The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00036

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
^Jewish Flondliiai in
and MIOFAll OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Numbwr 9
Hollywood. Florida Friday. Man* 3, 1972
Price 20c
re's Temples Schedule I
irch Federation Sabbaths
Mann, vice president i In a d d i t i o n to the services.
Welfare Federation and which will point out the needs of
the Temple Division I the Federation campaign through
speaker* knowledgablc in this
area, the month will also be de-
voted to special meetings of the
various temple groups and individ-
ual solicitation through the Tem-
ple Division.
The Temple Division was ori-
ginated last year, and under the
leadership of Mr. Mann proved so
successful that it was decided to
continue with a similar procedure
this year. Working with Mr. Mann
are Joel Rottman and Dr. Sheldon
Willens, both members of the
Executive Committee of Federa-
tion.
Temple Beth Shalom will be the
first to hold a Federation Sabbath
this weekend. On the following
Friday night Temple Beth El,
Temple Solel and Temple Sinai
will hold theirs; Federadon Sab-
bath will be marked at Temple
Israel of Miramar Friday evening,
March 17.
Temple Beth Shalom will hold
its Temple Division meeting Sun-
day at 10 a.m. Temple Division
meetings will be held at 10 a.m.
Sunday, March 12, in Temple Beth
El, Temple Sinai. Temple Solel
BStYMOUIt MANN
pombined Campaign for
year, has announced
Ration Sabbath services
fid in the area's temples
month of March.
and Temple Israel of Miramar.
'--,' .'
fs
:e Demands Extradition Of Barbie
^RIS (WNS) In a personal message from President Georges
fou to Bolivian President President Hugo Banzer, France has
I the extradition of Klaus Barbie, "the butcher of Lyons," a
Nazi war criminal who had been living in Bolivia under the
| of Klaus Altmann. Barbie had been arrested by Bolivia for
ayment of a debt to the government following a French re-
that he be jailed unti. France could forward proof that Alt-
was really Barbie. He was released by Bolivia after the debt
lid and it is believed he may be in Paraguay where wanted
live undisturbed.
Mings, Land Given to United Synagogue
JEW YORK (JTA)Jacob Stein, president of the United
gogue of America, has announced the gift of two buildings and
fin the" heart of Jerusalem which wHl become the headquarters
organization in Israel. The buildings, which were formerly a
I of. an .American Protestant Mission, will ateo house the World
Acil of Synagogues.
turn Of Nazi Collaborator Protested
PARIS (WNS) Reports that Darquier De Pellepoix, a notori-
| Nazi collaborator during World War II, who has been living in
in under political asyhim since 1944, and had been sentenced to
|th by a military court In December 1947 in absentia, might re-
to France, has drawn vigorous protests from two major Jewish-
^neh organizations. The death sentence expired in 1989 due to the
Jute of limitations and Pellepoix, who was personally responsible
rounding up Jews for deportation, has applied for permission to
enter France.
ident Allowed To Fly Nazi Flag
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (WNS) The board of trustees of Hofstra
liversity has upheld the right of a neo-Nazi student, David Kerr,
to hang a five foot Nazi flag from the window of his dormitory
jm and to advertise for members for the neo-Nazi National Social
1 White People's Party of Arlington, Va.. in the student paper which
[supported by student activity fees. The student body of the uni-
tsity, which is located a short distance from New York City, is
timated to be 40-50% Jewish. Half of the faculty and board of
stees are also estimated to be Jewish.
Raids Made
To Check
Terrorists
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
forces took air and ground ac-
tion against Arab terrorists in
southern Lebanon this weeK fol-
lowing heavy commanao raids
Friday and Saturday into the
heart of "Fatahland," the area
of Lebanon under terrorist con-
trol. Official Israeli sources gave
no details of the continuing mili-
tary operations, saying only that
action was being taken as re-
quired to prevent terrorist move-
ments.
It was learned, however, that
the Israeli Army Engineers
Corps is bull-dozing a road from
Israeli territory into "Fatah-
land" under cover of tanks and
artillery and that Air Force
jets were called in to silence
terrorist artillery shelling the
road-builders.
Although the Lebanese gov-
ernment asked the U.N. Secur-
ity Council to apply sanctions
against Israel for its armed in-
cursions, most Beirut news-
papers seemed more embittered
against the terrorists tor in-
volving Lebanese territory In a
new conflict with Israel.
The latest in the series of Is-
raeli raids against terrorist buses
in southern Lebanon followed
an upsurge of tnrroris* activity
in the border region las* week.
An Israeli civilian couple was
killed in a bacooka ambush
Wednesday night on a road
three mile* south of the Leb-
anese border. Thursday night, an
Israeli officer, a soldier and a
Bedouin border poHoe inspector
were killed In another ambush
In the came rerion and six Is-
raeli soldiers were wounded.
The reprisals were swift in
coming. Early Friday momine
Israeli tanks and tron into Lebanon and Skyhnwk and
Mirage fighter bombers attacked
terrorist bases in the region
where an estimated 5 000 Pal-
estinian guerrillas are concen-
trated.
The main targets of the rround
and ah- attacks were the villares
of Tanta, Alnata awl Hebbarive.
On Saturday HebtoaHve and Ra-
sbelyr Fakhar on the slopes of
Mt. Hermon about three miles
from the Golan Heights were
hit.
The Beirut newspaner. Amal.
reported that Israeli renrisals
raids came as no s>irnrie and
called on the terrorists to stop
using Lebanese territorv as a
base for attacks on Israel.
ki'ik I..... nan
France To Pay $75 Million
To Israel For Mirage Jets
PARIS (WNS) After four
months of negotiations. France
and Israel hare finally reached
an agreement under which Is-
rael will receive anDroximatelv
$75 million as reimbursement
for the 30 Mirage V iets which
had already been paid for but
nevertheless were embargod by
the late Pres. Charles De Gaulle
on the eve of the Six-Day War.
The money includes the
amount paid for the Jets, nlus
interest for more than three
years at the rate of 7% per year.
JWF Goal In View
Reflecting the enthusiasm and involvement of the entire
Hollywood Jewish community, the campaign cabinet of Jewish
Welfare Federation announced this week that with only the
initial gifts portion of the campaign completed. 50% of the
campaign goal has already been reached.
The amount pledged so far is more than $600,000 half of
the $1.2 million goal set by them for this year. This goal is the
largest amount ever attempted in this community and from
these first reports and early figures the ultimate success of the
campaign seems assured, according to Dr. Norman Atkin, 1972
campaign chairman.
Indicative of the trend in gift-giving this year is the re-port
that on the basis of individual pledges already made, there is an
average 479f increase from each individual contributor. It is on
tltis basis that the success of the campaign is confidently
predicted.
With the wind-up of the initial gifts portion of the campaign,
the month of March will see the climax of the other divisions of
the drive. The Apartment Division, under the cochairmanship of
Maurie Meyers and Melvin H. Baer, and the Women's Division
campaign, under the chairmanship of Mrs. Carolyn Davis, are
already in full swing. To fulfill their final goal, many meetings
will take place during the weeks ahead, and personalities knowl-
edgeable in the needs of UJA and the Israel Emergency Fund
have been invited to speak to the groups attending them.
Apartment Division meetings have been planned for the
early part of March in a number of different buildings. One of
the first will be Tuesday evening's meeting at Galahad Court.
Rabbi Robert Frazin of Temple Solel will be the guest speaker
and entertainment will be offered by Danny Tadmore.
The Women's Division planr include one of the biggest func-
tions of their campaign a March 16 brunch at the Emerald Hills
Country Club for women giving a minimum donation of $25 or
more. Guest speaker will be Gerda Klein, a Polish-bom Jew who
was in Europe at the time of the Nazi occupation.
i...... ......""""""'-
,,
SSSJ Reports On Recent
Developments In Russia
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry has reported that Sylva
Zalmanson Kuznetsov, 27, the
Jewish political prisoner serving
a 10-year term, has been grow-
ing weaker, is "not eating at
all" and is not working. She
has been reported in serious con-
ous condition for months.
In another development, the
SSSJ said Margarita Shpilberg
of Riga, wife of Arkady Shpil-
berg, who is serving a three-year
term, smuggled a document in
to him in Potma prison that he
could use to agree to her emi-
gration. But the document was
rejected by the authorities be-
cause Shpilberg signed in He-
brew and wrote in the wrong
date. A telephone call last week-
end to Mrs. Shpilberg, whom the
SSSJ had reached every week
heretofore, failed of success, the
student group said, when the
operator advised that "no one
by that name is in the city."
The SSSJ said it was not pos-
sible for her to have moved so
quickly.
Also reported by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry were
the following developments:
Esther and David Markish, the
widow and son of Peretz Mark-
ish, the poet executed in a Stalin
purge, have publicly renounced
their Soviet citizenship; on Feb.
1 they were again denied emi-
gration after months of efforts.
Also renouncing his citizenship
was Boris Kogan, n Moscow
lawyer.
Vladimir Machlis of Moscow
has been told by the Ovir (visa
office) chief there that he will
not be allowed to emigrate un-
til the Middle East crisis is re-
solved; he was told that one
in his line of work cannot be
allowed to go to Israel now,
although the former pilot and
former journalist has been un-
employed since October.
Lev Naumovich Yagman, the
32-year-old engineer sentenced
to five years' imprisonment at
the second Leningrad trial, suf-
fered a heart attack but was
denied medical aid.
Maj. Mark A. Dymahitz, the
45-year-old pilot whose life sen-
tence at the first Leningrad trial
was reduced to 15 years, has
been transferred to a special
prison camp run by the KGB
(secret police).
David Taitelbaum, of an un-
specified city, has been denied
emigration for the second time
on grounds his work involves
classified information.
Prof. Aleksander Lerner, the
Moscow computer expert at
whose home Rep. James H.
Scheuer (D/N.Y.) was arrested,
is in "slightly improved" con-
dition following gall bladder at-
tacks for which he says he was
denied medical care.
Yona Kolchinsky, a Soviet Jew
who was drafted into the So\iet
Continued from Pag* 11-


- --"
Page 2
Jen is I fAcrkUmn
Friday, March 3,
'Save Soviet Jewry' Rally Set
At Temple Emanu-El March 19
A. "Save Soviet Jewry Rally",
will. be held at Temple Kmanuel.
Fort Laudmlale. Sunday, March
19. at 7 p.m. under the sponsorship
of the Broward Board of Rabbis.
Guest speaker for the rally, for
all the youth of Broward County,
will be Dennis Prager. who since
returning from a trip to the So-
viet Union in 1969 has earned an
international reputation as a
spokesman on behalf of Soviet
Jewry. Jewish communities
throughout thr United States and
Canada have rcen aroused by his
speeches on the plight of the So-
viet Jew as well as on other sub-
jects of Jewish interest.
Mr. Prager was in Russia dur-
ing the High Holy Days, and
stayed through Simchat Torah.
Because of this, and because of his
knowledge of the Russian lan-
guage, he was able to meet and
speak with scores of Jews, espe-
cially the young.
Mr. Prager is a 23-year-old
graduate student of the Russian
and Middle K'ast Institutes and a
fellow of the Sehool of Interna-
gland on a. scholarship from his
college, he Lc}ve gree cum Iawte*" "from Brooklyn
College, where he specialized in
History and Middle Kastern
studies. -
Mr. Prager has traveled through
more than 30 countries In Kurope.
Scandinavia. Middle East and
North Africa and made a fact
finding and writing trip through
j six Communist countries of Kast-
' ern Europe in 1971. He was a
delegate of United States at the
Brussels World Conference on So-
\ iet Jewry, in 1971.
Mr. Prager. who teaches courses
in History of anti-Semitism and
i Comparative Religion at Hebrew
I High School, directs Soviet Jewry
' programming for Hertzl Institute
! of the Jewish Agency and serves
i as national spokesman and consul-
1 tant to the Center for Russian
j Jewry and Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry in New- York.
Coordinators of the program are
Mrs. Shirley Goldman, youth co-
ordinator of Temple Beth Shalom
and Arnold Pakula, youth co-
tional Affairs of Columbia Univer- | ordinator of Temple Beth Kl. Hol-
sity. After a year of study in En- lywood.
March and April Coffees
Themed xPromise-A-Day'
Temple Solel
Purim Carnival
Temple Sole! will hold its Purim
Carnival from noon to 3 p.m. Sun-
wood, it has been announced.
The carrrval is the combined
project of the Temple Youth
Group (SOLTYi. the Sisterhood
and the Men's Club.
Jeff Bauman is president of
SOI.TY; working with him are
youth group members Linda Etnas,
Eric Bauman. Michael Rose.
Wendy Berke, Joan Dranrt- and
. Paul Eichner.
Mrs. Alan Fiske is chairman of
I the carnival for Sisterhood. Her
committee includes Mrs. Martin
Dranit. tickets; Mrs. Jerald Rubin,
I food; Mrs. Lewis Medoff. booths;
Mrs. Joel Mish. prizes; Mrs. Stan-
ley Sellgman. cake walk; Mrs.
Robert Frazin, white elephant
I sale; and Mrs. Robert Stone, pub-
! licity.
Members of the Men's Club
participating are Arnold Cohen.
j Ralph Muscat, Lewis Medoff,
I Mylei Sher, Robert Stone. Stanley
i Seligman and Alan Fiske.
Hot dogs, hamburgers and other
| refreshments will be available.
Tickets will be on sale at the
door.
All proceeds will go to Temple
Solel's Religious School.
For Quality Dry Cloning
CALL LEWIS CLEANERS 979-0*79
'neb-., D.li~ SM.1C. ILL \J\)LL
GREATER HOLLYWOOD
iiM i. hue mt. nuTMM mm*-*
INCOME TAX SERVICE
CALL FOR AM APPOINTMENT OR WALK IH TODW.
CALL 966-TtM FORTY
FLORIDA INTANGIBLE RETURNS PREPARED
NEW YORK CITY AND STATE FORMS AVAILABLE
(ALSO: Mass., N.C, Md., Ky.,)
Open Daily Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(Evenings by appointment only)
ASK ABOUT OUR OTHER SERVICES:
Small Business Bookeeping
Medical Management Service
Investors Accounting Service
"A Promise-a-Day" will be the
theme of a series of morning cof-
fi M to l>e hosted by the Women's
Division of Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration through the months of
Match and April. The theme is
taken from the slogan of the UJA
campaign this year "Keep The
Promise." Women will be asked
to make a "promise a day" by put-
ting aside some contribution each
day for the Federation campaign.
Kach of the coffees will feature
a sjieaker who will explain the
workings of Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration locally and also UJA and
the Israel Emergency Fund na-
tionally and internationally. As
the programs are being planned
in an educational vein, a question |
and answer i>oriod will follow each
apeaker'i talk. The first coffee is
scheduled to be held at the home I
of Flaine (Mrs. Martin) Fleischer
Tuesday morning, the second at !
the home of fClcanor (Mm. Bruce)
Moidel. Tuesday, March 14. Rikki
(Mrs. David) Goodman will host
one Wednesday. March 15, and an
evening meeting will be held at
the home of Kleanor (Mrs. Bruce)
ford I Abram Thursday, March 16.
The morning meetings will start
at 9:30 a.m., while the meeting
at Mrn. Abram's home will start
at 8 p.m.
Hostesses for the coffees will
be Marty (Mrs. James) Jacobson,
Susan (Mrs. Robert) Stone, Josie
(Mrs. Ted) Task and Marzi (Mrs.
Douglas) Kaplan. Marcia (Mrs.
Steven) Tobin and Marty (Mrs.
James) Jacobson are coordinating
the coffees for the Women's Divi-
sion. Anyone who would like to
give a coffee at their home may
call one of them to make arrange-
ments.
Dance Repertory Company
Presents March 11 Program
The 12 dancers in the repertory I
company appearing in the South |
Broward High School auditorium j
Saturday. March 11. at 8:30 p.m. I
will present a cross-section of |
techniques, moods, rhythms and j
styles from romantic ballet to |
avante garde modern, chore-
graphed by Knglund, Balanchine,
Limon, Kglevsky, Sokolow and Pe-
tipa, it has been announced.
The performance, which Is
under the auspieces of Community
Concerts of South Broward, will
be under the direction of Richard
Knglund, who has more than 80
ballets, divertissements and dance
works to his credit. His wife, bal-
lerina Gage Bush, and Jeremy
Blanton will be guest artists. Mrs.
Ray Schlichte will be glad to furn-
ish further information.
Sacred Concert
KOSHER CATERERS
BAR MlTZVAHS
WE DOINGS PARTIES
SPf OAK/ING IN HOMl CATIHNG
AND HO til WOK
888-3469
l NO aMiwil (Mac
866 5278
430 SWALLOW 0 MIAMI SPRINGS
At Park Temple
A sacred concert (Avodath Ha-
kodesh) by Composer Ernest
Bloch will be given at the Park
I Temple United Methodist Church,
100 SE 2nd Ave.. Fort I.auderdale,
Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
Maritone cantor will be Ken-
neth Williams, with orchestra
members from the University of
: Miami Music Department and
, chorus members from Park Tem-
ple.
The production will be directed
by Theodore Wheeler of the Music
Department of Broward Com-
i Ttunity College and music director
I )f Park Temple. It will be free and
open to the public.
Rent-A-Car
.j, LOW AS
FREE MILEAGE
100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
320 $. DIXJf HWY.
920-4141
Homwooo
MS-569B M'.om;
DO YOU WANT THE BEST VALUE FOR
YOUR HARD EARNED SAVINGS THIS YEAR
OUR FOLDERS US1 HOTELS AND ClASS, DAY -BY-DAY TOURS. ME*IS.
SERVICES. WHAT'S INCLUDED AND WHAT NOT. BOOKING AND '.Mi-
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WE HOLD CONFIRMED AIR AND HOTEL SPACE IN ISRAEL AND EURO*
OUR TOURS ARE PUT TOGETHER BY EXPERTS OUR PRESIDENT, SAN- 0
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ENGLISH. HEBREW, GERMAN. YIDDISH, SPANISH, FRENCH, ITALIAN RU.
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DO YOU NEED BETTER CREDENTIALS FOR SUCCESSFUL AND FASC -I
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RAIES INCLUDE NEW AIR FARE DOLLAR ADJUSTMENTS.
IN ADDITION TO OVER 150 MONTHtY GROUP DEPARTURES TO ISEl
AND ELROPE WE ARE GLAD TO ANNOUNCE THE FOLLOWING SPEOAl
FROM MIAMI VIA NEW YORK WITH El At:
I.MT. SINAI MEDICAl TOUR. MAY 25. ISRAEl
ONIY............
'84*
$ 1,044
*999
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ISRAEL. ITALY 4 FRANCE OR ENGLAND..........
t. TEEN TOUR TO ISRAEL ANDENGLAND JUNE 21.
FULLY ESCORTED AND SUPERVISED. CO ED
TEMP" FS BETH SHAIOM AND BETH El.HOllY-
WOOD.................................
PLUS $25.00 REGISTRATION FEE & $25.00 NON-MEMBERS
TEACHERS TOUR TO ISRAEl AND ENGLAND.
JUNE 21. FOR EDUCATORS. SOCIAl WORK
ERS. HEBREW TEACHERS AND REUGIOUJ
SCHOOL TEACHERS lEARN TRAVEl & OTHER
CREDITS).......................................
SUMMER TOUR TO ISRAEl. SWITZERLAND &
ENGLAND. JULY 18 FIRST CLASS. FULLY ES-
CORTED BY RABBI M SCHUNSKY, TEMPLE
ADATH YESHURUN OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AIL TOURS PLUS $3 00 TAX
OUR OWN FASHION CONSULTANT FOR TRAVEL & CRUISE W->
ROBES AT YOl/R SERVICE AT NO TOST
BON VOYAGE TRAVEL INC.
I PERSONALIZED WORLDWIK TRAVEL SERVICE
1074-1076 INTERIM. ILVD., N.N.B., FLA. 33182
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YOUR ISRAEL EUROPE HEADQUARTERS
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WRER CREF "flilS"


Friday. March 3. 1972
*JewishnorkUan
Page 3
Hadassah Marks 60
Years Of Service
Hailasrah, 60 years old this
ear. w marking 60 years of self-
service to the needy, -under-
ucated, homeless Jews-who have
migrated to Israel.
In Hollywood, Hadassah is a
cic quarter of a century old, but
t will be celebrating both anni-
eisaries at the chapter's annual
onor luncheon, which will be held
t noon Tuesday; ."March 21, in the
iplomat Hotel.
Donor chairman, Mrs. P. Tay-
>r. has announced that plans for
lie luncheon are being; finalized
t\ tier committee, which includes
Ira. r r.jices Segal, Mrs. Edna
la i blest one, Mrs. Betty Goldman,
Irs. Shirley Wolf and Mrs. Sally
J.iviilbff.-'- -
Joining in the festivities will be
hose members of the original Hol-
,-vvood Chapter of Hadassah who
till live .n-Hollywood. Those char-
pi merr.oers will be toasted dur-
lg the luncheon, by chairman.
Irs. Frances Briefer and her co-
hairman, Mrs. Ethel Posnick.
The D< nor Luncheon Is the cul-
in.it it ir; of the year's fund-raising
Mills In Hadassah. Tickets are
35 each, with many women clo-
uting $50 to be a Patron. $75 to
( a Gold Patron, $100 to be an
,nii. $113 To bo an Ami Patron,
11(1 In i* an Ami Gold Patron,
200 to foe a Benefactress, $300
> be a Guardian in Israel. $600
ii be an Ima or Abba, and $720
i an Imat Chayil. More than
00 mc r.Urs and guests are ex-
erted to attend.
Mrs. William Shulman. who will
0 especially honored, is becoming
n Imat Chayila Woman of
alor tor her contribution to
ladassah for the 15th time, Mrs.
hulman has become Imat Chayil.
lei husband is an Abbafather
for the ninth time. Both Jacob
tit/ and Jack Shapiro have also
lecome Abbas this year. The Imas
mothersfrom the Hollywood
lapter include Mrs. Jacques
'.liefer. Mrs. Irving Press, Mrs.
enry Salamnn and Mrs. Philip
aylor and Mrs. Jacob Lutz. This
ear. the Chapter hit a new high
n women who became Amis--
li.inlsrAvith a total of 147 from
II groups.
Mrs. Posnick and Mrs. Briefer.
a\c announced the names of the
o-tesses who will see to table
rrangements and guests seating,
'rom the'Beach Group are Mrs.
lalilda Ragovin, Mrs. Estelle Rat-
er, Mrs. Doris Sheiber, Mrs. Ul-
an Soigal and Mrs. Gladys Tay-
ir; from Mt. Scopus, Mrs. Hcrb-
11 Sonnenklar, Mrs. Melvin Gar-
> i. Mrs. Marvin Wolf, Mrs. Joel
CaswaM, Mrs. Bernard Lynn, Mrs.
tiward Gross and Mrs. Stephen
(ui child; from Hillcrest, Mrs.
Ii'iinan Goodman, Mrs. Joseph
Adler and Mrs. William Strong;
rom the Shalom Group. Mrs. Sal-
> Davidoff, anil from H'Atid, Mrs.
Mncrs Segal.
Hadassah was organized by
llenrietta Szold in 1912 for the
purpose of combatting the dis-
resstng social and health situa-
lion I hen prevalent in Palestine.
Krom a modest budget of $4,000
thai first year, and only two
American trained nurses, Hadas-
sah has grown to an organization
with an annual budget of over $18
Million,
Without a single professional
fund raiser on its staff. Hadns-
sah's administration as well as its
|K>licy is run by volunteer lay lead-
ership centered'in its own biuldjng
in New Ydjrk City. The group has
grown totfewr 320,000 members
in ncarlyjnXOO chapters in the
1 nited StJRes-and Puerto Rico.
The Hactassah-Hebrew Univer-
sity Medical Center in Kin Karem,
Jerusalem! is Hadassah's most im-
portant project in Israel. It is the
county's largest center of heal-
ing, teaching and research. It in-
cludes a 660 bed hospital, a meil-
ieal school run Jointly with the
Hebrew University, a nursing
school, a dental school run jointly
with the Hebrew University and
>
. the Alpha-Omega Fraternity, a
mother-and-child pavilion, a school
of pharmacy and n synagogue for
staff and -patHHits homing the-42
famous Chagall stained-glass win.
dows depicting the blessings of
Jacob on his son*.
The 1971 Ami Includes:
Shalom Oroup-rMn-. Hubert Mortal
iiiui mm, Irving .Puvidorr.
,.HAt'J 'Irouii Mr*. Samu.l llarMky.
Mr* Philip IWnatafn, Jlr. Alex
Flicker and Mrs. Ueurge s-u.-ll
Ihiaeh GroupTi,e MoSOSMaa Max
gader, Harry Hn-iKiin. Bttfl linker
Harry Ilurnsieln. Jacob ltllckHtrln
IUIh Uurke. .Norman Clark. Curolvn
IIiitim, Robert DhvIc,. Max Dkkman,
Minnie Druce. Sidney iMilhi-rK, Hen-
ry Kinenbern. Dorothy Kimlein, Imvld
1' e.idman, Bernard Frlc iL I a n d r
Samuel J. Ciolilfru. Philip Oorrioit,
Max llolman, Jack Ilurnitz. Bsllier
J.. itaplHii, Abraham Karpay, ltieci
Mln.i David Lnry, -.s Lippt,
Jack Inman, .lacoli I.utz, J.iMeph
Micliaelon. Max Moillln, .M. Monl-
koff, Sidney Muntar twins Novi.-k
Murray Paeun, Jowiph Pearlalein] ,
CharleH 1'erlmulh. Bernard Pollen,
Klhel PoMiick. IrviiiK I'reBM, Hone ,
Bpltl Itifkln. William KubeiiHteln. i
Mlndy SHhb.nxky, Henry Balamon, CV- !
III H. Handler, Krnrv Bohwartl B*n>
jamln Shelb.-r, William Sliulnum.
Woeea Bkolniok, Philip Taylor. Sam-
uel Wallace. Maurice ttlklBiein, tieru-
art lellln, Julius Youiik and Cieorire
W.-itznian.
Hlllcrenl CJroup The Meadamea
JoHeph Adlcr, laadore Bachman, Ida
Hiwsci, Barney stack, Rosa itium-
slein, Harry llu.-h, Marvin Carrel,
Max Corbat, Simeon ESpHteln Joaeph
Kel.iman, Myron OolaberK, Samuel
ioldberK, Al Cloldmeln, Herman
'Golden Gaieties'
Benefits Seniors
"Golden Gaieties'' will hit the
boards at 8 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday, March*- 11 and 12, at
Hollywood Hecreation Center, 2030
Polk St., with Mis. Myrtle Gray
directing the singers and dancers.
Sal and John Messineo aj\? in
charge of ticket sales. Mrs. Helen
Hill is assisting Mrs. Gray.
Theme of this yr-aVs musical
romp is a ?rlhute to the 50 States
honoring the heritage of the
country.
Starring roles will be played by
members of American Association
of Retired Persons, David Park
Seniors, Happy Rascals, Illinois.
Indiana, New Jersey, New York
Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin
State Clubs, Northeast Commun-
ity Center's Sweet Sixteen*, the
Past Presidents Club, President''
Council, Railroad and Senior Citi-
zens 49ers Club.
Proceeds of both performances
will be used to purchase equip-
ment for seniors' activities. The
program is part of the 21st annual
Irish Fair activities.
Uoodman, Archie Kamer, Jack Kaiser,
Hose .Ma.-kiii. .N'aihan Dwarkln, Her-
man Itlchmiin, Nathan Hosen, Miriam
It. Roaan, wuiinm Bajhaon, iteimiel
s.heiniiaum, Charles stein, Martin
Steyer. William Strong', BMft Welaa,
Samuel Wcrbnch. I.ouiH WlHeman,
Charlei Wnik and Oscar Zarkower.
Henrietta Baold tiroupMrs Mux
iMiller, Mrs line Kutx. Mrs. Meyer
N'ovick and Airs. Herman Shane.
HoWII BOOMM oroun The Men-
dames David I'.aksi. l.llyn Heckerman,
Moille Bersman, Herman lU-ller, Hub-
ert Herman. I'.enjamin tiicKelHon.
I'aul II. Cohn, Charles Ihippelt, Max:
Klcheer, Jacob folbauni. Art h u r
Friend, Melvin fJarber, Joaeph (iolub,
Herman Cioodman. I:..l..-i t (Inrdon,
Sailie Ciotllleb, Julius (ir,cn, Stephen
l-'alrcbild. Hen llasiuky, Joseph Hand-
shu, Lillian 11. HnrriH, Herbert Heid-
en. Karl Beichen, .Minnie Frank, Max
llymauson. Louis Kaplan. Joseph
Klein, Harry Inline. Hyman liind,
Cella I^vin, Henry Levin, Irving- Lon-
don, Seymour Mann. Loulx Michel.
Alex Mlnowtlx, Charles Moses, I-ouls
I'ndow, Arthur Plum. Mymnn Hlfkln.
'i......:-' Hobinson, Jack Itonen, Mon-
roe Huda, Abrahnm J. Sailer, Oscar
Si hill. r. William Srhaeffer. David
Shapiro. Jack Shapiro, Jacob Sh, i-
man, Herman Sietfel, l-ena Silver-
man, Saul Simha, Murray Taylor,
Joseph W'aldman, Marvin Wolf and
.in. i i.h Andrews.
BUILDING FOR LEASE
HALLANDALE BCH. BLVD.
40' x 150' Air Cond.
Terrazzo Floor.
Acoustic Ceilings. Parking
Good for Warehouse or
Storage. Short or
Long Term Lease.
Call 983-2318
WANTED
WOMAN ON SOCIAL
SECURITY ABLE TO WORK
PART TIME, WILL
ARRANGE SALARY
Phone 927-4822
MASHGIACH
WANTED FOR KOSHER
BUTCHER SHOP
In Ft. Lauderdsle Area.
Call 565-6689
Placemats
TABLE CLOTHS
NAPKINS (paper & Linens)
Largest A Beautiful Selection
FABRIC N MAT SHOP
28 N. Federal Highway
DANIA, FLA.
EXTRA SPECIAL!
Jiini'iMftH
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
Tytot Slrl at 1tf> Awhm jy* fliy.,frw' ...... .....rW-.,.
<^>i'fliiicj or J^ituing. C__all .
S.&N.

KURASH,
REALTORS
INC
24 Hast Service 23-24*l 947-2332
242* Hollywood Blvd.
Stanley S. Kurash
Naomi R. Kurash
Our Large Staff of
and Qualified Associates
Ready To Serve You.
rt*ll
I
Marine Painst A Supplies
HARDWARE PAINT. INC
HOUSEWARES ft GIFTS
HONE DECOR ACCESSORIES
Contemporary Art
Bltb / Clostt Acctssarits
Bss4 WiNfews n.tm Dlviltrs
Wlidiw Shadij Atiifrctal Fltwtrt
Drattry Rtit Ftliagt
lalliaiar Plaata
Key A Lock Work Patio Furnitura
Store Hours 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Closed Sundays
IN EAST BEACH BOULEVARD
HALL AMD ALE, FLORIDA SIMS
PHONE STI-HSt _____
velvetone
cleaners
2838 Hollywood Boulevard,
1/2 Block East of Freeway I 95
Over thirty five years
of service to the communities
in North Dade and Broward Counties.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL, INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
1250 Normandy Drive: fifteen minutes from Hollywood
920-1010
19th and Alton Road: in the heart of Miami Beach
Miami: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street
Manhattan Brooklyn Westchester Bronx Far Rockaway
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Edward Rosenthal Morton Rosenlhal Carl Grossberg Leo J. Filer
Murray N. Rubin. F.D.


Page 4
*Je*isti norM/ar
Friday. March 3, 1972

^Jewish Flcridian
OFnCE and PLANT120 N.E. 6th Street Telephone 37J-4405
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 920*392
P.O. Box 2973, Miami. Florida 33101
Fred K. Shochet Sblma M. Thompson
Editor and Publisher Assistant to Publisher
MARION NEVINB, News Coordinator
, Ths Jswlafc Floridian Doss Not OvarantM Tha Kashruth
Of Til* MerchandiaajAdvsrtlasd In Its Columns.
Published Bf-WfrT(1v by the Jewish Floridian
Secor-dClass Postage Paid at Miami, Fla. m^^T
Jewish Welfare Federation op Greater Hollywood Shopar Edttorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Widens, Chairman; Ron Berkerman, Ben
Salter, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atlrin,
The Jtwiih Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of ths Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapere, and ths Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year 12.00
Out of Town Upon Rsqusst
Volume 2
Friday, March 3, 1972
Number 9
17 ADAR 5732
Grave Danger In Referendum
On March 14, Florida voters will have the opportunity
to express their desires in a straw vote concerning three
school issues facing all our children.
On two of the issues. Quality Integrated Education
and Prayer in the Public Schools, we, as a minority group,
have already taken our stand.
As Jews, we have always been opposed to prayers in
the public schools as it is a violation of the separation of
church and state guaranteed in the First Article of the Bill
of Rights. To be against quality education for all children
of course is ridiculous.
The third issue, that of busing, is an extremely delicate
one. It is a many faceted problem. On the one hand, the
relationship between the parents and their local public
schools can strengthen education. On the other hand, to
have separate and unequal schools, can destroy the fabric
of the democracy of America.
In addition, important to the Jewish community, is the
principle involved in the kind of straw vote which will be
on the Florida ballot March 14.
For minority groups, such as Jews, there is grave
danger in this kind of referendum for it can lead to the
very kind of majority oppression that the Bill of Rights in
our Constitution was written to prevent. Protection of the
rights of minorities, whether religious or political, has been
a cornerstone of the American system and anything which
eats away at these protections must be fought vigorously.
Conference A Notable Occasion
There are few institutions in this country or Israel
which have the devoted following of the Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem and the national conference of the Amer-
ican Friends here is thus a notable occasion.
The growing bond between this nation's educational
establishment and the distinguished Israeli university is
marked by the interchange not only of students bul, in
recent years, of a significant number of professors. With
this background, it is not surprising that the major speaker
at the closing dinner will be U.S. Cabinet member Elliott
Richardson, the Secretary of Health, Education and Wel-
fare, to add lustre to the event
Megilah A Tale Of Triumph
Purim is a holiday based on the Book of Esther which
has been called by many a biblical short story, since it is
a marvelous tale filled with heroes and villains. But, as is
our way, we have made this aprocyphal story into a mean-
ingful description of triumph over persecution and oppres-
sion.
Because of that triumph the traditional reading of the
Megilah the story of Esther is done in an atmosphere
of carnival, of noise, cheers and boos. As we observe the
holiday next week, it is our hope that by our open demon-
strations of faith we will continue to keep the tyrants and
persecutors at bay.
Award Will Be Treasured
We will be pardoned our justifiable sense of pride in
commenting on the fact that "The Jewish FToridian' has
been named to receive the first Jewish Communal Service
Award established by the Anti-Defamation League of
Florida. That there are other institutions which are equally,
if not more, deserving of this honor we would be the first to
state and have done so editorially on many occasions.
However, we could no better than quote William M.
Alper, chairman of the ADL board, in announcinq the
choice, ob he noted that while "The Jewish community fre-
quently takes the Floridian for granted," ADL recognizes
that unique contribution which this newspaper has made
to the community as an education resource and an informa-
tional one, providing the Jews of South Florida a vital
means of communication.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH AISOP
TON -rr-
Nixon to the contrary, every
thinking American ought to give
strong support to massive, forced
busing to achieve racial balance,
on a single, quite simple condi-
tion. The condition is reason-
able evidence that this kind of
busing really will overcome the
terrible educational retardation
that afflicts the average black
child, whose true handicap is
deep poverty.
For many years now, liberal
educationists have told us that
thoroughly desecrated schooling
would surely overcome this re-
tardation. Indeed they have I old
us that is was the ONLY way
But, unhappily, they have dis-
to overcome this retardiation.
regarded the hard facts.
IN MOST favorable condi-
tions, two major efforts have
been made to prove the truth
of the liberal educationists' the-
ory. In White Plains, N.Y., and
in Berkeley, Calif., the school
systems have long been racially
homogenized in just the way
demanded by Judge Robert R.
Merhige in his famous Rich-
mond. Va., decision.
In this series of reports at-
tempting to get at the hard facts
of the busing problem, the re-
sults in White Plains and Berk-
eley have already been set forth
in some detail. It is enough,
therefore, to say that the basic
results have been bitterly dis-
appointing, despite undoubted
moral fringe benefits.
THERE HAVE been modest
educational gains; but the black
retardation is still grave. Black
third graders in Berkeley for in-
stance, though marginally bet-
ter than before homogenization,
are still reading at an average
level 13 months behind the white
children in the same classes
and the same schools.
In short, the results predicted
by the liberal educationists have
not been attained, even in these
two school populations of easily
manageable size, with strong
goodwill to help. The results are
obviously bound to be far less
good, moreover, where the at-
tempt is made to homogenize
school populations of many tens
of thousands in an atmosphere
of extreme ill will.
IN THESE unfavorable con-
ditions, there are also bound to
be heavy countervailir costs to
set against the gains, if any.
This will still be true if it is
possible to count on such edu-
cational gains as have been
made in White Plains and Berk-
eley which is doubtful.
Quite aside from the nation-
wide political tumult about mas-
sive, forced busing, the wide-
spread presence of acute ill will
is proved by the fate of most
American center cities of any
size in the last decade and a
half. In the center cities in this
period, for many different rea-
sons (including court orders in
Southern cities), the old neigh-
borhood school system has been
progressively weakened.
THE RESULT has been a
continuous, determined and enor-
mous flight from the center
cities of white parents with chil-
dren of school age. The census
and school figures are there to
prove It. So we are on the verge
of getting segregated, ghetto so-
lar cities which will certainly
benefit no one at all.
Judge Merhige has now de-
clared in his Richmond decision
that the remedy is to merge
the center city school districts
with the neighboring suburban
school districts, thereby leaving
the whites nowhere to flee to.
But in the first place this kind
of large-scale homogenization is
not even practical inside the
larger center cities themselves.
In New York City, for example,
it would require busing Man-
;

it
hattan's black schoolchildren to
outer Queens and remote Staten
Island and vice versa, too.
THERE ARE also other costs
and difficulties that no one
seems to compute. One is the
prospective cost to the children
themselves of en extra half-
hour a day (in Richmond) to an
hour-and-a-half a day (in such
a city as New York I that will be
required by long-range busing.
Another is the money cost. An-
other is the inevitable cost of
fit
Increased racial tension and ill
will.
And that the majority of black
parents also prefer .neighbor.
hood schools, beyond doubt. In
New York,, for example, they'
have long had the option of
freely busing their children away
from their neighborhood!
to schools of their own choice
Yet only the tiniest minority J
well under 2% are currently
Continued on Pag 5
JM.8
Max Lerner
Sees It
KINGSTON, JamaicaThe general elections In Jamaica
will be held on Feb. 29, and they offer a good case history in the
politics of a developing country. I write as an interested visitor
over a long period both before and since independence who
cares too much about the long-range welfare of the island to
get caught in its immediate partisan politics.
The election campaign here is mercifully brief, but more in-
tensive than the much more protracted one in the United States.
It takes place in a series of local, outdoor party rallies, which
generate more noise than light, and on the battle page of the is-
land's excellent newspaper, the Daily Gleaner, and. in a -sequense
of remarkable full-page Gleaner ads by both parties, which take
the place of American TV spots, but are less expensive and (for
this reader) far more interesting.
BOTH MAJOR PARTIES here are labor parties,'and each
looks back to a founding father. The older of the two the
Jamacian Labor Party has its base of support among the rural
poor, the older trade unions, the business groups and the landed
whites. The people's National Party draws its support from the
newer unions, the more militant blacks, the urban unemployed
the students and the small but growing technical and profes-
sional group.
The parties are now under second-generation leaders. Hugh
Shearer, the prime minister and the head of the JLP, learned his
political skills under Alexander Bustamente. a salty,' flamboyant
labor leader whom the British imprisoned and later knighted
He lacks the old man's ease and fire, but he has grown into
power effectively, commands it well, has kept some able men
around him and is a formidable man to displace. Michael Manley.
the opposition leader, lacks the brilliance and verbal grace of
his father, Norman Manley, who founded the PNP, hut he shows
great promise and may have a more realistic flair'for politics. If
the JLP is centrist, the PNP is more like the British Labor
Party today, with a moderate and a left wing.
FOR THE PAST lo YEARS, the JLP has run the govern-
mem. and the PNP has been out of power and hungry for it. ThU
may say more about their current attitudes than anything else.
The opposition party talks darkly of corruption in high places
and uses the broom as its symbol, emphasizing that it is time
for a change. The government party talks darkly of the socialist
dogmas of its opponents and uses the bell as its symbol ringing
presumably for vigilance. It says the change has already come,
and points to its record of modernization.
, T*T, HUgh Shearer wan* some of Bustamente-s magic
,,I7.., peop,e t0 "* off on hlm- Michael Manley likes to be
called Joshua." and holds aloft the "rod of correction." presum-
nbly handed on from Halle Selassie. Thus two highly competent
modern men are political enough to pay tribute to the element of
the irrational in the fealty of the people.
hBUTuTHE *AMACIAN P^ies suffer less from Ideological
po.es han in most other developing nations. The Jamacians are
polt.es than in most other developing nations. The Jamacians are
with a wry folk wisdom of their own and with no great hanker-
ing for the dry and bitter fruits of ideology. The trouble with
dogma is that its victims see the world through blinkers which
narrow and distort the real world which the government of a
new nation must deal with-the marketing of sugar, bananas,
industrial products, the recruiting of skills, the managing of for-
eign exchange and internal credit, the borrowing and develop-
ment of technologies, the control of populations.
Jamaica is lucky in one important sense, since its two party
leaders are both trade union leaders, and trade union activism in
politics channels much of the energy that might otherwise get
dammed up or go into political turbulence. But it shares with
other developing nations the great tragic trap: As it moves tier either party) from labor-intensive to technology-intensive
projects, its rate of growth (In Jamaica's case a healthy 6r;
goes along with a joblessness which Is made worse hy a too-high
birthrate and baby sprawl.
AND FOR EVERY government there will be the additional
niRhtmare of having to find or train technical and managerial
skills at the very time when the seductions of the world outside,
drain them away from the home country.


; '-1 v -
Friday. March 3. 1972
+Jewlst> nor/War?
Page 5
47 EMERALD HILLS COUNTRY CLUB
Women's Division
Brunch March 16
The story of her early exper-
iences In Nazi occupied Europe
will form the "bash for the talk
Mrs. Gerda Weissraan Klein will
give for the Women's Division of
Jewish Welfare Federation at a
Thursday morning brunch March
16 at Emerald Hills Country Club
for women who have contributed
a minimum gift of $25 to this
year's Federation campaign.
Mrs. Klein was born in Bielitz,
Poland; she was living there with
her parents and brother at the
time the German armies occupied
Poland In 1939 and took them cap-
tive.
In the midwinter of 1945. as the
Nazi empire began to crumble be-
fore the advancing Allied forces,
the 4,000 women inmates of the
camp in Silesia where she was in-
tered were driven 1,000 miles
eastward toward Czechoslovakia
by the Gestapo. When the March
Attache Beauty Salon
2711 S. Ocean Drive
Hollywood
922-1416
DARN I YARN
>. Knitting Boutique
Nmt DoorTo Merchant*
Green Stamp Redemption Canter
20 canta an ounce and up
Hon. tliru Sat.: B:tO to 1:30
Thuradaye 0:30 t* :SO P.M.
"Varna Wound To Order"
"Small Appliance Repairs"
117 S. 19th Avanue, Hollywood
Bet Hlyd. Blvd. 4 Harrlaen
Phone S2S-7J74
Guaranteed Work
Genuine Factory Parts
MOBTY ROSKNBLUM
Formerly, of Long Beach, N.V.
Vlbu
came to a halt in a small village
in that country, there were less
than 200 survivors.
However, fate intervened for
Mrs. Klein In the form of an ad-
vance contingent of U.S. Infantry,
commanded oy Lt Kurt Klein,
which entered that village as lib-
erators. She married him a year
later and came to the United
States. Mr. and Mrs. Klein now
live in Buffalo.
Mrs. Klein, who has told of her
experiences in an autobiography
entitled, "All But My Life," a book
which has been hailed by critics
all over the world as one of the
most moving documents to come
out of the Nazi period in Europe,
is a writer for the Buffalo Evening
News Courier and for the New
York Times.
This event is slated to be one
of the highlights of the Women's
Division campaign this year. Be-
cause of the unusual and exciting
character of the speaker, it is ex-
pected to draw one of the largest
audiences attending a Federation
meeting this year.
To date the Women's Division
shows an increase of 107% in
amount of pledges secured. With
the sustained interest and con-
tinued involvement of the com-
munity's women, it is expected
that this figure will be increased
throughout the Women's Division
campaign.
6HTD4 MT. Kit IN
^Atatter of Jaci kg,
JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued from Pas* 4
taking up this option.
RACIAL, costly school im-
provement in the neighborhoods
where the children are is an-
other way to offer quality edu-
cation to the children of the
poor, both black and white. This
way was briefly tried in New
York City some years ago; and
when really supported, the New
York experiment achieved what
has not been achieved in White
Plains and Berkeley ghetto
third graders reading at a level
equal to the national average.
The experiment has been all
but dismantled now because- of
oitter hostility from some of the
liberal educationists, and from
total want of support from any
of them. Take your own choice
between the two alternatives.
"Boutique For Ho and She'
"GROUP THBRAPY"
123* Dixie Highway
Hollywood
JaanaSHJrtaNovaltlaa
Hours 11-812-6 Sundays
For Creative Upholstery
Call John W. Puerto
11* W. Dixie Highway
Hallandale
CUSTOM DRAPERIES
- Phone 922-7760
Captain Nicks At
-FAR AWAY JOES"
All The Seafood Vou Can Eat
SOS S.W. 8th Ave., Hallandale
CARRY OUT 925-8848
Serving from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
LEARN THE ANCIENT ART
OF JAPANESE BUNKA
Cultural Embroidery To You
EA8Y TO LJSARN
EASY TO USE
Oriental Art Studio
917 S. 21 at Ave. Hollywood
Phone 925-8641
FASTING REDUCING REJUVENATION
WHOLESOME MEALS PEACEFUL SURROUNDINGS
EXERCISE CLASSES SUNBATHING POOL BOATS
jS^rVtf/7/f FOR FREE LITERATURE jfQLr
Ufa,-----------------^*
OMA ^
BON ITA SPRINGS, FLORl DA
"Where Health is
33923-JF USA.
Taught"

NEW
CIRCLE
BEAUTY
SALONS
TRY US
YOU'LL LIKE US
Peraonal Servles
Delightful Reauita That Laat
Coze' Beaute' Salon
Galahad Hall Apia.
S001 So. Ocean Drive. Hollywood
Air-Conditioned Dryera
Houre: -6 No Sundaya
Phone: 927-5842
GALAHAD HALL
SOUTH
BEAUTY SALON
M01 S. Ocean Drive
HOLLYWOOD
Open Men. Sat. 9-4
SHAMPOO
& SET
Permanent Waves
from $6.95
(set extra)
DOWNTOWN
I837N. Young Circle
Between Hwd. Blvd.
and Dunlcin Donuts
922-9444
FROM
*1.99
GRAND (
7 DAYS AND
HOLLYWOOD
HILLS AREA
on Stats Road No. 7|
983-9555
6 EVENING*
WALK-INS WELCOME
tlj.lMM)ll!iJ
JttlS&L
J*u3S Barnett Bank of Hollywood Tyler Street at 19th Avenue ^K ^aBaBaae*** rnone 923-9222 K?
Blue Mountain
Camp
EAST STROUDSBURG, PENNA.
FABULOUS FACILITIES
AMAZINGLY LOW TUITION
HIGH IN THE POCONO MOUNTAINS
East Stroudsburg, Ponns
FABULOUS FACILITIES AMAZINGLY LOW PRICES
COED CAMPING AT ITS VERY FINEST
40ACHLAKE
SWhVsVJNG POOL
BOATING AND FISHING
WATER SKIING SAILING
LIGHTED TENNIS COURTS
BASEBALL DIAMONDS
LIGHTED BASKETBALL
COURTS
SPORTS FIELDS
VOLLEY BALL COURTS
BADMINTON COURTS
INDOOR t OUTDOOR
STAGES
MOVIES AND SHOWS
LARGE REC. HALL
INOOOR TOLLER SKATING
LAME AIRY DINING HALL
MODERN KITCHEN
CERAMIC WORKSHOP
ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOP
NATURE BUILDING
INFIRMARY AND CLINIC ,
RIDING STABLES I RING.
RIDING AND HIKING TRAILS
OUR OWN RADIO STATION
TRAMPOLINE AND
GYMNASTICS
err PROGRAM
CAMPER-WAITER (10th
CA&PER TUITION- S00
CITAN0 WAITER
TUITION$525
LIMITED EMOUMNt
70BOYS-7QCWLS.
FOR INFORMATION PHONE 9453304 9-12 AJ4. 4-7 P.M.
S. GOULD
FRUIT SHIPPERS
Pure Orange and Grapefruit Juke
1809 Wiley St. (4 blocks north of Hollywood Dog Track
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Telephone 927-5447
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V


v^

Page 6
+Jei$l flcrkiiar)
Friday. March 3. 1972
mam tgwr servke of browaud county
Highlights Of
The Year 1971
' 3y ESTHER I.OWEXTIIAU
Executive Director
One out of every two families
that en mo to the Jewish Family
Service in 1971 liveil in the Hal-
landale or Fort I-auderdale areas
of Browanl County. This reflects
the expansion oi Jewish popula-
tion throughout the total county
end makes Jewish Family Service
a truly county-wide agency.
Some .VK) families again were
searching for alleviation of or an-
swers in piobiems that at least
temiKirarily seemed overwhelming
or threatening to their stability, i
The most frequent request was
made by bcw'ideicd parents try-
ing to cope with trying behavior ;
or demands mode by children rate,-- i
big in age from pro-sch young adulthood, j
Closel) tousmring were couples
who were fearful of strains In
their marriages and then came our I
ktar oJttsens, besieged by Illness, \
or loneliness, or adjustment lif-
ficulties precipitated by retire-
menl and a different way of life.
Just coming toi help frequently
.mitigates an Immobilizing anxiety, j
This th. n enables families with
iiroiossional guidance to cope and
learn new ways of handling prob-
lemi, thus restoring their sense of
adequacy.
These 500 troubled families re-
ceived 1,725 In-pcrson and 3,100
telephone Interviews from our pro-
fessional staff. An additional 219
families were given information
and referral service, (a vital pro-
gram in itself offered by Jewish
Family Service to the community.
Many problems confronting fam-
ilies today involve most or all
members of the family. Conse-
quently. 4ba family interviews
were arranged.
One out of every four families
seeking counselling was referred
bv a family who had exjH'iienced
the agency's professional services.
Others came at the suggestion of
rabbis, schools, courts, social agen-
cies, doctors, lawyers, friends, re-
latives.
Local Postof f ices
Take Applications
For U.S Passports
Postmaster K. M. Dtinlap has
announced th.it three \tost officer
in the Greater M ami area are now j
accepting applications for U.S. |
Passports.
Applications will be acoopte,'
Monday through Friday during
r -uiar business hours a' t'le Mali
Office, 300 NE I t Ave I >ra'.
Gables Branch, 2S1 Valencia Vve
O and M
Bi inch 1300 Washington Ave.
Mian
Other of Ices In the South Ftar-
Ida area providing this m serv
Ice are Hleleah, Hollywood, Fort
Lauderdalc, and Pompano iv ach
according to Postmaster Dunlap
The volume of international
travel is Increasing steadily and
it is dear additional ways are
needed to aceommor'ote the in-
< asing number of US. citizens
applying for passports, but adjudi-
cation and issuance of pass;>orts
Mill remains the responsibility of!
tlve States Passport Office in'
Washington, D.C. and field gen.
i in major cities of the United
stes, he -aid.
A major aim of Jevv'sh Family ;
Service is the prevention of family
breakdown we like to offer help
when problems first become ap-
parent and before they result in '
serious or permanent damage. To
this end. we use not only our s|>e- '
rial programs ol individual and !
fomil counselling but work close-
ly with all the other helping re- ,
sources pun idod by the county.
The continual growth of Jewish
! cial service needs. These needs
have i.cen recognized by the
agency's supporting organizations,
the Jewish Welfare Federation of
Creator Hoi I wood, Cnited Fund
'<'. Browsed County and Jewish
Federation of North Browanl.
Bach has increased its allixation
for 1972 so that the board and
staff of Jewish Family Service
may continue to seek additional
ways of solving primarily the Jew-
ish community of Broward Coun-
ty.
**.*
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Age 45. $337.50 $28.80 Monthly i.d.
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Men. thru Sat. 15
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'1
JDL Official
Arrested In
Los Angeles
TLOS ANGELES (JTA)
Irving S. Rubin, 26. West Coast ;
coordinator of the Jewish De- |
fense League, has been arrested !
on a charge of assult with intent
to commit murder against the
Los Angeles County head of the
American Nazi Party. He was
free on ball after surrendering
to authorities.
Nazi leader Joseph Tomasci.
21. filed a complaint early this
month charging Rubin with fir-
ing several" shots at the Nazi's
car two days after a mass JDL-
ipuireared rJemowrlration Jan.
30 in front of the party's head-
quarters in Kl Monte, a Los
Angeles suburb.
The JDL and other local citi-
zen groutis have been attempt-
ing to apply pressure on the Kl
Monte city officials to oust the
Nazis, who call therr.selves the
National Socialist White Peo-
ple's Party, from their El Monte
headquarters.
A rock and bottle throwing
melee erupted Jan. 30 at the
headquarters site after the JDL
marched past the swastika-
decked building and then dis-
persed. Forty persons were ar-
rested and jailed on various
charges, however, as violence
broke out between spectators
and the uniformed Nazis, some
of whom were carrying rifles.
HEAR
JACOB
SCHACHTER
Off THE Aft
riAl TOM
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bsrHawgd:
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binical supervision of
Rabbi Solomon I. Birnbaum.
KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE
1455 S. Akritii St. Chicafi, W
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Kosher Corned Beef, Pas-
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Liver Sausage. Tonga*.
Knackwurst and Frank-
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i
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Bring us your
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How much cash does your problem call for? In our 47 years,
we've helped more people with low-cost loans than any other
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Friday. March 3. 1972
rJenislitloricUari
Pag 7
**^****~'****>+++++*+++**++^

Scene ar0und

March Activities Of Hallandale Chapter Of Hadassah Groups
immunity, rt is curious to ponton t Ae.P>P"*or the
I hat take plaoe m the sclf_J^ successor, of events
fel hour.,. e'f"Same room over ^e course of just a
completely dno"t ^1 StS7 ?t'* ^ hSt l *">
hcnT ?," "** f ,h enC0Untcr grouP lead*rs -openneT; aS
honesty ft an interesting day and a learning Zt
S&flflSLF"--60n* of tt~ ** sr
rt jKUtT"! "^ the Mme r00m beCam< thp for the
fti*Z! f'"^ the Schlnrsh^ *** >*-
hC "T 'I "e f larKWit "* Thorings held
d';f The" T w '^ 75 Wmen "^"^ in, the 'his
h?Z ,'0Om'kcd qui,c diffnt than it had looked the day
Ih lore for on this occasion a long runway ran the length of th
room.and row, Gf tables were lined up all around.
For this day Marcia Silver and her helpers on the decora-
ttoi* oomm.ttee worked hard and with much success to make
the room unbelievably beautiful for the affair. Dolls decorated
by the dolts of the committee were used as centerpieces They
wen so admired that they were offered for sale and the receipts
wene added to the total taken in that day.
The Scholarship Foundation was started just a few years
aero by Annette Milloff and a small group of local women. In
197,}, 30 youngsters were helped .to start college by the group.
This lunehtoiAis thefr only fund-raising event. As I looked
around the room, at this representative group of women, I
couldn't help hut wonder how many of them gave a thought to
Hi.-, youngsters for whose benefit the Foundation was formed
and. for whose benefit this luncheon was being given.
For these youngsters we don't have to support drug clinics or
intention homes or rehabilitation centers. We only need to help
them get started on the road to a future by helping pay for
their freshman year at college.
Much credit must be given to Harriet Blitz, chairman of
the luncheon and Carol Sacks her cochairman. And a special
b front table and who has to pacify all those who feel they
deserve the best. Some day they'll design a theatre with only
front rows and a balh-oom with a runway running in and out
in front of all tables so everyone will have a front table. In the
meantime, thanks have to go to those people who undertake the
seating arrangements for any affair. It's a thankless task,
fr & -tr
The Women's Division of Federation gave another one of
their super luncheons this week. More than 75 women gave their
minimum donation of 9100 and sat down to the sumptious food
at Emerald Hills. I was sitting at a table with Nancy Atkin,
Fiorette Aranow. Doris Schwartzman, Gladys Abram and Char-
lotte Gordon and all of us managed to finish every bit of the
food. This luncheon circuit will continue on through April it
would seem; by then we'll all be ready for those quiet summer
days.
At this luncheon Mrs. Jacob Lutz spoke to the women .ibout
her recent trip to Israel. Some of the women we saw there were
Gloria Greenspun, Pcrle Siegel, Ruth Joelson, Charlotte Gordon
Shenker, Caroline Honeyman. Ginger I-eff, Mollie Fektman,
Hattie Giijberg Loretta Epstein, Rose Schecter, EsteUe Cohn,
Martha Feingold, Esther Lowenthal, Madeline Silver, Sally
Blackman, Rachel Shapiro and of course Carolyn Davis, Fed-
cration' JBomen's Division campaign chairman and her cochair-
man A viva Ba.i.
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TOO E. DAHIA BEACH ILVO.. DANIA
Hallandale Chapter of Hadassah
and its six affiliated groups cele-
brated Hadassahs 60th anniversary
at this week's donor luncheon.
Mrs. Casper Alman was luncheon
chairman and Mrs. Ed Dincin co-
chairman.
Group activities for March have
been announced by the various
chairmen. *
Chai Group will hold its regu-
lar meeting Tuesday, March 21, at
noon in the Home Federal Build-
ing, Hallandale. Education chair-
man, Mrs. Jacob Kimbrig and co-
chairman, Mrs. Joseph Wise will
conduct a panel discussion with
members participating.
Fairways Group was to hold a
regular meeting Thursday, with
Education chairman Mrs. Murray
Feurstein speaking on "Purim."
Hemispheres Group Will hold a
regular meeting Tuesday, March
21, at 12:30 p.m. in the auditorium.
In celebration of Hadassah's 60th
anniversary, the film "The Dream
and the Deed" will be shown.
Imperial Towers Group will
have a luncheon and fashion show
at noon Tuesday, March 21.
Community Passover Seder
At Diplomat Hotel March 29
Temple Beth Shalom's annual
community Passover Seder will be
held at the Diplomat Hotel, the
evening of March 29. Dr. Morton
Malavsky will officiate, assisted
by Cantor Irving Gold.
This will be a strictly kosher for
Passover meal, under rabbinical
supervision. Group reservations
are being accepted and tickets and
additional information may be ob-
tained by calling the temple office.
The seder tickets are being
handled by Mrs. Bill Gordon.
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AND
MAGAZINES
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2*2 N. Fed. Hwy. Halla.dol*
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NO WAITING
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LIGHTED FOR NITE PLAY
CLUBHOUSE FOR
LUNCH AND
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I rh.nt 919-9211
_
Parker Towers Group will have
a card party and social in Parker
Towers Card Room at 12:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 21.
Plaza Towers Group will hold a
regular meeting at noon Tuesday.
March 21, in the Soaial Hall. Plaza
Towers "Dolls on Parade" with
latest styles by Fashion Shpw and
members partic|wt^{ig^--' | ,
Hallandale Chapter of Hadassah
and Chai, Fairways. Hemispheres,
Imperial Towers and Parker and
Plaza Groups will host a luncheon
for Gold Patrons at Kmerald Hills
Country Club at noon Wednes-
day, March 22. Mrs. Zachary
Boosin is rHMrman; Mrs. George
S. Viflenihal is co-chairman for
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Bring this ad for your free gift


Page 8
+Jeist ncrkJian
Friday, March 3, 1972
AN OPEN LETTER FROM JEWISH YO
In a few weeks the people of Florida
will play a major role in selecting the 1972
Democratic Presidential Nominee.
For several months now the Jewish com-
munity of South Florida has been bom-
barded by high powered campaigns. Our
community has been courted, our press
saturated, our homes visited, our mail-
boxes flooded in an effort to convince us
that this candidate or that candidate is "Is-
rael's best friend" or the "Jews best friend."
Sadly enough even certain Jewish institu-
tions have give? the impression of becom-
ing vehicles for partisan political aspira-
tion.
We are Jewish youth leaders from the
Miami area. Many of us attend the Hebrew
Academy or the Mesivta High School. We
are or have been the officers of the student
bodies of those schools as well as of the
Miami Jewish Youth Council and the South-
ern region and Miami chapters of our na-
tional synagogue and temple youth orga-
nizations. We are not however speaking
to you now in any official capacity but
rather as concerned Jewish young adults.
We do not have the Chutzpa to tell you
how to vote we only ask that you con-
sider all the facts before voting.
We are supporting Senator Hubert Hum-
phrey of Minnesota for the Democratic
Nomination. We do this because we think
there is more than one issue to consider
and because we are impressed with the
sincerity and devotion with which Senator
Humphrey has long championed the causes
we believe in.
The Senator from Minnesota has a rec-
ord that speaks for itself:
* More major humanitarian legislation
bears his name than those of all the other
candidates combined: Peace Corps, Medi-
care, Food for Peace, extended Social Se-
curity Benefits, and the National Defense
Loan Program which has helped millions
of students meet the rising cost of college
education. He has shown a compassion for
the poor, the aged, and the infirm not only
in these programs but in his historic pro-
posal for a Marshall Plan to rebuild the
cities of America.
His experience encompasses both for-
eign and domestic affairs. He authored the
Nuclear Test Ban treaty. He led the fight
to create the United States Arms Control
and Disarmament agency. As Senator and
Vice President he was in charge of delicate
negotiations with many foreign heads of
states and officials and served on the
United States delegation to the United
Nations.
While many politicians today seem to
thrive on playing one ethnic or racial group
against another. Senator Humphrey has al-
ways believed in a pluralist America and
has steadfastly refused to curry favor wrth
any group at the expense of another.
BUT WHAT ABOUT JEWISH ISSUES?
Frankly, we fed it is an insult to Jewish
voters to only talk to them about Israel or
Soviet Jewry. We feel that peace, compas-
sion, healing the sick (where were the other
contenders when Hubert Humphrey led
the lonely struggle to create Medicare?)
feeding the hungry, teaching childretv and .
racial harmony are all "Jewish issues" ajsp.
In fact, we introduced several of th*m to
mankind some 3,500 years ago.
.-**.
Of course there are specific contempor- '
ary issues that we as Jews have a special
concern for. In these matters also Senator
Humphrey enjoys a unique record which
we deem worthy of our unstinting support.
He has traveled the length and breadth
of America for over 25 years speaking at
Jewish functions, raising funds for Jewish
causes, and being in the forefront of every
struggle dear to Jewish hearts. From work-
ing for the creation of the State of Israel to
helping safeguard the Sabbath observor's
constitutional rights, his has been a quarter-
century of accomplishment.
Others may create a great deal of
publicity over "being Israel's best friend."
Obviously Israel needs the military sup-
plies that current legislation allows her to
buy from the United States. But such legis-
lation regularly is endorsed by dozens of
Senators (including all presidential hope-
fuls) and passes by overwhelming margins.
Senator Humphrey, while always cospon-
soring such legislation, has never taken
personal credit for this. He would rather
have the world know that these planes
represent the bipartisan support of the
American people than to squabble with
others over who should take the lion's
share of domestic glory for doing what is
only just and correct in the first place.
* Yet there are fundamental differences
between the Senator's record on Israel and *
that of his opponents.
. .
* They usually call for the United ^ates
to sell or extend credits to Israel to bpy
American weapons. For years Senator Hum-
phrey has called on the United States "to
make a binding treaty with Israel in order
to give her (as we do our NATO allies) the
weapons she needs for her survival. Sen-
ator Humphrey has decried the fact that me
prime minister of Israel must come to
America to beg for arms or be at the elec-
tion year mercies of political figures. We
should not, he feels, make political gain
out of what is our moral obligation.
Everyone talks of military aid to Israel.
But, the same enlightened compassion that
marks the Senator's overall record also
flavors his view towards Israel.
* He was among the first to call fy-di


Friday, March 3, 1972
^Jewish ncrkUan
Pag* 9
iOUTH LEADERS OF SOUTH FLORIDA
*
rect economic aid to Israel to help absorb or accolades for helping lead the diplo-
the 750,000 refugees thrown out of Arab matic struggle for Soviet Jewry. Maybe if
lands (and more recently for those fleeing more politicians felt this way we wouldn't
Soviet Russia also). Unlike the other con- have to wait for an election year to hear
tenders he first made this call not in the from them on the issue,
current election year but years ago. '
* Domestic Jewish Civil Rights In this
He is the only candidate to take a area Humphrey stands alone. His deep
clear position on the city of Jerusalem concern for the quality of life of all Amer-
wKich the United States refuses to recog- cans has long placed him in the forefront
nize as capital of Israel. Senator Humphrey of the struggle for the constitutional right
calls this "gross hypocrisy" and has called of all citizens. A Jew denied housing, re-
on the United States to back Israel's claim fused employment or discriminated against
to a united Jerusalem as capital of Israel in educational opportunity because of his
in which the religious shrines and holy religion will be backed in court by the fed-
places of all faiths are honored and are eral government because of legislation pro-
under autonomous control (in contrast to posed, written, and guided through Con-
the Jordanian destruction of the Old City gress by Senator Hubert Humphrey. His
Jewish Quarter in 1948-67 which Senator special concern for the rights of Sabbath ob-
Humphrey has, unlike his opponents, servers and, at explicit request of Orthodox
strongly condemned). Jewish leaders, to create legislative safe-
* ruu jg !* a guards for kosher slaughter, must also be
Other candidates support military aid mentioned.
to Israel because, beyond the domestic po-
litical benefits, they believe in arming any In closing we urge all Floridians to weigh
nation beset by Communist supported ag- these facts, consider these issues, and join
gression. Certain of them did the cause of us in supporting Senator Hubert Humphrey
Israel no benefit by declaring that they fr president in the March 14th primary,
support her just as they support the gov-
ernment of South Vietnam. Whatever his We need help to bring our message to
record on Vietnam (and the Pentagon Pa- others. Contributions of time or money are
pers demonstrated that every seminal de- both needed. Please send this coupon to:
cision to escalate that sorry war was made ,
i r ii u u w D^rA^* \ Jewish Youth for Humphrey
before Humphrey became Vice President in ., J" r
1965) Senato^ Humphrey has never equated c/o Flo"da*g>hrey Comrn-ttee
Israel and South Vietnam. We feel those 'ostOff,ceBox4419
, i i i c i i rviain rosf jTtice
who do are not as good a friend ot Israel -,-
, 4 a i- Miami, Florida 33101
as they might want us to bel leve.
Is Israel a means or an end in itself? Sen- Name -------..................------------------------------
ator Humphrey has always treated her as Address
the latter. .
Of course there is so much more we ........- ...............--------------------
could talk about: phone Number____________________
Soviet Jewry years before this became m M fhe fo||owi fjmes:
an "in"' issue Senator Humphrey was
speaking out on behalf of the cultural and date ------.......--------._
religious rights of Soviet Jews and on their hours____-___-
right to emigrate to the nations of their .........
choice. More recently while others were I enclose a contribution of:
malting sure that they received maximum $5Dk$10a $250 $50^
press coverage on this issue Senator Hurrv '
' Shrey was quietly but firmly helping So- PuWi^ by: Jew.* Yoothfor Humphrey
vTet Jewry He personally raised their 2Sft **
plight with Premier Alexis Kosygin in 1969. 4299 C#lQ
Humphrey doesn't feel he needs awards M,.m, Beach, Florida 33140
SAMUEL ABRAMSON MARK MILLER
President Jowh* Youth Council of Groator Miami Prosidont N.tion.l Conf.ronco of Synagogue Youth
Southern Region 1970-71
JAY DENNIS POLIACK
Pr^d^-North Miami aWiChn*" m^ DAVID POtJLACK
National Conferonca of Synagogue Youth National Community Relations Commission
National Conference of Synagogue Youth
FRANCES GLUSHAKOW IRVIN REINHARD
Recording Scrotary Miami Beach High School vice President United Synagogue Youth
Secretary United Synagogue Youth-Southoast Region Southoast Region
MVWJAFK MKMMAWtUMm
Orsar.laatier.al Hetina* fer MeMifkatlea prp.. enly >d. Ml. AOW.


Page 10
vJemstr ftcric/iarri
Friday. March 3, 1972

PERSONALITY PROFILE
Mark Fried
By ABBEY KLEIN
Oneja/.the few young men about
town (who is practically a native)
JVIark Fried, 27, has already be-
AMffff FRIED
run contributing to our com-
munity.
Grandson of Mrs. Coil Kest and
1Iip late Henry Kest. one of the
founders of Temple Beth El, Mark
vacationed here in Hollywood
Torn his home in Bronxville, N.Y.
nd Sherman Oaks, Calif., prior to
Moving here permanently at age
32.
Mark attended Olson Junior
High School and graduated from
South Broward High School be-
fore enrolling at Florida Atlantic
University, where he earned his
egree in Finance. He is now
studying there for his Master's do- Mark says.
giee while working as a stock-
broker.
In addition to his studies and
I his work, Mark has found time to
be active during the past two
years with Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration, serving as vice-president
of the Young Leaders Council and
advisor to the Jewish Youth Coun-
cil, a newly formed group of Jew-
ish youth representing all the
youth groups in the community
as well as the young people who
are unaffiliated with any organ-
ization.
His interest in young people has
also caused Mark to contribute
his time and eeffort as a board
member of Teen Age Hot Line.
Other organizations in which Mark
is involved are the Jewish Family
Service and the Jewish Community
Relations Board.
Mark and his wife. Mike, who
is employed by a prominent law
firm in Hollywood, htve been mar-
ried for three years. Mike also at-
tends Miami-Dade Junior College
where she is a Sociology major,
and is one of the founders of the
Aviva Chapter of B'nai B'rith and
a member of ORT. Their shared
enthusiasm for camping affords
them much-needed relaxation and
together they s|>end as much time
as they can at it.
It is most gratifying to talk to
such a dedicated, active young
man who finds time at this stage
of his life to give thought to the
plight of his fellow Jews every-
where. Not yet born at the time
ol the holocaust. Mark has none-
theless been greatly affected by
this unbelievable historical event.
Under adverse circumstances it
could happen again -even here,
Dinner Celebrates
Campaign Success
An "over the top" campaign was
the reason for the dinner given
recently by United Fund cam-
paign officials for Broward County
residents, including volunteer
workers and members of the vari-
us.wws./-,edia- ..,.,... ./..i
The goal was sun>asscd by $45.-
000 according to a statement made
by Tltomas J. Walker, past presi-
dent of the United Fund. The
1971-72 goal of $1.2 million was the
highest in the history of Brow-
ard's United Fund drive.
Dougla< Kaplan, who was cam-
paign chairman for South Brow-
ard. L. Paul Nestel. high-rise
chairman, and Jerry Yellin of the
board of governors received cam-
pai.-n awards. The South Broward
group raised $44,606, surpassing
this area's goal for the first time.
George Ostin., publicity chair-
man for United Fund, gave a spe-
cial "thank you" to the news
media. Without their cooperation,
the public could not have been
made aware of the goals and needs
of the campaign, he said, and with-
out their help, he concluded, the
goal would certainly not have been
surpassed.
Entry Blanks Available
To Photography Contestants
Prospective contestants in the
forthcoming Photography Contest
I the 12th annual Seven lively
Arts Festival can now pick up en-
try blanks for the contest ai the
Recreation office, 20.10 Polk St.
There will be four categoric, for
entrants: professional, amateur,
journalism (action shots) and
olor. Cash prises will be awarded
jii all categories. First place will
get 830; second $30. and third. $10.
Ribbons will be presented to the
top three and additional ribbons to
honorable mention winners.
Deadline for submitting
mounted prints is March 27. Any
l/o photograph in veeticle or hori
Zontal position must be mounted on
vertical mountb-inrd. 16 x 20 inches.
Bach contestant may submit three
different photos. Name, address.
phone number, title of entry and
category chosen for the entry
must he printed clearly on the
lack of the mount board. No titles
may bo printed on ihe front.
Photos may be delivered to the
Recreation Confer office. They
will be displayed at the Center
April 4 to 9. The winners will be
exhibited from April 17 through
April 22 in window space in down-
town Hollywood.
Presentation of awards will take
place during the festival which
opens April 4 and ends the week-
end of April 15-16. Newspajxr
photographers, amateurs, profes-
sionals, teenagers and adults arc
invited to participate.
During the wk of the festival
thetc will aLso be programs paying
li ibute to music, dance, drama, po-
etry, painting and sculpture and
special programs devoted to each
of the arts.
Walter Gray and Mrs. Edwina
Jaffe will l>e cochairmen of this |
year's event. William D. Horvitz
is president of the board of trus-
tees of Seven Lively Arts Festival,
Inc.. and Mrs. Thomas A. Thomas
is program chairman.
Lighthouse Chapter
Sponsoring Luncheon
The Minnie Goldstein Chapter
of the American Israeli Light-
house will hold a luncheon and
card party on Thursday, March
16. at 12:30 p.m. in the Washing-
ton Federal Bank Bldg. 633 N.E.
167th St., North Miami Beach.
At the last mooting of the or-
ganization. Mrs. Enid Dank, na-
tional president described its re-
habilitation center in Israel.
Hobby Show And Skit Will
Highlight NOW Meeting
An unusual display of art, cer-
amics, needlework, and hand-
crafts will highlight the Monday.
March 6, meeting of the National
Council of Jewish Women, Holly-
wood section. The Hobby Show
will be on display at Temple Sinai,
1201 Johnson, St., at 12:30 p.m.
Another feature of the me- ting
will be a skit entitled The New-
comers," written, acted and pro
duced by members of the Council.
Mrs. Estelle Langs and Mrs. Claire
Freedman arc cochairmen.
Gov. Askew, Ben Horowitz
In Salute To City of Hope
Florida's Gov. Reubin Askew
and Ben Horowitz, executive di-
rector of the City of Hope pilot
medical center in Duarte. Calif.,
attended the special salute to the
City of Hope sponsored by its five
South Florida chapters in the
North Miami Beach Auditorium
Sunday. Gov Askew, past presi-
dent of the Martin Louis 1 twin
Chapter in Hensacola, has proclaim-
ed Feb. 27 City of Hope Day in
Florida.
While in South Florida, Mr.
Horowitz had luncheon with Gulf-
stream president James Donn,
Jr., and Mrs. Donn. who have
been selected by the City of Hope
as its Couple of the Year and
will receive the 1972 Torch of
Hope Award. Joining them were
representatives ot the five Soutn
Florida chapters, including Mrs.
Cy Plasky, president and Bernard
Hoffman, past president of the
Miami Beach chapter, and Mrs.
A. J. Portnoy, president of the
South Broward chapter.
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National Solidarity Day For
Soviet Jewry Set April 30
By Special sVport
NEW YORK N.Y. The Na-
tional Conference on Soviet Jewry
has designated April 30 National
Solidarity Day for Soviet Jewry
the largest nationwide event
ever to be hod on behalf of So-
viet Jews.
In conjunction with the observ-
ance, there will be a massive peti-
tion campaign to gather at least
1 million signatures. The petitions
will press for inclusion of the
plight of Soviet Jewry on the
agenda of talks that President
Richard II. Nixon will have with
Soviet leaders in Moscow late in
May.
On the heels of National Solidar-
ity Day, several hundred delegates
from local communities across the
nation, and from national Jewish
organizations, will convene in
Washington, D.C. May 3. They will
bring with them the signed peti-
I tions to be preserved to the Presi-
dent prior to his Moscow trip.
In making the announcement,
the National Conference on Soviet
iJewry..wclcomed/PiBsidBt MixonAs
trip in the interests of furthering
peace between the United States
and the Soviet Union, but added
that it also advocates a positive
concern for Soviet Jews who have
been deprived of the opportunity
to develop their culture, to prsue
their religion and have otherwise
been denied their most basic hu-
man rights, including the right to
leave freely.
Although the emigration picture
for Soviet Jews may have improv-
ed somewhat recently, the basic
problem of Soviet Jews has not
hanged, the conference pointed
out. Emigration is not a stated
right for Soviet Jews but is sub-
ject to arbitrary decisions Harass-
ment and the persecution of Soviet
Jews continues; Jews are dis-
criminated against in Jobs and in
education.
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k


Friday. March 3, 1972
"JmHIi ftcridlcnn
Page 11
This Week In History...
40 Year* Aro This Wrnk: lS
"Waiaaw The poor V-.vs who
aW'.'nx J*"brury. ma5>'tarrt)in>
March in the gloo.r forecast
here."
Prof. Albert Etastefel told the
JTA in Los Angeles that Hitler's
fate "will be far better if he falls
to be elected President of the Ger-
man republic."
"Berlinonly immediate Inter-
vention with Washington, which
would find its echo throughout the
world, can save German Jewry
from pogroms which otherwise
Hitlerites arc quiet at present,.but
this is only the calm before the
storm. This storm, when it comes,
will be doubly dangerous for the
Jews unless the Nazis are told
by the world that the annihilation
of the Jews will not be tolerated'."
Bernard G. Richards was feted
for 25 years as author, journalist.
Zionist and American Jewish Con-
gress executive srcretarv.
10 Vears Ago This Week: 19fi2
Reporting "considerable im-
At the recent Women's Division of Jewish Welfcrre Federa-
tion luncheon for donors of $365 or more are cochuirmen,
from left, (seated) Mrs. S. R. Munter and Mrs. Harry Pc-r-
mesley; (standing) Mrs. David Shapiro and Mrs. Morten
Silberman, who was the guest speaker.
seem unavoidable, prominent Jew- i provement" in various govern-
ish ,|eadec$ state)* to the JTA- The | merits' attitudes, finance Minister
Lev! Kshkol said "a solution to
Israel's Common Market problems
will be found, sooner or later."
The Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem had 05 Arab students, seven
more than the year before.
Marking the 200tn anniversary
of the first Jewish settlement in
Michigan, the University of Det-
roit--the largest Cathc'ie institu-
tion of Its kind in the United
States staged a series of events
honoring Israel.
The (Conservative) It-.obinical
Assembly urged an end to the
"chaotic, conflicting and competi-
tive efforts" In the United States
10 aid Soviet Jewry. It is shocking
how every national Jewish organ-
ization acts on its own, issuing
pronouncements sometimes con-
tradicting one another, confusing
exeryone and helping no one,"
Rabbi Kdward Sandrow, president,
complained.
The South African Board of Jew-
ish Deputies asked Parliament to
consider banning publication of
anti-Semitic material.
Six Jews were killed and seven
seriously wounded in Algerian lib-
eration clashes. The next day, the
Chief Rabbi of Mascara died after
being knifed outside the main
synagogue.
The KKnesset. by 37-29, de-
feated a Liberal bill to ban official
wiretapping Justice Minister Dov
Joseph called the bill "good only
for Communists."
JTA president Klea/ar Lipskv
announced an extension of ser-
vices with publication as of March
15 of a weekly Community News
Reporter.
Sen. Barry Goldwater fR-Ariz.).
picketed in "Npw York by fascists,
declared in Madison Square Gar-
At*n: "LPt me say. as a man who is
half Jewish ... I don't remember
ever having known a Jew who
wasn't a patriot."
(Prom 'In fiiox of the JTA)
Did you
ever hear
of an
Italian
Balaboosta?
SSSJ Reports On Recent
Developments In Russia,
Continued from I'age 1-
>-i A........ // 1/ -*..... !<../
Army after seeking emigration
and who protested on grounds
that he had declared himself
an Israeli citizen, has been sub-
jected to "tremendous harass-
ment." Kolchinsky was arrested
Jan, 1 and held for three days,
during which time it was de-
manded that he renounce in
writing his "actions and convic-
tions directed ;Jt emigration to
Israel." He was released after
three days Ixvaune there was no
legal grot-rid for him to be dt
talned any longer.
Yitzhak Shlaieiman of Khar-
kov has had his visa revoked
pending his disclosure to the
authorities of the person al-
leged to have leaked word of
the situation of Jews in that
Ukrainian city. The only inci-
dents there that have so far
been re|x>rted were two house-
earcMngs on Jan. 28.
The Red Cross project chair-
man of the Greater New York
Conference on Soviet Jewry,
Krnest Goldblum. was in Geneva
to seek aid for Jewish |>olitical
prisoners from the International
Red Cross. He brought with him
from the International Red
Cross. He brought with him
messages of support from Sen.
James L. Buckley and Rep.
Among the guests at the Women's Division luncheon for
those who made a minimum contribution of $365 were Mrs.
Louis Gerstley and Mrs. Harry Coffman.
* -Ce
COMPICTE
Spaghetti
Dinner
with MUSHROOM SAUCE
Mr. Jay Kaufman, (left) Mrs. Allen Tint and Mrs. Gus
Klinkensteiit were among thc*e who attended the Women s
Division luncheon in behalf of the Federation campaign.
Be one the easy way. Serve your
family Chef BoyAr-Dee Spaghetti
Dinner. Complete in this one pack-
age. Ready in just 12 minutes. *
And what a delicious meal for
your familytender, freshly
cooked spaghetti, lavished with
savory mushroom sauce, finely
seasoned and home-style thick-
then topped with zippy grated
cheese. U-mm, real Italian ta'am.
GHBoyaFdee
Peter A. Peyser and an appeal
from Moscow Jtws citing tbe
prisoners' "danger" under tin u-
"unbearable conditions."
Three Jewish scientists in
Tbilisi; the capital of Soviet
Georgia, have protested rejec-
tion of their emigration applica-
tions in letters to the K^B
(secret police) and the Israeli
Association of Architects and
Knginecrs. They told the KGB
that the Ovir (visa office) had
advised them that there was
"no sense in our leaving" for
Israel, and they asked the KGB
to help effect a "just decision"
on their applications. |
The scientists told the Israeli
association that they had been
forced to leave their jobs after
applying for emigration, and
were being barred from working
in their profession. But, they
concluded, "Justice will triumph"
and they will eventually reach
"our historical homeland." The
scientists, all physicists, are
Giigory Goldstein, 15 years' ex-
perience. Isay Goldstein 10
years, and Kluabeta P.ikovna,
two years.
Samuel Gilinov of Riga is
warned twice by officials that
he would be committed to an
asylum if 'ie continued to seek
emigration, it was reported.
HARRY TOLLIN
A-e you stuck? Do you nd advice about making that "nblhir.j*
room come alive? Are you stymied by what colas to use, floor ootf>
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You probably don't want the cost ot a decorator and could do tie
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provide necessary sketches or swatches or just brainstorm What 1 it.
otfe-ini is the help of a skilled, professional InenrJ. 1 will diagnose*
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Don! be afraid to call. One consultation will take care of yojf
problems and is cheaper than one mistake.
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PtKJS 12

*Jewlst> FIcrlcBarn
Friday, Mcsrch 3. 1972 =B
OUR TOWN
_..;. SOMETHING NfW
The newly formed Temple Beth El Art and
Cultural Committee has some exciting plans on
tap. Come Saturday evening, April 8, in the Tobin
Auditorium of Temple Beth El the committee
with the cooperation of the Hollywood Art Mu-
seum will present "Art For Pleasure," a show-
ing of over 200 paintings and sculpture. Artists
exhibiting in the gcla evening are Esther Zwet-
baoh, Hollywood Art Museum teacher and noted
oil painter; Sidney Wallace, well-known for his
excellent lithographs; Enw Gallo, sculptor, and
RIU Gombinski of the Galerie Mendel of Con-
temporary Art (now located in Haifa). Many
works of Israeli artists and a fine collection from
the DeCinque Gallery will be displayed.
Heading up the committee are Dr. and Mrs.
Rubin Klein with a big assist from Mr. and Mrs.
Morton Abram, Dr. and Mrs. Norman Atkln, Dr.
and Mr*. Abraham Fischler, Dr. and Mrs. Ira
(ilazer, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Glaxer, Dr. and Mrs.
Stanley Kessel, Dr. and Mrs. Milton Nowick, Dr.
and Mrs. Harry Orringer, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
Schecter, Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Schleslnger. Dr.
and Mrs. Stanley Sliver, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Tobin and Dr. and Mrs. Marcus Zbar. Advisor to
the group is Sidney Kronish.
There'll be no charge for admission. For
those who wish to be listed as patrons ($10 per
couple) a cha.npa^ne cocktail party in their honor
will begin the evening. A fine opportunity fcr all
those participating: IbJB artists, temple and
wospective art buyers whose purchases will
je tax-deductible.
BRUNCHING
Three good friends put their heads together
to plan a brunch and did quite a job of it. At the
Invitation of Betty (Mrs. Ben) Silver, Reae (Mrs.
-Ved) Spines and Motile (Mrs. Milton) Spier, 80
women were welcomed to Emerald Hills Country
Club for brunch, cards, and camaraderie.
The setting couldn't have been lovelier. Floral
arrangements of red tulips, white baby's breath
and white mums adorned the tables covered in
bright red linen. A perfect color choice for the
time of the year George Washington's birthday.
Some of the out-of-town guests attending
were Mrs. A. Solomon and Mrs. Herschel Ekhom
of Carroll, 111.; Mrs. Irving Lippert and Mrs. Hy
Bonner of New York; and Ann (Mrs. Robert)
Woolf of Boston. Winter residents Mrs. Louis
Blue and Mrs. M. Alpern were there, too, as were
many beautifully coifed and well-groomed lo-
calites: Ruth (Mrs. Charles) Doppelt, Louise
(Mrs. Milton) Forman. Mrs. Abe Feldman and
her daughter, June (Mrs. Hanley) Wolf, Mrs.
Bert Biegelsen, Mrs. Goldye Mlchelson, Mrs. Her-
bert Mlntz and Mrs. Roy Bazelon. Fort Lauder-
dale was well represented in the persons of Mrs.
Jerry Zwicker, Mrs. Archie Bobbins and Mrs
Richard Levy.
A beautiful day of flowers, food and friend-
ship thanks to three lovely ladies: Betty, Rose
and Mollie.
K- #
DELICIOUS ORATORY
The Metropolitan Dinner Club of Gn ater
Hollywood held their second get-together of
the 1971-72 season at Emerald Hills Country
Club. The group's slogan of "Good Food, Good
Company, Good Minds" put it well. The evening
of gourmet dining (beef Wellington, if you pkase)
was highlighted by the appearance of guest
speaker, Gary K. Clarke, one of the most kr.owl-
edgeable and articulate zoo directors and ecol-
ogy experts in the free world. His talk on "Zo-
by ^bobfte schlesinger
ology and Peopleology" imparted to the listener
an appreciation of the true nature of wild ani-
mals, an understanding of their behavior and an
insight into their relationship with and effect
upon man a delightful adventure into the
world of animals and people.
Judging by the smiles on the faces of Stan
and Naomi Kurash and Don and Barbara Ko-
vacs it was a fine evening. Mr. and Mrs. Julius
Harris and Lewis and Mltxl Cohen seemed to be
enjoying themselves as well. The brothers Sorln
were on hand, Ted and Sam, with their respec-
tive spouses Lil and Edith. Speaking of Edith,
her sister and brother-in-law, the Aaron Good-
mans of Montreal, and her aunt, Bertha Herman
of Winnipeg, were on hand to join the "Sorins
4" for the dinner-club get-together.
*T PEOPLE AND PLACES
Helen HanilU, that Boca Raton gal who
snagged the main prize of the I.W.F.A. (that's
the International Women's Fishing Association)
for the biggest marlin catch in Mexico is not only
tops in the fishing world but tops in the "big
heart" department. She came through as one of
the benefactors for the Feb. 25 "Race For Life'
at Gulfstream, benefitting the American Cancer
Society and donated a most valuable concert
organ to boot. Helen keeps fine company. Her
friend, Lyn Fontaine (who knows more than a
thing or two about fishing herself) deserves spe-
cial Kudos from the Society as the top fund-
raising hostess for the event at Gulfstream.
If you're calendar jotting, circle April 6 for
the big night at the Playboy Plaza featuring
Sammy Davis, Jr. The Jewish Home for the
Aged is sponsoring the event.
That couple doing up the town in style is none
other than Dr. Rabin and Ahkey Klein. Reason
for all the night life is the arrival and entc-tain-
ing of Abbey's mother, Mi* A. Robert PeakJn of
New York (better known in the literary world
as Ruth Preston, fashion editor of the New York
Post.) Abbey's days are equally well occupied.
She recently entertained 50 women at a "Kaffee
Klatsch" in honor of Mrs. Albert Berler of San
Antonio Tex. The national president of the
Brandeis University National Women's Com-
mittee. Mrs. Berler came to town to tell the
Brandeis Story '72, "Everything You Alawys
Wanted To Know About Brandeis and Were
Afraid to Ask." Mrs. J. Smollan, Mrs. Lawrence
Nusbaum, Mrs. Ned Gordon, Mrs. Robert Gor-
don and Mrs. Joseph Steroberg were on hand
for that informative morning.
Attention to all you square dance lovers! Sat-
urday, March 18, at 8 p.m., the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth Shalom will feature a square dance
and late chuckwagon dinner. Neil Blanchard, pro-
fessional square dance caller and his troupe of 10
will perform and instruct in square and Israeli
dances in the temple's social hall. Mrs. Peter
Bauer is chairman and reservations may be made
by contacting Mrs. Zina Richman. Mrs. Morton
Katz, Mrs. Sherwin Golden, Mrs. Philip Levtne
and Sirs. Peter Bouer are in charge of devia-
tions. A Grandma Moses original will be offered
as a door prize. Sound like quite an evening? So,
mosey on over to the chuckwagon, 'podnah"
and swing that "purdy" little girl.
Interested in ordering Carmel wine kosher
from Israel? Contact Mrs. Leslie Boner of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom Sisterhood. All proceeds go to
the Torah Fund.
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Mrs. Weinstein Reelected
President Of Ka-Dee-Mah
The board of directors of Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah-. haaiiannounced the
ejpcticn-.of Mrs. PhiHp Wemstpio,
Jr. as its president for the second
successive year. She has been a
member of the board of the camp
since its inception.
At the same time the board of
directors confirmed the appoint-
ment of George Kirn as director
of the camp for the 1972 season.
Additional officers as reported
by Mrs. David Goodman of the
nominating committee are James
Fox Miller and Morton Levin,
vice presidents; Mrs. Myron Burn-
stein, secretary, and Mrs. David
Goodman treasurer.
The board of directors also in-
cludes Mrs. Louis Fineman, Mrs.
Martin Fleisher, Rabbi Robert
Frazin, Dr. David Glassman, Her-
bert Katz, Dr. Albert Kellert,
Mrs. Alan Podis. Dr. Alfred Ros-
enthal, Dr. Joel Schneider, Reuben
Palmers
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923-8255 or write:
TEMPLE BETH EL~ .
1351 S. J 4th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send mt literature on the above. .
NAME: '
ADDRESS:
PHONE:


r, March 3. 1972
JfewfcftJ%r*ft*j7
Page 13-B
RABBIS IN THE COMMUNITY
Rabbi David Shapiro, Temple Sinai
By MARCY LEVIN
hi David Shapiro has served
ritual leader of Temple Sinai
lllywood for 20 years, giving
IH1JI DAVID SHAPIRO
|the longest tenure of any
nan in the area. "I've been
prove to myself and the
kunity that I have stick-to-it-
ts" jokes the rabbi.
Ilywood was just a village
[his congregation numbered
100 families when he ar-
Currently It numbers al-
800. From Its original home
PoHc St, (now the site of
lollywood Recreation Center),
pie Sinai today sits on a 10-
tract and contains in addi-
I to a sanctuary, a separate
el, school and youth building.
bi Shapiro Is very proud of
ongregation where he "alms
^rve the well-being of all
and old alike." With the
|>le's youth and educational
fctors, programs are offered to
everyone's -nefdey-iie proud In]1
|ts to a Parents' Cultural
r.ue which meets monthly, a
kly mother'*'-class' and 200
kg people involved in the youth
Vam. A recent "Shabaton" or
it, involved 100 for a full
|end of the spirit of the Sha-
this modern world in which
five," Rabbi Shapiro says,
are -not always able to be
ervani.as they wish. Religion
taervance do not have to be
hangable," he adds. "By his
0f life, his attitude and re-
ship, the rabbi can influence
ewishness of his people."
st .president of the Greater
li Rabbinical Association and
IGreater Hollywood Clergy-
Association, Rabbi Shapiro
[served as president of the
east Zionist Region for six
In 1959, he was awarded
oure by his congregation,
i in Turkish-dominated Jeru-
hls father, grandfather and
^grandfather were rabbis.
Shapiro, who came to this
country at Bar Mitzvah age was
ordained as a rabbi in 1938. He
is a graduate of New York Uni-
versity and Yeshivath Yavne The-
ological Seminary.
His first palp4t Rajir Wte. After a six year stay.
he assumed the duties as director
of the American Jewish Congress
in Chicago and the midwest, and
in 1949 accepted a pulpit in Beloit
Wis.
Rabbi Shapiro and his wife, Leila,
are the parents of two children.
Their daughter Judith, Is the wife
of an associate professor at the
University of Kentucky's Dental
School. She and her husband and
their three children reside in Lex-
ington.
Herman, the Shapiro's son pres-
ently lives in Israel, where he is
a writer. Although born in Amer-
ica he has a great affinity for
Israel, ami has chosen to piake
his home in the land of his father's
birth.
About 10 years ago, Rabbi Sha-
piro first returned to his home-
land. Of the modern cosmopoli-
tanized city he says, "Jerusalem
hasn't lost its fascination for me.
I always experience a chain of
historic events which Jerusalem
represents in the life of Jewish
history." He feels that every Jew
should travel to Israel at least
once in their lifetime.
\r Mitzvah
b -6-
JEFFREY SMITH
rey, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Smith, will celebrate his Bar
ah Saturday. March 4, at
fce Sinai. Jeffrey, an eighth
student at Nova Middle
i. Is a member of the Nova
|uig Team.
it -it -it
(STEPHEN HANDEL
t>hen, the son of Mrs. Estelle
U of Hallandale and Bernard
Si of Poughkeepsle, N.Y., will
ate his Bar Mitzvah Satur-
larch 11, at Temple Sinai,
pn is a seventh grade honor
it at McNicol Junior High
it >j* it
MICHAEL SKLAR
liael, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sklar, will celebrate his
litzvah Saturday, March 11,
iple Beth Shalom.
Rabbi Shapiro has lived longer
in Hollywood than anywhere else.
"I've deeper roots here," he says
Speaking of the prenomenal
changes our city has undergone,
he declares, "As the Jewish com-
munity grows, I hope and pray
we always maintain a spirit of
unity and harmony. .Each congre-
gation has a unique role, as long as
we can enrich and enhance our
lives through joint efforts."
Lindsay Names Aids
Among Senior Citizens
New York Mayor John V. Lind-
say received well'-wishes at pool-
side this weekend at the Parker
Plaza in Hallandale. Amon? his
guests were Hallandale City Com-
missioner Dr. Milton Weinkle and
his wife, Miriam; Louis Jason, pres-
ident of the Condominium Asso-
ciation; Dr. Lewis Sacks, Dr. Al
Rosenthal. Mrs. Frances Shapiro
and Henry L. Kay, 10th Congres-
sional District delegates for Mayor
Lindsay. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kop-
pelman assisted with the refresh-
ments.
During a press conference at
Broward County Community Col-
lege just prior to his Parker Plaza
visit, Mayor Lindsay reiterated his
support for U.S. military aid to
Israel.
Soviet Build Up
In Cuba Attacked
By Rep. Pepper
By Special Report
WASHINGTON. D.C. Con-
gressman Claude Pepper said
President Nixon revealed In his
recent "State of the World" mes-
sage "a very disturbing and po-
tentially very dangerous indif-
ference to the Soviet military
build-up in Cuba."
"I was astonished to find only
a few lines out of 235 pages re-
ferred to the Soviet military pres-
ence In Cuba," Rep. Pepper said
in a brief House address.
'The language of the President's
message suggests that the Cas-
tro regime's military ties with the
Soviet Union have merely 'invited'
a permanent Soviet military pres-
ence into the hemisphere; where-
as, the harsh fact is that there is
already a very substantial, perma-
nent Soviet military establishment
on the Island of Cuba."
BY RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Stacy GoU to evM-*ere, why'
' mast Jewish tradition insist up-
on a special place for offering
prayers such as a synagogue?
The requirement for this is ex-
plicitly stated in the Talmud
(Berakot 6B). The rabbis seemed
to find support for this require-
ment in the Biblical description
of Abraham when he offered pray-
ers to save the wicked cities of
Sodom and Gomorrah.
According to the Bible, "Abra-
ham hurried to the place where
he stood before the Lord" (Gene-
sis 19:27). This is taken to indi-
cate that Abraham seemed to
have established an appointed lo-
cation where he prayed to the
Almighty.
Having a designated place to
pray shows that prayer is inten-
tional and purposeful. Just leaving
it to chance without having a
specific place to pray, somehow
indicates that one assumes prajer
to be rather coincidental and
somewhat mechanical.
Thus, even when one is pray-
ing individually, he should have
a special spot chosen in which
to pray. The designated place for
public prayer, i.e., the synagogue,
has the added feature that it Is a
place of communal prayer. One
prays there as a member of the
community, a community amongst
whom the Almighty dwells.
Why is It that when the Can-
tor repeats the liturgy on Friday
evening, he does it In an ab-
breviated form and not In Its
full form as Is the case at other
times when he repeats the
liturgy?
Basically, the liturgy of the
Shmoneh Esreh (18th, really 19th
benedictions) is not repeated at
the evening service because there
is a question as to whether the
evening service is of the same
basic nature of required liturgies
as are the morning and afternoon
services.
Thus, any repetition of the even-
ing service on Friday evening has
a special reason. The reason is
so that the latecomers might have
a chance to catch up with their
prayers while the Cantor is chant-
ing the abbreviated repetition and
thus be able to walk home in
the company of their fellow wor-
shippers instead of being left alone
while others depart.
In order to show that the re-
petition of the liturgy on Friday
night is not of the same basic
requirement as the repetition
every morning and afternoon, the
repetition takes an abbreviated
form. In this way the worshipper
Is made to realize the exact nature
of this liturgical tradition.
(C), 1972. Jewish Telegraphic AaTencyj
L^omwM/fy K-~rctlenaar
l-KIHAY, MARCH S
Federation Sabbath Night 8 P.M. Temple Beth SbalorrJ
iV^J^fcH* _^J "
10 A.M. Temple
Religious
Services
HAUANOALf
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Rabbi Ma* J. Weltx. Cantor Rev.
Jacob Danaioer. 12* N.E. 1st Ave.
HOLLYWOOO
BETH EL (Temple). 1S61 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. 4B
BETH SHALOM (Temple). 172S Mon
roe St. Coneervatlve. Rabbi Morton
Mslaviky. Cantor Irving Gold 46
INAI (Temple). 1801 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraum. 47
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal)
Services at Hollywood Hills Hlaii
School January {1 8:16 p.m. Rabbi
Robert Frasln.
TEMPLE BETH AHM.310 Southwest
2nd Avenue. Hollywood
Sabbath Eve Services are scheduled
for 8:15 p.m. Murray Wechter will be
assisted by Herbert Smith lay leader.
The Sisterhood will spnsor the Ones
ShabbaL
MRAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple) 8920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. 48
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
8INAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Raobi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irvln
Shulkes.
I. Temple Beth
Fund raising luncheon
JWF Temple Division Meeting
Shalom 1725 Monroe Street
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women
NoonDiplomat Country Club
Temple Solel Purim Party Noon Stirling Elementary
School Stirling Road at 56th Street
MONDAY, MARCH 6
National Council Jewish Women Hollywood Section
Meeting 12:30 P.M. Temple Sinai
Sisterhood Temple Beth Shalom Meeting 8 P M
4G01 Arthur Street
TUESDAY. MARCH 7
Senior Friendship Club-Temple Beth Shalom Luncheon
11;30 A.M. 1725 Monrce St.
Sisterhood Temple Sinai Meeting 3 P.M. Temple
Sinai
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8
Sisterhood Temple Beth Shalom Torah Fund Luncheon
11:30 A.M. 1725 Monroe Street
National Womens Committee of Brandeis University Cof-
fee 9:30 A.M At home of Mrs. Lawrence Nussbaum
Mens Club Temple Sinai Luncheon Noon Temple
Sinai
THURSDAY, MARCH 9
Branch 1070 Workmens Circle of Hoilywood Meeting 8
P.M. Home Federal Bldg. Young Circle
FRIDAY. MARCH 10
Federation Sabbath Night 8 P.M. Temple Beth El;
Temple Solel; Temple Sinai
SUNDAY. MARCH 12
B'nai Brith Women of Hollywood Donor Dinner__6 P.M.
Carillon Hotel, Miami Beach
Victor B. Freed man Ladies Aux. No. 613 Friendship Tea
--NoonBeau Rivage Hotel
Mens Club Temple Beth Shalom 10 A.M. 1725 Monroe
Street
JWF Temple Division Meetings 10 A.M. Temple Beth
El; Temple Solel (3850 North Hills Drive); Temple Is-
rael of Miramar
Mens Club Temple Sinai JWF Federation Breakfast
9:30 A.M. Temple Sinai
TUESDAY. MARCH M
JWV Robert Z. Franzblau, Miramar Post 177 Meeting
8:30 P.M.Temple Israel of Miramar
WEDNESDAY. MARCH IS
Senior Friendship Club Temple Beth Shalom Meeting
Noon 1725 Monroe Street
Hollywood Auxiliary Jewish Home for the Aged Board
Meeting 10:30 A.M.
THURSDAY, MARCH 16
Minnie Goldstein Chapter American Israeli Lighthouse
Meeting 12:30 P.M. Washington Federal Bank Bldg.
633 N.E. 167th Street, North Miami Beach
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women Donor Luncheon of
Greater Miami Council Noon Deauville Hotel
JWF Womens Division Luncheon 10:30 A.M. Emerald
Hills Country Club
FRIDAY. MARCH 17
JWF Federation Sabbath Night 8 P.M.Temple Israel
of Miramar
Research Grant Awarded
To Dr. Abraham Jf. Stein
3?
Dr. Abraham M. Stein, chairman
of the Department of Biological
Sciences in the College of Arts
and Sciences at Florida Interna-
tional University, has been award-
ed a two-year research grant of
$50,815 to continue his studies of
tsocltrate dehydrogenase, an en-
zyme that controls the rate of
respiration and energy production
in the body.
The grant was awarded by the
National Institute of Neurological
Diseases and Stroke of the Na-
tional Institutes of Health.
The research project will deal
specifically with the purification
and properties of the enzyme from
the mitochandria of brain tissue.
It is part of a system which car-
ries on the chemical processes of
respiration at the cellular level.
Dr. Stein, who said that the
"studies of regulatory mech-
anisms at ihe cellular level are
yielding insight into the biological
processes and the nature of dis-
ease," first became involved in
related studies of respiration and
metabolism of cancer tissue some
eight years ago; this research has
now developed into the present
study of the brain enzyme.
Dr. Stein also serves as an ad-
junct professor of biochemistry in
the School of Medicine at the Uni-
versity of Miami, which will be
the sponsoring Institution for the
research grant He is the author
of publications on enzymes, mam-
malian brain metabolism and can-
cer research.
He has been invited to the Inter-
national Flavoprotein Symposium
in Konstanz, Germany March 14-
19, to present the results of other
studies dealing with the biological
effects of cadmium and mercury.
These investigations suggest the
manner in which heavy metals ad-
versely effect the function of an
enzyme involved in the respira-
tion of heart muscle.
Before coming to Florida Inter-
national, Dr. Stein served as as-
sociate protessor in the Depart-
ment of Biochemistry, College of
Medicine at the University of
Florida.


Page 14
+Jeist>ncrkHair)
Friday. March 3. 1972
Humphrey Denounces U.S.
Policy As 'Hypocritical*
VS. Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, "The United States government
(D.-Minn.i. issued a statement re- was silent In the face of this
cently which assailed the policies [ forced annexation and the injus-
of the United States government j tices that accompanied it.
r hypocritical." <, For, \9 >e.arR Jerusalem was a
truncated city, split by walls of
I'.efusal to recognr/e not only I Darbed'vvire'and hatred. Trie Jor-
the reunification of 1967. but even i danian army was finally removed
the fa. t that Jerusalem is the I in 196? when Israel reunited the
capital of Israel, the Senator de- I city and began, with comiwssion
clared. "bitrays a shocking lack and devotion to human dignity, to
i of sensitivity" to political real- nd "P the wounds of division.
itios and the feeling of the Israeli ..... ,.--------. ,, in
rrom the nibble of armed oe-
, people, tupation has sprung up a city of
The Senator charged that a I peace. Shrines of all religions are
dual standard" has been utilized j treated with respect. Kach rsMft-
by the United States in ilealine ous group has been granted au-
. with the Jerusalem issue re- tonomy. Jerusalem the golden is
malasng silent when Jonianiar. once aKin a single thriving vi-
traofi destroyed the city's ancient brant unit.
j J< wish shrinks, but condemning ..^ ,ho L- g g 0 v e r n m e n t
Israel when she restored a "Jew- choos,.s (,,mlemn ann(.xa.
. ish presence that was forcibly re- t|on.. in ||c ()f Jsraeli assurances
. moved after 3.000 years of being tnat Jpnlsalem wi ^ trcated and
. tbc tea] point of world Jewry. stored as a holy city for all -
The United States, ho declared Christian. Moslem and Jew alike
st recognise that fact that Jeru- wllh fno cceaa, under mterna-
talem hai always been and must tJewl guarantees, if necessary, to
remain a single united dty an.; all placea of woMhip,
thai it is the capital of Israel. Thjs is a ,,.,, stan(|ar(| is
Said sen. Humphre) : It la now hypocritical now to condemn Is-
'Ovci 23 vears .sine.- .Jo, usalem Ml rael wn,,c "*' s'lently acquiesc, I
declared the capital ol the new '" ,np Illegal seizure and calcu-
State of Israel. Anyone faintly l""''1 destruction of much of the
familiar with the last three mil- <:"v "f Jerusalem at the hands
lennium of Jewish history cannot "f '"' Jordanians,
fail to understand the deep sin- ,.Wp .,.,.,, w .
Iflcance of this declaration Jeni- ,Z(, Jcmsa,om as th(. (.apita, of
salem and the Jew are so deeply ,,,., lMg W(. ue,(. w no|
'"'.'.: ""T''.'"."I'.".!.':'!:!".:'.^'^ cry U When Jordanian forces
occupied half of that sacred city
later that year. We were wrong
Jackson Endorsed
By 7 State Leaders
Sen. Henry 11 Jackson's Presi-
j dential campaign in Florida gained
momentum last week as he re-
i ceived endorsements from three i
I Florida cabinet members and four
| of the state's nine Democratic
i Congressmen.
| The" seven elected represent*-
j tives compare to one each for
, Sea Edmund Muskie and Sen.
. Hubert H. Humphrey, according'
to state cochairman M. Lewis Hall, I
I Jr of Miami. Congressmen
Charles Bennett. BUI Chappell,
Jr.. James Haley awl Robert L. F. I
Sikes all endorsed Sen. Jackson j
I at a SlOO-a-plate fund raising din-
ner held at the Diplomat Hotel.
State Insurance Commissioner I
| Tom O'Malley announced their )
I endorsements, along with those
of State Comptroller Fred O. Dick-!
inson and Cfimmissioner of Kduca-
tion Floyd Christian.
that even the formal announce-
ment merely ratified what mil-
lions oi Jewish hearts had alwayi
known. Incredibly, the United
to remain silent when the
old Jewish quarter was re-
Slates government refused and duccd to rubble and shrines of
continues to refuse to recognize deep significance to Christian and
Israel's right to decide which city Jew alike desecrated and we
is its capital. compound these wrongs by ignoi-
"In 1948. the Jordanian Aral, i"K tho reunification of Jerusalem ,
Legion, in blatant disregard of Bnd thc numane administration of (
United Nations resolutions and ,n"' cil* undcr Urael rul'
world public opinion, seized the "The Psalmist speaks of Jeru-.
Old Cltj of Jerusalem, razed its salem the rebuilt, as a city that
synagogues, desecrated the 1.000, is united together." Sen. Hum-
year old Jewish cemetery, ox- phrey said. The time has come
pel led its Jewish population, ami for U.S. |licy to recogni/e thc
denied access to the city's holy reality of a rebuilt and united i
places to all Israelis Jew. Chris- Jerusalem as the capital of the
tian and Moslem alike State of Israel."
CPA Explains Deductions
For Interest, Taxes Paid
Far most home-ownii"; families
the largest and most easily com-
puted income tax deductions arc
for mortgage Interest and real ei
tate taws, according to James T
Lang, CPA. ]>res: lent of the Flon
Ida Institute ol Certified Publk
Accountai
These items usually are easy t'i
determine, Mr. Lang savs, because
if one pays his n J I taxc
through the lei mizatlon
holding h a mo tgase, both i iv
taxi and Intel esl paid are I
m a >' 'ii-end statement pro Ide I
nortgage-holi
oiiu-r deductible tax a
e- payments mat <|uii
di ;a;ing in the I ->
The tax It* .ct /!->'. b de-
ted A i. 'i,
repei I include state and .
Income taxes and taxes on
oline, personal property, sale- and
use and security i i i taurs.
Taxes paid on Income-producinit
activit] al o i i tlble, but
bs business expeti
Only those taxes owed by the I
taxpayer himself are deductible,
the CPA official stressed Those
paid on behalf of a relatlvi o
friend generally are not.
Since ni"st sales taxes are paid
only a few [lennios at a time,
only the most conscientious rec-
oid-keeper i.s likely to have a list
ol such payment-, so the Internal i
Revenue Service penults a tax-
payer to use a Treasurj sale* lax
guide in preparing an estimate- of
-ales taxes paid, based on income
and other factors. If the sales
taxes exceed the amount indicated
in the guide, the taxpayer may be
called upon to provide proof, which
can be difficult.
Computing interest paid d
the- yeai i quite ample ir th tax-
payei retains bills and rec
Mr. Lang says, inasmuch as the
truth-ln-lending laws now require
ation In moat cases ol the
i ctte ol Interest charged.
In filing 11 turns, a distinction
.should be etween Ini
non-business tran-
sa t mis and thai paid for Income-
producing purposes. The latter
should be deducted from thc In-
thai resulted frotn such ac-
tivities, a deduction that can bf
taken even il one uses the stand-
ard personal deduction.
As with taxes, only Interest pay-
ments for which the taxpayer
himself was obligated may be
deducted.
Sen. Jarkson lauded Samuel M.
j Fried la ml. his finance chairman
In Dade County and chairman of
j the dinner which raised more than
' SUO.000 for the March 1-1 primary
campaign, "for heading thc most
i successful fund raising banquet
j in the history of Florida Presi-
dential primaries."
Miami Beach headquarters for j
Sen. Jackson o(>cned at 1364 |
Washington Ave. as the Washing- ;
ton Democrat arrived to accept
a national award from the Israel !
Histadiut Foundation.
Rabbi Joel Geffen !
To Address Florida
Jewish Men's Clubs
Dr. Joel S. Qeffen of New York
City, national spiritual advisor of
the -National Federation of Jewish ,
Men's Clubs, will address a special I
meeting of the Board of Directors !
of Its Florida Region at 9:30 a.m.. I
Sunday at Beth Torah Congrega-
tion. North Miami Beach.
Rabbi Geffen is the director of
the Department of Field Activi-
ties and Community Education of
The Jewish Theological Seminary
of America. He will be presented
by Ralph Fistd of Miumi, presi-
dent of the Florida Region of the
National Federation, who will pre-
side at this meeting.
An important report on the
plans for the forthcoming 43rd
annual convention of the National
Federation of Jewish Men's Clubs,
which is to be held at the Caril-
lon Hotel, Miami Beach from Sun-
day. May 28, through Thursday.
June 1. will be made by Rabbi
Geffen and local coehairmen Abe
schon. of Beth Torah Congrega-
tion, and Myrim Lev ine of Tern-
pie Sinai, Hollywood, before lead-
ing rcpreaentativ s of the Men -
ciuhs of 25 Florida congregations
in the Conservative Movement.
Rabbi Norman Shapiro of
Temple Zion. Miami. Regional
Spiritual advisor, will be one ,>|
the active participants in the meet-
ing,
The National Federation of Jew-
ish Men's Clubs is afiliated with
The Jewish Thooiogir-ii Seminar}
oi American, the Rabbinical As-
sembly, and the United Synagogue
of America,
TREES ARE
EVERYBODY'S
BUSINESS! t\k
.-rrJft.
Post Office Advises
Mail Order Caution
The U.S. Postal Service warned
this week tnat postal customers
should proceed with caution in or*
d< i inj; merchandise or services by
mail from unknown mail order
merchants, accordin.; to Postmas-
ter E. m. Dtmiap
David L. Ordway, "ombudsman"
for the |Mistal system, said OQjn-
plaints from customers indicate
that such orders can turn out to
in- unsatisfactory transactions.
Forest Hills Project
Construction Halted
NEW YORK (WNS) Man-
hattan State Supreme Court
Justice Irving H. Saypol has
ordered construction of the
controversial 840-unit low in-
come public bousing project in i
Forest Hills halted.
The judge called thc project's
design "a defective plan" which
does not resemble the original
design for the project anc'' said
changes in the approved plan
were adopted without the re-
quired public hearings. City
Con>oration Counsel J. Lee
Rankin said the city will appeal
the decision 'at the earliest pos-
sible date."
Th* Quet-ns Jewish Commun-
ity Council, which hus appi sed
the project, rejected a repurted
"compromise plan, terming it
"phony." The plan caJhul for
M-allng down thn si/,, of the
Forest Mills project anil sliltt-
intc pa*i of the 840 unitn to a
low-income iionsinu prejart in
the I.indenwond section of
({iiecns which has nlreuily ln-en
rejected by the City's Board of
Kstimate.
Asked what they would pre-
fer on the site. Seymour Sam-
uels. president of the his organization favored the high
school that was originally plan-
mc: for the site.
The housing- project" >n*s ori-i
Inalry planned for the Corona
section of Queens, but after
meeting opposition from the
largely Italian residents of that
area, the project was moved to
Forest Hills and the hhjh school
to Corona, where opposition to
the high school has stalled plans
for its construction.
Meanwhile, rerirrsentativ.-s of
several Foreat IIIIIs groups, and
Mrs. .Myrtle WhKruww, black
executive president of the "Kiv.-
Borough Coalition To Save New
York." met at the White Hon*l
with i.riicials iiiuurdlately con-
cerned with the project.
A meeting of black and lew-i
ish leaders scheduled for Oracle
Mansion, the mayor's residence,
was cancelled when Roy Wilk-
ins, executive director of the
national Association for the Ail-
Advancement of Colored Hvopu-,.
refused to attend.
JOHN Z's ITALIAN CUISINE
EAT IN OR TAKE OUT
JOHN Z's ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL!!
$1.99 Complete Dinners ...
1450 N. Dixie Hwy 929-6217
Sun. 2 til 11 p.m. Mon. thru Sat. 11-Midnite
"LET JOHN Z. PREPARE YOUR PARTY"
ItEXT A CAR $20
441 MOTORS
WK,
c Ml.
PHONE FOR FREE DELIVERY
1*01 N t*rk AVE., HOLLYWOOD
PH. m-7)M
CAMP TEEN TOWN
of
TIMBER RIDGE
Located in the Shenandoah Mrs. of West Vs. 4 week program
for boys and girls 13-15. Horsebsckriding, tennis, waterskiing,
canoe trips, all land and water sports, drama, fine arts. Mature
staff. For further infomation contact:
Mrs. Fred Blumenthal
Hollywood, 983-0197
DR. STANLEY R. HARRIS
OPTOMETRIST
onnouncei the removol of his
offices to
4915 SHERIDAN ST.
HOLLYWOOD TEL 966-3647
EYE EXAMINATIONS CONTACT LENSES
MARTIN W. TREIBER, M.D. P.A.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS NEW
OFFICE FOR THE PRACTICE OF ...
INTERNAL MEDICINE
2526 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hours by Appointment 925-1439


Friday. March 3,1872
......
vJmisti fhridRan
Paga 15

Tt
Jews In Sports
By: HASKEIL COHEN
Violence Of Unsportsman-Like Sportsmen
V. Till? l-'AT tW \x- \\r V... o-j'.i__, _^ 1 ...
fE THREAT OF WAR by Sadat and |newal of
fighting on the Suez Canal has to.' be, considered
-butin-the meantime some mfnor wars on the home
front have broken out in several areas in the sports
world. Games in soccer and basketball leagues are
being played with an unusual amount of bellicosity.
I recently watched the opening soccer matches
of the National League Football season and in both
ends of the doubleheader, featuring Maccabi and
Hapocl Tel Aviv elevens against strong opposition,
was appalled at serious displays of fisticuffs which
marred both contests. The same day the soccer
match in Haifa between two league rivals saw that
game end with the goalie of one club rolling in the
dust, battling the opposing team's coach.
A few days later in league basketball in Tel
Aviv, Jack Arzner, a Sabra, who grew up in the
states and attended the University of Cincinnati and
is now playing for Betar Jerusalem, for no apparent
reason hauled off and slugged the popular captain
of Tel Aviv, Romy Gott, and fractured his jaw in
three places. Gott, carted away to the hospital, also
sustained a severe concussion and it is feared his
playing days are over.
.
Rivalry in Israel sports has always been keen
. but psychologists are hard put to explain the; reason
for-so much physical brutality lately. Unlike the-
statcs, where competition is primarily at the high
school and college levels, play in the Holy Land is
between clubs which for the most part are arms
of political movements. As a result of pressures
exerted by the politicos, clubs are going to ridiculous
extremes in order to secure winning teams.
A sad result is that Israel's sports programs
are being diffused with professionals from abroad
and with under the table payments to its better
amateur athletes. In order to restrain two top
soccer players from leaving the country, bonuses of
astronomical values were granted them so that to-
day each star is considered independently wealthy
for the rest of his life.
It may be that the recent defeat sustained in
the European Basketball Cup play by the Maccabi
Tel Aviv five, may change some of the hoop leaders'
thinking vis-a-vis club basketball and national team
play.
Maccabi Tel Aviv, loaded with plenty of money,
thought it could buy itself into European Cup
I
championship contention. A buying expedition in
the United States brought tha Maccabis Steve
Chubin, who played for seven ABA teams in a
three-year pro tenure; Ron Dunlop, a black journey-
man, and Steve Bilsky, late of the Ivy League
champion Pennsylvania quintet.
Exponents of a good national basketball '.earn
for Israel are trying to convince heads of the club
program to combine their efforts and work toward
the possibility of getting Israel past the trial com-
petition in August for one of the two open berths
available to the Middle East for Olympic Competi-
tion.
With that thought In mind the U.S. Committee
for Sports in Israel, headed by Nat Hohnan, lias
arranged for a top flight American coach to nan lie
the teaching reins in Israel. Shortly after the first
of the year, Doyle Parrack, an Ail-American at
Oklahoma State under Hank Iba, who coached suc-
cessfully at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and Okla-
homa State, will leave for a year's stay in Israel
where he takes over the complete teaching and
coaching program at both the senior and junior
national levels.
Between You and Ma: By BORIS SMOtAR
Full Story Not Yet Told
I. ..!! I I .
COR THOSE WHO SEEK perspective in the strug-
gle to help Soviet Jews, it would be advisable
to read "In the Cause of Soviet Jewry." published
by the American Jewish Commit-
tee. The AJCommittee has also
published recently an annotated
bibliography of books, periodicals,
pamphlets and articles on Soviet
Jewry which appeared in the Eng-
lish language during the last five
|i years.
"In the Cause of Soviet Jewry"
does not tell the full story of the
AJCommittee's concerns and efforts in behalf of
the Soviet Jews ranging from the search for au-
thentic data about the nature and forms of dis-
crimination against Jews in the Soviet Union to
educating and mobilizing public opinion and action
in this country. The full story of the AJCommit-
tee's involvement is still to be told. However, the
mentioned publication provides good background
and orientation for those who are just now joining
in the fight for equal rights for Jews in the U.S.S.R.
The annotated bibliography of recent wrilings
on Soviet Jewry is similarly intended to focus inter-
est on the Soviet government's treatment of its
Jews. Entitled "Jews in the Soviet Union," it lists
and summarizes some 290 books and writings which
deal with the political, social and cultural conditions
of the Jews there. It also deals with the anti-Zionist
and anti-Semitic propaganda in the Soviet press
and radio and with the political reprisals, arrests
and trials of Jews who seek to leave the country.
Population and sociological studies on Soviet
Jewry are also covered in the compiled bibliogra-
phy. So are historical and ideological sources of
Soviet policy toward Jews. It is the first compre-
hensive bibliography of writings concerning Sjviet
Jewry published since January 1967, and consti-
tutes a key to contemporary literature for those
interested in the fate of Soviet Jewry.
ISRAEL NEWSinTER By Corl Alpwt
Jerusalem And The Christians
kJIl.I.lONS OF CHRISTIANS throughout the
" world think of this holy city of Jerusalem in
terms of their religion. Few are aware that through
, the centuries only a relatively
small number of Christians have
dwelt here. Since the toppllr.g of
the Crusader kingdom in the Mid-
dle Ages, the Moslems have seen
to it that their domination of the
life and culture of the city has
been sturdy. Christians and Jews
were tolerated on and off, but the
Moslems were in control. The min-
aret built 800 years ago has remained taller than
the Church of the Holy Sepulchre next door.
For centuries the actual number of Christians
in Jerusalem was almost infinitesimal, and it was
not until the beginning of this century that their
population began to grow. Under the British man-
date the number of Moslems and Christians was
almost equal. In 1946 there were 31,000 Christians
Whet happened1 to the Christians after old
Jerusalem came under Jordanian rule is told by
Ori Stendal in an article in the magazine, "Chris-
tian News from Israel." The return of Moslem con-
trol and domination triggered off a rapid emigra-
tion of Christians so that in 1961 there were only
11,000 and in 1967 only 8.500 left in Jerusalem.
The vanishing of Christian influence was best
visible in the municipal council of the old city ol
Jerusalem. In 1955 only one Christian was elected
a council member. In elections thereafter none at
all were chosen, and so the Jordanian government
arbitrarily appointed some Christian councilors tc
keep up appearances.
Christians and Moslems may have been eloss
neighbors, but they always kept pretty much apart
Marriage between the two communities was and
remains very rare.
With the help of mission societies, the Chris-
tians have had by far the better schools. Their
youth was much better educated, but this education
proved self-defeating. The young people saw nc
future in Jerusalem, and so the trend to emigration
was accelerated. Incidentally, if should be noted
that the Christians who emigrated rarely went to
other Arab countries. They turned their faces from
the Middle East, and went to the United States,
Canada, South America or Australia.
The Six-Day War brought about many changes.
For one thing it broke '.lie Moslem domination. For
the first time in many centuries the Holy City is
now open and free in all its parts to pilgrims of all
faiths, without discrimination, penalties or fear.
Each religion is protected in its holy sites by tho
Israel povemmerU.
Furthermore, after the first shock of disloca-
tion there was an economic recovery and a new
prosperity. Some of the emigration has continued,
to be sure, but it'has been offset by the birth rate
so that the decline in' Christian population has
ceased.
The newspapers carry occasional reports about
proposals to "Internationalize" Jerusalem, or return
it t the Jordanians. There are debate* on the sub-
ject inside and outside the United Nations. It would
appear that many in the Christian world have little
real understanding of the revolution which has taken
place in the Holy City. And there are some who
would turn the clock all the way back to the days of
Saladin, the conqueror who in 1187 routed the
Christians from Jerusalem.
What Israel has done for the Holy City in the
past three years has been an historic achievement
which the Christian world will yet come to ratlin
and appreciate. And the clock will not be turned
bact
BOOK Rf y/W By Seymour B. Liebman
Personalia
THE FAMED ARTIST, Frank Kleinholz, came to
his profession during his adult life. His early
training as a lawyer, his orientation as a Jew and
his empathy for his fellow-men
have enabled him to see and por-
tray people and scenes with the
sensitivity of the artist. His book,
The Flowering Rock (University of
Miami Press, $10) is the account
of his six month's stay in 1950 on
the Isle dc Brehet. Kleinholz*
proves himself to be as adept with
words as he is with oils.
The book contains 88 pen and ink, pencil and
charcoal sketches of the people he saw and the
places he visited off the Normandy coast. In addi-
tion to this wealth of beautifully reproduced
sketches and Bernard Lipsky's elegantly designed
book, there is the charming account of life among
the Bretons as experienced by the author-painter,
his wife and two children. Kleinholz' writing Ls im-
bued with a warmth and naturalness and is high-
lighted by the deft interposition of humor. The book
- is a rare gem.
Lives and Voices edited by Stanly F. Chyet
(Jewish Publishing Society, $6.501 is a collection
of 19th and 20th Century American Jewish memoirs
of nine i>eople, only one of whom Is a figure of note.
One cannot escape the unkind thought that some ol
the authors were inclined to see their lives or
minor exploits with something less than a modicum
of humility. Whether these memoirists "leave a
unique and vivid jwrtrait of American Jewish life
between the 1850s and 1960s" (per the jacket) is
debatable.
Arnold Stein's The Making of A cane House Publishers, $51 is the story of how a
determined father "made a genius" of his daughter,
Bdtth. He withdrew her from Dade County Schools
because he became disenchanted with them and un-
dertook her education himself. She entered college
at 12, graduated at 14, became an instructor at
Michigan State University at 15, and was to re-
ceive her Ph.D. at 18. One is non-plussed at times-
to decide whether the book is an account of the*
father- a colorful character and deserving of a-
book about himself or that of the daughter. He
comes through too often and his obtrusiveness de-
tracts from the story of his daughter.
The Conscience of Majority by Barry Gold-
water (Pocket Books, $1.25) is an exposition of
the | -nator's political philosophy. His exposure of
the lailure of liberalism and his chapters on 'The
Shaic of the Future" are thought-provoking.


I II
Page 16
+Jewish fhrklton
Friday. March 3. 1972
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