The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00035

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
0Jemsti F/cndli<3nn
and SHOP Alt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 2 Number 8
Hollywood, Florida Friday, February 18, 1972
Price 20 c
JWF Campaign Moving Into High Gear
In a statement made this week,
Dr.. Norman Atkln, campaign
chairman for-Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration,, said, "All of us who are
members of this year's campaign
cabinet are full of enthusiasm
about the way the current cam-
paign is going. As meeting after
meeting takes place and each of
us gets to speak to more and more
people, we are finding not only an
air of enthusiasm but concrete,
tangible proof of our cornmunity*s
ledication to the cause of Federa-
tion with contributions consis-
tently larger than last year's,
With the daily press reporting
on the tremendous influx of Soviet
Jewry into Israel," he continued,
' il stems that everyone in the
Jewish community here is aware
of the increased needs of Israel
this year. For those of us who
are so deeply involved it is gratify-
ing to note the percentage increas-
es in the majority of our donors'
gifts. We feel sure that this trend
will continue as we work on to
achieve the largest campaign ever
for the Hollywood-Hallandale
area."
Dr. Atkin also announced that
he is planning a worker's meeting
Tuesday evening for those who
have already made commitments
to the 1972 campaign of $1,000 or
over. The guests will be asked to
cooperate in soliciting prospective
denors who have not yet been
reached. Pledge cards will be dis-
tributed ami in this way people
already committed themselves will
have the opportunity of carrying
the needs of the campaign to their
fellow Jews, thus accepting an
even larger portion of the respon-
sibility for fulfilling this year's
needs in Israel ami the greatly in-
creased needs of the many local
agencies supported by Federation.
The Metropolitan Division will
hold an organizational meeting
Thursday evening, Feb. 24. This
will be the first time this Division
has met this year; the members of
the Young Leaders Council, the
hoard of directors of Jewish Fam-
ily Service, the board of trustees
of Jewish Welfare Federation and
a number of members of each or-
ganization represented on the
Jewish Community Relations Coun-
cil will be invited.
Sadat Rebuffed By
2 Arab Presidents
JDC Representative Is
Women's Division Guest
Mrs. Paula Borenstein, public
relations representative in the
Paris office of the Joint Distri-
JERUSALEM (JTA) Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat of Kgypt,
whose recent trip to Mosccw
was less than a resounding suc-
cess, suffered another rebuff
last week at the nands of his
Arab friends.
Th presidents of Syria and
Mudan declined to attend wa
Arab summit meeting Sadat
hud arranged In Libya, appar-
ently to entice the Sudanese
Into Joining the Egypt-Libya-
Syria Federation.
When President Jafar el
N'umeiri of Sudan announced
that he would not attend. Presi-
dent Hafez Al Assad of Syr a
also cancelled his visit Sadat,
who was in Tripoli, cut short
his stay and returned to Cairo
Monday afternoon.
Observers here believed the
incident spelled a further decline
in Sadat's prestige at home and
abroad. They said he called the
Tripoli meeting to repair some
of the damage done to his im-
age in Moscow when the Rus-
sians refused to go along with
setting a date for the Egyptian
military showdown with Israel
that Sadat says is Inevitable.
Sadat*s visit to Moscow turned
out to be Importunate and die
Soviet news media made no
secret of the fact. The Egyptian
leader apparently thought he
could recoup by persuading Su-
Kolitz Guest Speaker At
Diplomat Towers Feb. 27
Zvi Kolitz, a distinguished au-
thor and film producer, will be
the guest speaker at a Sunday eve-
IVI KOLITZ
nlng, Feb. 27, meeting at the Dip-
lomat Towers in Hollywood which
is being held in connection with
the 1972 campaign of Jewish Wel-
fare Federation, it has been an-
nounced.
Mr. Kolitz, who has written ar-
ticles, plays and' stories in Hebrew
and English, was the author and
executive producer of Israel's first
major motion picture "Hill 24
Doesn't Answer," a film which was
awarded international prizes in
Cannes and Mexico City. He was
also the co-producer of "The Dep-
uty" on Broadway, a Tony Award
winner which was one of the most
controversial plays in many years.
Mr. Kolitz has s|>oken through-
out the country the nast few years
on behalf of the United Jewish Ap-
peal. He is one of the best informed
and dynamic speakers for the State
of Israel.
The meeting will be held in the
Recreation Room of the Diplomat
Towers at 6:30 nm.: drinks will
he served before the evening's
program.
dan to Join the three-way Arab
Federation.
Students of Egyptian affairs
here believe, however, that
Sadat's position will not be
threatened unless Army officers
join the university students who
have been clamoring for a
tougher stand against Israel.
First West Bonk Elections
Sine* 1963 Scheduled May 2
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
first West Bank municipal elec-
tions in nine years will be held
In 14 towns on May 2, it was
announced last week. The bal-
loting will be conducted accord-
ing to Jordanian law and will
be supervised by representatives
f the Interior Ministry.
The elections are intended to
replace Incumbents whose terms
expired several years ago. The
last elections on the West Bank
were held In 1963.
Mrs. Jack Zackler, national
president of Pioneer Women,
led its delegation to the World
Zionist Congress in Jerusalem.
Harriet (Mrs. Milton) Green of
Miami participated as a dele-
gate.
bution Committee, will be the
guest speaker at an 11 a.m. meet-
ing of the Women's Division of
JWF Thursday, March 2, at Emer-
ald Hills Country Club planned
for women making a minimnm do-
nation of $50 to the Federation
campaign.
Mrs. Rorenstein, a survivor of
the ghetto of Vilna and Nazi con-
centration camps, has been a mem-
ber of the JDC's Paris staff since
1948.
She was still a schoolgirl is her
native city of Vilna. Lithuania, at
the outbreak of World War II.
Under the terms of the Hllter-
Stalin Pact of 1939. Lithuania fell
under Russian occupation and
there was comparative security
there until 1941 when the Ger-
man armies began their march
across the Russian-held territories.
In September of that year, a ghet-
to was set up In Vilna, and all
t he Jews of the city confined there.
During this period, every mem-
ber of Mrs. Borenstein's family
her father, mother, sister and
brother was murdered by the Ger-
mans.
In 1943, she was transported to
a concentration camp in Germany
where she did forced labor in an
ammunition factory until the lib-
eration of the camp in April 1945.
As the Allied armies approached
the camp, the German garrison
removed all of the girls to a near-
by field and shot most of them.
Mrs. Borenstein was one of the
few who managed to escape.
After working as a farm labor-
er, Mrs. Borenstein was repatri-
ated to Paris in May. 1945. There
she was directed to a place where
she received her first decent meal
and her first new clothing since
the outbreak of the war, and then
to a special home for recuperation.
provided by the Joint Distribution
Committee.
Later she joined the staff of a
Yiddish newspaper in Paris and
came to the staff of the JDC In
1948 as a Yiddish writer and in-
terpreter. Her husband, a French-
man of Polish-Jewish parentage.
is also an alumnus of a concentra-
tion camp.
Mrs. Donald Berman, Mrs. My-
ron Brodie, Mrs. Edward Gottlieb.
Mrs. Andrew Grcenman and Mrs.
Paul Koenig are serving as co-
chairmen for this meeting.
ws Briefs
Kuznetsov's Amnesty Appeal Rejected
NEW YORK (JTA)The Supreme Soviet has rejected an
appeal for amnesty for Sylva Zalmanson Kuznetsov, the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry reported. The Conference said the
rejection was received by the prisoner's brother Shmuel, who had
appealed for amnesty a month ago. The Supreme Soviet asserted:
"Sylva Zalmanson's crime was proved according to Soviet law. We
win not give her amnesty."
14 Dutch Families Receive Medals
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The Israeli ambassador in The Hague,
Shimshon Arad, last week presented 14 Dutch families with the Yad
Vashem medal of the Righteous of the Nations, for the help they
gave Jewish families and Individuals during the Nazi occupation
of The Netherlands. This was the fourth ceremony in three years at
which Dutch citizens received the Yad Vashem medals for their
help to Jews durinfi World' War II.
Israel Recognizes Bangladesh
JERUSALEM I JTA) Israel has officially recognized) the new
state of Bangladesh. The announcement said that Foreign Minister
Abha Eban informed Banfiladesh Foreign Minister Abdus Samad
Azad of the decognition in a cable Friday. The recognition decision
was taken after telephone consultations with all members of the
Cabinet.


'age 2
vjcnist Meridian
Friday, February 18, j972
Planned March 5
Elie Wiesel's First
Hollywood Visit Set I^JSl**!
Pm im carnival Hemispheres Group Doubles 71 Pledge
Elio Wie
ind ma

tilt W'fSEl
;ii a nifotiiv: in Te i pic Sinai
1 loll) vo I M n ay. Feb. 2S, al
H p. n. This his
pcai nnce in 11
The la nous Iter, w ho a-'
horn In 1928 in T mia, wa
lei nage sui vi\ or of Aus -lr.\ it/
1 nuchenw aid, so his ki
Hi |he holo aust on a
basis Hi eft G nan; te the'
war in led in Paris ai d be-
can a writi
Mi Wiesel's novels and articles
have won him manj awards, In-
luii. u the Jewish Heritage Awai
for xcellencc i" literature; the
Prix Rivarol iii Paris, the National
Jewish Book Council Award i
the Re Av ard >l the
Woi Id f il in ol the ft
; iels< n Association
iking recentlj al > i1 the
i> as co ith
lvs ol Hi holoca i. he In
that the :

I i he mi om< If
la thallei
evci I that words
Speakii ol i idaj youth o
lesi ii i d, "Th rebellious, vo-
a .'ii.! ol ten \ iolent in ---< ol
toda; are a I hat is ,
ene ation late. It is thi
thi victims ol th,' holocaust
. in is the link
i., lioki fi -i ind
Job, we ai I awl
j what happ ned to us,
i : .. llegi .1 becaua
i has happ ned to us." he con-
inn trial and the
Six-Da) Wa. changed the basic
attitud "I the Israelis, it became
a different country, the holocaust
became a unifying factor. You have
Yemeni tribesmen who never
bcafd of Auschwitz shouting "no
more Auschwita."
Mr. Wiesel's books Include
"Niuht" which is an account of
his own life in the concentration
Camps, and 'The Jews of Si-
inei." i report on the plight of
Soviet Jewry. His newest novel.
"A Beggar In Jerusalem" won him
the Pi i\ Mi die s. one ol France
major litei arj av arils.
Ticket* foi his appearance ma>
in- obtained a1 the temple offl
ir b> mail; the public i~ welcome,
Performance Of
'Sleuth1 Benefits
Scholarship Fund
On Saturday, Feh, 26. the South
Broward Bar Association AuxJIi-
arv will host the performance of
"Sleuth." the Broadwav and Lon-
Ion sellout mvstcry-thriller. at the
Parker Playhouse, Fort I-auder-
dale.
All proceeds from the evening
will go to the club's Scholarship
Fund established at the University
ul Miami Law School, according
tn Mrs Joel Klaits anil Mrs. Rob-
ert Stone, cochairmen of the
i \ .nt.
i ui Tuesdav, March 21, the Au-
xiliary will join the South Brow-
ard Branch ol the Women's AAxil-
i the Broward C0untj Medi-
i al Association for their annual
eon blned affair at Hllicrest Coun-
try ('in'i in Hollywood. All w l\ e
ol attorneys living or practicing
in the South Broward area are
ill) invited t" attend these
' lhai es Flnkel
secretary o* the
club, may be contacted tor addi-
tional information.
I Temple Soli l is planning n Purim
i' i : i.....'i to :< p.m. Bun-
daj M irch 5 i' Strrlini Elemen
Ii ||| R r \ : 56th
St 1. The ct nival is
Ihi ..-Meet rf the Tern
G i iSOIjTY), the
. | the Men's Club.
i in i- president of
SOLTY Win kin.: with him are
Linda F.maa, Eric Bauman, Michael
Wend Berke, Joan Dranll
and Paul Kichner.
Mrs. a'an Flske is chairman of
the carnival for Sisterhood Her
committee includes Mrs. Martin
Dranit, tickets; Mrs Jerald Rubin,
fo-d; Mrs. Lewis Medoff. booths:
Mis. Joel Mish, prizes; Mis. Stan-
ley Sclimnan. cake walk; Mm.
Robert Frazin, white elephant sale,
and Mrs. Robert Stone, publicity.
Members the Men's club par-
ticipating are Arnold Cohen. Ralph
M i Robert Stone. Stanle) Seli<;man.
and Alan Fiskc.
Hot dogs, hamburgers and other
t- will be available
Tick ts n ill be on sale at the d 'or.'
i' eds a eat ma ki d for the
lous school.
In response to the appeal of Ira
Hirschmann, well-known author
and expert on Middle Eastern Af-
fair-, an overflow crowd of 150
persons more than doubled lasl
for the Hemii phen i
Apartm >nts at a meet n held re-
on behalf of Jewish Wei-
Ion's 1972 i '
Mr. H i1
In Israel and the u
of the current need-
Chairman for. the Federation
campaign in the rletrrtspl
plex is David Scttwartzman Work-
ing with him as cochairmen are
Dr. Stanley Beizer, Harry Cohen,
Dr. Arthur Lichtenstein, Mosea M
Upton. Marvin Shocket. Charles
Siegal. Maurice Stearman anil
William Weiss.
Accordionist Arie Kadurl
vided the musical eQtertain.nent
and background music for thi
Mi''.'ting.
Brotherhood Rabbi's Topic
Rabbi Max Weitz will be
nest speaker at the meetin
th" Hal1 a'-dale Chapfej
B'rith Women on Thursday,
24 at 1 p.m. at itv Home Ke
Building, 21C0 E. Hatlandaic B
Blv the subject of Brotherhood."
meeting was inadvertently I
for Feb. 23 in a previous isst,
this paper.
r* fa
leral
ich
TWi
is ted
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We've got the finest selection
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All the famous names in china
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Royal Doulton, Wedgwood,
Royal Worcester and Minton.
b You'll also find fine crystal,
figurines, gift ware and special
limited editions. All at special
prices for overseas visitors. Plus
our packaging and safe-delivery
service.
If you're not able to visit us,
we'll be happy to send you our
fully illustrated colour brochure,
together with detaiIs of how to
order by post.
But when you're in London
looking for china, you won't be
lost for direction. ^*
The fine china and crystal
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W.l.Tel:01 499 9881.
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Friday, February 18, 1972
*Jemsti IhriOtom
Paqe 3
Dr. Aryeh Plotkin Guest At
Presidential Towers Meeting
Mrs. Leo Burson
To Speak Sunday
At Temple Sinai
Dr. Aryeh L. Plotkin, noted lec-
turer, expert on Middle Eastern
a flairs anil former officer in the
DIT. AKYIH PLOTKIN
Israel Defense Forces will be the
Kiiest speaker at a meeting to
be held on behalf of the Jewish
Welfare Federation 1972 Cam-
Patrons Present Musical
Trip Around The World'
The patrons of the Arts League
of the Hallandale Civic Center
Fiuul will present a musical "trip
annui,'. the world" on February
17. 'S. 10 and 20 at 8 p.m. in the
Hallandale Junior Ilitjh School.
The program will consist of three
one act plays entitled Around the
World in Three Big Hops. The
Civic Center's choral group will
perform an overture for the plays.
Florence Rose, who is in charge
;>f direction for the presentation.
has been responsible for providing
many other successful theatrical
evenings. Tickets may be obtained
from the Hallandale City Hall
cashier, Chamber of Commerce or
Recreation Center.
Rabbi Contacts Students
During Dr. Morton Malavsky's
visit to Israel last month, he con-
tacted Hollywood students attend-
ing the university in Israel and in-
vited several of them out to lunch,
including Howard, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard Kaufman, his
daughter Judy, Mark, the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dresnick. Judy,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hy Mars,
and Julie, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Martin Silverman. All are dormer
members of Beth Shalom's United
Synagogue Youth chapters.
'GEORGIA BOY
FRIED CHICKEN''
Hallandale Beach Blvd.
^ullandale 929-6622
"WITH THIS AD"
1 dinner regular price
2nd LIKE dinner V2 Price
Broaated Chickens .
Made Ui Famous!
DIPLOMAT FOOD MARKET
3505 S. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
Diplomat Tower Bldg 922-5618
Naw Management New Pricea
- : New Policy
!>" n at the Presidential Towers
Apartments at 5:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 1.
The guest speaker for the Youth
Aliyah evening to be held Sunday
at 7:30 p.m. in Temple Sinai, will
be Mrs. Leo Burson, honorary na-
Dr. Plotkin. a recognized auth- \'"']r **2 President of Hadassah
oiity on international relations, in-
ternational law and comparative
government, was educated at the
Universltlea of Jerusalem and
London. He was the first citizen
ol Israel to be admitted to Prince-
ton University's Woodrow Wilson
School of Public and International
Affairs. He obtained his M.A. and
Ph.D degrees from Princeton,
where he later taught in the De-
partment of Politics.
Dr, Plotkin has appeared on the
Voice of America broadcasts and
has distinguished himself as an
outstanding speaker on extensive
lours throughout the United States
and Canada.
The committee of sponsors for
the Presidential lowers meeting
includes I. J. Abrams, Mr. and
Mrs. Monte Bclsky, Mr. and Mrs.
Jerry Borer, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Carrado, Mrs. Carolyn Davis, Mr.
and Mrs. Lawrence Covitz, Mr.
and Mrs. Mike Kirsner. Mr. and
Mrs. Louis Klinger, Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Lerman. Mr. and Mrs. Louts
S. Rosen and Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Ruby.
Building chairman for the Fed-
eration Campaign is Louis S.
Rosen.
for life. She is replacing Mrs.. Roz
Suit/ as speaker due to a death
In Mrs. Soltz' family.
One of the most outstanding
leaders of Hadaaaab, Mrs. Rurson
is a member of the national board
of Hadassah and a past national
vice president. She presently holds
the portfolio of the National Con-
stitution chairman, and is a de-
puty member of the Actions Com-
mittee of the World Zionist Or-
ganization .
Mrs. Burson. who is now presi-
dent of the Memphis, Tenn., Jew-
ish Community Council, served as
Commissioner of the Tennessee
Department of Kmployment Secu-
rity during the administration of
Gov. Buford Kllington. She visited
the Soviet Union as a participant
of the Hadassah Study Mission in
1966, and was a delegate to the
World Conference of Jewish Com-
munities on Soviet Jewry in Brus-
sels last February.
Post Meets At Temple
Post 177, Jewish War Veterans,
will meet at Temple Israel ol Mir-
amax, H920 SW 35th St., on the
second and fourth Tuesday of each
month at S:30 p.m. it has been
announced. All qualified veterans
;>**f> u-el''OT>>(\ _________
fKobert <)au/or
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For Your FREE Kit
Call: 966-TEN FORTY
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AUTHORIZED JOHNSON DEAL-
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To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States.
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Page 4
+Jewi$ti fUrM/ar
Friday, February 18, 1972
fcJemsti FNeridfiaiffi
.,,.1 Mlli vi 1.H.1111 iiiiiLvnvuii
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.E. 6th Strebt Telephone S7J-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephonb 920-6192
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida J3101
Fred K. Shochet Selma M. Thompson
Editor and Publisher Assistant to Publisher
MARION NBVTNS, News Coordinator
The Jewish Rorldian Does Not Quanntii The Kathrvth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Ite Columns.
Published Bi-Wee^lv by the Jewish Floridiais-
Secor.d-Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla.
Jewish Welpare Federation op Greater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Widens, Chairman; Ross Berkerman, Ben
Salter, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atkin,
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weskly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arte Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 2
Friday, Feburary 18, 1972
Number 8
3 ADAR 5732
Conference Important To Future
Thousand of American and Canadian Jewish leaders
gather here next weekend to launch the worldwide cam-
paign on behalf of the Israel Bond Organization. The im-
portance of this annual conference to the future economic
health of the Jewish state was given additional drama by
the emergency meeting called by Prime Minister Goida
Meir in which a number of Miami men participated sev-
eral weeks ago.
In his new role as Minister of Commerce and Industry,
Lt. Gen. Haim Bar-Lev will be the major speaker from
Israel. The shift of Bar-Lev from chief of staff of the Israel
defense forces to the Ministry of Commerce is a classic
illustration of the Israel dilemma: a nation building its
economy in the face of continued military threat, with dedi-
cated men for whom the shift from military uniform to
civilian clothes is all part of their commitment to freedom
and security of the Jewish people.
This year's goal is almost double the sale of S251 mil-
lion in bonds during 1971 and out of this inaugural con-
ference should come the impetus for a successful campcign.
The Issue Won't Just Disappear
By arbitrarily declaring the controversial resolution on
aliyah unconstitutional, the World Zionist Organization
Executive has soothed a lot of ruffled feelings and pre-
vented a possibly disastrous split. But that doesn't mean
that the issue will disappear; on the contrary the pros-
pects of it growing are great.
There is little question that the new generation of
Israelis, in particular the native-born, are impatient with
those Zionist leaders elsewhere who delay emigrating to
Israel. The resolution, which caused the Hadassah ladies
to walk from the 28th World Congress, was inspired and
introduced by the young delegates from Mapam and
Labor and, as the old-timers pass on, the militancy of the
youth will be reflected more and more in relations with the
diaspora leaders.
One can understand the resentment of the tough, young
Israeli builders toward the "outsiders" who seem to have
so much to say about their nation without actually partici-
pating in its day-to-day struggles. Yet they must learn to
understand, as well, that Israel is unique among the na-
tions and that those of us in galut have just as great a
stake, if of a different dimension, in the success of those
struggles for survival of the Jewish people wherever they
may live.
American Ties Highlighted
American ties to the life of Israel will be highlighted
when the annual mid-winter conference of the Israel His-
tadrut Foundation takes place here to plan the campaign
in support of the Foundation's outstanding program.
Although this will be a national conclave, with nome
1,000 delegates expected, there is special local significance
because the national chairman of the board of the Hista-
drut Foundation is Temple Beth Sholom's Rabbi Leon
Kronish and there is strong support for the Histadrut pro-
gram in this area.
The three-day conference has a number of outstand-
ing national and international speakers whose messages
should prove of great interest to the local people who
attend the sessions.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON Dr. Henry
Kissinger is big news nowadays.
The two national news maga-
zines have him on their respec-
tive front covers this week, for
example. But even their vast
staffs do not seem to have got
to the inner essence of the man,
which also explains his peculiar
relationship with President
Nixon.
THE ESSENCE can be put
in four words: Balance of power
politics. The fact is that both
the President and Henry Kis-
singer broadly believe that the
world balance of power is the
mainspring of history. Although
younger, both belong to this re-
porter's generation; and we had
a good hard lesson about that.
The lesson was simple enough.
The British and French, who
had the main responsibility in
those days, let things elide until
Germany's rearmament under
Adolf Hitler had caused the bal-
ance of power to go to hell in a
hack. Whereupon the British
and French inevitably discov-
ered that they had no remain-
ing choices except to fight like
cornered rats, or to give in.
FORTUNATELY for every
one of us, the British particularly
chose to defy the apparent odds,
and to fight with measureless
courage. The British left-wing
intellectuals, symbolized by that
virtuous old fool, George Lans-
bury, were responsible for the
silly slogans that largely pro-
duced the second world war,
such as "Arms races cause
wars." Some British right-wing-
ers, symbolized by the Marquess
of Halifax, also played their own
sordid roles, now revealed by the
publication of the Cabinet
papers.
At any rate, this was the cen-
tral experience, in very differ-
ent ways, in the lives of Richard
M. Nixon and Henry A. Kis-
singer. It brought the United
States into the second world
war. Thank God it did, too. For
where should we be today if the
United States had stood aside
and a successful Nazi Germany
had been the first to develop a
full panoply of nuclear weapons?
IT IS THIS oddly, very dif-
ferently shared experience, in
turn, which underlies the rela-
tionship between Richard Nixon
and Henry Kissinger.
The two men, so different in
all other ways, nonetheless talk
the same language the balance
of power language that most
American intellectuals no longer
understand because they never
read history.
THESE TWO men's shared
belief in balance of power poli-
tics further explains just about
everything lhat President Nixon
has done in the foreign arena,
with Dr. Kissinger's advice and
help. Take the Vietnamese war,
as the most important example.
When President Nixon was
elected, he asked Dr. Kissinger
to explore every possible course
of action including what
would have amounted to abject
surrender. In 19">9. even the most
abject Mirremter would have
been loudly applauded,
plauded.
BIT THE President and
Kissinger concluded that such
an American surrender would
have disastrous effects on the
overall world balance of power.
They further concluded that
these effects would be widely
felt, in Israel, for example,
where the Soviet throat was al-
ready grave. So they decided on
the middle course of Viotnami-
zation.
The same theme runs straight
through the Chinese story. In
1969 the Soviets approached
the White House, pretty directly,
to ask whether we would look
the other way while they under-
took the nuclear castration of
China. President Nixon replied
with a very loud raspberry not
at all because he had illusions
about Communist China, but be-
cause China's nuclear castration
would have caused (and may
still cause I a most unfavorable
upset in the balance of power.
BY THE SAME token, balance
of power considerations played
the decisive role in the arrange-
ments for the forthcoming visit
to China. The Chinese Commun-
ist leaders are still deathly afraid
of nuclear castration because of
the enormous Soviet investments
Continner! on Page S
s\.S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK, N.Y. The impressive fact that has emerged
from the whole business about the secret American peace pro-
posals is the bulky, brilliant, omniscient, omnipresent and very
professional fact of Henry Kissinger. Subtract him from the
Nixon equation in the White House and you subtract the China
policy, the Vietnam withdrawal and Vietnamization policy, the
clement of strategic secrecy and surprise, the intellectual scrut-
iny that has been brought to bear on the total diplomatic pack-
age.
There have been brain trust advisers to Presidents, like Harry
Hopkins and technician-theorists like Adm. Mahan. and shadowy
behind-the-scenes figures like Col. House. The Kissinger mixture
is like nothing before him. As a public figure, he combines all
the disabilitiesintellectual. Harvard, divorced, a German-
born Jew, photo-prone with pretty girls, a confidante of the
President. What more fatal combination could one ask for?
ft ft ft
YET THERE IS SOMETHING ELSE, which carries all this
off. It is Kissinger's clear and cool ability, the grasp of prob-
lems, the mastery of material, the historical perspective, the
sheer professionalism. For a moment the Anderson papers struck
a blow at this image, showing Kissinger in his most dubious role
as he rode herd on the bureaucracy to carry out Nixon's willful
and ill-fated Pakistan policy. One version in Washington is that
the leaks to Anderson may have been aimed at exactly that
intention, to topple Kissinger from his dizzying height an
event that might please some foreign governments and perhaps
Americans engaged in the cobralikc struggle at the Capitol. If
so, it didn't succeed.
If we needed anything to confirm Kissinger's professional-
ism, a reading of his press conference remarks and answers
about his secret Paris meetings would do it. They are precise,
subtle and responsible without being stuffy.
The combination of President Nixon's speech, with its law-
yerlike brief for the defense, along with Kissinger's dialogue with
reporters, gives us a tolerably clear view of what stL'l prevents
peace. It is not the Administration's stubborn insistence on a
military solution, nor any refusal to discuss a political solution. It
is quite simply the reluctance in Hanoi to accept a political solu-
tion short of their own, which is the overthrow direct or indi-
rect of the Thieu regime in Saigon. "We are not prepared,"
said Kissinger, "to end this war by turning over the government
of South Vietnam as part of a political deal."
* ft ft
THAT IS A GOOD ROCK TO STAND ON. It is healthy to
have the crucial question of the nature of a political not a
military settlement finally clear enough for debate. I don't
believe it has been clear to most Americans up to now. American
liberal op.nion about the Saigon government has passed Jhrough
interesting phases. First, that it was no government, n'ofhing a
vacuum, a cipher, incapable of holding an army in the field or
retrieving the villages that Vietnamization was Hopeless.
Then, that it was corrupt and dictatorial and not worth savin-
"en II ,t were possible. Finally, now that it has shown itself
ranly viable, that whatever its character or strength we-have
no obligation to it which would interfere with a poiittear-ssrHe.
ment on Hanoi's terms.
Quito conceivably, the coming Tet offensive, mounted from
Hanoi and bound to be massive, may topple the Saigon armv
and regime. Quite conceivably American air power .may .pro. e
inadequate to keep it alive, which would confront Nixon'wUI. the
sharpest crisis of war whether to escalate "American
military involvement .again or accept Lc Due Tito's political
settlement and abandon the Thieu regime. I* Due Tho may be
Gambling on this. Nixon and Kissinger may be gambling that
Saigon can survive the next Tet offensive and that Le Due Tho
will then be more amenable to the eight-point peace plan,
ft ft ft
MORE OR LESS AFFECTIONATE political nickname- are
endemic to the American scene. Roosevelt had his "Sammy the
Rose" and his "Tommy the Cork." Now Nixon has his "Henry
the K." Despite his secret agent mystique, he is very much out
in the open now, which is all to the good.
I wish I knew whom Muskie, Humphrey, Lindsay, McCar-
thy, McGovern, Jackson, Chisholm or Yorty has who would do
what Kissinger is doing. In fact, if I were a Democratic candi-
date now I should announce that the one man I would carry
over from Nixon would be Henry the K.
ssHMMm


"Friday, February 18, 1972
+Je*isti Flcrktian
Page 5
Catz Installed As President
Of New B'nai B'rirh Council
B nai B nth Council of Broward try Club.
Others officers were installed at
the same time, including Bruce
Daniels, president-elect; Sam Al-
bert, Gil Mallinger, Joe Perlstein
and Bill Rabins, vice presidents;
Ronald Rosen, secretary; Fred
Klein, treasurer and Abe Baum,
Marvin Blum, Harry Cohen, Dick
Donath, Joe Friedman, Paul Huro-
witz, Dr. Phil Levin, Henry Serfer
and Archie Simon, trustees.
Louis Ossinsky, Jr., first vice
president of District Grand Lodge
No. 5, comprising all the B'nai
B'rith lodges on the Kastcrn sea-
board from Maryland to Florida,
was the guest speaker.
The new Council comprises 10
lodges with 1.500 members, the
greater majority of them residing
in the high rises of South Brow-
ard. It will serve as a coordinating
_ I body for the lodges, assisting them
in their activities, fostering the
interchange of ideas and fellow-
ship, and eliminating the duplica-
tion of their efforts and energies.
IRA H. CATZ
Attache Beauty Salon
2711 S. Ocean Drive
Hollywood
922-1416
bKatftf of ^wcf im
JOSEPH ALSQP
Continued from Pane 4
in a vast additional military
buildup -on their frontier Since
1969. The President, and Dr.
Kissinger, too, are still afraid
of the same upset in the balance
of power that they feared three
years ago.
So the true object of the
Nixon visit to Peking will be to
deter the Soviet attack on China,
if this can possibly be done. And
the same theme even ran
through the much misrepresen-
ted White House management
of the Indian crisis.
THE PRESIDENT took great
risks in the Indian crisis, both
at home and abroad Either you
must suppose that he is irra-
tional or you must believe that
he credited the intelligence that
the Indians were getting ready
to dismember and destroy West
Pakistan, under the aegis of
the Soviets.
Balance of power considera-
tions therefore required him to
take the risks he did take, with
the result that the Soviets
called the Indians off.
The balance of power is in
truth the key to the Nixon-
Kissinger relationship.
DARN & YARN
Knitting Boutique
2660 Hollywood Blvd.925-7734
Next Door To Merchants
Green Stamp Redemption Center
20 centt an ounce and up
Mon. thru Sat.: 8:30 to 5:30
Thursdays 9:30 to 6:30 P.M.
"Yarns Wound To Order"
"Small Appliance Repairs"
117 S. 19th Avenue, Hollywood
Bet Hlyd. Blvd. A Harrison
Phone 925-7374
Guaranteed Work
Genuine Factory Parts
MORTY ROSENBLUM
Formerly of Long Beach, N.Y.
PRE ARRANGE
NOW Before NEED
WRITE TODAY FOR FREE
INFORMATION
HOLLYWOOD
MEMORIAL GARDENS
ClMl Mil I llll.
ItOO No 60th l.c
Hollywood, Fli 31021
3*
lilt ^St Ml

I >
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
Tyiet Slreel at 19th Avenue
Phone 9238222
s
It's New
1
f a+ doety *
MEN'S
HAIR STYLING SALON
Layer Cuts
Razor Cuts
Protein Treatment
Manicurist
\ Total shape up
program for
male hair
For appointment
call
922-9300
I960 Harrison St., Hollywood
Also Complete Line of Hair Conditioning |
"Boutique For He and She"
"GROUP THERAPY"
1236 Dixie Highway
Hollywood
JeansShirtsNovelties
Hours 11-812-6 Sundays
For Creative Upholstery
Call John W. Puerto
113 W. Dixie Highway
Hallandale
CUSTOM DRAPERIES
Phone 922-7760
Captain Nicks At
"FAR AWAY JOES"
All The Seafood You Can Eat
905 S.W. Sth Ave., Hallandale
CARRY OUT 925-8848
Serving from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
LEARN THE ANCIENT ART
OF JAPANESE BUNKA
Cultural Embroidery To You
KASY TO I.JXARN
EASY TO USK
Oriental Art Studio
917 S. 21 *t Ave, Hollywood
Phone 925-8641
Personal Service;
Delightful Results That Last
Coze' Beaute' Salon
Galahad Hall Apts.
3001 So. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
Alr-Conditioned Dryers
Hours: 9-5 No Sundays
Phone: 927-S862
10 SPEED! T"******
racer
Hit the roads and lanes on a beautiful Florida morning!
Nothing could be greater than cruising along on a deluxe
27" ten speed racer. See something you like? Center pull brakes
will glide you to a quick and graceful halt. 27 x 1V*" black and white
racing tires on a Suelto 22Vi' diamond frame. Huret Derailleur,
chrome derailleur guard and spoke protector. $74
Cycle Shop, all burdine's except miami beach
-m*-
GALAHAD HALL
SOUTH
BEAUTY SALON
3801 S. Ocean Drive
HOLLYWOOD
Open Mon. Sat. 9-4
Phone 929-1840
-&
^SlDI**^


Page 6
vJenisti AtaMbfl
Friday, February 18. 1972
PERSONALITY PROFILE
Dr. Joel Schneider
By ABBEY KLEIN
Pr. Ji.cl Schneider, only .11
rears nil] apd a relative newcomer
j-v our community, brought with
DK. Ml SC.ritlDtlt
lira ;i rather exciting background
tnd ;> very definite feeling of
nommitment to Israel utid Juda-
ism.
' I believe that ti:i survival of
world Jewry is (Insularly depend-
ent ujxin a viable ami thriving Is-
rael," he says. "Israel represents,
al this time, the only hone for the
Miivivai ol Russian Jewry, am at-
tempts to pronwta the emigration
Of Russian Jews to Urai I Should '
foe supported boh spiritually and.
more practti ally, financially. Al-
though the disaster in Germany are lading
the plight of cur brothers in Rus-
sia represents the same attempt
Ui destroy European Jewry."
Horn unit raided in New York
City, Joel attended Bronx public
schools. H and his equally in- ,
terestina wife, Merle, and then*
two children, Aian, 64. and Karen.
4Vfc, were "pioneers" in Emerald
Hills, the fifth family to settle
ihere. Their enthusiasm for Flori-
da living brought hLs mother and
stepfather here recently, hut his
only brother, Paul, settled in At-
lanta
Joel graduated from City Col.
e e of New York in l!>r>9. Phi
B< ta Kappa and valedictorian of
His class. While there he majored
in Science and Music, studied
guitar and taught himself to play
the piano. The recipient of the
Jonas Salk scholarship based on
original research he performed in
,'^anic chemistry to Albert
Einstein College i Medicine. Yes-
hiva University, he graduated in
1963 after having achieved mem-
i rship in the medical honor
societ) Alpha Omega Alpha.
Hi. Schneider did his Internship
nt Jackson Memorial Hospital in
Miami "where the sand rapidly
tilled my shoes" and he was deter-
mined to settle in Florida after
he had fulfilled his other commit-
nents. His residency at Bronx
mi i; ai and Albert Einstein Col-
lege Hospital was followed by his
rtl .i 4756 rsA.K. Typndall Air
Force Base in Florida, where he
held the rank of Captain from
3967 to 1'
Dr. Schneider and his family
Rent-A-Car
4, LOW AS
$5 A DAY
Mil MMAGl
100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXJC HWY.
920-4141
MOtlTWOOO
M5-56t M^m!
joined Temple Sinai and he !*-
came involved in the Young
Leadership Croup of Jewish Wait
fare Federation, working with
them last year to help coordinate
solicitations in Emerald Hills. This
year he is serving with Dr. Bern-
ard Millofl as cochairman of the
Physicians division.
Dr. .Schneider has also recently
I een elected to the Hoard of Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah. This is not a new
field lor Joel his formative
.ears were spent in the New York
VMHA's organized activities and
hi spent several year as a coun-
selor al VMHA camps in New Jer-
sey. He has also found time to ful-
fill his duties ns flrsl vice presi-
iii', i: the Emerald Hills Home-
>uners Association, has become an
tennis enthusiast ihe was a
until time neutralized his
,ii Ive! i.
Bui past and present accom-
ments do not afford Joel
Schneider a "sit back you've done
your snare" attitude. Rather he
is always thinking of the future
and what more can he do. He has
a very strong feeling concerning
tin' lack ol community facilities in
a city that desperately needs
them.
'We must offer our Jewish
youth the facility for a common
social and recreational meeting
place in other words establish
a youth center," he declares.
In every way, Dr. Joel Schnei-
der is a very, very s|>ecial i>erson
with a most refreshing natural
sense of humor, enjoying life to
the fullest and finding great satis-
faction in giving.
HOLLYWOOD HEARING AID SERVICE
BATTERIES REPAIRS
Phone: Broward: 920-8338 Dsde: 949-8042
2124 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD

MAI CO HEARING AIDS
HOLLYWOOD 33020, FLA.


Neil Wolfe and his trio will be '
the artists Sunday at the 8:30;
p.m. Community Concert at
South Brcward Hiqh School.
The trio, which includes Lewis
Borryman, bass violist, and
Howard Keddison, percussion
ist, will present a program oi
iavoiite melodies, songs 'vith
i
:lassical improvisations an'l 3ii-
loctions from Broadway musi-
cals. Admission by member-
ship only.
CASAde IMPORTS
.
LlamaAlpaca
and
Bolivian Chinchilla Rugs
RUGS CARVINGS PONCHOS
IMPORTED FURNITURE
M/i MoiiYwooo Btvo DONNA HAY
HHHAOiiD. fiorioa 330^0 MARGARET LEATHERS
"CHIC SHE WIG
BOUTIQUE'
C"
615 E. Hallan-Jale Bench Blvd.
Hallandato 929-7951
"Crealiva Hair Design."
$atfyu& Vacxrfuming
FASTING -REDUCING REJUVENATION
WHOLESOME MEALS PEACEFUL SURROUNDINGS
EXERCISE CLASSES SUNBATHING POOL BOATS
-^Sgfc WRITE FOR FREE LITERATURE Jf&Lt
BONITA SPRINGS, FLORIDA 33923-JF USA.
Where Health is Taught"
GRAND OPENING
Cerscheffcf & Walters Inc.
NINA CASHETTA PRES.
7220 TAFT ST.
Let Us Find Your Place In The Sun
Specialists in Condominium
RESIDENTIAL AND COM MERCIAL PROPERTIE
ACREAGE AND RENTALS
SERVING THE ENTIRE SOUTH BROWARD AREA
981-9704-Office 989-3010 Evenings
. i.

Your Smile is Part of Our Business
fc^/SH
l


Friday, February 18, 1972
***^***^A**^^VWWW
*. #p*/#> norUtun
Puge 7
v**'v,'^****^^^w*www
scene aWnd
by Marjon Nevms
T^*^' ** ***0*0*****.....y^ ^W^MM^MM.
i
The luncheon season is on and this female has just 'fsurcd
out why most of these luncheons feature fashion shows Those in-
s.dious ac-licrx of high fashion know that after we finish eatinR
al that food we surely won't be able to fit into our old clothes
.u u =5* RrW ourseh-es on those patty shells overflowing
''h ihe inWftablc chicken in cream Muee, we watch the match-
M.ck tn models .they don't cat the lunch! I walking flown
the runwa>s and we figure that even though we are fast swelling
fr..m a Rze 7 to a size "unlimited," there will be clothes to buy
and hoiVt'ully in our new size.
As we ate the Ice cream bathed in brandy sauce at the
Smith G'lb luncheon, we watched the dozen female manikins
and one. male-okin or whatever you call a male model- ra-
vrtingnn front of us and showing just about every type of
c.thesthat has been popular in the last many years, "it seemed
to me like a sort of "tell us what you'll buy and we'll find it for
you" year. To conquer what has been an apathy on the part of
most utomen to these past few year's fashions, they are trying
Pv. rythlng. Its denim and ruffles and gingham and lace It's
pants an.: skirts and ruffly blouses and tailored shirts.
* it &
At the Smith Club scholarship fund luncheon our tab'e in-
eluded Annette Milloff and Dorothy Fine, my two Smith College
alumni friends who greeted us all. They were wearing red.
white anil blue neck ribbons designating their alumnus status
and separating them from the rest of us who got our educations:
elaewheA As Marcia Silver and I drove up to Fort Laudeidale.
we talkoj aboit her studies at BCC. She's taking some psychol-
ogy cougi-s. Annette Milloff is also taking some courses in this
er way to a Master's degree at Nova. We decided that
big to hear Bill Schutz of Esalen when .he comes to .
to ap|M-ar at the Henderson Clinic Training Institute.
of the stalwarts of the "encounter" movement and one-
men at Esalen Institute at Big Sur in California. Carol
and Maxine Tanis were also part of our little table
ibis particular luncheon.
liother c"ay during this same week I made my yi arly
e to the race track. Annette Milloff acted as the initi-:
JjBbi fact, my hostess for she seturt-*! the passes
*lgwr> at Gulfstream. It doesn't teem,passible but]
'*>] Ki- riding and yours truly manager* to pick tlvi.
thPvVe also
,---..,<>,
jble*We also round out that betUdiftn^iOdtf'horse lnm*.-
IdoeSfC] necessitate winning. It was-a .-beautiful day as"T
n.l watched the little sailboats in tha inner lake at thfl
track. "Be sailors who sail the little boats sMM to have fouffd a.,.
: ost p5*>ant-job. Sailing, sunning and getting paid for it s<>ms .
[eri then they had a fashion show and here we saw Alan
Inger doing the modeling.
AS! ir 'it it
Iteration luncheon for all those women who gave'
[lore, Francis BlOUltein of New York spoke excitingly of
the need there. The luncheon was a^t.Mickey S'gal's; '
although she was unable to take tinfe bff from her a
teechinjEto be there, sister June Gordon acted, as hostess and
helped 3$eet. J,he women; her mother Alice Maiknan -poured the
coffee for the guests including Carolyn Davis, Birdie Einsfein,
I'earJ Weit/ner, Francis Briefer, Aviva Baer, Kllie Katz. Frieda
Giiihrr, Ethel Posniek. Perle Siegel and Faye Ruby. It was a
heaulifu] day looking out from the Segal living room past the
l"ve(r pool complete with sliding board to the Inland Waterway.
Mi.r| than that ... it was a good day for the campaign of Fed-
eratmn for all the women there gave unstintingly to start off
tin Women's Division campaign with a bang.
)\ really exciting event for the women of this community was
the film showing of the film "Images" arranged by cochairmen
Marcia Tobin, Charlotte Brodie and Kllie Katz for Federation.
More than 150 women came for brunch, watched the film and
(hen) broke up into discussion groups and talked about the con-
tents of the picture. It was a morning that most of these girls
v ill remember, for many of them were new to Federation and
!. arned a bit about its functions for the first time. Sue Stone,
Itikki Goo. man, Marty Jacobson and Helen Glassman all knocked
themselves out helping Marcia, Charlotte and Ellie arrange all
the details.
--------1----------------------------------"--------------------------
*^H*AA**^*^*^*^^^*^^V>
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
3 ADAR 5:56
THE ORIGINAL WORLD FAMOUS
*
A^^^^^AA^A*^^^^*^^^^^*
be
name dropper
F+
Kur^'j tTi i rr3
.
RED SOCKEYI*
A SALMON/
etbeltierg

~jror ~St Ljala C^venlna!
Under Hie Same Management and
Same Type of Continental Entertainment
makes
a great
impression
FEATURING:
* The Authentic
Austrian Slap
Dancers from
Innsbruck
* Lou and Lota
The Juggling Chefs
Comedians from
Germany
* Erica & Edward
Famous Professional
Vocalists of Light
Operetta
SUPER! GERMAN
AMERICAN CUISINI
Mew Tim.: 1:1 S P.M.
DANCING STARTS
AT 4:45 P.M.
Phone
922-1331
For
Reservations
SPECIAL
ATTENTION
GIVEN
TO PARTIES
Pre*" Levin, Mgr.
LOCATED ON FEDERAL HWY. U. S. 1
NALLANDALE (Next to Hollywood D*9 Track)
MEMBERSHIP
J00
.,____., JOIN THE
^^ FURNITURE--------
JCLUB
BUY YOUR FURNITURE
& CARPET WHOLESALE + 5%

$1000.00 REWARD TO ANY PERSON WHO
PAYS MORE THAN THE WHOLESALE PRICE
- YOU ARE GUARANTEED TO PAY ONLY
OUR ACTUAL COST & 5%
r
MOST SHOWROOMS HAVE QUALIFIED DECORATORS
TO CORRELATE YOUR COLORS AND PLAN YOUR NEEDS.
BEING A MEMBER OF THE FURNITURE CLUB
YOU WILL RECEIVE A LETTER THAT WILL ADMIT
YOU TO THE WHOLESALE SHOW ROOMS.
ENCLOSE $5.00 FOR MEMBERSHIP
---------For Information Write to--------------
9800 W. Bay Harbor Drive Miami Beach, Box 411
Name.
City
Address
Ph.



Page 8
+Jewlsti ncr/dttbr
Friday, February 18. 1972
Women's Division Meetings An
Effort To Reach All Segments
The Women's Division of Great-1 caust had left 1.4 million Jewish
er Hollywood's Jewish Federation,
which is working toward a more
ambitious goal than any previous
year, has planned meetings to
reach every Jewdsh woman in the
area. Each will appeal to a differ-
ent group in the community in an
effort to interest all segments of
the community in the work of
Federation.
Led by Mrs. Carolyn Davis as
campaign chairman and Mrs. Rob-
ert Baer, cochairman, succe>sful
meetings so far have been held in
both the $500-and-up minimum do-
nation and the $365-and-up-cate-
gory.
During the next two weeks there
will be a meeting for women mak-
ing a minimum donation of $100
(on Thursday, Feb. 24) and for
women making a minimum con-
tribution of $50 Thursday March
2. Both will be luncheon meetings
at Emerald Hills Country Club.
The National Women's Division
survivors in Europe with little
hope, no place and no source of
sustenance to turn to. The group
of 300 women which met at that
time pledged their all-out support
for the UJA campaign. This was
the forerunner for the formal es-
tablishment of the Women's Divi-
sion, which has been actively in-
volved in all the campaigns since.
Here in Hollywood, the Women's
Division started some 20 years
later, but it has grown by leaps
and bounds and this year is expect-
ed to surpass by far anything that
has been done before.
The success of the Division seems
to surpass by far anything that
offers an opportunity for the indi-
vidual woman to express herself
by becoming involved in humani-
tarian activities on an equal foot-
ing with her male counterpart. It
affords the modern Jewish woman
an opportunity to fulfill an ancient
commitment by assuming moral
of the United Jewish Appeal was : and financial responsibilities for
started back in 1946 after the holo-1 fellow Jews in need.
Hadassah Chapter
Plans Two Events
The Hollywood Chapter of Ha-
dassah will hold its annual Youth
Aliyah Pledge evening Sunday at
7:30 p.m. in Temple Sinai.
The regular hook review meet-
ing will be held Tuesday, at 1 p.m.
in the Home Federal Building, 172t)
Harrison St. Rabbi Robert Frazin,
spiritual leader of Temple Solel,
will be the guest speaker and re-
view the book "A Beggar in Jeru-
salem" by Elie Wiesel, a survivor
of the holocaust who through his
life and his books has become a
source of light and legend to the
Jewish people.
There will be a small admission
charge, for which full donor credit
will be given.
Sisterhood, Men's Club
Sponsoring Art Auction
How would you like to be the
owner of a Toulouse-Lautrec litho-
graph for free?
Such a piece of art will be given
away. Sunday, Feb. 27. at the Art
Auction sponsored by the Sister-
hood and Men's Club of Temple
Solel. The 8:00 p.m. auction at
Emerald Hills Country Club, 4100
North Hills Dr., Hollywowi, will
be preceded by a special preview
presentation at 7:00.
Guests are urged to come early
to study the numerous works of
art from Paris, London, Spain,
Italy, the Ukraine, Israel and
other world art centers, ranging
in estimated price from 520 to
$2,500. Auction works will include
original oils, watercolors, etchings,
woodcuts and lithographs bj such
famous names as Dali, Renoir.
1-autrec, Chagall, Dufy, Goya and
Picasso.
In answer to an increasing and
flourishing interest in Israeli art,
many works by such artists as
and Walter Spitzer will be offered.
Although Israeli art has a short
history, it recalls the ancient
Jewish traditions, religious themes
and motifs of Europe, it was
pointed out.
A special feature of the even-
ing will be a drawing for a
Georges Roualt "signed in the
plate" lithograph entitled "Les
Visages;" other objects of art will
be awarded as door prizes.
Cochairman for the event are
Raphaelis, Sandu Liberman, Vardi
Mj lea Sher and Mrs. Lou Free-
man. Sisterhood committee mem-
bers are Cheryl Welsberg, Judy
Mish. Merry Liff, Hilde O'Mara.
Elinor Weber. Phyllis Sher and
Kay Seligman. Men's Club mem-
bers are Phil Weisberg and Stan-
ley Seligman.
There is no charge for admis-
sion; the public is invited to at-
tend.
Seniors Hosting
Benefit Luncheon
For Immigrants
The Senior Friendship Club of
Temple Beth Shalom will host a
hot luncheon antf party for the
benefit of Israeli immigrants Tues-
dav. March 7. at 11:30 a.m. in the
social hall of the temple, 1725
Monroe St.
Mrs. Sam Blonder is chairman
of the luncheon; Mrs. Pauline
Zuekman is treasurer and Mrs.
Helen Kalish, secretary.
The luncheon committee includes
Mrs. Louis Rerkman, Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Bernstein, Mrs. Rose Bal-
sam, Mrs. Helen Doyele, Mrs.
Abraham Fox, Mrs. Minnie Frank.
Mrs. Thelma Gus, Mrs. Adele Ger-
her, Robert Etkin, Mrs. Dorothy
Kowitt, Hy Rohlick, Mrs. Betty-
Mi Her, Mrs. Fanny Miller, Mrs.
Rebecca Spiegel, and Mrs. Ann
Turner.
Tickets for the luncheon may
be purchased from any member
of the committee.
Broward Board Of Rabbis Sponsoring March W Rally
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The Broward Board of Rabbis
will sponsor a "Save Soviet Jewry"
rally, Sunday, March 19 at 7 p.m.
in Temple Emanu El, Ft. Lander-
dale attended by all the Jewish
youth of Broward County. Rallies
of this type have been held
throughout the country since the
plight of Russian Jewry became
serious.
Dennis Prager will be the guest
speaker. Coordinators of the pro-
gram are Mrs. Shirley Goldman,
youth coordinator of Temple Beth
Shalom, and Arnold Pakula. youth
coordinator of Tempi* Beth El.
a
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i tncntv*! y&
NMUHAl JEWISH MgSIC^CSIHCH
flka
The theme of the 1972 Jewish Music Festival "Music of
the Sephardic and Oriental Jews" is heralded In a three-
color poster of the National Jewish Welfare Board's Jewish
Music Council, national sponsor of this annual cultural
event. For display at synagogues, Jewish Community Cen-
ters, schools, fraternal societies, women's organizations and
other groups throughout the United States sponsoring Jew-
ish Musical Festival events from Feb. 29 to March 29, the
poster was designed by Sy Warsaw.
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Bring this ad for your free gift


Fiiddy, February 18, 1972
Jewisl)fk#kfktn
Page 9


THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING!!
THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING!!
In Unprecedented Numbers!
"LET
MY
PEOPLE
GO!"
Yes,
they are
coming
now
we must
help
to see
that they
continue

i
to come!
Russian Jews Embarking from plane at Lod Airport
From Airport to Immigration Office
-

As more and more Jews are allowed to leave the
Soviet Union, the supportive role of the Western
activist must increase. The dollar now is as impor-
tant as the demonstration. Up to 36,000 Soviet Jews
are expected to arrive in Israel during 1972, and, to
guarantee their absorption, the U.J.A. has announced
it will need an additional $200 million in contributions
this year. Funds must be made available for hous-
ing, the major obstacle in their successful absorption,
for jobs and probably for new settlements.
The Israel Government has judged absorption to be
a top economic priority of the coming year, and as a
result will trim its 1972 defense budget to find monies
to meet the emergency.
This record influx of Soviet Jews will be viewed
aYa-'welcome strain" by Israel-welcome because any
immigrant eventually will be a boon to the economy.
However, about 30 percent of the Soviet Jewish
immigrants have no vocation and absorption costs for
Soviet Jewish families are approximately $35,000. for
Jhe first year. American money is vital. Diaspora Jews
must give larger amounts than ever before. $200
fniltion more.

t;


keep
the .
promise
SUPPORT THE UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
AND
THE ISRAEL EMERGENCY FUND
By Giving To
THE JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
1909 HARRISON STREET, HOLLYWOOD, 33020 927-0536
B
i


Page 10
+Jf*%nfinrrKffcr
Friday, February 16. 1972
II
Political Zionism And The
coming Power Struggle
\ HKss i wartime head of the Almitelty unn
... -,,^-4 flu-mic* I^wtUJUSi. 4n4:v)ai-,Soc
xiTTticarZionisM. mjr jabotinsky, organizer of the Lon
l>
BV M.VIN HKSS
To understand i
the souice of Inspiration for the
men who conceived the Mea. how
and who got the power and main-
tain..I it and conflict! within the
movement, it is Decenary to de-
fine Zionism. First, Zlon was used
as the spiritual name for that
hill section i i Jerusalem captured
by King David, whereon the First
Temple was built. In our Bil I
Its si mlficance Is reflected this
way:" '" l 'orget thee, O
Jerusalem, may my right hand
om its c nnlng and my tongue
cleave to its roof. ." In the l ISO's
the name was adopted by Ash-
la nazl Jew:- foi the i olitical move-
ment to promote a Jewish State
In Palestine (or all Jews living In
the Was; ora.
During the 18th and 19th cen-
turies men in Europe again be-
came concerned with the human
Jewish Legions, who fought to
oust Turkey from the land on
the Palestine Front and in Gali-
polL
At the San Remo Conference
(19J0i Wei/man influenced the
WZO to award the Mandate for
Palestine to Kngland. the terms
for which were unanimously con-
firmed by the League ol Nations
119.22) and separately by the
American Congress (19231.
ialksts. ^Jormei
rd Balfour's Dec
influencing Britain's leaders in
this about-face. Their anger boiled
over at all the Commissions
Downing Street sent to investigate
the unrest in Palestine, who al-
ways reached the same solution;
restrict the Jewish immigration!
They criticized Wei/man because
ii seemed to them he was unable
or unwilling to sjioak out against
those destroying the poUttciflS of
his late friend.
Mrs. Kessler's Topic: Art Applied To Everyday Livtog,
... ,,, will speak on Ar ixs A^lieu to
Mrs. FCm Kesster will be thi F Livinr: v.^K.-asJeA.
sixaker at a meeting of the Ho 1 ^ r.;(]||| mJjni(WI f ,.., par.
wood Section. National ( o:.nil of ^ (>f ^ n ;i|BLa ,
Jewish Women, at l p.m. Monday! y/ho> ^^ )f A n,,ir.llT
in the Home Federal BuUtBng, whtf ,, Am,.ri.
2100 K. Ilallandale Beach Blvd. ^ shp ^ ( Nhi,,itCll ta Na.
Mrs. Kessler. a professional art-J Uonal and Injerfattjeial Celeries.
Admiralty I Immigrations accused the Fabian | ist ana teacher since 1958 and j Mrs. Judy Hapip"ft is ir charge
lU^W'tS'l.'lL.W )#&<* dinner sj^fe '^3.'ltl's*'^ir5f_ I_____________,
iclaraoon of now | z!-------------------------------------------------
To understand who got the pow-
er in the Zionist movement one
must study the Mandate, particu-
aiK Aiticle IV. which provides'
More friction between them and
the Histradut. led by Hen-Gurion,
developed when a new kind ol
immigrant came to Palestine; the
professional class out of Germany
. an appropriate Jewish Agency I and the small business man from
shall be iecogni,cd ... for the j p|an,| .With respect to the latter,
purpose of advising and coopera- j in 1933 wnen the Trade Unionists
ting with the Administration of j ,|emanHo<| first to see the callouses
I'aiestine in such matters as may on their hands before they would
affect the establishment of a j lct thom in tnc Revisionists ex-
Bplrit, and amidst the ferment of j(.wjsn National Home. The Zionist | [K)SP,| tr,is hypocrisy.
new social philosophies, three men
(followers of Hegel 1 were among
the first to perceive that economic
circumstance was the most Im-
portant factor in human affairs.
Two of them, Ma>\\ and Kivels
wrote the 'Communist Manifesto."
The third, Kabbi Moses Hcs.s.
tnoke with them after its publica-
tion. He could not believe the doc-
trine <>f class warfare was the
answer to his longing for social
Justice.
To answer Hegelian arguments
he wrote the book, "Koine And
Jerusalem" in which he compared
the Jewish Civilization with the
1 in, the fiisl lime ever that
> 1 ei i"'i was Identified as a
IZATION. The i>.k became
i! Jewish (las-:; Herzl, referring
U' it as !ii- 1 1 n.:.terial, said
c,t Hess: ". all I aimed at is
already to !) found in him" when
1! c idea to form a political Zionist
ei; him. 1 Ins k<
Weizmari refer to t:iis work simi-
larly.
In essence. Rabbi HeSS preach- d
ench race has Its own function
and mission in the development
oi mankind. The Jewish is the
]i ;.li .'1111)11 Ol laWS ol social ju.stice
Organization, so long as its or-
ganization and constitution arc,
in the opinion of the Mandatory,
appropriate, shall be regarded as
such agency. It shall take steps
... to secure the cooperation of
.1,1 Jews who are willing to assist
.11 the establishment of the Jewish
National Home. '
The seeds for [xiwer assumption
A 1 ,< planted at Basle. New roots
of power were nurtured by the
.01 mation of the Jewish Agency,
ind control was easily maintained
by the political activists among
thi Yishuv. ESaaily, because the
yishuv was composed of a body
,.i Jews trapped tor 2,000 years
in Arabia's feudal system; old,
pious Jews, who emigrated to
Palestine to die. not live; mem-
bera of the agrarian communes
(Kibutz) WhOM founders were in-
fluenced by collectivism ideologies
before departing Russia and the
trade Unionists (Histradut) im-
1,1.1 it with similar Socialistic no-
tions.
The make up of the Jewish
Agency remained largely un-
1 n.inged from its formation
through Partition, a iieriod in
Revisionists demanded a ixiliti-
cal climate and officials friendly
to capital. They believed this es-
sential in order to induce large
investments to build industrial
plants capable of providing jobs
for large numbers and thereby
supply needs from within.
CConccrncd with similar econo-
mic aspects regarding the upbuild-
ing of Palestine, but unconcerned
with its face-lifting, unless the re-
turn to the land Involved the
establishment of itself as a spirt-,
tual. cultural base for Jews in the
Diaspora, Asher Ginzberg. better
known by his pen name Ahad- '
Ha-am, "one of the people," a
pai ticipant in the Halfour Decla- ;
ration, lesigned from the WZO.
His critical essays scalded Zion-
ists. He warned a National Home
could not be made ready to ac- j
cept Jews so long in exile unless
they were, by means of education,
re-instilled with a "National Will."
Ahad Ha-am maintained Nation-
alism required uniting the spiritual
and cultural aspects of the jieople,
material and intellectual needs
in an organized and united human- Aml.,i(.an litR.s exll.n(linK from I alike, if the Jewish tieonle'and't'heir
, .. 1., achieve its mission, he said il;nil t(> jaJtinsk/s ; Ho^la^we^Svlve^^Sd
Pa^tinerbecauae E else "2^]t?S2!k*t2: ^".He maved to Palestine, con-
can deliver them economically,
(1 <-a>se for it they blamed the
. continuance of the Shokel voting
lally and spiritually, rhis would svstem
give them new life and their pro-
per place in the family of nations. Thcy res,Kned frorn tne WZO
Her/.l saw in these social and ., ,
... .. ,-,: ,,.,,, to form the New ZO and called
ethical attitudes a political aspect
that would make possible a world themselves Revisionists. They pro-
organization of all sections of pagandized that F.ngland had be-
J.wiy; capltaUsts and workers; ,.mp ,no (.njpf pnpmy Jpwish
orthodox and tree thinkers; West- |
Bin and Eastern Jews. He called
tinued writing, and dedicated him-
self to the development of a mo-
dern secular Hebrew culture.
The writer hopes this review of i
Ashkenazi-Zionist politics prcced- !
ing the founding of the State will
help the reader understand more j
fully the upcoming struggle for
IMilitical power in Israel.
the first Congress in Basle in
1897, at which the World Zionist
Organization was founded. From
(hat time forward to World War
1 the Zionists tried to persuade
other prominent Jewish benefac-
tors to join them.
After Beale, the Zionists met
with the heads of European gov-
ernments, the (H toman Empire's
leadership and fruitlessly investi-
gated resettlement in other lands,
thereby creating internal schisms
within the World Zionist Organi-
zation.
In 1917 Lord Balfour issued his
famous Declaration committing
Britain to the support of a Jewish
Home in Palestine. In this connec-
tion Jews pay homage to the mas-
sive efforts of Chiam Weizzman
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Itfy. February 18, 1972
*Jtw/* #? fkr/kfiar
Pug-; 11
ATIONAL BEAUTY SALON WEEK SALUTES
WOMEN'S BEAUTY FEBRUARY 13-19
u
M.


./ '
-ri
II
The Combo Cut, an American Hair Fashion
Jo: Spring-Summer 1972 introduced by the
Jational Hairdressers and Cosmetologists
Association combines several lengths into
tapered top layer with a soft length of
:url in the back. The look of the Combo is
Ibom free to go witn any of fashion's silhou-
I ones for spring. The Combo accents femin-
fine fashions with a bounce of gentle curl,
sometimes fulled back at the nape. For a
tailored sophistication, the shorter layer is
brushed behind the ear or pulled back in
[a sculptured curl. Hair pulled to the crown
lor accented with a hair piece creates eve-
Ining elegance for after five.
[National Beauty Salon Week
Set By Hairdressers
February 13-19 marks the 22nd
C lebratlon oi National Beauty Sa-
i Ion Week by more than 60.000 na-
j h.mvirtc members of tho National
I Hairdressers and Cosmetologists
Association (NHCAi.
"Turn a Head with a New Hair
, Style" lurtng the annual ohserv-
, ancp and turn your attention to
' total beauty communication, as
stylists across the country K>'t into
"Fashion 1972."
In addition to hundreds of fash-
ion presentations, radio and tele-
vision programs, queen contests,
parades and special events. NHCA
members Will take this opixjrtun-
ity to provide personal beauty
services to the many institutional-
ized women throughout the coun-
try. Thus special community serv-
ice has Ions been a tradition -'ur
in the National Beauty Salon Week
(NBSWi.
The creative efforts of the more
than 1.1C0 affiliates participating
in NBSW programs across the
country will be judged as part of
the annual NBSW national awards
program. Winning entries will b-
announced during th" NHCA na
tional convention. July 22-26 in
Palm Springs, Calif.
I
Heads Turned Feb. 13
As NBSW Activities Begin
Heads were turning this week
as cosmetologists throughout the
country matted the 22nd annual
National Beauty Salon Week
(NBSW).
The week-long event, sponsored
by members of the National Hair-
dressers and Cosmetologists Asso-
ciation (NHCA), focuses attention
nn professional hair care through
the efforts and activities of state
and local NHCA groups across the
country'.
Among the many NBSW activi
ties planned on the local level are
fashion shows, radio and television
programs, queen contests, parades.
special event promotions and vis-
its to various institutions to pro-
vide community services.
Focus of this year's program
will be on creativity and origi-
nality with each state an^ affili-
ate encouraged to "do their own
thing" to make NBSW a special
program of personal involvemen'
for all members on the local level.
The Solo Cutfor ready-to-wear, drip-dTy
and summer free, the only answer is a
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any woman the freedom to select the
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one-length fashion, the Solo Cut comes in
"casual" or "curly," with plenty of looks
for today's casual fashions. All are finger-
lifting free with a super fashion look for
summer. The Solo Cut is an American Hair
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Cosmetoloqists .Association.
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1920 S. Ocean Drive, Hallandale-925-1027
PARISIAN BEAUTY SALON
No. I 401 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale -923-1085
No. II620 N.E. 8th Street
Hallandale-925-2395
PETITE BEAUTY SALON
Creative Hair Styling
615 E. Beach Boulevard
Hallandale-922-3439
PINK FLAIR BEAUTY SALON
Free Pick up and Delivery
Service for our Customers
5801 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale
966-5740
ROSE & CLARK'S BEAUTY SALON
Specializing in Women's and
Men's Hair Styling
1909 Harrison Street, Hollywood-923-7808
TJ's HOUSE OF WIGS
Shaping and Cutting-Custom Styling by Toni
Imperial Towers North
1801 S. Ocean Drive, Hallandale-922 9210
TENDER TOUCH HAIR STYLISTS
Specializing in Wigs-Sales and Service
5715 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood-983-3058
TOWN & COUNTRY COIFFURES "HOLLYWOOD" ,
4521 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 981-8951
"SHERIDIAN"
POSTE HASTE CENTER
4545 Sheridan, Hollywood 961-2255


Page 12
vJewisti nork&tn
Friday, February 18, 1972
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlesiiiger
J ... ...... o
THANK HEAVEN FOR LITTLE GIRLS
Yours truly, a mother of two boys, has be-
ome accustomed to sharing her home with vari-
ous and sundry living creatures: the two legged
kind, some four-legged ones and an occasional
i rawling companion. She is terribly well qual-
Hed in rules of football, occasionally doubles
Jis a basketball center and could win a trophy
for screaming the loudest at any Little League
baseball game. Therefore, it's plain to see that
I'm a positive pushover when it comes to the
frills and feminine wiles of little girls. Be she
short, fat. long or lean, an offspring of an inti-
mate frli ml or an absolute stranger, fair of
a.c or down-right plain, if it's a little girl, I'm
goner.
And. thereby, my pligm unfolds, For. at this
articular poinl in time, our kitchen pantry is
;nundateii with cookies. Like bees to honey en-
tire troops of (".ill Scouts, out en masse and
hawking their wares, were magnetically drawn
.' the home of yours truly, "Mi-, i' (hover
Number due." Those uniformed and dimpled
darlings, sworn to loyaltj and doing a good deed
laily are positively professional experts when
I comes '" cookie pushing. Which all leads t..
he inevitable fact thai each ami every "Fuller
Brush" and "Ding Dong Avon Calling'' i |y
'i todaj had thtir roots in that superlative
Training ground for underage hucksters, "girl
scouting."
Aias. as the abdomen bulgeth and the family
weel tooth sinks slowly in the west, the fore-
ieeable future indicates no possible way of
Iwindling the supply of our well stocked pant r.e.
'erhaps there's heip ot there. Flea, we beg
nil. "Anyone for a mini cookie?"
ft ft
LUNCHEON FOR THE MAESTRO
A testimonial dinner in honor of Jan
VVolanek, the deal |y beloved Maestro of the Hol-
ywod Philharmonic Orchestra, is in the busy
tanning stages. A luncheon hasted by i>r. Koy
Uberl at the Diploma! Country Club brought
1 thei the committee members for a working
ession recently.
The event, a labor or love for all those In-
ulved, i.- scheduled for 7 p.m. March 2 at the
Reef Restaurant Barak (Mr*. David] Keating
is the chairman and I'.arbaiu Russet i.s her co-
hairman. Tickets can lie obtained by contacting
Mr*. I. Frank MsgQfi or Mm. Jen BcJiaeffer.
rocktails, a roast beef dinner with all the
trimmings. Ted Serin's Society Orchestra, per-
:orming guest artists and music lovers every-
where will combine for a memorable evening
;.n evening to do honor to a gentleman who has
devoted his life to music. See you there
ft ft ft
AWARENESS
There were 175 women who filled the Hemis-
pheres Ballroom one very early a.m. to partici-
pate in "Awareness Through Images," a mo-ning
of breakfast, film viewing and discussion period.
The program sponsored by the Woman's Division
>f Jewish Welfare Federation of Greater Holly-
wood and headed up by three very capable wo-
men, Charlotte (Mrs. Myron) Brodie, Elite (Mrs.
Herbert) Katz, and Marsha (Mrs. Steven) Toliin,
was a winner. Mrs. Irving Waxier of Miami was
guest speaker. She was involved with producing
the film through the Women's Division of Great-
er Miami Jewish Welfare Federation. A stimula-
ting morning it was as clearly evidenced by the
spirited discusssions at each of the tables fol-
lowing the film showing.
Some of the gals responsible for the wow
morning were Discussion Group Leaders, Mrs.
Morton Abram, Mrs. Norman Atkin, Mrs. Samuel
I inklestein, Mrs. Edward Gottlieb, Mrs. Stanley
Qreeasptm Mrs. Joseph Hopen, Mrs. Edward
Kaplan, Mrs. Howard Kellner, .Mrs. Morton
Lewta, Mrs. Ju<-k Levy, Mrs. Calvin Linda. Mrs.
James Miller, Mrs. Allan Orlove, Mrs. Kol>ert
Pltrell, Mrs. Abraham Suiter, Mrs. Aaron
eheeter, Mrs. Jack Shapiro, Mrs. Gerald Sieged,
Mrs. Sam Weliistein, Mrs. Henry Weiss, and
Mrs. Karl Mergenstein.
The intent of the film, which combined cer-
tain subliminal techniques with contrasts in
lack and white, was to evi onse and to
reate awareness, That it did. it was a!! that
i was promised to be and more i;\.-i'..n..:
NOTHING LIKE A BOY
Family, relatives and friends were all on
hand at Temple Beth El for the Bar Mit/vah
of Dnrrel Jay /.bar, son of I>r. Murous and Jackie
Zbar. As the tall and handsome young man con-
ducted the service, memory took me back to the
time when our two families became neighbors
some ten years ago. Darrel and our son, both
three years old at the time, struck up a fast
fi iendship. It must have been the big year for
cowboy identification for nothing else would do
but the wearing of cowboy boots from dawn to
dusk. Darrel was quite an adventurous lad at
that tender age. I remomber once he set out
for the local 7-11 store, pedalling his toy fire
engine down the middle of the street as dark
of night descended with worried parents and
neighbors hot on his trail. Well, those days are
clearly gone louver ami in their place stood a
young lad approaching manhood surrounded by
his v. ry proud family (and, a few of us very
proud friends) on a very significant day in his
li. '.
Sharing in the jojotis ev>nt were Darrel's
maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dia-
mond of Nashville, paternal grandparents. Mr.
and Mrs. Abe /.bar. .Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Colson
and Sam Zbar all of Tampa; his sister Lisa and
brother Jeff] Mrs. Bernard liii.vmon of Tus-
caloose, Ala.. Jack Zbar of Dalton, Ga. and
Tommy Goldstein of Nashville, plus a host of
friends and well wishers.
Luncheon was served to all in attendance fol-
low Ing the services and later that evening at
Emerald Hills Country Club, Darrel played host
at a teen party. A rock band, supper, and en-
thusiastic youngsters rounded out a big day in
the life of the young gent.
it ft
PEOPLE AND PLACES
Dr. Norman and Botibi Lnmlmuu combined
the Bar Mit/vah celebration of their nephew in
Orlando with a sightseeing tour of Disneyworld.
'1 he I.andmaii* and their three offspring had
quite a time Speaking of grand times. Sher-
man and Joanne Kats had just that. They "did"
.Mexico in great Style while South of the Border
t'i attend a Bar Association convention in Aca-
pulo Dining with celebs is getting to be the
thing with Dr. .Martin Feuerman. He was s|>otted
recently al a local dining estab with James
Cagney Ol movie renown. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Levy, Carol Ecker and Bob and Burltura Rich
made up the rest of the exciting party.
1'i.ttying up the audience at the opening night
performance of "The Pleasure of His Company"
at Parker Playhouse were Nancy (Mrs. Jay)
Simons. Lea (Mrs. Donald) Herman. < ami lie
(Mrs. I .eon | Sultan and Jordana (Mrs. Juan)
Wester. It was girls-night-out for the foursome
and the fact that suave and sophisticated/ Doug-
Ian Fairbanks, Jr. was api>earing as the star of
the play had quite a bit to do with it. Other
first-nighters were Bill and Alice Foster, Dr. and
Mrs. Iru Ftnegold and Sonny and Marilyn Wol-
flnger with their guests, Dr. George and Iris
(rune. On the subject of the Cranes, they're off
to Mt. Snow, Vt. with the kiddies for some seri-
ous skiing. Their last December jaunt to North
Carolina found them in 70 degree weather and
little powder. This time, they're leaving little
to chance. If Vermont doesn't have snow there's
none to be had.
It is not every day that an award-winning
major literary columnist and lecturer, a recipient
of France's major literary award, the Prix
Medicis, for his novel "A Beggar in Jerusalem,"
and the recipient of the Heritage Award for ex-
cellence in literature comes to town. Well, he
is coming. His name is Elle Wleael and he'll be
speaking at Temple Sinai at 8 p.m., Monday,
Feb. 28. For those of you who haven't already
purchased tickets, they can be obtained at the
Temple office, 1201 Johnson St. Admission is
$0.00 per person, $2.30 per student and seating
is limited.
If your name is Jo Noble, then you are a very
much involved citizen. 125 people were invited
to ner home recently to meet noted historian,
author and lecturer. Arthur Sehlcsinger, Jr., who
spoke on behalf of the Presidential candidacy of
George MeGevera, The following week Jo was
right in there with over 100 members of the
Broward People For Peace at the Home Federal
Bank Building for "An Evening of Enlighten-
ment." The documentary film "Another Family
For Peuce" was followed by an address by Scott
Ilerrlck. noted pacifist and philanthropist.
Seven Lively Arts Festival
Scheduled To Open April 4
The Seven Lively Arts Festival
opening April 4 will pay tribute
,fo music, dance, drama, poetry,
painting, sculpture and photo-
graphy for a period of two weeks.
Climax of the year's events will
take place on the weekend of
April 15-16 with an Art Show,
crafts display and tea party on
the green in Young Circle accord-
ing to William D. Horvitz presi-
dent uof the Board of Trustees
of Seven Lively Arts Foundation.
Inc., and Mrs. Thomas A. Thomas,
program chairman.
Everyone is invited to submit
entries in the poetry contest, which
will take place April 9 at the
Recreation Center, 2030 Polk St.
under the chairmanship ol .Mis;
June Justice. The winning entries
will be read by the distinguished
guests on the day of the finals;
awards will be presented at that
time.
Deadline for entering the con-
test is noon, March 18. Categories
are 1st, 2nd and 3rd grade boyi
and girls; 1th, 5th and 6th graders;
7th. 8th and 9th grade Students;
10th, 11th and 12th graders. Col-
lege students and adults will be
judged together in the 18 years-
and-over category.
First, second and third prizes
will be awarded in each age group.
Each contestant will be permitted
to submit two |)oems on anr sub-
ject and all entries must be ori-
ginal.
Fu3it. through syah, .graders do
not need to type fheir entries.
They may submit four copies of
each poem*, neatly drid legibly
written with ballpoint pen, on one
side of the paper only with al lutely no art work. Seventh grad-
ers through adults must type their
work. One original with three
clear carbons Is satisfactory.
Every page must show the writ*
er's name, age, address, town and
telephone number, name of school
and grade on the bottom. (Adults
may eliminate both age and
school.) Typed entries must be
on paper that is 8V4 by 11 inches.
A number of special awards will
be made. (Additional information
may be obtained by calling Mrs.
Jane Rose at the Recreation of-
fice! Entries should be mailed
i to Miss June Justice, Hollywood
! Recreation Division. 2030 Polk
j St., Hollywood. Fla. 33020.
Palmers
Miami Monument Company
3279 S.W. 8th Street, Miami
444-0921 444-0922
Open Sunday thru Friday
Personalized Memorials Custom
Crafted in our own workshop.
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NAME: _________
ADDRESS:
PHONE.


lebruary 18, 1972
*Jc1sti Ffaff-gdTfor/
Page 13
LV, FEBRUARY 18
plywood Scholarship Foundation Luncheon Noon
plomat Hotel
tDAY, FEBRUARY" 1 !l
nai BTith Chai Lodge Dance Charminade High School
LY. FEBRUARY 20
wor Friendship Club Temple Beth Shalom White Ele-
int Sale9 A.M. -Temple Beth Shalom Monroe St.
bllywood Hadassah Youth Aliyah meeting 7:3o p M
[Temple Sinai
j,AY, FEBRUARY 21
itional Council Jewish Women Hollywood Section
poting 12:30 Home Federal Building Hallandale
Ivd.
frllcrest Chapter B'nai B'rith meeting 1 P.M. Rec-
ttional Center No. 1 Hillcrest
DAY. FEBRUARY 22
tnior Friendship Club Temple Both Shalom meeting
X>n Temple Beth Shalom Monroe St.
IrQplc Bclh E! Sisterhood Donor Luncheon Noon
pplomat Hotel
lywo.;d Hadassah Book Review 1 P.M. Home Fed-
fal Hide Hollywood.
Ivv Robert Z. Franzblau, Miramar Post 177meeting
|30 P.M. Temple Israel of Miramar
roward Jewish Singles meeting 8 P.M. 1201 John-
bn St.
JESDAY, FEBRUARY 23
I'nai B'rith Women Hallandale Chapter meeting 1 P.M.
Home Federal Bldg. Hallandale Blvd.
|ty of Hope South Broward Chapter Torch of Life
jncheon Noon Diplomat Hotel
temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood & Men's Club Entertain-
ment 8 P.M. Temple Beth Shalom
ISDAY, FEBRUARY 24
^nai B'rith Women Hallandale Chapter meeting 1 P.M.
Hallandale Blvd. Home Federal Bldg.
^'omen's Division Jewish Welfare Federation Lun.-heon
Noon Emerald Hills Country Club
femple Beth El Brotherhood Membership Dinner 7 P.M.
Temple Beth El
treater Hollywood Philharmonic Orchestra 8 P.M.
foun; Circle
Miramar Chapter Pioneer Women Pre-Purim Party
1:30 P.M. Miramar Recreation Center
DAY, FEBRUARY 27
L;i-ies A^jfih^axy Victor B. Friedman 613Honor Luncheon
\ Noon Eden Roc Hotel
Temple Solel Sisterhood & Men's Club Art Auction 7
P.M. Emerald Hills Country Club
Temple Sinai Minyan Club Breakfast 9 A.M. Temple
Sinai
(DAY, FEBRUARY 28
National Council Jewish Women Board Meeting 10 A.M.
Hallandale Home Federal Bldg.
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood Board Meeting 8 P.M.
- 4601 Arthur St.
Temple Sinai 4th Annual Cultural Event Elie Wiesel
P.M.Temple Sinai
si) VV, FEBRUARY 29
fcenior Friendship Club Temple Beth Shalom meeting
Coon 1725 Monroe St.
|NRDAY, MARCH 1
sllandale Chapter Hadassah Donor Luncheon Noon
Diplomat Hotel
LSDAY, MARCH 1
liramar Chapter Pioneer Women meeting Noon
liramarfBtcreation Center
/omen's Division Jewish Welfare Federation Luncheon
Don Emerald Hills Country Club
I
!----------
*

This Week In History,..
(Prom the files of the JTA)
40 Years Aro This Week: 19S2 !
Soviet President Michael Kalin- |
in said Birobidjan would be a Jew- I
ish republic, not just an autono-
mous territorial unit. "There is
no reason," he explained, "why
a highly cultured people such as
the Jews should not strive either
consciously or unconsciously for
the establishment of their own
State."
"BERLIN Adolf Hitler, lead-
er of the National Socialists, en-
tered the lists for the Presidency
of Germany, following his formal
appointment to the faculty of the
University for Political Pedagogy
in Braunschweig, thus automati-
cally becoming a citizen. In law
circles, however, the opinion is ex-
pressed that the head of the
electoral commission will refuse
to recogni/e Hitler's candidature
on the ground that he is a fore-
igner."
Heinrich Shein. first president
of the Rumanian Zionist Federa-
tion, died in Jassy at 76.
President Hoover ordered the
War and Navy Secretaries to in-
vestigate an anonymous article in
"Army and Navy Register" slur-
ring Jewish patriotism.
Three Nazi Deputies were ex-
pelled from Germany's Parliament
for defaming Jews.
Jascha Heifetz fiddled before a
capacity audience in Jerusalem's
new Edison Hall.
10 Years Aeo This Week: 1962
The Board of Deputies of British
Jews urged remission of the "sav-
age" death sentences levied
against four Wilna Jews for "cur-
rency speculation."
Sen. Kenneth Keating (R: N.Y.)
recommended that the U.S. dele-
gation "publicly air the facts on
the (Soviet Jewish) situation be-
fore the U.N. committees and the
General Assembly," as the Krem-
lin "is disturbed by this kind of
pressure."
Citing the arrest and punish-
ment of 130 persons, mostly young,
for swastika-smearings and Nazi
pamphleteering, Austrian Interior
Minister Josef Afritsch said Nazi
ideolov was showing an unex-
pected revival.
Famed conductor Bruno Walter
(Schlesingerl, who was exiled
from Germany in 1933 and re-
tired in 1957, died in Beverly Hills
at 85.
Moscow Radio warned Arab lis-
teners that the Israeli visit of
Edward Kennedy, brother of Pres-
ident Kennedy, was part of a U.S.-
Isracli "plot" to "infiltrate" and
"enslave" yo.mg Aiw.sn jgt.s.
Seven Germans wore sentencer
in Stuttgart to prison terms ot
up to 4V4 years for killing four
Hungarian Jews in 1944.
A rare heavy snowfall disrupter
Israeli traffic, damaged crops and
groves and kept Foreign Minister
Golda Meir from an urgent policy
meeting.
"The Canadian Friends of th^
Middle East" said: "The whole
story of the six million dead Jews
is a pure fiction."
Religious
Services
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Rabbi Max J. Weitz. Cantor Rev.
Jacob Danzlger. 126 N.E. lt Ave.
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. 46
BETH SHALOM (Temple). 1728 Mon-
roe St. Conaervative. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold 46
----------
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnaon St.
Conaervative. Rabbi David Shapiro, j
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraum. 47
Dr. Bernard Milloff, host at a recent meeting of the Doctor's
Division of Jewish Welfare Federation (seated) is shown
with Dr. Rowland Moskowitz, associate professor of medicine
at Western Reserve Medical School, who was the guest
speaker at the meeting, and Dr. Ira Glazer.
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal)
Services at Hollywood Hills High
School January 21 8:15 p.m. ltabhl
Robert Frazln.
TEMPLE BETH AHM.310 Southwest
62nd Avenue, Hollywood
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple) 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. 48
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI (Temple) of NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkee. 3/
Carolyn Davis, campaign chairman of the Women's
Ion of Jewish Welfare Federation, poses with Mrs.
kis Blcustein, guest speaker, and (standing) Mrs. Rob-
prdon, honorary president for life of the Women's Divi-
[at the S500 and up luncheon of the Women's Division.
Bloustein is program chairman for Greater New York s
Bar Mitzvah
S HERRI FRIEDMAN
Sherri, the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Meyer Friedman, will cele-
brate her Bat Mitzvah at Temple
Beth Shalom Friday, Feb. 18, at
8:15 p.m.
fc it *
DAVID FRIEDMAN
David, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Meyer Friedman, will become Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Feb. 19, at
Temple Beth Shalom.
u it ir
ALAN LOBEL
Alan, the son of Mr. and Mrs
David Lobel, will become Bar Mitz-
vah* Saturday, Feb. 19, at Temple
Sinai.
f> ^
RICKY VEINGRAD
Ricky, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Morton Veingrad, will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah Saturday, Fob 2G,
at Temple Sinai.
it it ir
WILLIAM SINGER
William, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Aaron Singer, will celebrate nil
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth Sha-
lom at 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 26.
ROBERT SEGALL
Robert, the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Maurice Segall, will celebrate hLs
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth Sha-
lom Saturday, Feb. 26, at 6 p.m
Dr. Joel Wilentz, Dr. Joel Schneider, cochairmen of the medi-
cal Division, and Dr. Sam Winn at Dr. Milloff's home.
Dr. Alvin Cohen and Dr. Phillip Gould who were also par-
ticipants in the Medical Division meeting at Dr. Milloff's
home.


Page 14
-Jewtsli fkxktton
Friday, February 18, !3"2
First National Bank
Promotes 6 Officers
Two promotions to vice presi-
dent of the First National Dank of
Hollywood have been announced
DJ \V. A. Hotmail, vice chairman
and president. )* also announced
two other officer promotions as
well as the appointment of two
long service employees to officer
status following a recent meeting
of the hoard of directors.
Captain 1. J. Superfine, U.S.
Navy, Retired, was appointed vice
president for Administrative Serv-
ice A former assistant vice presi-
dent, he continues to be resi>on-
sible for special management
Mu> ies and projects, logistical plan-
ning, logistical support operations
of KDP, communications, and
security and procurement of sup-
plies and equipment.
L. K. Mitchell was promoted to
vice president and assistant to
the head of the Trust Department.
Alter Joining the hank as an as-
sistant trust officer in 1969, he
a as promoted to trust officer and
subsequently to assistant vice
president and trust officer. He will
continue to have supervisory res-
ponsibllity for Trust Accounts.
and, under the general direction
of H. C". Satchell, executive vice
president and senior trust officer,
will have general supervision of
the (."state Administration, Invest*
ment, and Operations Sections ol
the Trust i wpai tment
Kenneth R, Lockwood, formerly
,,s-;s'ant cashier in the Install-
ment Loan Department, was
named assistant vice president and
assistant to the department head.
It was noted that Installment
Ixian is one of the fastest growing
departments in the bank, having
increased an average of almost
two million dollars in outstanding
loans in each of the last 7 years.
Robert L. Forbes, Interviewer
in the Installment Loan Depart-
ment, will continue in that de-
partment with the rank of assist-
ant cashier. lie came to the Dank
i in 1965 and has seen service as
; teller and head teller.
Mrs. Joyce M. Doyer was pro-
' moted from trust administrative
' assistant to assistant trust officer.
I A graduate of the Trust School of
! the Florida Bankers Association.
' she has been serving as adminis-
, trative officer on trust accounts
! find will continue in that field.
Mis. Marjoric L. Swan, for 13
years executive secretary to exe-
cutive vice president and senior
trust officer H. C. Satchell. was
named trust administrative assist-
ant. She is a graduate of the Trust
School of the Florida Bankers As-
sociation.
Roses Theme Of
Hillel Luncheon
And Fashion Show
Some 400 women are cx|>ectcd
George Kirn Appointed
Director Of Ka-Dee-Mah
BUILDING FOR LEASE
HALLANDALE BCH. BLVD.
40' x 150' AirCond.
Terrazzo Floor.
Acoustic Ceilings. Parking -
Good for Warehouse or
Storage. Short or
Long Term Lease.
Call 983-2318
WANTED
WOMAN ON SOCIAL
SECURITY ABLE TO WORK
PART TIME, WILL
ARRANGE SALARY
Phone 927-4822
Placemats
TABLE CLOTHS
NAPKINS (paper & Linens)
Largest & Beautiful Selection
FABRIC N MAT SHOP
28 N. Federal Highway
DANIA, FLA.
THE
V. I. P.
An Intimate Dining Room
LUNCHEON
Monday thru Friday
DINNER
Nightly except Sunday
2037 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
PIANO MUSIC NIGHTLY
Cocktail Lounge
920-5934
Most Arab Terrorists Who
Fled Jordan Were Released
TEL AVIV ,'.iTA> Almost
all the Arab terrorists who fled
from Jordan after the Jordan-
Ian Army cracked down on iliem
last September have been re-
'.< ased from Israeli prisons, and
many of them are holding jobs
in Israeli territory.
A total of 10K Arab terrorists
save themselves up to Israeli
forces after crossing the Jordan
River during Amman's on-
slaught. Of these, 94 were sub-
sequently released.
to attend the first Hillel Com-
munity Day School luncheon and
fashion show in the Fden Hoc
Hotel at noon Thursdnv. Feb. 17.
proceeds of which will *c used
to help the school obtain the fine?
educational equipment available
Theme of the event, which
under the chairmanship ot Mrs. I
Don Solomon of Hollywood, will
be "KverythinK's Coming Up
Rotes," and the floral theme will
be carried out in the musical selec-
tions played by Herb Starling and
his trio, the decorations in the
hotels gilded circular hall and the
invitations as well as the spring
fashions from Young SophisMcates
modeled by ladies affiliated with
the school.
Mrs. Joel IS. Dcnn'.s is serving
as chairman of the 40-member
hostess committee, which includes
mothers, members of the Board
:>f Governors, and friends of Hillel.
Sisterhood Donor
Lunch eon Tuesday
The annual Donor Luncheon of
the Sisterhood of Temple Beth Kl
will be held in the Regency Poom
of the Diplomat Hotel Tuesday
noon. The invocation will be ;;iven
bj Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffc. spiritual
leader of Temple Beth El; Vivian
Uoj I. song stylist, comedienne
and impressionist, will entertain.
Mrs. Melvin Freedman is lunch-
iin chairman. Mrs. Kleanor Perk-
ins ant! Mrs. Charles Wolfe arc in
cha e oi -ills: Mrs. Harry Feld
man. Mrs Bernard Friedman, and
Mrs. Morton Scnavell are decora-
tions chairmen and Mrs. Harry
Schwartz and Mrs. Milton Nor-
wich are arranging for table
prizes.
Reservations chairmen are Mrs.
Martin Renno, Mrs. David Friod-
lK>rg and Mrs. Stanley Harris.
Donor and non-temple guest tick-
ets may be obtained by contacting
either or the reservations chair-
men.
SELECTIVE FILM PRESENTATIONS
THE MALL THEATRES I & II
At the New Diplomat Mall I. Hollandole Beach Blvd.
Hallandale 920'5656
JOHN Z' ITALIAN CUISINE
EAT IN OR TAKE OUT
JOHN Z's ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL!!
$1.99 Complete Dinners ...
1450 N. Dixie Hwy. 929-6217
Sun. 2 till 1 p.m. Mon. thru Sat. 11-Midnite
"LET JOHN Z. PREPARE YOUR PARTY"
Morningstar's jewelers
PROTECT YOUR JEWELS!!!
HAVE TNEM ArfMiSB IT STATE MAMOMD t JEWELKY APPRAISER
WHILE YOU WAIT
H9 N. 20 Ave. 923-2372 HOLLYWOOD
D&D
DESIGNERS & DECORATORS
Featuring Fine Inusual Wallcovering
For the Trade
2031 Tyler Street, Hollywood, Fla. 33020
Phone: 927-3101 Miami 944-0424
Rhoda Deutsch
Lou Deutsch
The board of dire-tors of Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah has announced the ap-
pointment <>f George Kirn, senior
counselor of the camp in the sum-
^Lmer of J9T1. as its director-
/H Mr. Kirn, a guidance counselor
at Horace Mann Junior High
ls! School in Dale County, has had
wide experience in all facets ol
summer camping. He has served
as director of Skipp.T Chuck's
"Camp Aquarius" and at Knob"l
School's summer camp. In addi-
tion, he has had extensive univer-
sity training on the undergraduate
and graduate level in guidance,
administration and physical edu-
cation.
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah was founded
five years ago to provide all the
basic elements of outdoor fun
as well as opportunities for voung
people to fonn friendships among '
For the past several year' thu
camp has used- the facilities of
Temple Beth-El. Older campers
have utilized the Girl Scout's C'aiiri
! Cicmcnti for ovi-m-My.^*,
A growing enrollment has rrean'.
a growing staff, and Camp Ka
Dce-Mah has bc?n fortunate to
fird experienced and able poop1"'
to help enrich the summer of
Greater Hollywood youths. The
"counselor in training" program.
which is available to selected old-
er earners has boon estrrncly
helpful in providing these addi-
tions to the staff.
Since its earliest days-scholar-
ships have been awarded to wor-
thy youngsters who wouki nof'
otherwise be able to attend camp.
One of the ideais behind the origi-
nal camp concept was tha,t no
;: j wish;.; ; uT noii^d' ^ ** *s***^.-
Wilh the sixth .-amp season com- '-"- >' cam-me because 01 lack
ing up. plans haw been ma.'e for
a biggcr-than-cver program. But,
as always throughout its history.
the staff will pay special atten-
tion to the social and emotional
needs of each individual child
of necessary funds.
Mrs. I'hilip Weinstein, Jr.. n
member of the board of dhsp- tors
since its inception and an-activ->
worker throughout the ycjtrs. Ls
president of the honrd.
P" """NEED ITriTeR LICENSE-?
Auto Driving School ot Holijwood State Certified tor Teenage Brlier MKitlM.
Courses and Insurance Certiiicales. Classes starting nsw. Complete instnictias
I lor all ages. Teens licenses' in 3 ees.
_ Call The number t School Sening Holljwocd ior the pis! 11 nirf
989-0587 After 6 p.m. 583-8159
1000 Pembroxe U. (Salari firing Cluo ling. ferrr tirporti
For Quality Dry Cleaning
CALL LEWIS CLEANERS OOO.flA??
Pick-up t Delivery Service / imm wUSmt*
GREATER HOLLYWOOD
140( DIXIE Hwr. HOlLr003 Niramar Pertroke Puts
| DE CINQUE GALLERY OF FINE ART"
is now showing
edna glaubman
paintings and drawings
Hollywood ] 808 Sooth Youn9 Circle 929-1623
WK.
8c Ml.
BENT A CAR *20
441 MOTORS
PHONE FOR FREE DELIVERY
HOI N 40th AVE.. HOLLYWOOD PH. 919.7300
Cut Window Heat Glare
Stops
dart
^Reflects SNiekT
CMrCflfeM
IT"'' i^^^Z^^-^\ f,fcrk
Mylar *^ <^"^^^==: lading
film
Reduce Air Conditioning and Heating Costs
SUN SHIELD
Serviciiiq Iroward & Dade IS yTf.
._________________983-1363



DR. STANLEY R. HARRIS
OPTOMETRIST
announces the removal of his
offices to
4915 SHERIDAN ST. ___J*
HOLLYWOOD TEL 966-3647
EYE EXAMINATIONS CONTACT LENSES

2337 N. 21*t AVE HOLLYWOOD
9 To 5 Daily 925-4635


February 18. 1972
9-Jewisti ncrfj&tn
Pag3 15
at Recent JWF Women's Division Meeting
|aw the Film "Images" And Discussed It
cia (Mrs Steven) Tobin, Ellie (Mrs. Herbert) Katz, Char-
(Mrs. Myron) Bioaie, cochuirmen of the recent educa-
H meeting ol the Womer.'r. Division of Jewish Welfare
Bration are shown with Mrs. Reva Wexler. the guest
aker.
'.*
i 1
>


3mmittee members at the meeting included Rikki (Mrs.
:vid) Goodman. Helen (Mrs. David) Glassman, Sue (Mrs.
abert) Stone, and Marty (Mrs. James) Jacobson.
landing Floretle (Mrs. David) Aranow, Marthu (M:s.
[aion; Schecter, Mrs. Sylvia Spector; seated Marzi (Mrs.
suqlo-i) Kaplan, Joan (Mrs. Herman) Niad and Josie (Mis.
ed) Task.
M W
.*q
_
jnding Mrs. Karen Katz, Sue (Mrs. Max) Chira, Elian
Irs. Phil) Kabot, Carol (Mrs. Louis) Momingstar, and Ev-
-fcrn (Mrs. Robert) Glasser; Seated Mel (Mrs. Barry)
|oth, Betty (Mrs. Sam) Finkelstein, and Cheryl (Mrs. Philip)
reisberg.
!
A?
i

landing Penny (Mrs. Robert) Frazin. Yola (Mrs. Melvin)
>encer; Seated Ncncy (Mrs. Barry) Pollack, Nancy (Mrs.
hmanl Alkin, and Merry (Mrs. Howard) Lift.
Ui
" ^#" E mm ^^H L^L^lW
BB M Wmr I m m L M
, BY RABBI 1>R. SAMUEL J. FOX
j'<<:>,, 1 ^7L'.-J.-lh Mwrpnlc Agem vi
Why in it customary for the
hems, wife to sort of wave hi-r
bands back and forth when light-
ing the Kabhnth can-lies?
Generally speaking, lighting the
Sabbath candles presents a prob-
lem in Jewish observance. Tradi-
tionally, Jewish law requires a
benediction to be made before per-
forming a Mitzvah. Thus, one
would be required to offer the
benediction before lighting the
candles. However, reciting the
benediction might be considered
as already accepting the Sabbath
and thus the candles cculd not be
lit after the benediction since can-
dle lighting is a violation of the
Sabbath.
Thus, the candles are lit first
and the light is shielded from the
housewive-s eyes so that she can
pronounce the benediction and
then gaze u[>on the candles, the
latter being an act following the
benediction. The question is: how
is she to shield the light from her
vision? Some say she should cover
her eyes. Others say she should
hold her hands over the car.dles
Molding them from vision.
As is often the case in such con-
troversies, both acts are done.
Thus, she covers the candles with
her hands and then covers her eyes
with her hands. In order to do both
of these consecutively, her hand--
would have to be going back and
forth and would appear as if they
were waving.
What is the proper ponturr
when reciting the Kid-rush on
Friday night, standing or sittlug'.'
There seems to be two varying
nninions. Some stand, while others-
sit. Those who sit do so because the
Kiddush is related to the meal and
things that are related to the meal
are done in the sitting position
Thus, should the Ki.'dush be re-
'ited in a standing position the
Kiddush would not be related to
' the meal.
Some of the mystics disagreed
i v>'ith this because they considered
the Kiddush as a form of cretin"
j to the Sabbath queen or the Sah-
I bath bride. A queen naturalIv.
I should be greeted bv standing in
respect to her. The blessings that
are chanted in front of the bride
at the wedding ceremony are also
chanted in the same position.
The junction of the Jew and the
Sabbath is like the union of the
groom and the brire under the
wedding canopy. The Kiddush is
thus like the benedictions chantrd
under the canopy which are done
in a standing position.
Why Is the T..rali read on Sat-
urday afternoon besidfw the
reading which ha already beTi
accomplished on Saturday morn-
ing?
The usual explanation for this
custom is that it serves as an
extra reading for one who ma\
not be ab'e to get to hear the
Tornh reading in the synagogue
on Monday and Thursday morn-
ings. The accepted practice Is to
read the full portion of the week
on Saturday morning and then to
read the first section from the.
following portion oti Saturday af-
ternoon. Monday morning and
Thursday morning.
The rabbis realized that many
people are engaged in a multitu'e
of occupations which may not al
low them ample time to attend
the synagogue on Monday and
Thursday mornings. To serve
these people with a reminder that
the Torah is read at other times
besides Saturday mornings, the
Torah is read on Saturday at the
afternoon service.
Some contend that the Torah i--
read on Saturdav afternoon to
Impress the Sabbath ynagosue
worshipper thai our reading of the
Torah Is a task which is indeed
never completed. We must be evi
anxl iu9 to continue ibis holj pur-
suit and i ver developing our inter-
est and knowledge Torah
hi. 1*7! Jewiah T.i. mui''
At a planning meeting held at the home of Mrs. P^ul
Koenig to finalize arrangements for the March 2 luncheon
of the Women's Division of Jewish Welfcre Federation, at
Emerald Hills Country Club fcr wemen making a minimum
donation of S50 to the Federation campaign, are (from left
to right) Barbara (Mrs. Robert) Roberts, Brenda (Mrs. An-
drew) Greenman, Natalie (Mrs. Louis) Joblove, Sue (Mrs.
Carl) Lord and Bobbie (Mrs. Sheldon) Schlesinger.
flcz (Mrs. Louis) Bennett, Myrna (Mrs. Jack) Levy, Mar/
(Mrs. Edward) Gottlieb, Rochellc (Mrs. Paul) Koenig, and
Bobbie (Mrs. Phillip) Levin.
Standing is Perle (Mrs. Gerald) Siegel; Sylvia Mrs. A. J.)
Salter, and Natalie (Mrs. Norman) Blulh are seated.
From left are Audrey (Mrs. Jerome) Efros. Anita (Mrs. Heniy)
Weiss, and Ruth (Mrs. Paul) Rodonsky.


Page IB
vJewist tUrkHar
Friday, February ig_ \h
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Term* Available
6 BLOCKS N. OF SHERIDAN
Open Daily 9:30 ta 5:30. Mondays & Fridays Until 9 P.M.
PHONE: 927-0237


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