover holidays
with proceeds going to the Torah
Fund. For further details con-
tact Mrs. I^eslie Bouer at the
,lomr,)o officfe, 4fi01 Arthur St.
;**_!
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Friday. March 17, 1972
*Jewlst florkilnn
What 9 Cooking
Bv RUTH SIKKIS
-
Jewish holidays do not tarnish as times go by. On the con-
trary. The> seem to rejuvenate and shine with new significance
for each generation. Take, for instance, today's concern with
c ology. -roing back to nature and setting an Karth-Day (in New
York). It may sound very contemporary and new But it is not.
We have a holiday that dates back centuries, totally dedicated
to ntfuve.
Hi.- holiday, which is the New Year for trees, is called Tu
P'shevat. To celebrate it properly one should go out to the fields
and parks, enjoy the fresh air, the greenery, the pale sun of
party spring. One should also plant a new tree, a young sap-
pi ing, to be personally involved. To serve the right food for this
holiday one draws on the variety of fruits, fresh or dried. Actu-
ally, the traditional fruit-plate, also known as "Hamisha-asar,"
looks as modern as a dish just bought in a health food store.
Here is a recipe that combines traditional dried fruits into
modern little "nature" candies. Serve them as sweets, desserts
o*- a gift.
APRICOT BALLS
8 oz. dried apricots 2 tbls. bread brumbs
6 oz. coconut flakes 1 tsp. orange liqueur
1 tbl. orange marmalade 20 tiny paper cups
Grind the apricots in a meat grinder. Grind half of th?
coconut, followed by one tablespoon of bread crumbs to push
down the left-overs.
Put everything in a medium bowl. Add t1"- marmalade,
range liqueur and remaining bread crumb'. Mix well with a
wooden .spoon till you have a smooth "dough."
Put half of the dough on a piece of wax paper and fold the
paper over it. Shajie the apricot mixture into a rope of 10 inches.
The wax paper will prevent the mixture from sticking to your
hands. Remove the paiier and cut the rope into 10 pieces. Repeat
with the rest.
Spread a flat plate with the remaining coconut flakes. MaJ;e
a ball out of each piece and roll it in the flakes. Put in a paper
cup. Repeat same with the rest. Makes about 20 balls.
ft ft ft
This dish is inspired by the British kitchen, which clah.is to
be the number one in beef roasting. The claim to fame is sub-
stantiated by centuries of meat eating that perfected beef roast-
ing 'nto an art. To accompany the delicious roast, the Bitish
prefer Yorkshire pudding. The "pudding" Is not really what you
may have in mind. It is not heavy like a bread pudding, nor it it
sweet like a dessert pudding. The Yorkshire pudding looks like
a puffed pancake, is light and airy inside while delicately crisp
outside. To the romantic Knglishman the pudding reminds ore of
a big yellow flower opening to the sunshine. But its purpose is
rather prosaic to soak up the juices of roast beef. Our ver-
sion is adapted to the Jewish kitchen and you may serve it as a
skle dish for any meat with sauce or gravy.
KOS1U.K YORKSHORE PI DDING
1 Pgg Vi cup water
'A cup flour 1 tbl. oil
Va tsp. salt
Blend all ingredients for about two minutes in electric
blender There should be no lumps, and the batter should look
smooth aid satiny. Chill the batter for at least one hour. Stir
once more before using.
Preheat oven to 400 degrets fahrenheit. Pour the batter into
a well-greased pyrex pie plate nine inches in diameter. Put in
the center of the oven. Bake for 15 minutes and lower the heat
to 373 degrees. Bake for another 20 minutes till the "pudding"
puffs at the rim and becomes golden brown. Serve imr. ediilely.
Makes 4-C> servings.
ft ft ft
As a busy working woman, mother of tluee, anu chroni-
cally short of time, i am always on the lookout for quick, good
recipes. Sometimes I experiment a lot to find one. and some-
limes it Ls just serendipity, as is the case here. I put some
chicken in the oven tor dry doasting (I am also mindful of my
diet) and planned to serve it as Ls. Since the chicken looked too
dry I poured some wine over it, then added some mushrooms,
sprinkled some of this and that, covered the pan and ran along to
lay business. I practically forgot about the chicken until dinner
lime My husband, who by now has a very discriminating palate,
enjoyed it and didn't fail to let me know that he appreciated my
culinary efforts. So I decided to share with you the recipe that
is so simple, and delicious.
SIMPLY DELICIOUS CHICKEN
4 chicken thighs tsp. white pepper
2 tsp. salt 1 CUP drV whitc Wlnc
H tsp. garlic powder K lb. fresh mushrooms
Vk tsp. thyme
Sprinkle the chicken with salt. Put on a teflon roastin:; pan
and place skin down in a 425 degree preheated oven. Roast for
10 minutes then turn over and roast for another 10 minutes.
Clean mushrooms and slice them thinly. Sprinkle the chicken
with garlic powder, pepper and thyme. Add the mushrooms and
wine to the pan and cover it tightly with aluminum foil. Reduce
the heat to 350 degiees and bake for 45 minutes, occasionally
lilting the cover and basting with the juices. Turn the oven off
and just leave the chicken there to keep warm until serving
time. Serves four.
Winners of the 1972 Frank L. Weil Awards
of the National Jewish Welfare Board ate
(from the left) Rabbi Israel Miller, promi-
nent New York rabbi; Leon Kaplan. Miami
Jewish communal leader, and Jacques
Lipchitz, world-renowned Jewish sculptor.
The awards wi:l be presented at the ban-
quet of JWB's National Biennial Conven-
tion Saturday April 15, in Atlanta, Ga.
Rabbi Miller, president of the American
Zionist Federation and former chairman
of JWB's Commission on Jewish Chap-
laincy, will receive the award "for dis-
tinguished contribution to the welfare of
Jewish personnel in the U.S. Armed
Forces." Mr. Kaplan, former president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
of the YM-YWHA of Greater Miami, will
receive the award "for distinguished con-
tribution to the advancement of the Jew-
ish Community Center field." Mr. Lipchitz
will receive the award "for distinguished
contribution to the advancement of Jew-
ish culture." The three fields of work for
which the awards are given are JWB s
responsibility in behalf of the American
Jewish community. The late Frank L. Weil,
for whom the awards are named, was
president of JWB from 1940 to 1950
Seagram's VO. Canadian.
For people who like
everything just right.
C*OIANIISRY- BUND OF StUCICO WH1SKIES.6 YEARS 010.86.8 PROOF. SUGMU C.CMUJS CO., N.Y.C.


Page 8
+Jmisl> fhrldkwi
Friday. March 17, 1972
A STATEMENT
TO BE READ
AT PASSOVER
SEDERS
Remembering the struggle of
the Soviet Jews to attain free-
dom and equality, the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry, an
association of 34 national Jewish
organizations and hundreds of
Jewish community councils and
federations, urges that service
leaders read this statement over
the matzah at upcoming Passov-
er Seders.
THIS IS THE "MATZAH OF HOPE'
This Matzah, which wc set aside as a symbol
of hope for the Jews of the Soviet Union.
reminds us of the indestructible links that exist
between us.
As we ot*rve this festival of freedom.
we know that Soviet Jews are not free to leave
without harassment; to learn of their past; to
pass on their religious traditions; to learn the
languages of their fathers; to train the teachers
and the rabbis of future generations.
We remember with bitterness the scores of
Jewish prisoners of conscience who sought to
live as Jews and struggled to leave for Israel
the land of our fathers-but now languish in
bondage in Soviet labor camps. Their struggle
against their oppressors is part of an ongoing
effort, and they shall know that they have
not been forgotten.
As Soviet Jews assert themselves they are
joined by all who are aroused by their affliction.
We will continue until they emerge into
the light of freedom.
CHAIRMEN OF WOMEN'S DIVISION LUNCHEON
At the S100 minimum contribution luncheon are chairmen
Mrs. Caroline Honeyman, (left) Mrs. Michael Joelson and
Mis. Jerome Leff.
Chairmen of the $50 minimum contribution luncheon in-
cluded (from left) Mrs. Donald Berman, Mrs. Myron Brodie,
Mrs. Andrew Greenman, Mrs. Paul Koenig, Mrs. Edward
Gottlieb and Mrs. Norman Bluth.
Temple Beth El's
Brotherhood, AJC
Series On Aflrfng
The Broward County Chapter of
the American Jewish Committee
i'i Conjunction with Temp],.
El'j Brotherhood will hold tha
~.-..>. 1 c 1 v sjn 0f a two-parl Be-
lies on the subject 0f -xhe A 1
'i 9:30 Bum. Sunday in the Tool
Auditorium of the temple, 1351 S.
14th Ave Hollywood.
The tonic of discussion Wil] he
"Health Cue Problems of the A.
ing." The first suhjeet covered
was "The Klderly Jewish Poor."
Conducting; the lerfei Is Dr.
Charles R. Beber, president 01 the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee.
Dr Beber, who is considered
me o', the outstanding garbntolo*
gists in the country. 1 v
man) 1 ommissloni includln the
White House Conference on Aging.
1 Is is on the board of direct
the American Geriatrit Socl >ty,
medical !i ector of Douglas fjnr-
dena Jewish Home for the Aged
and physician in charge of the
Geriatric clinic, Jackson Memor-
ial Hospital and the University of
Miami School Of Medicine
BEFORE A
TENSION
HEADACHE
BRINGS OUT THE WORST IN YOU...
lake A11 .Kin to relieve headache pain
fast and let the brit of you come
through!Compared 10 all other lead-
ing tablets, Anacin gives you mote
of the pain-reliever doctors recom-
mend most. In minutes you feel
better, and act it. Next lime, before
S tension headache gets on your
serves and you're ready to snap at
people... take Anacin* Tablets and
kt the best of you come through'
TRAVEL SERVICES
AL VACCA, Mff
IfM Momsoe St.
LJ-M______J _
naavwoaa, rs.
MIMMI
CHAMMa Of COMMMCI
25-S-4S
fit. Itll
HEAI
JACOB
SCMCHTCR
OH THE AIM
SAT TOUt
Mvoam
roots* auisic
tvtjnr sunoat at noon
RAW0 STATION WITO
1200 0* Your Did
Apartment Division campaign chairman Maurie Meyers
(left) poses with Aryeh Plotkin, guest speaker at the recent
Jewish Weliare Federation in the Presidential Towers, and
Louis Rosen, (right) chairman for the building.
Cr -Cr -to
Mr. and Mrs. Jock Ruby woro among the guests at th-
ish Welfare Federation Apartments Division meeting in 'he
Presidc:i'icl Towers.
'.'
h
Residents who attended the recent meeting of the Apart-
ments Division of Jewish Welfare Federation at the Presi-
dential Towers included Mr. and Mrs. Louis Klinger, (left)
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Kirsnev and Mr. and Mrs. Louis Bauer.
For Reservations And Tickets
McDANIEL TRAVEL
OPEN t SUN. tO 5
1845 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
922-3531
DANIA
NURSING HOME
"WHERE PEOPLE CARE FOR PEOPLE"
Mstafcsr sf Fhi. Nvrsiaf Nhw ASMCHrttsa
SKIUU NUKSING CAM
WMI0 HUWSIS OH DUTY WOUND TNC CLOCK
DOCJOtS OH CAU 24 HOVKS A DAI
MARTIN STEYER
AdministratCM-
SIDNEY M LEE
Ami. Administrate*
Phone 927-050*
440 Phippen Road Dania, FU. 33004


Friday, March 17. 1972
+Jelsti FtorkHairi
Page 9
I
Love is a strong bond. So is the promise which
has kept Jews together through centuries of
oppression.
Love is a fragile word. So is the word "cease-
fire" for the people of Israel.
Love is giving with no thought of retjrn. So is
your pledge to the UJA.
But there is return.
Through the UJA, you have helped hundreds of
thousands of immigrants come home to Israel.
You have given them the beginnings of a new life.
You have kept part of the Promise.
But we have even more vital promises to keep
in 1972. And we cannot allow them to accumu-
late. The people of Israel need you now more than
ever before. Defense drains 80% of their tax rev-
enue. And they are the most heavily taxed people
in the world. This means that they haven't the
resources to help us in fulfilling our obligations
to immigrants. The 70,000 immigrants who will
arrive in 1972 face a critical housing shortage.
Their education and health needs must be met.
And it is our job to solve these problems in 1972
-before they get too big for any of us.
Money will buy food and books and medical
care. Your 1972 pledge will buy a lot of people
peace of mind. That s what it means to be
keep .
the promise
GIVE TO THE ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
OF THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
THROUGH THE
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION CAMPAIGN
1909 Harrison St., Hollywood, Fla.
Phone 927-9536
E
itof


Page 10
+Jr**M Hcrknar
Friday, March 17, 1972
Soviet-Libyan Oil Pact Viewed
As A 'Marriage Of Convenience'
JERUSALEM 1JTA1 Lasti
eek's ilUfclosure In Moscow of
,iel giueiuent witn Libya
a Jointl) develop that country's
II resources was viewed here
Imarifj h mania ol un-
nee for both parties.
Although tiv agreement
reaks ih,' Western oil monop-
0I3 in Libya :t w not conaidered
. tin; Ru~-ia will play a
major role in the Libyan oil in-
dustry nor is it expected to alter
tin' strons: internal f.nti-OorrT-
munlal Stand of Libya's ruling
military junta heaoVd by CoL
Muammar el-Qaddafi
A. i i.nliriK to a report in Ta*.
Question Box
B) KABB1 SAMUEL J. FOX
What i tlu- purpov ot the
\rMtu.ii<- prayer whit-h U rwitfd
whm tlw Torah mtoII in rr-
.i.ivit (rum tho ark.
This is tin- well-known prayer
"B"rich Sh'meh" (Blessed i>- the
ranw ol the Sovereign of the Uni-
UA Navy Should
Use Israel Ports.
Says JWV Head
By Special Report
LOS ANGELES -The national
eommandar of the Jewish War
Veterana has urprMl that the deep
V ater port* of Israel be UMd as
' liberty ports" by the VS. Sixth
Fleet in ordnr to emphasise that
the Southeastern Mediterranean
it ;>ait of its defense perimeter.
According to Jerome D. Cohen,
JWV head, "showing the flat? in
the deep water ports <>f Israel will
act as a ileterrent to the Soviets,
r hose bases in Egypt tcivo it strat-
egic domiiuusee over the South-
aatern Meditrrranean. a lonj;-
Bought Soviet dream since the
daj s of the C/.ars."
Conunandet Cohen made the
suggestion after an extensive tour
ol the Mediterranean area and
meetings with hieh officials of
NATO, the Sixth Fleet, and the
government of Israel.
verse). This prayer is found in
the Kabbalistic Book of the Zohai
(BxodUS 208a 1 where it Ls writ-
ten thai "when the scroll is taken
out iii the congregation to be read
the gates of the heavens of mercy
open and the celestial low is
awakened. It is then fitting for 0
man to ecite this prayer."
The famous Kabballst, Rabb
Isaac Luria, is said to have Intro-
duced this prayer Into the regular
liturgy. Some contend that it
, should be said only on the Sab-
hath when man is not too much
in a hurry so that he can con-
centrate on its meaning.
The prayer in general is a peti-
tion to the Almighty to bestow
upon the worshipper the light of
learning and inspiration, declaring
that man relies only on the Al-
mighty to bring peace, sustenance
and enlightenment
OnetalK sjieaking. it should bo
noted that the Holy Scroll is ac- j
tually the covenant that estab-1
tithe* the two-way relationship:
between men and the Creator
Whin the ark is open an! the
scroll is revuiled and about to be j
taken out for reading, man is close
to the Almig-ty and is obligated
to reaflirm the 'nd that exists
between man and God.
ii't. IS7S( .7,-uisii Tatasrapbk) Askmmtjt)
the Soviet press aRency, the pact
mi rear tied with a Libyan Uel-
eyatiim In Mont-ow, Inohitles
prospecting for mineral deposits
and gas. training Libyan national
rail res, provides for cooperation
in prospecting. rvtra.-liiij; and
reiiMiuu oil, ami In developing
power generation and other
brances of Libya's national econ-
aasy.
Qaddafi, who has likened So-
% let imperialism to Western Im-
perialism, has been uncomfort-
able in relation to his partners
in the louse 'alteration he en-
tered into last September with
Egypt and Syria, both countries
with strong ties to Moscow. But
he regards the agreement with
Moscow as political leverage in |
dealing with the West which
he mistrusts no less than the
Soviet Union.
Observers here said the main
reason the Soviet Union signed
the part wu It* Inability to de-
velop Its own oil resources fast
enough to keep |iaee> wMh its In-
dustrial expansion. The U.S.S.K.
is said to be lagging by as much
as 10 years in this endeavor.
The Soviet Union, once an oil
exporting nation, has in recent
years become an importer of oil.
The Soviet-Libyan deal con-
firmed what political observers
have known for years that
Soviet relations with any coun-
try has little to do with that
country's regime or ideology.
This is the case in Kgypt, where
the Communist Party is Illegal.
It is most evident in Russia's
brisk trade with Spain whose
regime under Gen. Franco is re-
garded as Fascist by the 0 S.S.R.
Observers here said thrt Rus-
sia's need for Middle East oil
may eventually lead it to deals
with Saudi Arabia, which is ve-
hemently anti-Communist.
The Ford dealers of Dade and Broward Counties have
moved full steam into the small station wagon field with
this new Pinto. Though the wheelbase is the same as the
Pinto sedan, the car adds another 9.7 inches to its length in
the carco urea. Available in both a Squire model, as show.
here, and a basic edition, the new aU-uround family car
has a two litre engine and four speed transmission as stand-
ard equipment. Automatic transmission is also available
HOLLYWOOD HEARING AID SERVICE
BATTERIES REPAIRS
Rhone: Broward: 920-8338 Dade: 949-8042
2124 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
22
MAI CO HEARING AIDS
HOLLYWOOD 33020, FLA.
"MARCH SPECIAL---------
2-Yr. Warranty
COLOR TUBE (295hi.
E L
H
T
)
129
95
InHallmd
& F
R O
ECTRONICS
IXMRT IfrAIIS
Color T. V. Black A White T. V.
"Sorvic* li Our ONLY luim.r
18174 N.W. 2nd Aye. Miami rouna 624-9311
Rubinsteins
MAKE
SOMETHING
OUT OF IT
PETCEMETERY
24-HOUR SERVICE
Ctmplttt burial onu tvmtrml
rronjeannM for fM of all
typit, including pick-up service
ieeutiful Cemetery Grounds
Cfemotion Service*
Mtdtrotc fricei
fcT HEArty
MEMORIAL PARK
226-7387
10*01 WEST FLAGLEU
BURDINE'S 2 day
WAREHOUSE
shop Hulurdaif 8-3p.m------Hitniiau I2-.7 #>.
in.
This is the big one! The super-sale you've been waiting for! Top name
brands from our warehouse and all 9 stores! Huge savings on famous furniture.
Henredon. Hibriten. Drexel. Ethan Allen and lots more. Better carpets, priced
lo clear fast. Major appliances and tv's... at a fraction of their usual prices.
Beat the crowd! Come early for best selections!


Friday, March 17, 1972
vJenistifkridHan
Page II
PERSONALITY PROFILE
David Goodman
By ABBKY KI.K1N
IX-spite the. fapL.m&lDavid
(1(H).!Ri;tyrWs 11VI n Hillyvi(H)d
Hills for less than, he, his lovely
wile, Kikki, and their two hand-
some sons, Kip and Adam, have
.ilready made themselves very
much to honn'.
Dave was born and raised in St.
l.ouls, where he attended the Uni-
versity of Missouri and the Mis-
souri Law School. When he and
Kikki moved South 11 years ago.
Dave became associated with a
law firm in Miami. He was there
for seven years prior to joining
Hie law firm of Koenig and Katz
In Davle, He says he finds his law
practice a very gratifying and
stimulating experience and is de-
lighted that he has became a mem-
ber of the community.
Dave is a member of the Davic
Hotary Club, a director of the
South Broward Bar Association,
and of the University of Missouri
Alumni Association. His hobbies
include photography at which he
is most proficient anil some ten-
nis; one of his most satisfying un-
dertakinga has been coaching a
Little League baseball team.
The must fascinating of his In-
to rests, aside from his law prtc-
tiees. he says, is his membership
in the Council for International
Visitors. The prerequisite for join-
ing this group is a true interest
in other people and that is a qual-
ity David Goodman certainly
seems to have.
The main purpose of the Coun-
cil is to play host to foreign vis-
itors i sometimes business men.
sometimes students) and show
them how Americans live while
making them feel Jt home and
welcome. ~
Both Dave and Kikki have de-
lighted in the time they have giv-
en to these visitors. One, a young
Israeli. Art Melnlek, was working
for his doctorate at Cornell and
is now a professor of economics
at the University of Haifa. He
and his wife so enjoyed their as-
sociation with the Goodmans that
they made Davt the godfather of
their son.
The Goodmans also spent many
interesting hours with a criminal
lawyer from Vienna and a young
couple from Bangkok, Thailand.
To round out their international
friendships, they became foster
parents to a college student from
Santa Domingo ark! a young law-
yer from Seoul, Korea.
Coincidentally. the Dav ie Rotary
Club will sponsor an exchange
student who will he slaying with
Dave and Kikki for at least thro..
months next year.
Dave has been workhv: wit'i the
Voting Leaders Council of Jewish
Welfare Federation and serving as
vice president and program chair-
man this year. Rikki. an active
member of the Women's Division
of Federation, is on the board of
("amp Ka-Dcc-Mah.
The Goodmans firmly believe the
future of the Jewish people de-
pep.'s on the existence, safety and
prosperity of Israel. Both Dave
and Rikki are looking forward to J
S trip there, but Dave says they
are wailing until their boys are
little older because he feels the
journey should be a family experi-
ence.
Sammy Davis Jr. Signed For
Playbby Plaza Dinner-Dance
Sammy Davis Jr., one of the
outstanding entertainers of all
tune, has been signed for the Ith
anniversary diner-dance sponsored
bj the Hollywood Auxiliary of the
Jewish Home for the Aged, it has
1 i en announced. The dinner in the
Playboy Plu/o Hotel. Miami
Beach, Thursday evening, April (>.
will be preceded by a 6:30 p.m.
cocktail hour.
Since Mr. Davis' performance at
the Playboy Plaza will mark his
only appearance in South Florida
'his year, resei .ations for the din-
ner are being accepted on a first
come, first served basis.
Ringside and close-to-ringside
reservations will be available with
the purchase of gold tickets at ,
ST."). Silver tickets are $40. Seat-
ing placement will be made as
checks are received.
Arrangements may be made by
contacting any member of the Re-
servations Committee, including
Mrs, Charles Greenman. Mrs. Ruth
Brotherhood Hears Beber
Dr. Charles R. Beber. noted ge-
riatric specialist and member of
the White House Confcrenci on
Aging, will speak on "Health I are
Problems of the Aging" at Tem-
ple Beth 111 Brotherhood break-
fast Sunday ai 9:.") a.m. in Tobil
Auditorium. The event is spon-
sored by the Temple Adult Edu-
cation Series in cooperation with
the American Jewish Committee.
All proceeds will go to the Israel
Youth Scholarship Fund.
Doppeit. Mrs. S. L. Barkas, Mrs.
J. K. Miller, Mrs. Joseph Bi< gel-
son, Mr. and Mrs. Sol Bloom, Mrs.
A J. Salter. Mrs. Herbert Heiden,
.Mrs. A. P. Weinberg. Mrs. Hilda
Ginsburg, Mrs. Kthel Posnick, Mrs.
Norman Yaguda, M. 8. Wright,
Mrs. Louis Bennett, Mrs. Stanley
Silver, Mrs. Francis Briefer and
Mrs. I.ilyan Beckerman.
Adomat Appointed
1972-73 Chairman
Of IJ-F Campaign
O. !:. Hutchison, Jr., president
of the United Fund of Broward
County, has announced the ap-
pointment of K. A. Adomat to
serve as general chairman of the
1972-73 United Fund Campaign
which will kick off in September.
Mr. Adomat, vice president of
Florida Power and Light Com-
pany, was born in Arlington. Fla.,
and received his B.I'M-.', degree
from Georgia Institute of Technol-
ogy after serving three years in
the U.S. Navy in World Wai II.
He stated as a student engineer
with Florida Power and Light in
1950 and worked his way up. Ho
was named vice president last
year.
Mr. Adomat has served for two
years on the Board of Directors
Of Broward County United Fund
>f general chairman he will be
In addition to lilling the post
nerving this year as secretary and
as a member of the Executive
Committee.
OPENING SPECIAL
P.
and
DIP CLIP POODLE SALON
111* U. Mile Mwy. 925-244I Hsitr*e4. He.
Mon. thru S.t. I I
DoHarSfecM
This Week Oar,
1
if
Tn/rt.
yra'll
Uk*
/rfafrer of J~t*ci byi
JOSEPH ALSQP
Continued froir Pce 4
cause the Chinese are still pretty
.uiak despite refoarlfablc .nu-
clear progress!
IN THIH kind of equation,
it is always a iangej to the
alpha-power to have the gamma-
minus-minus power in its rear.
if the gamma-mlnus-mlxnis pow-
er is destroyed, therefore, the
alpha-power has vastly more
freedom of action in dealing
with the beta-power and in
other ways. In sum, a serious
upset then occurs in the over-
all balance of power. This fa
what the President vv: r.ts to
avert.
But he wants to aver; some-
thing else, too. If the eventual
Soviet decision is to undertake
China's castration, it ic clear
tin the world will enter lt new,
exceptionally ugly era. like the
later years before the Hitler
war. Averting that will also be
worth much. So one must h.-.pc
thai the President has succeeded,
although one must wait and PSe,
too.
Bar, Medical Auxiliaries Join For Brunch Tuesday
planned the affair for the Medical
Auxiliary, host of this yea a'*
event, has arranged for Joyce
Gardner of Travel Consultants.
Ft. Lauderdale. to address the
gathering. Her topic will lie "A
Travel Prescription for Profession-
al Wives." Reservations may i
made through Friday by contact-
ing Mrs. Pixel.
The South Broward Bar Asso
eiation Auxiliary will join the
South Broward Branch of the
Broward County Medical Associa-
tion Women's Auxiliary for brunch
at the Hillcrest Country Club
Tuesday at 11 a.m., it has been
announced.
Temple Solel Seder
At Emerald Hills CC
rJmerald Hills Country Club will '
or the scene of two traditional
PaSSOVer seders sponsored by Tern
pie Solel on the first and second
nights of the holidav. Wellies lay
March 29 and Thursday March 30
Rabbi Robert Fra/in, spiritual
leader of Temple Solel, will offici-
ate at both services.
The first evening's services will
he open to Emerald mils Apart-
ment residents, villa owners and
members of Temple Solel; the
second night'.; services will be open
to Envrald Hills Club members
and their families.
On both evenings services will
commence at 6 p.m. in the main
dining room of the club with din-
ner being served at 7 p.m.
BBW Chapter To
Hear M. Bisgyer
The Hallandale Chapter of B'nni
B'rith Women will meet Thursday
March 23. at 12:30 P m. in the
Home Federal Building 00 Hallan-
dale Beach Blvd. A cMlat'on will
be served before the business por-
tion of the meeting.
Maurice Bisgyer. honorary ex-
ecutive vice president of B'nai
B'rith. will speak on the contrib-
utions of B'nai B'rith to the es-
tablishment of Israel.
Mr. Bisgyer. who retired as ad-
ministrative head after 28 years
with B'nai B'rith. Ls a life mem-
ber of BI'.YO, ADL, Hillel, and
the International Council. He has
received the Doctor of Humanities
degree from Hebrew Union Col-
lege, and is the author of several
books.
Members are urged to bring
husbands, friends and guests.
TOUR ISRAEL
AND
EUROPE
with
RABBI MORTON MAIAVSKY
of
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM,
HOLLYWOOD
June 21-July 12
GREECE, ISRAEL,
SWITZERLAND SPAIN
MIAMI to MIAMI
1st Class Throughout
$1199 (Plus $3 tsx)
For Brochure and Information
Call 981-6111
Mrs. Irving Pixel, who has
HIM A CAR $20
441 MOTORS
WK.
-t-
Ic Ml.
PHONE FOR FREE DELIVERY
1901 N 60th AVE., HOLLYWOOD
PH. fSf-7300
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
Tyler Strvel l 19th Avr>u
Phon. 921 -8M2
<&
GOLDEN ISLES CONVALESCENT
CENTER & NURSING HOME
2400 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Phone 927-9717
24 Hour Nursing Supervision
LEONARD D. CORDES, C.A., F.A.C.N.H.A.
Vice President Managing Director
BOND DETECTIVE & SECURITY
AGENCY, INC.
Ill S.W. 8th Ave Hallandale, Fla.
LICENSED BONDED I INSURED
INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES
COMMERCIAL SECURITY
PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS
Domtitic
Civil
Criminol
UNIFORMED GUARDS
Construction Sitos
Shopping Contort
Apartment Buildings
FREE SECURITY ANALYSIS
24 HOUR SERVICE....920-2515
FRUIT SHIPPERS
Pure Orsnge end Grapefruit Juice
1809 Wiley St. (4 blocks north of Hollywood Dog Track
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Ttlephone 927-5447
NEW CROP NAVELS, PINK OR WHITE GRAPEFRUIT
SHIPPED ANYWHERE U.S., CANADA and EUROPE
NOW SHIPPING MINEOLA
TANGELOS AND TEMPLE ORANGES
D&D
DESIGNERS & DECORATORS
Featuring Fine Unusual Wallcovering
For the Trade
2031 Tyler Stroet, Hollywood, Fla. 33020
Phone: 927-3101 Miami 944-0424
Rhoda Deutsch
Lou Deutsch


Page 12
" kwisiyfkrkiian
Friday, March 17, 197j
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlesinger
maty patter
It wasn't a bicycle built for two. It was two
bicycles for each and it came as a complete sur-
prise to the recipients. The occasic- was the
joint birthc-ay party dinner celebra. on at th
home of Leon and C'asnllle Salt** In honor of
two good friends who share the same birthdat-
!> (Mr.. Donald, Herman and Leon Saltan.
Mr*. S. put forth a dinner bour.iful for a nouse
full of pals who together celebrate the occasion
every year Let and Leon spinning around the
living room on th<-ir new !0-speeds thanJdng
one and all f r th- ir gift of glorious transporta"
tion. proved beyond a doubt that they could
kxp up with the bost of them.
Peril Meia uill have to throw in th-- 'owe'.
when word tea hi h i that the "party-throw.
Infect" couple hi town did it a~an Al and (jmI
Ooodman filled the raft r- of their home with
people from a) over two eountjea While two
y on -h.' ktlo, a
' '
i- the i : ig 01 i. Gj y fort
held forth In each <
i II of .!-:- patientl;
i!" Ir turn to I it 1 Future had it
for them. A< ci i ii j to Car I fwho Incider.'
i floor : n [th grei n
: ber) "No i m ha i ti rtter tun than I
" With that w<- mil-- ,
however. T:. .-.;.. eqaa -.
b : those in atten lance thai w nlng.
wasn't til the wee houn that .in- last
irted,
COFFEE TIME
Since ii- ino ption raw yean ago, The Start-
ing Place, a project of the DeJIgaitrJai Sub-
stances Guidar Center, inc. ha, reaebad over
10.000 people. Through Its program of education,
Information, n ferral and guidance countelma
a rvlcet the C liters goal is to reduce -'run de-
p n ency among our children at the xmmunity
level.
According to i.:tir:l\ii,- (Mr. Kftuln) Gor-
don, noflata dir The Starting Place, There is a great need for
community support." For this reason a lerlea of
tiyht member-hip '.flees i? underway. First in
the series was hosted by Diane (Mia, Ttrllia).
'she's the new executive dire.'ori Shaffer and
Joan (Mr. QetaM) Raticoff. A qoodly grouo of
involved ladies becoming new nvnbers at that
educational ard Informative ether in-
(Mr*. Maiiryi Coai'railJ, t'hurlotte (Mrs. Itvfag)
PbteJ, Lets (Hie, .lse:,h, IHegalssa nd m....y.
many more. '.Sir.ee It's the women who havi
tabled the S P., ling on than, .... .
1 an to u'llize tli-
many service- foi prevent'on rated Mi G
don. Already y much Involved sa ol r I
are Lmaa Wfaa, Ihlrlej Bsnftth, Mitzi Mum and
Aim Vorra.
Judging by l of coffees coming up
there'll be man) to s Id to tl
ing list. At th.- end ol irrttm (Mia, \i
Un Ooraaa will the n at member
coffee and Ann Vorra and Lwa Yagui.i wll
team up for yel another,
k GLORIOUS DAY
The sun shone and the weather was suffici-
ently perfect to gladden the heart of any Florida
Tourist Development Commissioner on Feb 25.
the big day of The American Cancer Society's
third annual "Race For Life" benefit at Gulf-
stream Race Track. The sellout crowd enjoyed
luncheon in the clubhous0, a day of racing and a
change to win some pretty terrific prizes to
boot. Colorful pots of fresh tulip plants topping
ea:h of the tables and a tulip strewn watercolor
by Judith Steven* Say fie adorning the bright
red program covers carried out the theme of the
day. "Coming Up Tulips To Win The Race For
Life."
Dr. and Mr*. Peter Irving, winners of th"
flawing will eiiioy a weekend for two donated
by the Dora! Country Club Resort The $100
gift eerti!irate from Saks Fifth Avenue was
von by Mia. DavM gaafetd. while Chad (Mrs
Bara) MBtaeeta walked off with that divine 1SK
h rafj bl (let in the Grand Prix drav ing.
The committee members of the Iw-rvfit just
to be '' bappieal people around thea
than doubled the proceedi of
the pn At a private luncheon follow-
fil day, Don Bweeswy, executive di-
Broward County l.'nit of A.C.S.
nai d with <* generous ch-ck from 40
proud workers, a glorious day indeed for
ail I ed in t^" winning combination
A somrnrtti e s id community.
6 iz PEOPLE *ND PLACES
Cong to double ehr-v,:, riavid Pixel. 11
year-old dynamo ion of Masniee and Dot Pixel
who rot only copped the f.'st place douh'e-
awar' with his oartner. ifi-intr rHMseanssacst', in
the State of Florida Junior InvpMtkmal T.-nni-:
Tournament hut also brought home '.he 2'i foot
tronhy for Good Sportsmanship a-- swell. Now
that's what I call a winner!
Mo e Tood news: Marilyn (Mra, Sonny) Wolf-
Inrer and Jele (Mm. Rubin) Kurtz are ho'h
bom" from the hospital now Nice to hear it. .
< amille Sultan enjoying a vacation in Vene-
zuela and -fordana (Mm. Juan) Wester :: iov
with her past weekend in Puerto Rico. Also
hear tell glowing reports of th-- sucee-;-. of two
vents: The Darby Ball br-nefitting Nova Unl-
varatfy and Community Concert's presentation
of th Neil Wolfe Trio.
Mi mberi of the South Broward Rar Associa-
tlon Auxiliary will Join members of the Soutn
oward Branch of the Woman's Auxiliary to
i1. Browii. -I County Medi-al Association for
their annual combined affair at Hlllcresl dun-
i I- The gala event is scheduled for Tues-
March 21 Mm. < sartwe natal shouid be
tacted for it.formation.
'i i word on good ..j Ameriean mgerulty
and know-how. What o^poars to be the most
Imme late n lull of President mxoa's trip to Pa.
Ig .n his ou st to normali/.- relations with Mao
Te-tung is prominently dl played at Jordan
Marsh Department Stan in the Hollywood Fash-
ion Center. I-o and behold In the millinery de-
you believe multi-coiore-l eOoHs
hats for milady? And, some in rvd, while an i
blue yet!
r^vAisel Insurance AgencyZi
m
TRAVf'URS
u
Ansel Wittenstein
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
IIREMAN-5
FUND
AMERICAK
IMvMkci tonrt.ii.
Rabbinate Permits Bigamous Marriage
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel's
Orthodox rabbinate, which governs
matters of personal status accord-
big to halacha. religious law, per-
mits bigamous marriages in Cer-
tain circumstances.
Dr. Zerach Warbaftig. Minister
of Religious Affairs, advised the
Knesset that since 1948 the rab-
binate has granted 802 Jews the
right to take second wives al-
though they were neither divorced
nor widowed. Israeli criminal law
defers to religious law in this mat-
ter. It states that a man shall not
be prosecuted for bigamy if his
bigamous marriage was entered
into with the approval of a three-
man rabbinical tribunal legally
constituted.
Dr. Warhaftig. an GrtluxJox
rabbi representing the National
Religious Party, said 24 such mar-
riages were authorized last year.
He said permission has been
granted when the man's first wife
was an incurable lunatic incapable
of 'iunmsj divorce papers; when
she refused to cohabit with hq
husband, or when she could not
conceive and would not accept t
divorce.
Holmes' Florist
FLOWERS
Far Al Occasions
aiasaas nsauu
mi iiima Msmsu
< niTMtrt runa
. cesuta wdjihk
ftS) Urt *H. fliti tm%
9*1-4861
Palmers
Miami Mtnwm*m CempMr
3279 S.W. 8th Strut, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Open Sunday thru Friday
Personaliied Memorials Custom
Crofted in our own workshop.
evitt
Jflemoriai Chapel
'JtWISH fUNtlAl OMfCrORS"
LOCAL ANO OUT Of STATI
ARSAMOIMf NTS
: 1891-64441
* urn w oixii Hwr n m.
SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY
with
Funeral Home Contacts throughout
the United States
Funeral Director Available 24 Hours A Day
To Assist With All Funeral Arrangements
Hau.\womrs oi i>rT mjvr i owidfrkd
MfdWVYOeW
140 i. Mis. Hkihw.y ph. 2J4stI
Hollywood, Florida 33020
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Vempte 3etk t
gardens
The only all-jeuish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923 8255 or write: 8*+-~Sk 1
TEMPLE BETH EL /?.*-?-*
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send mi literature on the above. .
NAME: ________________
ADDRESS: .
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
ASK YOUR
RABBI ABOUT US
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
16^riARRrSONST.rK)aYW(X)O,rlA.nT0r^ 922-7511
e>a4 J. Hovlihon,
ur.a


Friday, March 17, 1972
v.....*........iVi'ivnvwwmMi

scene around
by MariOn Nevms
MMMAAMAAAMAMMWWWVV
*Jcnisii fh,k1i-*r
Page 13-
.,, s"BHm trie ?ng for a Federation lunch-
eon as the Women s Division held their $50-and-up minimum
donation luncheon there. The gals all worked hard and the crowd
was large and beautiful. The chairmen set the pace with Iheir
treat Job of organization and each and every one of them
looked "smashing." Mary Gottlieb and Natalie Bluth we-. ,i
the door greeting women and directing all to the proper table
Italians. Inside the portals were Kochelle Koenig who was
Chalrmta for the day, Lee Borman, who acted as toastmislress
and who was one of the eochairmen, and Brenda Greeninan
another hardworking cochairman.
ft ft ft
Charlotte Brodie, another in the group who worked ha'd on
this gathering, introduced the speaker, Paula Borensteln and
VVU so touched by the brief biography which she was rending
that she had difficulty holding back the tears. As I llfltened to
the story of this beautiful woman who had survived the Polish
i.littos and Nazi concentration camps and who had teen all
0 her family killed and even all of her Companion! in the eon-
ccntratlon camp shot moments before the Allied armiei arrived,
1 looked around and saw that Charlqtte wasn't the only person
emotionally involved for most of the women wound up with
tear-streaked make-up. Mrs. Borensteln is now public relations
officer for the Joint Distribution Committee in Paris.
When the day was over, It was found that most of the girls
had exceeded their $50 pledge so it was a successful day for
the Women's Division of JWF. Too many people there to men-
tion, but the women of Hollywood were well represented for
sure. For those who missed this one or any of the other Federa-
tion luncheons, I expect we'll see them on the 16th.
* 9- ^
File Wlesel was the speaker and Temple Sinai was the place
and it would be easier to mention the Jews in Hollywood who
weren't there than to begin to try to list all those who attended.
The Haber Karp Hall was Jammed with young and old. Mr.
Wlesel became a spinner of tales as he put it, for the evening
end he read to the audience a number of stories of different
origin.
When his talk was over, the members of Temple Sinai held
a reception for him and his wife. As we all sipped champagne and
nibbled at the goodies. I said hello to Bea and Jake Mogllowitz
Bea is an old friend of mine from way back when and It was
fur. seeing her again. Then I greeted Mltzi and Seymour Mann
who are even older friends or should I say friends of longer
standing who wants to be older? And there were Rosa-
lyn and Joel Rottman, Edythe and Rabbi Jaffe, and many, many
more. Standing at Mr. Wiesel's side was Elaine Pittell, beaming
at the success of the evening. Much credit has to go to he.- for
her enthusiasm which sort of carried everyone else along and
for the hard work she put into making the evening a success.
Aiso thanks have to go to the members of Temple Sinai who
brought Mr. Weisel to town and gave us the opportunity of
hearing him.
BITS AND PIECES Milt Hopfenberg, who used to bring
me the news of Chai Lodge is now busy working on getting a
Bookmobile for the Hollywood area. A commitment of money
to purchase the Bookmobile and provide for its upkeep was
made by the last City Commission, but Milt tells me that the
current group of City Commissioners haven't gone ahead with
the project. I'll bet on Milt's ultimate success as he is a hard
worker and this project is very close to his heart. Walter Gray
reports that the San Salvador SLster City group is visiting Holly-
wood over the Passover and Easter holidays. About 60 strong,
they will stay in a local motel but the members of the Holly-
wood group interested in the project will play host and will en-
tertain them in their homes and take them sightseeing in the
area. Walter says that each time a group visits here, it is differ-
ent people; so many residents of our sister city are getting to
see Hollywood. Naomi and Stan Kurash are off on another Yacht
Club weekend. This time to Nassau. Hope their answering serv-
ice can't reach them on the boat. Always wondered who buys
real estate at night but judging from the phone calls that follow
them everywhere, peop'e at least consider It.
ROYLE B. KLINKENBERG, M.D.
CHARLES E. LOWE, M.D., P.A.
ANNOUNCES THE ASSOCIATION OF
JAMES T. TREZZA, M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
CARDIOLOGY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
921 NORTH 35th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
BY APPOINTMENT TELEPHONE 1 4M4
Bar Mitzvah
WENDY UKIlK
Wendy, the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Berk, members of
Temple Solel, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah at Emerald Hills
Country Club.
ifr Or *
ROBERT SIMON.SON
Robert, the son of Dr. and Mrs.
Louis Simonson, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, March 18
at Temple Sinai.
ft ft ft
SIJZY SHAFFER
Suzy, the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Sheldon Shaffer, will become
Bat Mitzvah Friday evening,
March i4. at Temple Sinai.
ft ft ft
GARY OROM
Gary, the ion of Mi. and Mrs.
Edward Gross, will l. called to
the Torah as u Bar Mitzvah Sat-
urday, March is, at Temple Beth
Shalom.
ft ft &
SAKI ROSS
Sari, the daughter ill Mr, and
Mrs. Emanuel Ron, will b,. Bat
Mitzvah Friday evening, March 34,
at Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft -Cr
PHILIP HERMAN
Philip, the son or Mr, and Mrs.
Ilobcit Herman, will cclchiale his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday. March 2r>,
at Temple Beth Shalom.
ft ft -Cf
JOHN MORE
John Lewis, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert More, will conduct the wor- i
ship service and read from the
Torah when he becomes Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, March 18, at Tern-
pie Beth El.
John is a seventh grade student
at Broward Preparatory School
and a member of the temple's Jun-
ior Youth Group.
John's parents will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat in his honor. Among
the guests will be his maternal
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
Murray of West Palm Beach; hU
paternal grandmother, Mrs. Ber-
tha More, Mr. and Mrs. Julius
Braun of Chicago, 111., and Mr.
and Mrs. D. F. Kendall of Boca
Raton.
JWV Meets At Temple Israel
Robert Z. Franzblau Post No.
177, Jewish War Veterans, (Mira-
marl will meet at Temple Israel
of Miramar. 6920 SW 35th St..
Miramar on the second and fourth
Tuesdav of each month at 8:30
p.m. All qualified veterans are wel-
come.

MASHGIACH
WANTED FOR
KOSHER
BUTCHER SHOP
IN FT. LAUDERDALE AREA
Call 565-6689
REGULAR & ADULT
BOOKS
AND
MAGAZINES
BOOKS N' THINGS
2*2 N. Fed. Hw*. HalL.dalt
PH. 920-4343
One of the nation's leadinq economists. Robert Nathon,
discunsed the current situation in Israel and the progress of
the Jewirh Welfare Federation campaign in Hollywood with
a largo group of men who had boen invited to mest him
at the home ol David Aianow night).
Robert Nathan explains the economic problems of Israel
and its most urgent financial needs to Milton Ledner (left)
and Leo Brecher (right) who were among the guests at Ihe
home of David Aranow.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS NEW
OFFICE FOR THE PRACTICE OF...
INTERNAL MEDICINE
2526 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hours by Appointment 925-1439
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
COMMUNITY PASSOVER SEDER
at the
DIPLOMAT HOTEL, HOLLYWOOD
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 1972, at 6:30 P.M.
conducted by
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
assisted by
CANTOR IRVING GOLD
Strictly Kosher Gourmet Seder with all the Trimmings.
Call immediately for reservations: 981-6111
FASTING -REDUCING REJUVENATION
WHOLESOME MEALS PEACEFUL SURROUNDINGS
EXERCISE CLASSES SUNBATHING POOL- BOATS
S^gtz. W*IT F0* FREE LITERATURE jflm
B0NITA SPRINGS, FLORIDA 33923-JF USA.
'Where Health is Taught"


Pag* 14
vJenist ikrktiar
Friday. March 17, 1973
'Circle Exhibit And
Juried Art Show' Set
The 121 h annual Seven Lively .
Arts Festival "Circle Exhibit an-1
Juried Art Show" will take place!
April 15 and 16 at Young Circle
,n Hollywood with Mrs, Bdythe
Adams erviqgj as coonlinatoi.
The event L* rfjxfl fo alfarttotl
rind crafttmen. All art work must
he original and all arti.s's mu-i be
in attendance to man their exhib-
its. Entrj blanks for exhibit space
mi,, available now at the Holly-
wood Recreation office, 2080 Polk
St.
This >ear onlj exliiblton are In-
vitcd to enter tl< juried show: I
Lhey may submit two work- 01
art at no extra Charge. There will j
i.- cash prizes lor first, second
and third places in tin- eategorie*
of oils, acrylics, water colors,
sculptures, graphics and drawings,
nixed media 'such as collage)
rafts, such as i-.tt try, Jewelrj
.nd china painting.
Space will Ik- rlio.led '>:i a firs'
me, first serw \ basis, and will
assi^ed by number prioi t"
the show. Exhibitors will have
he same snai e for both days,
chibits will be judged on a the-
tic set-up and appearance. The
winner will receive a full refund
on his entry fee.
The event is sponsored by Seven
Lively Arts Festival. Inc., in co-
operation with Hollywood Recrea-
tion Division. William D. Horovit/
is pfe*iifrnt of the board of Trus-
tees; Mrs. Thomas A. Thomas is
program chairman and Mrs. Harry
Orringer, Jack Alexander and Mrs.
Mitche: Sham are in charge of
registration.
Committee m<>ml>crs include
Mis. Robert DeWcese, Mrs. Je-
rome Biyant, Mrs. Alan Podis.
Mrs. Don Kovacs, Mrs. All>crt MoB-
tella. Mrs. Michiel Petros, Mrs.
Dou'las Brown, Mrs. Raymond
Nolan. Mrs. Irving Pixel. Mrs.
Joseph Wilkerson. Mrs. F.nnio Mur-
rorri and Mrs. Don Smith.
Further information on entries
may be secured from Mrs. Mit-
chell Simon, -1115 Buchanan St.
Hillcrest Has 3 More Amis
Hollywood Chapter of Hadassah
has announced the names of three
additional Amis in the Hillcrest
Group. They are Mis. Fannie
Phaff. Mrs. Max K..scnthal and
Mis. Simeon Einstein.
Religious
Services
HAUANOAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Rabbi Max J. Weita. Cantor Rav.
Jacob Oanzigar. 12t N.E. 1tt Ave.
HOUYWOOO
BETH EL (Tampla). 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
M
BETH SHALOM (Tempi*). .1728 Mon-
roa St. Conaervativa. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold 46
SINAI (Tampla). 1201 Johnson St.
Conaervativa. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraum. 47
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal)
KcrvieKs lit Hollywood Hills HiKh
School Janemry ti 8:18 i> nt RaoM
Robert Kruxiii.
TEMPLE BETH AHM.310 Southweet
2nd Avenue. Hollywood
Babbatn Eve Barvlcea an- achefltihMl
for S: 1 r. p.m. Murray Wi-cht.-r will bf
1 .ism.-i.mI by Herbert Smilli lay leader
'I'll.- Slslerh"oil will apaaor Hie (Meg
Bhabbat.
MHtAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple) 6920 SW 35th St.
Conaervativa. 48
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley. Cantor Irving
3?
Shulket.
Mail A Box Of Matzoh
To Soviet Ambassador
To dramatize the plight of the
Soviet JeWB, the Jewish Wellan
Federation of Greater Hollywood .
mil its Jewish Community Rela- '
ions Council plan to Hood ihe So-
le! Embassy with boxes of mat-.
OS.
The plan is also i* lag imple- ,
ii nted in many other communities
throughout the country In an ef- j
fort to fOCUa national attention on j
ihe Soviet Jewi> problem.
Each member ol the Hollywood
'ewish community is urged to ;
nail a box of mal,:os to Amhassn-
loi Anatolj Dobrynin. Embassj
of the USSR. 170 l.xih St, NW,
Washington, D.C 20OO!. Addition-
Hi labels are availabk al the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation offices.
Iy09 Harrison St. and at local
synagogues, Postage for each ix>x
i. B i cents.
The campaign la called "Mail
Hope to 3,000.000 Jews in the So-
viet Union," and Federation
spokesmen expect the thousands
oi boxes arrixing at the Soviet
Embassy to register American op-
position to the Imprisonment of
jews in Russia,
The moasage on the label reads:
"The matZOh, a symbol of free-
dom for 3,200 years, now symbol-
izes hope and reminds the .Soviet
Ambassador that the American
people stand with the Soviet Jews
in their struggle."
Election Of 72-73
Officers On Agenda
Mrs. Angelo Palumbo, president,!
, ill be presiding when Hollywood
Chapter 725, B'nai B'rith Women, j
holds its general membership meet-
ing Monday in the Town Hall
Room of the Home Fede-al Bank
Bldg., 1720 Harrison St.
Tin- Elysium Chapter of B'nai
i B'rith Girls end their president,
Li Zber, will be introduced by
! Mrs, David LeVtne, program chair-
1 man. Their original presentation
s entitled "Jewish tlirls; Chang-
! inj,' Problems 1890-1972."
The election of 1972-7.'! officers
I is included in the agenda of the
I business meeting which will fol-
low Sophie Goldman will sponsor
j Ihe refreshments. Potential --pon-
ROra are urged to contact Sadie
Cohen to make arrangements.
The Chapter will deliver Pass-
over lood basket- to needy persons
i the last wee|< of the month. Dona-
tions or information regarding
persons requiring assistance
shoul be --''nt to Mrs. David I.e-
Vin<, community service chair-
man,
Mail hope to
3,000,000 Jews in
the Soviet Union
CLIP THIS MAILING LABEL!
On March 17,1972. use il to mail a one pound box ol
matron lo Ihe Soviet Ambassador in Washington
The thousands ol boxes will serve as your testimony
ot opposition lo the tyranny ol imprisonment ol
3 million Jews in the Soviet Union
CLIPHCHF-
This matzoh, the symbol of freedom for 3,200
years, now symbolizes hope for 3-million
Jews of the Soviet Union, and reminds
you that freedom-loving Americans stand
with them in their struggle.
FREE THE PRISONERS-LET MY PEOPLE GO
FRAGILE
POSTMASTER:
PARCEL
POST
TO
Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin
EMBASSY OF THE U.S.S.R.
1706 18th Street N.W.
Washington, DC. 20009
K^ommunitxj K^^alendc
FRIDAY, MARCH 17
Federation Sabbath Services 8 p.m. Temple Israel of
Miramar
SATURDAY, MARCH 18
The Fixer" movie 2:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. to be shown
in conjunction with Soviet Jewry Rally Temple Beth El
Sisterhood Temple Beth Sh'olom SquaiV'^Wrlce" fflftrW
8 p.m. 1725 Monroe Street
SUNDAY, MARCH 19
Miramar Chapter of Pioneer Women Donor Luncheon of
Greater Miami Council -- Noon Dcauville Hotel, Miami
Beach
Browarri Chapter American Jewish Committee Serie* on
'The Aged'" 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth Kl
Jewish Welfare Federation workers brunch 9:30 a.m. -
BmeraM Hills Country Club
Soviet Jewish Rally sponsored by Broward Board of
Rabbi- and Jewish Youth of community 7 p.m.Tem-
ple Emanu-El Fort I^auderdale
MONDAY. MARCH 20
National Council of Jewish Women Hollywood Section
Meeting -12:30 p.m.Home Federal Building Hal-
landale Beach Blvd.
Hillcrest Chapter of B'nai B'rith Meeting 1 p.m.
Recreation Center No. 1 Hillcrest
Tl'KSDAY, MARCH II
Hollywood Chapter Hadassah Donor Luncheon Noon
Diplomat Hotel
Senio: Friendship Club of Temple Beth Shalom Meeting
Noon 1725 Monroe Street
Chal group of Hailandale Hadassah Masting Noon
Home Federal Building Hailandale Beach Boulevard
Hemispheres group of Hailandale Hadassah Meeting -
12:30 p.m. Hemispheres Auditorium
Imperial Towers group of Hailandale Hadaaaarl -luncheon
Noon Imperial Towers
Parker group of Hailandale Hadassah Social 12:30 pin.
Card Room of Parker Towns
Pla/a Towers group of Hadassah Fashion Show Noon
- Socal Hall of Plaza Towers
WF.D.VKSDAi, MARCH '>'
Hailandale Chapter Hadassah Gold Patron Luncheon
Noon Emerald Hills Country Club
Hollywood Hills Chapter OUT Brunch 10 a.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 23
Victor B. Friedman Ladies Auxiliary Donor Luncheon
Diplomat Country Club
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women Board Meeting 7:30
p.m. Miramar Recreation Centei
THURSDAY, MARCH 23
Hailandale Chapter B'nai B'rith Women- Meeting 12:30
p.m. Home Federal Building Hailandale Beach Blut
MONDAY. MARCH 27
National Council <>l Jewish Women Hollywood Secti in
Board Meeting 210 a.m. Home Federal Building Hal-
land, ile Beach Boi:!e\ard
Seder for patients Florida State Hospital 7 p.m.
Sisterhood Temple Sinai Board Meeting- -8 p.m.
pie Sinai
TIKSUAY. MARCH !
Senior Friendship Club of Temple Beth Shalom Me tins;
Noon 1725 Monroe Street
JWV Robert Z. Franzblau, Miramar Post 177 Meetll g
8:30 p.m. -Temple Israel of Miramar
Hollywood Hadassah Book Review 1 p.m. Home Fed-
eral Building Hollywood
WKDNRBDAY, MARCH 29
Hollywood Auxiliary Jewish Home
Meeting 10:30 a.m.
for the Aged Board
Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood
At a recent meeting of workers of Jewish Wolfara Federation
at the home of Dr. Norman Atkin, 1972 campaign chairman,
representative men of the community pledged their help u>
solicitation of other potential contributors to the campaign.
From left to right are David Yorra, Abe Durbin and Albert
Yorra.


Friday. March 17, 1972
fJewisli fhrkUar
Paga 15
ISRAEL NEWSLETTER
By Carl Alpert
Arab-Jewish Relations
yjt ARE MMRMH so absorbed in our con-
" ccrn with relations between Israel and the
Arab states on the political and international level,
I that, we may give insufficient at-
tention to relations between .Tews
and Arabs in Israel on the Individ
ual, man-to-man basis.
It is a fact that the approxi-
I mately 403,000 Arabs living within
the State of Israel reside, for the
most part, in their own towns and
I villages. Even where there are
sizeable numbers of Arabs within
a city, as in Haifa, they cluster together in areas
which become known as the Arab quarter. The basis
for this is sociological, and is not too different from
the causes which impel Jews in the United States
and elsewhere to live in a Jewish neighborhood:
proximity to friends; availability of religious and
educational facilities, etc.
Adding to the separation of the two elements
in the population is the further socio/economic fact
that 89"c of Israel's Jews live in urban areas,
whereas only 43% of Israel's Arabs are urban
dwellers. The obvious result is that the two do not
come into frequent personal contact.
Recent studies conducted by Dr. Yochanan
Peres of Tel Aviv University reveal some interesting
attitudes on the part of Arab and Jewish young
people toward each other.
Would you be willing to marry an Arab/ Dr.
Pores asked a sampling of Jewish youth. "Not will-
ing" replied 67': of the Sephardi Jewish youth.
Only 2r,'< were willing, and the remainder presum-
ably uncommitted. Ashkenazi youth showed a some-
what different result: "Not willing," 56r/{.
"Are you reaay to accept Arabs as close, per-
sonal friends?" "Absolutely not," replied 38% of
the Sephardi young people. The Ashkenazi opposi-
tion was 27% but the major percentages in each
rase could not give a firm answer.
Dr Pws te of the opirtfoh'TrHt "the Sephardi
reaction is their way of rejecting their own oriental,
or Mid-Eastern background, and expresses their
desire to become like the dominant group the
Ashkenazis.
What do the Arab youth think of the Jews?
Willing to be friends with Jews 58%; willing to
live in Jewish neighborhoods 42%; willing to
live in the same house with Jews 30%.
Once again it would appear that this is a re-
sult of the desire to become like the majority a
short step toward long-range assimilation. There
are frequent instances of Arab youth who change
their names and seek to "pass" as Jews.
The attitude toward Jews among Arabs of the
West Bank, who have not had the tradition of close
relations with Jews over the last 23 years, is quite
different. Among the West Bankers: Willing to live
with Jews12% (not willing 69%); willing to
have Jewish friends 19%; maybe 42%; abso-
lutely not38%.
In pondering the meaning of these figures it
should be borne in mind that Israel's Arabs and
Jews live under the cloud of threats from across
the border uttered by Arab leaders who constantly
proclaim war and a desire to annihilate Israel.
Relations are further exacerbated by the occa-
sional activities of saboteurs who throw bombs in
buses, markets or other public places. Each such
act is calculated to receive a hostility which may
have been abating. Indeed, that may be the delib-
erate purpose of many of the wanton acts of terror-
ism which take their toll among Jews and Arabs
alike.
:i '. i : i.i
mi.....":".;:: ..i.i'ua.., '!# .. cihimi
DATELINE JERUSALEM
By Amos Ben-Vered
Post Office Is Snarled
THIS IS .NOT A SI'CCES* STORY. It is a stovy of
Israel's fastest growing government department, which
.it the same time has become a symbol of inefficiency. The
Ministry of Communications (Posts) employs 20% of Is-
rael's government workers. It runs mail services, tele-
phones, telegrams and telex operations of the country.
Recently, a letter arrived in Jerusalem from Tel
Aviv after six days, according to the postmark. In the
same week an airmail postcard from London took 11 days
to reach the letter box, a letter from Jerusalem four
day.-, a letter from a Jerusalem suburb five days, and an
invitation to a wedding in Jerusalem itself nine days.
Installation of a telephone may take up to two
years. Even if technically everything is in order, it takes
something like four months. Three departments deal with
it. One of them is responsible for the line only, which
lends to the subscriber's apartment or office. After the
telephone is installed a third department is called into
action: the one responsible for making the connections
to the exchange and testing the line. The three depart-
ments communicate with one another by mail, or, in
urgent cases, by telex. I found out that even officials do
not know where the other offices are located.
Getting a phone, or line repaired, is a task beyond
the powers of the average Israeli. Dialing the Faults
Department may take hours; the number is usually busy.
And if a team is sent to locate the fault, the subscriber
had better be at home a return visit may take three
weeks or longer to arrange. If one wants action, one has
to plead special circumstances with the clerk accepting
the complaint- that there is a sick person at home, or
that the owner is a doctor or a police officer.
The Communications Ministry still functions on the
organizational lines established during the British Man-
date more than 30 years ago. Young Israelis have since
taken over the top jobs, some of them former army
officers. But they, too, have succumbed to the system.
The low quality of the manpower employed justifies low
salaries; the latter in turn makes work morale low. Every
20 employees seem to have their own union, and barely
a month passes without at least one of them striking,
thus compounding the confusion.
(Copyright 1R72. Jewish Telefjraphle Arvih> I
BOOK REVIEW By Seymour B. Liebman
Three Good Books
THE I'OKiXAXT, (HUPPING drawings in The
Book of Alfred Kantor (McGraw-Hill Book Co.,
$17.95) a unique and moving book, give startling
reality to the holocaust. The Chi-
I |nese proverb, "One picture is
j worth more than 10.000 words" is
more aptly applied here than in
I most instances.
Alfred Kantor is a survivor of
I Thierenstadt, Auschwitz and
Schwarzhekte. The 126 paintings
I in his book are either sketches he
preserved while an inmate or du-
plicates that he matte after his release. The brief
text is almost in the spirit of Elic Wiesel's writing
in that there is no patent attempt to depict horror
or to prolong accounts of brutality and sadism. The
cumulative effect of the pictures tells the still-
incredible story of man's inhumanity to man.
Israel: A Survey and Bibliography compiled and
edited by Muriel Emanuel (St. Martin's Press. $12)
fills a much-needed void. It will satisfy those who
want basic information in more than capsule form
but who don't relish wading through an entire'book
to find the answers they need. For scholars and
those who desire additional information, each arti-
cle has an api>ended bibliography.
The book opens with a-brief history and a lec-
tion on Zionism and then proceeds to government;
collective and co-operative settlements; the econ-
omy; technology and medicine; education and the
arts with 6 sub-sections; Christian, Moslem and
Druze communities, and the Dead Sea Scrolls.-Each
section and sub-section is written by a competent
author; for the most part academicians and officials.
The writing is in terse and cogent language and
editorializing is at a minimum. The book reveals
Israel and the facets of its life in a most commend-
able manner.
Heroes o/ Israel by Morris Rosenblum (Fleet
Press Corp., $5) is a trifle too terse. The author has
synthesized the biographies of 10 men and two
women who are 20th century notables Herzl,
Weizman, Ben-Gurion, Trumpcldor. Eliczer Ben
Yehuda. Hannah Senesh. "Mickey" Marcus, Yigael
Ya.'in, Yigal Allon; Moshe Dayan, Golda Meir and
Shmuel Y. Agnon.
One cannot fault the book for what it contains
as much as for what is omitted. We read of the ex-
ploits of the people but learn little of their personal
livi s or of their spouses and children. The author
has added little if anything new about the 12 heroes.
At Wt Were Saymf: By ROBERT L StGAl
'The Education <
Of A WASP
"THE .MORE I LEARNKD, the less I felt I could
do to change what I saw," Lois Mark SLUvey
wrote in "The Education Of A WASP," one wom-
an's honest and honorable account
of her education in prejudice and
its bitter by-products.
First published in May. 1970,
"The Education Of A WASP" is
now available in paperback. Father
Theodore M. Hesburgh, president
of Notre Dame, whose own heroic
efforts to advance equality of op-
portunity in his role as vigorous
chairman of the U.S. Commission On Civil Rights
are well known, has expressed the hope that many
will read the book. "Rather than instill gui'.t In
white America, I hope this book will inspire read
ers to reach the American dream in which Lois
Stalvey once believed,' he adds.
Is that dream no longer credible the d earn
of making this nation one in which liberty and
justice are actually for all? Not just for the black
Nebraska tackle who stops the fleet Alabama full-
back cold behind the line of scrimmage, not just
for the winsome singer of rock on the David Firs'
show, not just for Shirley Chisholm running for
president, but for the millions of less than talented,
often frustrated, frequently unchampioned plain
folks constantly obliged to berr the handicap of de-
valued origin or minority creed or despised race?
Near the end of her chronicle, all of the events
in which are undoubtedly true, Mrs. Stalvey tells
us what happened when she deliberately criss-
crossed letters she nad received from two p>ople
she knew, making sure that each beheld the iwnned
hatred or the other. One letter was from a militant
black who wrote: I approve of anything that will
relieve us of Jews, those human parasites who orey
on black misery, suffering and misfortune." The
second was from a Jew who wrote: "You're wasting
your time trying to help Negroes. They won't even
help themselves. They won't train to compete; they
can't take abuse. They have no pride, no character."
Mrs. Stalvey patiently traces her odyssey as
naive quarrel-settler, exponent of integration, timid
fighter fer an FEPC ordinance, catalyst in PTA
and tireless listener to stories of indignity and heart-
break rooted in racial prejudice. She had headed n
small advertising agency before she manned the
man who was so resolved to stand behind her in her
acts of enlightenment and decency that eventually
he took the clout of forced transfer to Philadelphia
and final loss of job and income for the sake ol
loyalty to unmovable convictions about racial
justice.
From the first modern stirrings of racial up-
heaval in America refusal to ride at the back of
the bus in 1955 on up through sit-ins, boycotts,
protest marches, bombing, arson, and rock-throw-
in. one Wasp, advanced from "trolley-car lib.'ial
to an unawarded but well-merited postgraduate de-
gree in the art of human understanding. "It was
years lefore I learned the difference between elo-
quent passionate speakers who unfurl brotherhood
speeches like flags and the quiet, stubborn men who
work silently doing what can be done." she
observed.
Terry Sanford, who won fame and the nat;on's
gratitude as an exemplary young governor of North
Carolina a few short years ago. has reminded us that
those Americans "who should be pacemakers in
tackling our racial and poverty problems seem con-
tent to let the future happen, largely without agree-
ment or design or direction." Perhaps unwittingly.
Mrs. Stalvey is a different kind of pacemaker; she
has shown that one woman's conscience, harnessed
to action, can help end drift and generate construc-
tive motivation.
|. .':.'" I '": i


Page 16
*Jmistitk>rkU9*
Friday. March 17, 1972

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