The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00031

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
eJewisli Floridiaim
hum* 2 Number 3
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood. Florida Friday. December 24, 1971
Price 20 c
IWF Announces $1.2 Million Campaign Goal
By MARION KEVINS
News Coordinator
nth the United Jewish Appeal
kpaign slogan "Keep The Prom-
echoing from worker to work-
Jewish Welfare Federation
fF) held the first in what is
ected to be an annual commun-
Iday event recently.
me day was planned as a pre-
Inary day of fun for all the
ppaign workers and was termed
1 a success by Dr. Norman At-
campaign chairman, that the
ipaign cabinet expects to make
yearly event.
k. Atkin also explained that
\ep The Promise," which is this
r's campaign slogan, refers to
promise that was made after
the June 1967 Six-Day War, when
the pledge was made that the
people of Israel would live.
During the evening dinner which
followed a day of golf tourneys
and a cocktail hour sponsored by
Hollywood Inc., words of greeting
were extended to the group at-
tending by all the leaders of the
campaign cabinet.
Although the speeches were min-
imal in time allotted, several of
the Division heads set goals for
their divisions. Herbert D. Katz,
speaking as cochairman of the
over-all campaign, said that a
goal of $1.2 million had been set
for the 1972 campaign.
Supporting Dr. Atkin and Mr.
Katz was Maurie Meyers, cochair-
man of the Apartments Division.
In offering his greetings to the
group, he said that his Division
would aim at a goal of $500,000
this year. This amount doubles
what was raised by this Division
last year, but Mr. Meyers said he
is confident that this goal can
be reached if all the people come
forth again and do their share.
Women's Division chairman
Carolyn Davis, just returned from
an Operation Israel Study Mission,
made a stirring plea to all assem-
bled when she set the Women's
goal at $100,000. Having had an
opportunity to see that Israel
needs many things she knows that
! every dollar sacrificed is desper-
ately needed there.
Jesse J. Martin, newly elected
president of JWF, at his first of-
ficial appearance following his
election, which took place the
previous day said, "Yesterday,
was my birthday and the presi-
dency was the most wonderful
birthday present I could have
received.
"I am sure that this year will
be a banner year for our Federa-
tion and our campaign. The spark
of enthusiasm generated by all
workers comes up as more than a
spark it is truly a flame and I
have every confidence that the end
results will be success for our
campaign. For all of you, he went
on, "I am as close as your phone
and will always be available to
each one of you to work and to
help."
Joel Rottman, the coordinator for
the entire Community Day who
the day before at the annual meet-
ing meeting had won the presi-
dent's award, received a standing
ovation from the group. He re-
sponded by saying that each and
every person in the room had
signed a pledge to work for the
campaign upon entering the door
that evening.
"This was an IOU to the State
of Israel and you the most
beautiful people I know in the
world will, I am sure, fulfill this
pledge," he said.
Representatives Contacted On
esumption Of Jarring Mission
By Special Report
JNITED NATIONS, N.Y.
tedish diplomat Dr. Gunnar
1 Jarring reportedly contacted
fh Israeli and Egyptian repre-
itatives about resumption of
peace mission last week
flowing Mondays General As-
ibly vote on a resolution call-
for Israel to "respond favor-
iiy" to the mediator's Feb. 8
juest for a withdrawal eom-
ftment and resumption of in-
iCt talks through Jarring.
He 22-natlon resolution was
opted by a 79-7 vote with 36
stentions. Ambassador Chris-
iher H. Phillips explained the
abstention by saying that
it some of the language was
satisfactory. Washington, he
blared, was In full support of
the renewal of Jarring"* nego-
tiations.
Egypt made clear it feels
that the responsibility for get-
ting things started again is Is-
rael's. "We have shown maxi-
mum cooperation," the spokes-
man said, "while Israel has so
far demonstrated maximum in-
transigence. Israel can persist
in this intransigence only if it
believes it has U.S. backing," he
declared.
In Jerusalem, a senior For-
eign Ministry official said the
Assembly vote won't help to un-
freeze the Jarring talks. "It will
only deepen the deadlock," he
said.
Shortly before the vote, For-
eign Minister Abba Eban reiter-
'remier Mum On
Details Of Visit
ated Israel's opposition to the
resolution, and said it left no
opening for new initiatives. The
U.N. General Assembly action
was expected by Israeli observ-
ers, who said that body has be-
come "an instrument in Arab
hands."
News Briefs
TEL AVTV (JTA) Premier
pda Meir held an impromptu
iort press conference when
returned from her two-
sk visit in the United States,
she refused to provide de-
lls of her discussions with
nerican officials and evaded a
estion about the further sup-
of Phantom jets.
be Premier was met at the
hort by Acting Premier Yigal
Ion, Defense .Minister Moshe
^yan and other members of
Cabinet and the diplomatic
rps.
Mrs. Meir reported that she
an opportunity for a basic
mission with U.S. Secretary
State William P. Rogers and
sistant Secretary Joseph J.
co and tried to clarify some
Bunderstandings and define
hat Israel thinks the United
ites should do.
Mrs. Meir said she found an
lormoos feeling of friendship
Israel In America and that
kr talks with President Nixon
and Mr. Rogers had clarified a
number of things.
In New York City last week,
some 2,000 persons attended a
dinner in Mrs. Meir's honor un-
the auspices of the Israel Bond
Organization. The dinner, at-
tended by communal, civil, re-
ligious and business leaders of
metropolitan New York, gave
special impetus to the national
effort to sell $50 million in State
of Israel bonds this month in
order to bring the total pro-
ceeds for 1971 to $250 million.
In her address, Mrs. Meir de-
clared Israel's willingness to sit
down with her neighbors and
arrange for a "secure and real"
peace ... not Just a piece of
paper.
Israel is willing to reach an
agreement on "borders safe for
us," she said. "Any borders will
be safe for the Arabs, for we
shall not attack them," she said
adding that they must be bor-
ders from which we can defend
ourselves with as few casualties
as possible if war breaks out"
JDG Adopts
$24.9 Million
1972 Budget
NEW YORK (JTA) A $24,-
940,000 budget for 1972 was
adopted by the Joint Distribu-
tion. Committee (JDC) at its
57th annual meeting, attended
by 400 Jewish community lead-
ers from the United States and
Canada.
The delegates elected Edward
Ginsberg of Cleveland as chair-
man of the JDC. He succeeds
Louis Broido, who was named
honorary chairman. Mr. Gins-
berg, General chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal, was re-
cently appointed head of the
International Fund Raising Com-
mittee of the Jewish Agency.
The JDCs record budget is
intended to finance health, wel-
fare, rehabilitation, educational,
cultural and religious programs
on behalf of 315,000 needy Jews
In 25 countries. Samuel L. Haber,
executive vice chairman of the
JDC reported that the relief
agency will have spent $23,527,-
000 by the end of 1971 to aid
some 311,000 Jews in Israel,
Eastern and Western Europe,
North Africa, Asia andi other
countries. About 40% of the 1971
expenditures went for a variety
of programs aiding some 97.000
people in Israel; 30% assisted
about 160,000 persons in West-
ern and Eastern Europe and the
balance helped 43.000 needy
Jews in North Africa and Iran.
Jack D. Weiler was re-elected
for a sixth-one-year term as
chairman of the JDCs National
Council and was also re-elected
' vice chairman of the JDC.
Ruth Engulfed At Kennedy
NEW YORK (JTA) Looking happy but rather frightened at
the size of the welcome accorded her, a shy Ruth Aleksandrovich
Averbuch arrived Sunday at Kennedy International Airport to be
engulfed by cheers and freedom chants from more than 100 well-
wishers, including rabbis, leaders and members of activist groups,
teenagers and two small girls bearing bouquets. Mrs. Averbuch is
the 24-year-old Riga nurse who recently migrated to Israel after
serving a year in prison for alleged anti-Soviet activities.
Cardinal Receives Prize
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) Raul Cardinal Henriquez Silva,
Archbishop of Chile, was awarded the 1971 Human Rights Prize of
the Latin American Jewish Congress for his "outstanding efforts in
the fight against racism, especially in defense of Jews in the Soviet
Union and Arab countries." Delegates from eight countries pledged
support for a settlement of Latin American immigrants in Israel,
solidarized itself with Israel's peace efforts and pledged support
for Jewish rights in the Soviet Union and Arab countries. The
Congress urged Latin American Jewish communities to support the
1972 "Year of the Book" to help disseminate books on Jew9 and
Judaism.
Warsaw Cemetery Vandalized
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The Jewish cemetery in Warsaw is
being systematically vandalized by professional criminals for profit,
the Dutch daily "Avro" reported According to correspondent Link
Van Bruggen, who was touring Poland, protests by the Jewish
congregation in Warsaw have been fruitless. Van Bruggen reported
that every night intruders penetrate the cemetery through an un-
mended gap in the fence and steal tombstones. These are later
polished to remove the inscriptions and sold for the production of
new marble gravestones. According to the newspaperman, the
Jewish cemetery is already largely in ruins.
Ground Broken For Center
TEL AVIV (JTA) Ground-breaking ceremonies were held
here recently for a $500,000 Pioneer Women's Center for overseas
members. The ceremonies marked the end of a week-long bi-annual
meeting of the World Executive of Moetzet Hapoalot Pioneer
Women attended by 30 leaders from nine countries. The new
center will serve immigrants and visitors to Israel. The meeting
adopted a series of resolutions on behalf of Soviet and Syrian Jews,
and also launched a program to train new leadership and expand
Jewish education. It sent a cable of support to Premier Golda Meir,
a former Pioneer Women leader.
France To Reimburse Israel
PARIS (JTA) The Secretary of the Parliament's Defense
Commission told the National Assembly several days ago that the
government has slated 287 million francs ($52 million) for the re-
imbursement of the 50 Mirage planes bought by Israel and embar-
goed since the Six-Day War. Joel Le Theule said this sum does not
include compensation and interest, which Israel demands. He added
that negotiations were in progress on the degree of compensation
on the basis of 6.5% interest a year, less than Israel demands.


Page I
* Jewish thrkUan
Friday, December 24, 1971

Sisterhood's Annual Torah Fund
Resid
ence
Hall Luncheon Jan. 4
The Sisterhood .t Temple Sinai
Will hold ils annual Torah Fund
Residence Hall Luncheon at noon
Tuesday, Jan. 1 m Tomplf Sinai's
Hab r SoRp Hall. Thf event will
n the Jewish Theological
Sem nary of America, academic
and spiritual center of Conaerva-
tive Judaism.
Guest speaker for the luncheon
will be Rabbi Sol Landau of Beth
David Congregation, Miami. Mrs.
Israel Resnikoff, prominent com-
munit) tea Vr. i< serving as chair-
man of the affair for the third
successive year.
Ever) year a prominent member j
..I Hie temple and the community j
Is honored and receives a certlfi- j
rate of meritorious service. Tilts i
year's honorec is Dr. Howard J.
Fuerst, vice president of the board
,i governors of Temple Sinai.
chairman of the Youth Commis-
sion, member of the Plannine, and
Zoning Commission of the Great
i'iu of Hollywood, who has been
a resident of the city for it; yean.
The Sisterhood's campaign is |
part of a national effort of the j
National Women's League to la -
si million for the Seminary's aca-
domic program and for construe-
tion of the Mathilde Schechter
Residence Hall for women stu-
dents.
Schools conducted by the Semi-
nar} in New York. Los Angeles,
and Jerusalem train rabbis, re-1
li'.'ious school teachers, cantors,
and scholars for the Jewish com-
munity. At its Herbert H. Lehman
Institute of Talmudic Kthics. con-.
linuing research is pursued in an- j
cient Talmudic teaching and Its ]
runt tnporar) relevance.
The seminary also maintains
B world-famous library in Judaics.
the Jewish Museum, and the In-
stitute for Religious and Social
studies, a graduate program for
clergymen ol aifJ faiths. The NBC
radio and television series, "The
Kternal l.iidil," and the AIM' pro-
gram,,"lUri-'cUot)^; A Jewish lVi-
elective" are also sponsored by the
institution.
Tickets for the luncheon may
be purchased from Mrs. Harry
Sussman, Mrs. Esther Rosenberg
Mrs. Nathan Widliti or the temple
office. Mrs. Joel Rottman. presi-
dent of the Sirterhood, extends an
Imitation to all those interested
in the advancement ami perpetua-
tion of Judaism through the Jewish
Theological Seminary
High-Rise Campaign
Is Being Organized
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The Apartment Division of Jew-
ish Welfare Federation is under
the cochairmanshlp of Maurle Mey-
ers and Melvin H. Baer who an-
nounced this week that the orga-
nization of the high-rise cam-
paign is well under way. A num-
ber ol appointments have already
been made and many more will,
be announced within the next few
weeks, they said.
Murray Smithline, who was a
worker in 1971's campaign, has
volunteered to serve with Mr. Mey-
ers and Mr. Baer as associate
chairman for the 1972 campaign.
Serving as vice chairman will
be I.. Paul Ncstcl, another experi-
enced campaigner, who will once
again handle the Parker Tower,
the Parker Plaza and the Parker
Dorado.
ng as vice chairman, will handle
the drives in the Attache Gardens,
the Aristocrat, Beach Plaza, Ox-
foi-d Towers, and Twelve Pillars.
Col. Martin S. Oster will be vice
chairman in charge of the Strat-
foi-d Towers, Cambridge, Welling-
ton, Hyde Park, Darby Hall and
Trafalgor 1 and JI. The entire
Hillcrest complex will be under
the Bupervislci] of Da\ii Ranins.
vice chairman.
The Sea Air Apartments will
have Aaron Hi-own as its building
chairman. This will mark Mr.
Brown's first participation in a
Federation campaign here in Flor-
ida. The Sea Edge Apartments will
have Steven Curtis anj Adolph
Silverman as their building chair-
men; Dr. Sam Siegel will serve a>
chairman for the Golden Sails
Apartments.
New students at Temple Beth Shalom Religious School were
consecrated during services held Friday, Dec. 3, and cer-
tificates and miniature scrolls were presented to each
youngster. Here Dr. Fred Blumenthal. (left} chairman o< the
school board makes the presentation to Debbie MaJine,
end Arthur LeVine receives his from Mrs. Gladys Diamond,
principal, as Dr. Morton Malavsky, spiritual leader of the
temple, looks on with approval. ^_______________________
LARRY LANG
INVESTIGATIONS
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LUIS M. ALBUERNE. M. D.
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BONANZA BOOK SALE
ORIGINALLY $2.50 to $75 00
NOW $1.00 to $19.95
The only Discount Book Store of its type in the area
handling a full stock of paperbacks, technical books, art
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The Year Round Holiday Cook Book
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Children's Books for all ages 59c up
The Great Comic Book Heroes
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The World of Currier & Ives
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Jewish Holiday Cook Book
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Friday, December 24, 1971
fJewisti Fk rid fan
Editorial From 'Bagel Bugler'
Published By Youth Counci
#Tli.- following; editorial, written by
il r vl Kones, eilltor, Is reprinted
(ruin 'he first edlton of the Basel
Kutkr, a paper put out l>y the mem-
f the Youth Council, a group
of |rish teenagers brought together
from ;i1l 'he varied youth groups In
th. area and also Including some
youth who are unaffiiiated with any
other youth groups. The Council Is
bf-li'K sponsored by the Women's Dlvl-
,f J.wlsh Welfare Federation
(J\VI"i and by the Young Leaders
Council of JWF.)
Life is a great journey. We
travel through the freshness of
birth, the newness of childhood,
Band Concerts Set
In Circle Bandshell
Th>' University of Nebraska's
famous "Cornhuskers Band" will
give a concert in Young Circle
Bandshell at 8 p.m. Wednesday,
fj Tli' band will be coming to South
Florida with the football team,
which is playing in the Orange
Bowl on New Year"s Day, and
will also play in the half-time
thow al the game and march in
the King Orange Parade.
The Marple-Newtown Symphonic
Marching Band from Pennsylvania
will Rive a concert in the Young
Circle Bandshell the following eve-
ning,.
This 161 piece high school group,
wh: Orange Parade, has featured such
famous artists as Bob Lowry, Ur-
bie Green, Doc Severensen and
Harold Brasch. It has entertained
during the Philadelphia 76'ers
Eagles and Phillies ball games dur-
ing the past year.
Cantor Leading Teenagers
On Four-Week Israel Tour
Cantor and Mrs. Yehudah Heil-
brun ol Temple Sinai, Hollywood,
will lead a group of teenagers be-
tween the ages of 13 and 18 on a
lour of Israel this coming June.
The iiroup will leave directly from
Miami.
The four-week trip will include
one week in a kibbutz and three
weeks touring Israel and either
London. Rome of Athens. Further
information may be obtained by
contacting Cantor Heilbrun.
"PAL JOEY'S"
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the indecision of adolesence, the
fullness of maturity, the satisfac-
tion and enmrtimes loneliness of
old age, and the arrival of death.
We, the youth of today, have
most of our journey before us. We
trust that by following the ways
of Judaism, we may learn to iden-
tify the most fruitful of the paths
that will lie before us.
We, the Jewish Youth Council
of Hollywood, hope that our paths
will join and thereby, help you
and your groups to become better
organized and insure the success
of each and every Jewish Youth
Organization.
Our immediate goal concerns
those of you who are unaffiiiated.
We encourage the many Jewish
members of our community to
join forces and follow the path
which loads toward a Jewish iden-
tity and involvement.
"Getting Involved" was our
main topic of discussion at our last
general meeting. Jeff Sarrow, a
senior at the University of Miami
Law School, spoke to us and show-
ed us how important it is to par-
ticipate actively. He left us with a
beautiful thought, "It's cool to do
your own thing and be happy for
YOU, but it's cooler if along the
way, you can help someone else."
Our lives can be strengthened
by a concerted effort. We can
make great strides forward and go
on to greater achievements if each
of us makes a meaningful effort
to become involved.
Teen Age Hot Line'
Program Discussed
Hollywood's Chai Lodge 2574,
B'nai B'rith, was to hold its regu-
lar meeting Thursday, at 8:30 p.m.
in the Home Federal Savings
Building, 2100 E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd., Hallandale.
The program for the evening
relates to the Teen Age Hotline
program sponsored by Chai Lodge,
with Eric Solomon and Dianne
Leardi, two of the teenagers who
handle some of the calls, explain-
ing the workings of Hotline from
the point of view of the operators.
The project is designed to offer
a sympathetic ear to teenagers
who feel they need help to guido
them to the correct place to ob-
tain aid.
Kantor Presenting
Illustrated Lecture
Ronald Richard Kantor will be
the speaker at the regular meet-
ing of the National Council of
Jewish Women, Hollywood Sec-
tion, which will take place at 12:30
p.m. Monday. Jan. 3, in Temple
Sinai, Hollywood
Mr. Kantor, whose subject will
he "Israel The Reality and
the Dream," is a noted interna-
tional correspondent, photographer
and lecturer. Recently returned
from the Middle East, his pro-
gram will be in the form of an
audio visual lecture with a pho-
tographic commentary on the life
and times of Israel.
Mrs. Alan Jacobs is program
chairman for the Hollywood Sec-
tion of Council.
CuliO'n Mad*
DRAPERIES
and
BED SPREADS
INTERIOt DICOBATINQ
FASHION FABRICS
805 N. FEDERAL HWY.
HALLANDALE. FLORIDA
Phone: 9230564
SHADES
SLIP COVERS
UPHOLSTERY
BESTLIKE PRODUCTS DISTRESS DISTRIBUTORS
CONCENTRATED BIO DEGRADABLE
SALE VALUES TO $2.80
96c Non Polluting Household Cleaners
96c Liquid Concentrate
96c Car Shampoo
96c Hair Shampoo
PERSIAN FLEA MARKET
5829 Hallandale Beach Boulevard
West Hollywood
rrs
-RAFTS
DRAFTS ^
1111 N. Ndtfol Hwy. Hollywood
BEADS end PATTMNS Te asako your owa Mftl
FREE COfKI
SERVED DAILY
Open Moa. tfcra So*.
10 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.
25.7671

D
ama
Bertram. Seward
INTERIORS
Furniture Repaired Refinished
WALLPAPER
PICTURE FRAMING
ANTIQUES RESTORED
CHAIR CANE
GOLD LEAF
PH. 987 5960
1SS0 $. STATE RD. 7
HOLLYWOOD
Page 3
"HELLO DELI"-RESTAURANT-CATERERS
New Diplomat Mall (East Entrance) Hallandale Beach Blvd.
"Where Nice People Meet To Eat"
Visit Our New Dining Room Leisurely Pleasant Atmosphere
Featuring: Luncheon and Dinner Specials
SALADS-PLATTERS-DAIRY DISHES-COLD CUTS (Kosher Style
HOLIDAYS ARE HERE!
We Give Special Attention to Catering
Holiday Parties and All Social Functions
Call 920-3322 NOW)
iHiiii
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
ly*M Strati al 19th Avenue
Phon. 923-8222
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
Best Wishes for a
Happy and
Prosperous New Year
Store Hourt 7:30 A.M. 6:00 P.M. Closed Sunday!
100 EAST BEACH BOULEVARD
HALL AH DALE, FLORIDA 13009
PHONE 927-eSfl
Over thirty five years
of service to the communities
in North Dade and Broward Counties.
RIVERSIDE ,
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
1250 Normandy Drive: fifteen minutes from Hollywood
920-1010
19th and Alton Road: in the heart of Miami Beach *
Miami: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street
Manhattan Brooklyn Westchest'er Bronx Far Rockaway
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States.
call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Edward Rosenthal Morton Rosenthal Carl Grossberg Leo J. Filer
Murray N.Rubin, F.D.


P&ge 4
*JmUti thrkiimr
Friday, December 24, 1971
Mrf vim* |l M I.MIIIH BIIHWH
OFFICE am> PLANT i:o N.E. 6th Street Telephone J73-4605
HOLLYWOOD Oil I' I Telephone 920-639:
P.O. Box 2973, Miami. Florida 33101
Fred K. Sikkiii r Selma M. Thompson
Eduor and Publiiher Assistant to Publisher
MARION KEVIN'S. News Coordinator
Ths Jewish Florldlan Does Not Guarantee The Kaahruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In It* Oolumn*.
Published Bi-W'tyy bj the Jewish Floridian
Sccor.dCla? Pottage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Jewish WELFARE Federation of Greater Hollywood Shofar Editorial
Advisory COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Widens, Chairman; Ross Bcrlterman, Ben
Salter, Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atlcin.
The Jewiah Floridian has absorbed the Jewiah Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewiah Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 2
Friday, December 24, 1971
Number 4
6 TEVETH 5732
Sobering But Challenging Figures
The opening oi the exits from the Soviet Union has
brought joy to the heart of every Jew. Authentic reports of
the new exodus indicate that, just in the past several
months, as many as 9,000 have arrived in Israel ana that
more are literally pouring in every day.
That this is indeed a blessing goes without saying, but
it is one which brings greater responsibility to all Jews in
the free world. Only this past week, the Jewish Agency
released figures which shows that it costs S23.000 to inte-
grate a Russian family into Israeli life.
Nor can American, British, South African and French
J( ws be unaware thct, in addition to our Russian brethren,
some 40,000 immigrants from other parts of ihe world, most
of them crriving with little but the clothes on their backs,
have come to Israel to be settled during 1971 a sobering
figure but a challenging one as well.
There are times when Jews question the fund-raising
activities which have become a normal part of our lives.
The answer which we have accepted, and will continue to
do, is that we are our brothers' keepers and it is only
through our Combined Jewish Appeal that we can realize
with them that precious freedom we have struggled for
these thousands of years.
Protest Not Surprising
Democratic self-government is hardly an ideal among
the Arab nations which continue to keep their masses in
bondage. It is no surprise, therefore, that Jordan is protest-
ing the Israeli plan to hold municipal elections in the occu-
pied area of the west bank. By permitting Arabs to vote in
the Jerusalem election, in admitting them to work from
such pluces as the Gaza Strip, and allowing Arabs from
all over the world to vacation with their relatives in Israel,
the Israelis are setting a bad example.
The Arab peoples are being shown that it it possible
to live in decency and dignity and. most of all, peace. This
is hardly what their rulers want them to know, and least
of all from Israel.
Nothing To Stop Them
It is a sign of the times that the lcrtest convention of
the Conservative movement rescinded the penalty of dis-
affiliation of synagogues which conducted bingo games.
While the resolution which accomplished this also ex-
pressed distasie and condemnation of gambling for fund-
raising purposes, its wording reflected the change in syna-
gogue financial problems which has taken place since
the penalty was first approved 10 years ago.
Synagogues which maintain the bingo practice will
be studied to determine whether it is financially necessary
to continue. Alternative fund-raising programs axe to be
suggested, but since these are known now it is likely that
the 50 or some congregations which now raise money
through bingo will be joined by many others. If they may
continue as members in good standing of the United Syna-
gogue of America, the Conservative parent body, there is
nothing to stop this questionable device for financing
religion.
Land Of Opportunity
The latest statistics on immigration to Israel show
that close to 50.000 made the decision last year to settle in
the Jewish statealmost a thousand of whom registered as
non-Jews. Included in this number were some 2,000 former
Israelis who were returning home.
An interesting feature is the high percentage of un-
married persons in the group, 53% of the women failing
into that category and 47% of the men. In all respects, it
seems, Israel Is seen as the land of opportunity.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON Then- are
or rather there wen- three
markedly superior public schools
in San Francisco. Their names
were Commodore Stockton.
Washington Irving and Spring
Valley. The overwhelming ma-
jority of their pupils came
straight from the darkest depths
of Chinatown, but they were
what the social pseudo-scientists
now call "high achievers."
Commodore Stockton school is
also a memento of the era of
total exclusion, it was estab-
lished because most West Coast
school systems used to be
sternly segregated, not for
blacks but for the "Orientals."
But now the San Francisco
school system has been subjected
to forcible homogenizution by a
general order requiring forced
school busing.
TO THIS order the China-
town community in San Fran-
cisco has responded with active
fury. A hero came forward in the
person of a snrcwd, sensible and
ambitious lawyer. Quentin Kopp.
With all but unanimous China-
town political support, lawyer
Kopp has now won a place on
San Francisco's board of super-
visors.
This was a reward, in effect,
for the anti-busing suit brought
by lawyer Kopp on behalf of pu-
pils in the three dominantly Chi-
nese public schools. On appeal
for a stay of execution of the
federal court's busing order, the
suit has already reached the
Supreme Court of the United
States.
JUSTICE William O. Douglas
predictably refused the stay of
execution, essentially on the
ground that everybody had to
Im> forcibly homogenized whether
they liked it or not. Shortly,
the Chinese suit will reach the
I'.S. Court of Appeals in Cali-
fornia, which is likely to make
the same finding as Justice
Douglas.
Hence the Chinese suit is like-
ly to reach the Supreme Court
once again and, in answer-yes-
or-no form, during the next year.
Until then, despite the poverty
of the great majority of China-
town's new immigrants, San
Francisco's Chinese are mostly
sending their children to private
schools organized and paid for
by the Chinese community.
ALL THIS is interesting for
two reasons. First, it suggests
how vastly more complex the
school problem is than most peo-
ple suppose. Second, it offers
any persons who like political
betting a very good long shot.
Here the point is that the
Senate Republican whip, Sen.
Robert Griffin of Michigan, and
the House Republican leader.
Rep. Gerald Ford, long ago
went to Atty. Gen. John Mitch-
ell to plead for "positive Admin-
istration action." Positive ac-
tion in this case can be defined
as the appearance of the Jus-
tice Department as an active
friend of the court, on the side
of someone who has entered a
suitable anti-busing suit.
SIXOF. THE Griffin-Ford ap-
proach to Mitchell, President
Nixon himself has encouraged
Sen. Griffin to "keep hammer-
ing away" on busing. It is
pretty clear, in fact, that the
President means to make forced
school busing one of the major
shows of the 1972 campaign.
Fr*r the moment, to be sure.
the President and his attorney
general have to play the role of
one of those alligators who look
like logs in the water until they
are sure of a good meal of nour-
ishing red meat. In other words,
they have to wait until Lewis
F. Powell and William H. Rehn-
quist are confirmed by the Sen-
ate as justices of the Supreme
Court.
YET SEX. Griffin has already
mentioned the anti-busing suit
brought by the Chinese in San
Francisco as the ideal oppor-
tunity for the Justice Depart-
ment to intervene as "amieus
curiae." The reasons are obvi-
ous The Chinese-Americans used
to be a rigidly excluded minor-
ity. And no one can deny their
skin color is not Caucasian.
The political stakes, if one u
hard-minded about it, are really
very hard to exaggerate. Presi-
dent Nixon's "Southern strat-
egy." for instance, will be all
out impossible to stop if he
(Continued on Pace 9
Jm.S
Max Lerner
Sees It
SAN FRANCISCO One thing is clear from the whole
India-Pakistan imbroglio: Force is what will count, and not
words. The Pakistani leaders let themselves in for a repressive
action that left them vulnerable in the extreme in East Bengal,
and India sized the occasion and moved in to administer the final
blow. The Indian generals, admirals and air marshals are riding
high, and reviving the traditions of ancient Indian military
prowness.
At the United Nations, where alone something might have
been done in time to stave off the killing and dying, the Rus-
sians have turned the Security Council into a privileged sanc-
tuary for India by Jacob Malik's formidable veto. Poor George
Bush, sleepless and bleary-eyed from his impossible labors as the
American warder in the UN. wasteland, says that Pakistan is
like a man with his leg cut off, who needs a tourniquet, not an
amputation. But an amputation is what the sick man of Pakistan
will get, and he will have to hobble along on his Western leg.
To be sure, death is raining from sky and land and sea, not
only on the combatants but on the guiltless of both sides, young
and old, settlers and refugees. But death is a denizen of Asia of
longstanding. For centuries he has had apixrintments at count-
less Samarras. with the innocent as with the guilty, and today
he operates on a larger scale.
There are even some neo-Malthuslan cynics who will tell you
that along with plagues and iamines. war is the effective way
by which the teeming, landless, unfed populations can be roughly
kept in check.
-tr -it it
I RECALL FIRST TALKING WITH Indira Gandhi more
than a decade ago when I was teaching and writing in New Delhi,
and she was Nehru's daughter thoughtful, sensitive, with
searching mind and disciplined emotions. I knew at the time
that she would not stay out of a political career. But none of us
suspected how effective she would prove at it.
She has shown herself agile, subtle, strong beyond all pre-
diction. The letters about India and about world history that her
father sent her from prison must have left a deep impact on her.
But even deeper was the experience of watching him as he made
hh decisions, of traveling throughout India, observing not only
how people live, but their deep undercurrents of faith and hope
and despair.
Usually, those who reach the chief-of-state positions arc new
men, upstarts, impelled by a power hunger. That is not true of
Indira Gandhi, who grew up at the top and learned the ways of
survival there. One can cite very few other instances of the sort,
and none of women, unless It be of great queens like Elizabeth,
who wielded her lonely power over England's great age of renais-
sance to which she gave her name.
Will the period of Mis. Gandhi's power come to be called
perhaps the Indiran Age? If she succeeds in crippling Pakistan
and reducing it to a minor limping strength on India's western
border, India will be master of the subcontinent. War Is hell, said
Gen. Sherman. A German historian once wrote that war is the
h. alth of the state. In actual historical practice, most heads of
state have operated between these two conceptions of war its
hell of suffering, its heaven of infusing the victor-state with a
strange hectic euphoria such as India is now experiencing.
-tr -b -tr
EVER SINCE STATEHOOD, Indian leaders, except for the
matchless figure of Gandhi, have played the role of finger-point-
ing moralistic onlookers at the feast of power. They have been
placed below the salt, given the leftover dishes reserved for poor
relations and called "economic aid," taught how to move into
the modern age. Nehru used to do a brilliant stint of scornful
attacks on America's "cold war mentality," its power hunger, its
lack of moral sensibility. And now it turns out that all along the
Indian leaders were waiting for the chance at seizing their own
place in the sun. And they are doing it.
If China is heady with its Asian power and its new world
prestige, if Japan has broken through into economic power at a
breakneck speed, if Russia and America play their dangerous
rcles at the dizzying heights of global power, there is at least a
South-Asian subcontinent for India to dominate, without any
deterrent power to oppose her. India knows that once there is a
Bangla Desh beachhead as an accomplished fact, the other world
powers will accept what has happened.
And when the war and the killings and the euphoria are
over? Then all the grim underlying problems will return and
little of anything will have been solved. But the place in the sun
will be there and let's hope it is warming.


Friday, December 24. 1971
pJenisti fkrHdia/n
Page 5
Parlor Meetings-A New
Type Of Fund-Raising
The first two works in Drcom- i discuss the needs and aim* of the
b#r -sil the stage for the sorics of cumimign.
parlor meetings to be conducted
First in the series of parlor
meetings was a cocktail hour gath-
ering at the home of Dr. Harry
Permesly, honorary president for
life of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion. Speaker for the meeting was
Robert Russell, president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Another honorary president for
life, William Horvitz, hosted an
evening get-together at his Emer-
ald Hills home. A dozen men lis-
tened attentively as speaker Robert
Leavy, a member of the Young
Leadership Cabinet in West Palm
I Beach, described the situation in
| Israel and the needs there.
In all "parlor meetings," cards
are distributed and pledges solic-
ited. The total result so far shows
a good percentage increase over
last year.
Regular Games At
Recreation Center
Card players >vil> find regular
games at the Recreation Center,
2030 Polk St.
'Progressive bridge and pinochle
are played 1 p.m. Fridayi with
directors for each in charge of the
rotating games. Sanctioned dupli-
cate bridge tourneys arc held 7
p.m. Thursdays. Master o-ints are
awarded after each tournament by
the director.
Almost every Monlay, there is
a card party at 12 :3Q p.m. spon-
sored by one of the clubs. The
price of admission includes des-
sert and table prizes. Contract
bridge lessons are available too,
if you are staying for the season.
There is a choice of morning and
evening classes. Both teachers use
the Goren system and both are
rcgi-tercd master instructors.
Chess and checker players gel
together 6:30 p.m. every Tuesday
and Thursday at the Center and
the welcome mat is out for all chal-
lengers. Call the Center for fur-
ther information.
Dr. Morton Malavsky State
Of Israel Award Recipient
Dr. Morton Malavsky, spiritual |
leader of Tcni]>l*>rMrrt Jhalom,,.in
Hollywood, received the State ot
Israel Award at a dinner on I .
half of Israel Bonds this week at
the Diplomat Country Club.
The award, which was conferred
upon Dr. Malavsky by Dorian \
Gilon, deputy director of Israel's
Ministry of Defense Mission to:
the United States, was presented ]
in recognition of his exemplary j
service and leadership on behalf of
Israel's economic development I
through the Israel Bond procram.]
Mr. Gilon is a hero of Israel's
War of Independence in 1948 and
also was in the Sinai campaign.
Prior to assuming his present ]>ost
he served as director of adminis-
tration of Israel's Nuclear Re-
search Center at Dimona. Born i.
Israel, he received his education a'
Balfour College in Tel Aviv and
'he University of California in
Berkeley.
J. Leonard Fleet was chairman
of the di.iner; the comm'ttee in-
clude I Maynard Abrams, honoi -
ary chairman; Jack Shapiro. Tem-
pi,' Beth Shalom president; l>n-
Ibies Friedman, Sisterhood presi-
dent; Jerome Friedman. Men's
Club president.; William Welser,
Senior Friendship president, and
Dr. and Mm. Samuel M'line.
chairmen of the committee >>\
hosts.
A reception in honor of Mr.
Gilon was hosted by Rabbi and
Mrs. Malavsky prior to the dinner.
during this year's Jewish Welfare
Federation campaign.
Parlor meetings, which were
tried lor the first time in Holly-
wood's campaign last year, are a
new type of fund-raising, with
small groups of people getting to-
gether on an informal basis to
STANLEY FRANK'S
CRIMPING PARLOR
and BOUTIQUE, INC.
Sophisticated Hair Styling
for Men and Women
at the "RIVIERA"
2080 S. Ocean Drive
Hallandale
Open 7 Days
Phone 925-6464
Happy New Year!
La Normandie
"French Cuisine at its Best"
Quaint and Delightfully
Different Dining
129 N. Federal Hwy., Dania
For Reservations Call
"Noralee"-927-1889
Did Wive
jull,e'i
KNIT SALON
Dtiigner
of
Hend Knits
| NMDUPOINT CRIWIL
'H IXFIIT
INITKUCTION OM
IM'MTIB t DOMESTIC
Y*NI ALU WORK
UARANTIIO
Om Tmi. Ikr* Fri. II am I.
Ipm m >. H m | ,m
'22-0874
2112 TYLER ST.
' TK. V.ll.f. s.r.
C*. M. o,. Hw. t Tr<
WISE WOMEN FOR BEAUTY
ON EXERCISE DEPEND .. .
CAROLYN'S EXERCISE STUDIO
915 S. 21 Avenue, Hollywood
CALL
925-2471
for
FREE LESSON
The Parent-Teachers Association executive board honored
the room mothers of Hillel Community Day School at a
recent coffee in the North Miami Beach home of Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Lipson. Mrs. Marilyn Shupack (seated) is room
mother coordinator; with her are (from left) Mrs. Lila Zedeck,
fourth grade, Mrs. Carol Kromsky, sixth grade; Mrs. Nancy
Sogoloff, third grade, and Mrs. Sarah Milkes, first grade.
rasmM
Barnett Bank of Hollywood
Tyler Street it 19th Avenue
Phone 923-8222

.to****
fT
Holiday Special Deserts .. .
FELBER'S STILL D0ESI
Felber's Homemade Ice Cream
8399 Bird Road
Catering for conventions, parties...big or small. Packed
fresh for your occasion Service for Restaurant
Si hotels. Inquiries Welcomed.
CALL 223-2792
At Last
A Dry cleaner that can handle*
the Fabrics of Today
and do it beautifully
THE PFTapSSIONAL
DRY CLEANER
DIPLOMAT MALL SHOPPING CENTER
PHONE 920-9977
1401 E. HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD.
NEXT TO fOOO FAIR {AT 14th AVENUE ENTRANCE! HALLANOAI E
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING
La-Crepe de Bretagne
CUISINE FRANCAISE
1434 N. Federal Highway, Dania
"DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT"
Excellent Food
Quaint and Charming Dining Room
FRENCH SPECIALTY CREPES BRETONNES
So Many Flavorsl
"From an Old Britany Recipe"
Also Featuring A Variety of French Gourmet Specialties
IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC WINES BEER
LUNCHEON AND DINNER SUNDAY BRUNCH ONLY
FOR RESERVATIONS 927-4100
Le Cafe de Paris
Stop By Before Jai-Alcri
Denis h Here To Serve You...
400 E. Dania Beach Blvd.
lAcrott from the Jai-AUi Pelace)
B Opening Special
CIAL DINNER $
ORE THE GAMES
For Reservations Cod 27-724 or 27-172 OWNER CHEF "DEMS"
OPEN for LUNCH and DINNER 7 DAYS
Refreshing French Sfyle Specialties Include:
Moults Marlnloros Vooi Cordon Bleu cu Chef
Sweetfcceods Fortstleres f*PP*' St*"* Hombe C09ROC
Froq Legs rrovencole ** tourqulgnons
Escereen *<* Morehmd de \*
Duck Homhe **< Wet So,


Page 6
vJewisfi fkridiarj
Friday, December 24, 1971
scene around
by Marjon Nevms
^*******^****a^*^^^^^^^wwwwvwmvwwwmw
This is the month for holiday parties and the time of the
year when many of us give a little more thought to those young
people among us who will not have a happy holiday season with-
out a little extra effort ami help from all of us. And many orga-
nizations and groups have planned parties for these deprived
children.
The members of Chai Lodge who actually show their concern
for young people year 'round by their successful operation of
Teen Age Hotline made their own holidays happier by ar-
ranging for a group of 1,000 children to spend the day at Pirates'
World. Each of the children received lunch and a toy to make
the day even more complete. It was really hard to tell which
group enjoyed the day most the youngsters or the men who
made it possible. I know that the men's smiles were almost as
tvoad as the young people's grins, and it was a happy day for all.
One group which spread Chanukah cheer to the young peo-
ple at the South Florida State Hospital was the Aviva Chapter
of B'nai B'rith Women. They brought goodies in the form of
special treat-type foods and gifts and made all these unfortunate
people a good bit happier. On another occasion during the holi-
day season, this same Chapter which is composed of perhaps 60
young women, gave a shower for a needy unmarried mother-to-
be. They got the girl's name from one of the Jewish agencies
and d<>cided to make her holiday a bit happier by giving her
some of the things that she will need so desperately upon tha
arrival of the baby.
Another group of younger people who took the time and
interest to think of some other youngsters not as fortunate was
Dodie Weinstein's Girl Scout Troup. These little girls brought in
books that they thought would be suitable for small children
and wrapped them in pretty paper and presented them to the
Hcadstart children from Carver's Ranches. This undertaking
seemed to make the donors almost as happy as the recipients.
b -Ct -ir
Sylvia Salter, Hollywood Hadassah's president, reports that
more than 500 women attended the paid-up membership tea
the largest group ever and 145 women pledged at the $100
luncheon at Emerald Hills which seems like a tremendous num-
ber for this bracket. But these girls deserve good results for they
work long and hard. At the luncheon there were four women
who each pledged $600 or more to support an Israeli child for
one year. They were Mrs. Frances Briefer, Mrs. Elsie Salamen,
Mrs. Phillip Taylor and Mrs. Irving Press.
BITS AND PIECES Community day was a big success
for Jewish Welfare Federation, and Joel Rottman's grin was
from HERE to HERE. His enthusiasm
for whatever he does is contagious and everyone had a great day
and evening. Ben Salter was particularly happy with that gob"
trophy he won. Dr. Norman Wrubel is the new president of the
Community Service Council.
Some of our more fortunate young people were busy this
month with young people's organizational meetings. From Tem-
ple Sinai Daryl Drictanan. Debbie Flxel, Scott Dcutsch. Sidney
Heilbraun. Pinky Halpert, Steven Scharf and Annette Veil, all
Senior USY'ers attended the Sub Regional Convention at Camp
Owaisea Bauer in Homestead. Also from Temple Sinai, Junior
USY'ers High Coffin, Nancy Fuerst, Sarah Lusskin, Allegra
Saragoary, Joseph Vegotsky and Jane Waldman attended the
same convention.
Linda Emas. Gary Goldstein and Jeff Bauman, all members
of Temple Solel's newly formed Youth group, are going to the
Dec. 23-26 Southeast Federation of Temple Youth Convention in
Savannah, Ga. The convention theme is Jewish identity and its
relationship to current issues.
Continuing with our young people, Saturday will be "College
Youth Sabbath" at Temple Sinai, and Stuart Hopen, the son of
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Hopen, win be one of the speakers. He is a
fix >hman at Princeton University.
FRUIT SHIPPERS
Pure Orange and Grapefruit Juice
1809 Wiley St. (4 blocks north of Hollywood Dog Track
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Telephone 927-5447
NEW CROP NAVELS, PINK OR WHITE GRAPEFRUIT
SHIPPED ANYWHERE U.S., CANADA end EUROPE
AL oitd ANGIE KAUFMAN
extend to all of their friends and patrons
A Happy New Year
Broward Chapter
Lecture Series Set
A six-k'Cture study group series
has been announced by the Brow-
ard Chapter of the National Wom-
en's Committee of Brandeis Uni-
versity. Subscriptions to the series
are now available and ticKets may
be obtained from Mrs. Jesse WeW
er, 401 Tamarind Dr., Hallandale.
The series will begin Wednes-
day. Jan. 3. with a lecture on "The
Mature Woman's Role and Her
Rights" by John Hill at the home
of Mrs. Hyman Kones. The Feb.
3 lecture, in the home of Mrs.
Alan Leilnwand. will be given by
Prof. Richard Janero on the topic
"Modern Theatre."
Mrs. Aaron SchecWr will host
the March 1 meeting where Sam
Eisman will present a discussion of
"Our Health and Organic Foods."
Prof. William Primus will speak
on "The United Nations and Red
China Today" April 5 at the home
of Mrs. Joseph Sternberg.
Prof. Phyllis Eisman will illus-
trate her lecture on "Humor In
Jewish Literature" with record-
ings. The group will be meeting
in the home of Mrs. Ned Gordon
for this May 3 event. The conclud-
ing event of the series will be an
illustrated lecture on "20th Cen-
tury Artists" by Prof. William
Nagle in the home of Mrs. Jesse
Weiner June 1.
Temple Sold Dinner-Donee
Planned To Welcome Rabbi
Temple Solel, Hollywood's newly
organized liberal congregation, will
welcome its spiritual leader, Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin, to the Hollywood
community with a gala dinner-
dance at the Hillcrest Country
Club, according to Jack B. Packar,
chairman of the rabbi's dinner
committee.
Reservations and table arrange-
ments for the Sunday, Jan. 23,
event may be made by calling or
writing the temple office, 3850 N.
Hills Dr. The 8 pjn. dinner will be
preceded by a cocktail hour. Tem-
ple Solel will be happy to accept
reservations from the general
public
Temple Beth Shalom Holds
Party For School Children
A Chanukah party was held this
week at Temple Beth Shalom for
the children attending Hebrew
and Sunday school. Dr. Fred Blum-
enthal, school board chairman was
assisted by Mrs. Edward Hoffman,
Sisterhood youth vice president.
Larry Dean Goodman and Don-
ald Lee Goodman presented a
magic show for the children.
PERSONALITY PtOfgf
Dr. Alex Kobb
"What made me decide to come
to Florida?
"I think I always wanted to live
Rent-A-Car
$5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
100 Mile Radius
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
530 S. DtXJC MWY.
920-4141
H0UYW0O0
MS S Miami
M. AltX KOBB
here," said Dr. Alex Kobb, ever
since I was a little boy. I came
down here often on vacation with
my folks, and just loved it.
I love the weather here. It gives
me a chance to get out and play
tennis two or three times a week.
I used to play golf but wasn't very-
good at it and thought that tennis
would be more exercise anyway."
Such was Dr. Kobb's reaction
when asked his reasons for mov-
ing to Florida after having been
born and raised in New York City.
When he originally came to
Florida with his wife, Marcia, they
settled in North Miami Beach.
However, he became associated
with Dr. Charles Friedman, a fel-
low dentist who lived in Holly-
wood and became friends with a
number of other families who lived
there and so the Kobbs decided to
move to Hollywood.
"After having been in Hollywood
I
for a while, Charley Friedman
asked me to help on the Federa,
tion campaign. That was a bond
four years ago and I've become
more active and my interest e*.
pecially in the Young Leaders Divi.
km has grown each year," he said.
He is now a vice president of the
Young Leaders Council and
member of the board of ADL,
and has just recently been named
to be included in "Who's Who in
the South and Southwest," a sin
gular honor for a young man.
Professionally, Dr. Kobb is i
member of the Greater Hollywood
Dental Society and also of the
American Academy of General
Dentistry. One of his favorite pro-
fessional activities is his member.
ship in the Dade County Dental
Research Institute.
The Institute, where he si>endd
several hours on his days off, haj
a three-fold purpose. The first i
for members such as Dr. Kobb to|
learn the latest in dental teeh
niques. Secondly, in the process ol
learning, the members work oi
welfare patients who would other
wise be unable to afford this type
of dental work. And the atb-ndini
dentists work at instructing deivl
tal assistants and laborator,
assistants.
This type of work is partiularl;
interesting to Dr. Kobb, who ha
always been interested in re and spent a year assistini* in Leu
kemia Research at the Downstat
Medical School in Brooklyn be
fore he left New York.
Dr. Kobb is a graduate of Hari
pur College in Binghamton. NY,
and the Dental School at Tempi
University, Philadelphia, Pa. H
met Marcia while working as
lifeguard during summer vacatio
and they were married while h
was in dental school. After gradu
tion he Joined the Navy, and w
stationed for two years in Norfol)
The Kobbs are the parents of tw
girls Amy Jo 6, and Wendy Le|
is one year old.

dominie
Formerly Of The Fontainebteau Hotel
Beauty Salon
Announces The Opening Of
dominies hair salon
Q.
,U
ovtiavt
T
1420 S. Federal Hwy.
US1 & Sheridan St.
Where Hollywood Meets Donia
Phone 920-2545
A New Era In Hair Design
Open Evenings Thurs & Fri.
r

GRAND OPENING
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
MR. FRUIT
<
1
1313 SOUTH ST. RD.7
[441) HOLLYWOOD,
Phone 983-9730
EXTIA LARGE


Friday, December 24, 1971
+Je*i*ti fir radian
Page 7
Pictured at the recent organizational meet-
ing held by the Builders Division of the
Jewish Welfare Federation at the home of
Division campaign chairman Abe Durbln,
are (from left) William D. Horvitz, president
of Hollywood, Inc., and honorary president
for life cf the Federation, Mr. Durbin, Marvin
Gottlieb, Allan Roman and Jacob Lute.
Among those who attended the Builders Division organiza-
tional meeting were Leonard Miller, (left) Jesse Martin and
Steven Muss.
Visitors Can Make
Gifts To Take Home
At the Recreation Center, 2030
Polk St., you will find craft and
speda] interest classes spread
ihroughout the week, both for
ihose who spend the winter and
those who just have "two weeks
with pay."
Woodcarving and whittling, china
painting, decoupage, flower ar-
ranging, ceramics. Macrame, sew-
ing, woodfiber, flowercraft, sketch-
ing, yoga, contract bridge for be-
ginners and intermediates, charm-
nasties, ballroom dancing, interior
decorating and an introduction to
art workshops is offered.
For the short-term visitor, there
is a special arts and crafts "open
house" from 10 a.m. to noon Thurs-
days at the Polk St. Center. Mrs.
Rose'Luric welcomes visitors and
takes them around the tables that
are set up with a variety of un-
usual crafts. Instructors specialize
in fabric painting with Artex, pine
needle work, smocking, needle-
point, beading, crocheting, knit and
felt novelties.
In addition, there are many
"ecology" crafts offered to keep
imaginative crafters busy. Plas-
tic egg cartons are used to make
butterflies, roses, mums and tu-
lips. Plastic bottles are cut up
into squares, then crocheted to-
gether to fashion tote bags and
handbags for adults and children.
Crocheted finger rings, bracelets,
necklaces and keyrings are great
favorites.
There are yarn doggies, done on
a wire hangar base with hanks of
yarn cut and tied into the proper
places. Smocked hats and pillows,
felt puppets, tree trimmings, yard-
stick holders and bookmarks Bre
also popular. Sketching is done in
charcoal, pastel chalk and pencil.
The variety of handiwork increases
during the season. Handmade ar-
ticles by moms, grandmothers and
doting aunts are the best kind of
gifts.
Review Off "The Grand**"
The Hollywood Chapter of Ha-
dassah will hold its regular month-
ly book review meeting Tuesday
at 1 p.m. in the Home Federal
Building, Hollywood Mrs. Vera
Von Fragstein will review "The
Grandees" by Stephen Birming-
ham. The small admission charge
will be credited toward donor.
3 Temple Sinai Delegates
To USY Convention Selected
Temple Sinai Youth Commis-
sion has announced the selection
if three delegates to the Dee. 27-
30 21st National Convention of
the United Synagogue Youth in
Washington, D.C. The cost of the
trip is being subsidized by the Sis-
terhoo; of the temple.
Delegates selected are Cheryl
Irvine. Greg Fineman and Gary
White. Marta Rottman. because
of her Israel pilgrimage this past
summer, will also attend in addi-
tion to the three delegates allowed
in the temple's quota.
Temple Solel Sisterhood
Plans Membership Brunch
The Sisterhood of Temple Solel
is planning their first paid-up mem-
bership brunch at Emerald Hills
Country Club Tuesday, Jan. 11, at
10 a.m.
Members of the Sisterhood will
model fashions by Lory's. There
will be no charge for members of
the Sisterhood but members will
be invited to bring guests at a
nominal charge. Reservations are
being accepted by Ellen Kabot and
Judy Mish and, must be received
no later than Jan. 3-
Menachem Cohen, (third from right) El Al Israel Air-
lines vice president North America, is flanked by
Hanoch Givton. director-general of the Israel Minis-
try of Tourism, and Amram Zur, Ministry of Tour-
ism representative for North America, who pre-
sented him with a Jerusalem medal in recognition
of his outstanding contribution in the development
of tourism. J. Peter Brunswick, (left) Baruch Lilo and.
Otto Herstik. (right) also received Jerusalem medals
for their efforts.
WANTED!
Experienced bookkeeper-executive secretary for the Jew-
ish federation of North Broward in Fort lauderdale. Most
have knowledge of pegboard system, typing, and office
procedures and own transportation. Good pay and excel-
lent working conditions. Contact Mr. Amdur, 565-4o9;
evenings and weekend. 733-5451-
FRESH PRODUCE
ALI BABA m "I FORTY THIEVES
PERSIAN FLEA HART
CLEANING
PRESSING
LAUNDRY
WYNONA CLEANERS
PHONE: 922-5561
500 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
WE PICK UP AND DELIVER
insur-A-car of Florida
AUTO INSURANCE
Easy Payments SR. 22' Filed Promptly
Phone 961-0705
Call Or Come In Today
Courteous, Personal Service
1309 S. State Road 7 (US 441)
W. Hollywood, Florida 33023
/
SUIPIUS IANKRUHS
C10SI0UTS IAIGAINS
, ISfATI ANTIQUI SALES
~ 1,000'! OF ITEMS
All NEW EICHAN1ISE
CHRISTMAS SIFTS
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V
TOYS TOYS TOYS TOYS TOYS .
BURT A ES TAX
ANTIQUES-IRIC-A-IRAC
OIL PAINTINGS ON IVORY
MAGNIFICENT IVORY FIGURES NETSUKES ELEPHANTS
OPIUM BOTTLES DOCTOR LADYS ETC.
BEAUTIFUL GARNET AND OPEL JEWELERY
FANTASTIC MERCHANDISE -FANTASTICALLY LOW PRICED
COME IN AND 1001-
Y0U ARE HOST WELCOME
PERSIAN FLEA MART
512* MAllANOALE ICH. ILVD. lVi IWCIS EAST OF 441
FREE PARKING Open 10 -9 Thurs. Fri.. Sat.. Sun.


Page 8
fJenisf fUrkSiar
Friday, Decembti l\, 1971
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlesinger
HOW TIME DOES FLY!
If ever a rendaaler was needed that time does
fly. the sight of Jodi tol tribution in that direction. That cute little red-
bird pro.-ho.)'. r ^harinj my carpool (wasn't it
just yesterday?) had blossomed into a lovely 13-
yoar-old youni; lady, thus eatapultins: yours
truly and contemporaries right out ot the birth
ui.i brii contingent squarely into the Bat Mitz-
vah set. But. oh such a lovely wa> to _'o.
The occasion was the Rat Mitzvah ceiemony
of Jodi Sue Stolove, daughter of Dr. and Mra.
Sender Stolove. at Temple Sinai a Few weekl
ayo. Surrounded ihe did
herself and : >ud. Joining Jodi and her
parents on the pu'.pit were Batto I Oafl, Joan's par-
ents. Mr. and Mr*. U H. Silver. Bad Senders da,:
lo^euh Greenlwrg. Following the aurviue a party
in Jodi's honor was awaiting at Kmerald Hills
Country Club.
Family friends flying in for the festivities
were Mr. and Mix. Rirhard SeuUi of Philadelphia
and Frank and Margie O'Halloran of New Or-
leans. Jodi's aunt. Mrs. E. L. Merlin, arrived
from Oklahoma City: cousins. Mr. ar.d Mrs. Ralph
SElls, came from Cleveland. Ohio and Mr. and
Mix. Sam Oaafe from Toronto
The evening Jodi hosted a teen
at :1h' Emerald HiUs Swim Club. Food.
k band, and dance contest made it a fun
night for the you: .-
Great Harbour Cay in the Bahamas was the
stint tl in of Dr and Mrs. Stolove for a little
iti m." following all the celebrat-
ing.
v>
THE RACE IS FOR LIFE
*' v 45 COnV
of The Race For Life benefit
sored by the Aanarleaa Cancer Saatetjr. The
ial event which features lunch and a day
'- Pa 29 at Golf-
s'ream Pa toff to a rine itaii with a cham- j
--> n at the plush
I Mrs. Efctanet n.uwi>.rr>. Mrs
and president of Hollywood
^^ I the Cancer
nd has been a r to
Dtioa
R,'P> chairman. Hrs. Norman
UuntMM :- chairman. Mrv Elberl
McLaury u and aMM marvelous news
of a wa> adn weekend. American plan for
two. at II vsutiful Doral Country Chib
irt. The v inner need not be present at the
- 23
In a- m of reminding the expected sell-
crowd that ar. annual checkup will prevent
-. dutch.' tuli;.* of every
>kr wi] from Holland but of
course "iubhouse Restau-
rant. Qu be afforded the opportunity of
at a fra
o: the s
- aald charm
color by a vsxd-
ftfra, Judith Steraaa BarBe.
Son no?
.
THIS IS YOUR LIFE
all took part in the program. Taped messages
from relatives and friends living in different
sections of the country were also played.
A sumptuous buffet band and liquid refresh-
ment treated the guests to a gala evening. Some
of the many spotted in the throng toasting 'the
man of tin- hour" were Bernie and Jan Sehreft.
the Rk-h.-trd iioMinv Don and -loan Rosenberg,
Hal and Carol Jacob*. Neil and Ronna Rott, Sam
and Be-.* Brown, the Jesse Martins, Laurence
and Rot Meyaff, Dr. Howard and Florence Fuerst.
Dr. and Mr*. Julian Blitz, the Nat Ostroffs and
William aid Norma Horvitz. Rick (iottleib. Mark
Spirt buidy was there, too, as was Al and Terry
i.eronemus who just returned from a glorious
trip to Europe All the Yorras were on hand, too:
Al and Ann. I.ila and Dave (Dave positively
splendiferous in a brown velvet suit).
If your curiosity Ls piqued as to the exact age
of the birthday honoree, it is one fact that simply
escapes me. How does "Younger Than Spring-
time" grab you?
9 V V
CHEERS TO THE CHAPERONES
Loaded down with luggage, cameras and rain
gear, I croup of lOO youngsters of the fourth and
fifth grades at Nova bade a fond farewell to
their moms and pops. With destination a whirl-
wind four-day tour of the Kennedy Space Center.
St. Augustine. Disney World and Cypress Gar-
dens, the clean a whistle, shiny mead darlings
boarded their buses one very early morning last
week accompanied by their many chapcrones.
I Let's hear it for the chaperones, folk*, they
deserve it I,
Observed in the excited throng was devoted
dad Dr. Rubin'Klela whispering words of fath-
erly advice to daughter Valerie, ditto Dr. Bret
Lii-skiii; Beth Miller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Jan**". Fox*: Meianie Scherfer waving "so long"
to mom Beverly; Todd Yeslovv accompanied by
dad nr*i the Leonard Fleet's daughter Julie;
and-Mrs. Alan- Podls" daughter Lisa; and Mindy
Blumenth.il. the Dr. Fred Biaiiu-nthalV pride and
joy.
Please accept my most humble apologies for
my failing to garner more names of the partici-
pants. However, at that time the thoughts of
both yours truly and my better half were cen-
tered upon insuring the safe return of our par-
ticularly adorable first-time-away-from-home
youngster. Gregg Schlesinger. As a result of our
efforts CaTegg departed, profusely labeled and
eed, front and back, top and bottom, leaving
absolutely no doubt as to his identity.
PEOPLE AHD PLACES
If that raven-tressed charmer in the red
anoafc waking a- Hollywood's Burdines looked
va-P it's no wonder. It was our own
Jackie i Mrs. Marcus, Zbar serving as personal
iti other volunteer workers of
the Hollywood 'S-bolarship t oundattaa. They 11 be
donating :i _. jMn
*tokne ar : Barb Robert. Bay shopping -.here
with th< agreed shopping
ooudn t have been more pi-
_ w as a soud gold charm
Ralph Edwards. For all else would
haw qualif.ed as a genuine Th ibl or I
television perl The occasion was a sur-
prise birthday parts for Bernie Spirts at F
aid Hills Ox. and it came off without a
hitch ver coup are directed
to w :> Aadrry: her mother, Galdie Partney of
St. Louis gam the party: and Stan and
Ferae rlmaa, who put together the This Is Your
Life" presentation.
The 100 friends and relatives singing For
He's A Jolt* Good Fellow" greeted Bernie as he
was ushered to a seat by the michophone. And.
one by one. voices from "be recalled
pleasant moments of Ins life. They had ail flown
o town for the super aorprke celebration:
Bernie's sisters. Both Base of California and
Martaa Baaake of St. Louis: his niece. Jaaa
Djaaaajy of California and Jack and Betty Ma-
laaky of St. Louis. His dad feraiav h-s son Mark
and. of course, his personality-plus wife Awarey
as branch at the home of Mrs. Janata
Doaa. Jr.. on Dec. 14th in honor of Dr. Abraham
Ftsraler. pruUeBI of Nova University, and the
Florida Derby ball committee. Their annual gala
for the Diplomat Hotel on Feb 25.
A 10-day hop to Switzerland was the latest
on the agenda for Dr. and Mrs. Harry Orriner.
It was at the invitation of friends with whom they
had struck up quite a fine friendship during a
previous visit there.
Eght-year-old Baaay Gaaxaarger. son of Sue
and Gerry Genabwrgrr, has never seen snow. So.
the little one is off to Vienna. Austria to do just
that see snow. Doesn't everyone?> And he'll
be making the long journey all on his own How-
ever, his grandparents. Era** an* Abt*a tiuaz-
barger of Vienna will be waiting*wtUnoatBi arms
to greet the brave trawler when he arrives for
his three-week stay. -----
Mr. and Mrs. George Fleischman celebrated their 50th
wedding anniversary recently in the Starlight Room o<
the Doral Beach Hotel. Winter residents of Hollywood, fce
couple who live in Brooklyn, N.Y., flew in for the occasic:..
Joining them for the festivities were their daughters. Rue
Friedman of Mountainside, N.J., and Evelyn Schrier rx
Merrick, L.I.. N.Y., and their husbands, Martin and Arnold.
and five grandchildren, lay and Ellen Friedman, Jerry, Karen
and Susan Schrier. While in Florida the Fleischmcc^E make
their home at 4001 South Ocean Dr.
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
14s S, DUK H WHWAT, HOUTWOOD
Phona 923 6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
;. "A Service WiftfH The Meaifs Of All"
m

4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Jemph 3etkt
Memorial
(jazdens
The only all-jew uh cemetery in Bioward
Counu. Peaceful surrounding*, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasoiubl) priced.
For information call:
_923_825S_or write: m&f,
TEMPLE BETH EL rX^^K*!
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDa"33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: ___^__^^
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HttlYVTOW, FU PH0NL 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan,
UF.0.


Scene* at the Dec. 6 Community Day for the workers of }WF
Friday, December 24. 1971
*Jenisii FhrBdUam
Page 9
Lou Shanok, (left) Samuel Diengott. Ed Dincin and Nathan Pasik.
Religious
Services
HAUANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
FUbbi Max J. Waits. Cantor Rev.
Jacob Danzigar. 126 N.E. 1st Ave.
*J i \ % y^ 44
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ava.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. as
BETH SHALOM (Temple). 1728 Mon-
roe St. Conaervativa. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold 46
SINAI (Temple). 1201 Johnaon St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraum. 47
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) Services
at 4721 Sarazen Drive.
I Doe. 24. 8:15 P.M.
Dec. 25, 10:30 A.M.
Vox
Sloane (loft) Rabbi David Shapiro, Mrs. Mary Feldman, David Harris, Mrs. David
Shapiro and Seymour Mann.
3HH
Oscar Rozansky, (left) Marcy Levine and Ben Katz
~
4L- JBl'JM.W
Dr. Stanley Kessel, (left) Paul Koenig and Dr. Louis Joblove.
{-^omvnunity vcalendar
ri': .'DAY. DECEMBER 28
Hollywood Hadassah Book Review 1 P.M., Home Federal Bldg.,
MlvwoMl
Hollondale Jewish Center Sisterhood 1 P.M. Election of Officers
Home Federal Building, Hollondale Blvd.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Board Meeting 8 P.M. Temple Sinai
MONDAY, JANUARY 3
Notional Cogneil Jewish Women, Hollywood Section Meeting -
12:30 Temple Sinai
rUESMr, JANUARY 4
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Torah Fund luncheon Noon Temple
Sinai
THURSDAY, JANUARY 6
Motlona.l. Jewish Center Sisterhood Officer Installation 12:30
Hollondale Recreation Deport men r
B'noi B'rrrfc Women Aviva Chapter Membership Tea -
(MR. Hollywood Towers
JjQBT JMitzvalt
IRA FLAGG
Ira, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Flagg, will celebrate his Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, Jan. 1, at Temple
Beth Shalom.
it -r &
DAVID KI'SlfNKK
David Bruce, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Kushner, will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah Saturday, Dec.
25, at Temple Solel, which meets
in temporary quarters at 4721
"Sarazen Dr.
JWatttr of ^aci Ly
JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued from Peso 4
comes out four-square against
busing. Gov. George Wallace
will have no real answer. Even
Northern states like Michigan
will also.be deeply affected.
OXE MUST add that this is a
tragic business. The guilt-ridden
American liberals have ap-
proached this problem without
the briefest look at the hard
facts; with a great burden of
sentimental preconceptions and
without even asking the blacks
in Harlem, for instance, whether
they really want busing. (They
do not, as the record shows.)
So the sloganeers among the
liberals have opened an exposed
flank where Nixon, the attacker,
will briskly attack.
GALES
GOLDEN
SCISSORS
1108 N. University Drive,
Hollywood
Hair Styling at its Best
Style Cutting-Tinting
Permanents
Phone 981-2341
Happy New Year
LUMANS
3806 South Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Phone 922-2250
Dresses Sportswear
Swim Suits
TEMPLE BETH AHM.310 Southwest
62nd Avenue, Hollywood
Friday 8:16 p.m. Murray Watcher will
l aeaiBtea by Herbert S. Smith I.ay
Reader. Kltiit-rhood will Hponsor One*
Bhabbat.
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (Temple) O920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. 48
Hollondale BBW Chapter
Holds Chanukah Luncheon
Thp Hallandale Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women was to hold a Chan-
ukah luncheon meeting Thursday
at 12:30 p.m. in the Home Federal
Building, 21C0 E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd.
Guest speaker for the meeting
will bo Mrs. Bessie Aquiba Azer-
rad, who will do a reading from
She.lorn Aleichem. Mrs. Allen
and vice president of the Chapter;
Mrs. Mollye A. Ginberg is presi-
Schweitzer is program chairman
dent.
Rabbis Host Homecoming
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe. spiritual
loader of Temple Beth El. was to
host the annual Homecoming Get-
Together for college students In
the temple lounge Thursday at 4
p.m. This provides an opportunity
to renew acquaintanceships.
CANOLELIGHTING TIME
6 TEVETH 5:16
9
^MAr\^rV*AMA*AA*A*AA
Egypt's Air Force
Has 896 Planes
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Egyptian Air Force numbers
896 combat and training
pianos including the world's
fastest fighter and the
world's largest helicopter
supplied by the Soviet Union,
according to the Israel Army
magazine, Bamachanc.
The magazine also publish-
ed details of Egypt's ground
and naval strength based on
figures published by Western
sources. The number of So-
viet-made combat pianos in
the Air Force is 407 which
includes 220 new MIG-2K
120 Sukhoi-II bombers,
about 25 TU-16 bombers and
some 30 Illushin-28 bombers
and 12 MIG-23s. a fighter
plane said by Western
sources to out-run and out-
climb any other, including
the American F-4 Phantom
jets in the Israel Air Force.
.
PAL JOEY'S
MEN'S HAM STYLING
"MANICURING"
1906 Harrison Street
Hollywood
Phone 922-9300
TEDDY'S DELI
RESTAURANT
1700 E. Hallandale Bch. Blvd.
Hallandale Shopping Center
Phone 927-9527
Happy New Yearl
MARCELLA'S
ITALIAN RESTAURANT
400 S. State Road 7
Phone 981-4050
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
7 Different Luncheon
Specials Daily! -$1.10
THE COMPLETE BOUTIQUE FOR HE AND SHE
GROUP THERAPY
It's The Ultimate!
SHIRTS JEANS POSTERS
INCENSE ACCESSORIES
Please Come In!
1236 S.Dixie Highway
Hollywood, Florida
LATIN AMERICAN
IMPORTS
The Unusual Store Unique Gifts t Home Decorations
LIGHTING FIXTURES ELEGANT MIRRORS
STERLING SILVER JEWELRY ABALONE OPENERS
RINGS CUFF LINKS HAND EMBROIDERED DRESSES
BLOUSES PAPER MACHE BRASS TIN ONYX
WOOD LEATHER TILE TRAYS PAPER FLOWERS
FABRICS MOLAS
325 E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard
(between US 1 & Dixie Hwy.)
Mon. thru Sat 10-6
Phone 925-2195


Page 10
ft k**ishfk>ridliar
Friday. December 24, 1971
Anniversary Of Leningrad
Show Trial Being Marked
ISumerous Awards Were Presented At the
Dec. 5 Annual Meeting of Jeivish Welfare Federation
The American Jewish Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry has an-
nounced the inauguration of a
nationwide campaign to mark the
first anniversary of the initial
Leningrad trial held Dec. 15, 1970.
The "show trial" ended in lengthy
labor camp sentences for seven
Jewish activists and death sen-
tences, later commuted, for two
others.
The first trial was followed by
a series of nine trials in different
cities, all aimed at the Jewish
dissl lents in the Soviet Union
who have been increasingly per-
sistent in demanding the right to
live as Jews and the right to
leave, particularly to go to Israel.
As a result of these trials, more
than 30 Jews were put in prison
labor camps, with sentences rang-
ing from one to 10 years.
As the opening gun in its cam-
paign, the Conference mailed a
special information kit to its en-
tire membership. The kit includes
a list of names and addresses of
Jewish prisoners in the USSR; the
Edward Ginsberg was elected
chairman of the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee at its 57th an-
nual meeting in New York City
this week. Mr. Ginsberg suc-
ceeds Louis Broido in the post.
final pleas of the defendants at
the Leningrad trial: and a list of
suggestions to Conference mem-
bers on how to help the cause of
the prisoners.
Among the suggestions are: to
write directly to the prisoners; set
aside special days, prayers and
sermons for them; urge special-in-
terest groups to make a particular j
plea for their colleagues: request
the intervention of Amnesty In-
ternatonal, the American Red
Cross and the U.N. Commission
on Human Rights; urge American I
officials in their dealings with the j
USSR to register the humanitar-
ian concern of American citizens;
and have local newspapers and <
radio and TV stations do a "one- ;
year-later" story.
The suggestion list urges that
special attention be given to the
case of Sylva Zalmanson, who was ,
sentenced to 10 years in prison.
Pregnant when arrested, she lost
her baby in a labor camp. She has
been denied medical care for sev-
eral serious ailments and may not
live long.
This information package is the
first step in a concerted, nation-
wide, ir.ierfaith campaign on be-
half of the prisoners. Among the
major events was "Freedom i
Lights for Soviet Jewry" at Madi-
son Square Garden, on the eve of
the first anniversary of the initial
Leningrad trial.
This massive gathering cospon-
sored by the Greater New York
Conference on Soviet Jewry and
he Center for Russian Jewry, was
focused on the plight of the Jew-
isn prisoners, especially that of
Sylva Zalmanson,
The American Jewish Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry represents
a mobilization of nearly 40 major
national Jewish organizations as
well as hundreds of local commu-
nity groups acting on behalf of
Soviet Jews. Since 1948. the Jews
in Soviet Russia have been denied
religious and cultural freedom and
deprived of their human -rights,
particularly the right to emigrate
to Israel.


Dr. Norman Atkin presents UJA Award to
Robert Baer.
Robert Gordon presents the Man of the
Year Award to Stanley Beckerman,
Sydney Levison Chairman
Of 'Wall Of Life' Campaign
The appointment of Sydney Levi-
son. prominent Detroit buslm
man and philanthropist who now
SYDNEY LEVISON
I Ma home in Hollywood, a*
chairman of the Mount Sinai Med-
ical Center's "Wall of Life" cam-
paign has been announced by Jul-
ius Darsky. chairman of the insti
tit ion's development fund. "His ac-
ceptance virtually guarantees the
success of this effort," Mr. Dar-
sky said.
The "Wall of Life" will be a
concave sculpture more than one
story high and permanently illumi-
nated, which will serve as focal
point of a plaza to be surrounded
by new medical center facilities
currently under construction. It
will bear the names of all who
contributed $5,000 or more to the
fund.
Proceeds for the campaign will
go towards continuation of the $30
million expansion program, which
Includes the eight-story Maribel
Blum Building, increased emerg-1
) and radiology facilities and
Anna and Lois Hand Complex
for nuclear medicine, complete
with the world's largest medical
ron.
Another component the Fred
J Ascher Allied Health Careers
O nter already is open on the ,
Mount Sinai's 54-
aere Miami Beach site.
Mr. Levison. a trustee and found-
er of the medical center, said he
views his assignment as "Wa'l of
Life" chairman as an honor. "This
*-ill be a magnificent piece of
work." he predicted, "one which
will be a fitting tribute to sup-
porters of the great work to which
Mount Sinai is dedicated.
"It is a privilege for me to be
able to offer my friends and
neighbors, and all those in the
community interested In furthur-
ing the cause of medical excellence,
an opportunity to reserve a place
for themselves, or for a loved one,
on the "Wall of Life," he declared.
Herbert Katz presents the Leadership
Award to Dr. Philip Weinstein, Jr.
Joel Rottman receives the President's
Award from Robert Gordon.
Maurie Meyers receives UJA Award from
Dr. Norman Atkin.
Hoss beckermem receives the Hy and Belie
Schlafer Young Leaders Award from Mr.
Schlafer.
THfTj
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Friday, December 24, 1971
+Jewlsti Fhridgar)
Page II
ISRAEL NEWSLETTER By Carl Alpert
Stories From Israel You May Never Have Read
COMK OF THE MOST Interesting news and events
In Israel never get into Ihe headlines. For
i (ample:
Jtauaiicisin. Biwliiiiilmiii re ,
shocked to see several Bnai Brak
iHassidim, replete with fur hats
I and long black gowns, entering an
automobile on the Sabbath and
driving away. They were on a life-
g saving mission, to give blood of a
rare type for a i3-year-old girl in
the hospital.
What to See in Israel. The Tel-
Aviv Municipality, to help heighten tourists' enjoy-
ment of Israel and the big city, has announced a
series of evening programs, including: films on
th> life of the primitive tribes in Australia and New
Guinea.
Camouflage. The telephone number of the
YWCA in East Jerusalem will not easily be found
by anyone looking in the Hebrew phone book unless
he looks under: YMCA for Girls.
Prows* of Integration. What do new immi-
grants to Israel complain about? In the first year,
about the Jewish Agency which handles their immi-
gration; the second year, about the government;
third year, about taxes, and the fourth gear
alxjut_jw immigrants. ff. ._ ^ ,,.,,,,
Impact of strikes. On the very day when the
employees of the Israel Meteorological Services pro-
claimed a labor dispute and beginning of a Strike, a
prolonged drought was suddenly and unexpectedly
broken with heavy showers.
Strikes and the Bible. During the week when
synagogues in Israel were reading the Torah por-
tion of the week. '-B'ha-alotcha et hanerot," the
eighth chapter of the Book of Numbers, which be-
gins: "When thou lightest the lamps .," em-
ployees of the Israel Electric Corporation went out
on strike, and Israelis bj the thousands turned to
oil lamps and candles.
University Student Life. When a student at one
of Israel's universities was summoned to the plat-
form at public exercises to receive a prize for high
grades in his term pai>er, several of his buddies es-
corted him to the stage, claiming that they had a
share in his achievement. And another student told
such a sad sob story when filling in his application
for a scholarship, that the dean of students sent him
a bundle of old clothes and a food package as well.
We're Proud of our City. The resident of an
,.e-. Atfab seetiant.of-WuiJa complained that the iwtmiai-
pality had built no playgrounds in his neighborhood.
Was this discrimination? In reply, Haifa's mayor
invited the complalntanl to come with him on a
tour of the city and see all the Jewish neighbor-
hoods where there were no playgrounds. The tour
will take all c'ay, the mayor added proudly.
A Matter of ( oiificlenec. Israel's Minister of
Tourism told an audience in Venezuela last spring
that Israel expected half a million tourists this year.
Newspaper report the next day quoted him as pre-
dicting a million tourists, and when the minister
hastened to correct the editor pacified him: Mr.
Kol, at the dynamic pace with which Israel grows,
you will reach the million. Have faith!
Housing Shortage. A young couple in vain
search for suitable living quarters in Jerusalem
found irritating the news item that the local zoo
had produced a pair of orangutangs, and a special
home would be built for tnem in the zoo's monkey
quarters at a cost of IL 80,000.

THE AMERICAN SCENE
By: BENGALLOB
Judaica Courses Bring Changes
Im| vssiYK CHANGES IX THE level of intellectu-
ality of the American Jewish community, in the
tatus of the American rabbi and in the types of
American Jewish leadership are foreseen as de-
loping from the impact on the hundreds of Jew-
ish collegians of studying formal courses on Juda-
ism on a growing scale in universities, rather than
in Jewish schools.
The forecast,was made by'Pr. Jacob Neusner,
professor of Jewish, studies at Brdwttw. pnhecnuty.
who noted, tlril "every field of Judaic learning may'.
be found In sorae "university.'* Jte added 'Uj:<.t "while
the profeors/cenih.iii' pjiiSntfly ol Ji'uSnh. origin.
th.y teach* stUdejaLs of every 'ethnic, atfd "religious;
ackgrotfMd." -He"'*t>j>:svn*ed -his-'-views* on ftje tre- s
njendowvpi-owth .'Jn=-Tecent year* J* the number of*
siich .epurpas jiuVfcr jtfiiversity auspices and/the pas-
i"ii>le iri^t^.'of"iflrit,de\'ciopin'*it in m recent issue
<: the 'JenrnaY-of"the Crtitral Coh'fe're'neo of Xfner-
ivan Rabbis,, the .Reform- rabhir.cal, organization.
i!> reported such., courses, were, being .offered, on
an ever-growing scale, in the Hebrew language,
Hebrew scriptures, Talmud, Yiddish, post-biblical
Jewish history, literature, theology and the life of
the Jewish people In modern and contemirary
ci\ ilization.
One result of the university approach to the
M.uly of Judaism, he reported, was the develoi*-
nt of "a new kind of young Jewish intellectual.
one who treats Judaics in the same respect but
critical way as American history or English litera-
ture or any other aspect of the humanities." This
student "demands the same high standards of
knowledge, the same detached and sophisticated
approach to ideas. He is less sentimental, less slov-
enly in his approach to Jewish thought and history."
Above all, Dr. Neusner asserted, he "is less likely
. to be intimidated by the authority, the superior
'knowjedge of others, whether rabbis, teachers or
' college professors."
Ak more and more such students take their
places in the adult community,, "a much higher
level at intellectuality than characterizes the pres-
ent generation" of the American Jewish community
is likely. He predicted that the intelligent quotient
of American Jewish life was likely to rise consider-
ably." That development, in turn", he said, "will
pose problems for-rabbis who are used to being the
only Jews in town who read Jewish books and.
thtnlt Jewish thoughts.'' The rabbis correctly "take
for granted that their authority rests upon their
knowledge" but in the future, "their commitment
to learning is going to have to represent a more
central part of their professional lives than at pres-
ent," he asserted. "An intellectual approach to
Judaism is not characteristic of the pulpit rabbinate
as a whole. That is going to change." Dr.. Neusner
predicted.
(Copyright 15*71, Jewish Telegraphic- Agency, Inc.)
Book Review By SEYMOUR B. UEBMAN
University Press Publications
A <".EM OF LUCIDITY, brevity and scholarship is
Dr. John A. Harrison's The Founding of the
Huwian Empire (University of Miami Press. $7.93).
The concise account is confined to
I the establishment of the Russian
Empire in Asia and America.
In terse but scholarly language,
the author presents sketches of
people and the land. Until the 9th
Century, the present Slav states of
Poles and Czechs hadn't formed
and the main state of the Rus-
sians was only a loose federation
of trading communities. The expansion over the
Urals and the Carpathians didn't begin until a half
millcnia later. This eastward movement was slow-
but inexorable and Harrison employs maps to
trace the course.
While there is a brief account of the meetings
between the Russians and Chinese in the early 18th
Century and the Treaty of Kiakhta, there is no
mention of the fears of the Spanish, and later the
Americans, after the Russians began a southward
movement from the Aleutian Islands. It is the
author*i prerogative to stop his account where he
will, but we hope that he will add a few more pages
to subsequent editions which the book deserves.
Crusader Figural Sculpture* in the Holy Land
by Moshe Harash (Rutgers University Press, $15)
is an exquisitely beautiful- contribution to the his-
tory of art. The author is associate professor of art
history at the Hebrew University.
Many figural sculptures ranging from baptis-
mal fonts to door frames and capitals were exca-
vated within the past few decades in Acre and Naza-
reth. The volume casts new light on Crusader art
as well as the history of religion.
Went German Reparation* to Israel by Nicholas
Balabkins (Rutgers University Press. $12,501 is a
narrative of contemporary social and economic his-
tory. The first six chapters give a background per-
spective to Germany's road into industrial genocide,
the social order of the Third. Reich and a survey of
the forces that conceived, financed and carried out
the ackial'genocide of European'Jewry. This is fol-
lowed tjy the economic problems of Germany and
Israel and the moral problems confronting Israel
and Jewry to claim or irot to claim?
.
The rest of the book discusses the Luxemburg
Treaty of 1952 and subsequent developments for
both nations. Balabkins in on the economic faculty
at Lehigh University and his fcjok is a veritable
tour do force. I
boo
JEWS IN SPORTS
By Haskell Cohen
I
I

A Tough Game j
CliORTLV UTU THE Six-Day War. when the
State of Israel was still trying to retain a ves-
tige of rapiwrt with the U.S.S.R., the American
Amateur Athletic Union appealed to Milton Kut- I
sher. Catskill Mountain hotel owner, to assemble a
basketball team and play the invading Russian
basketeers on his court. Kutsher reluctantly com- [
plied.
At that time, this writer had just returned
from Israel, and during his visit there learned from
Israeli basketball heads that the Russians were
coached by Leon Gomelsky, a Jew. Furthermore, on
the visit to Israel by the Russian hoopstcrs two
years before the war. Coach Gomelsky had mixed
clandestinely with the Lsraelis. Under constant wrr-
verllance by the commissar who accompanies all
Soviet athletic units on sports junkets. Gomelsky
managed to confer with Israeli sports writers while
riding up and down in his hotel elevators. On the
surface Gomelsky only spoke and understood Rus-
sian. Actually, he is fluent in Yiddish and had no
trouble exchanging news and background on the
folks in his home city of Leningrad.
The Russian hoopstcrs knocked off every Amer-
ican opponent on its U.S. invasion that spring and
arrived at Kutshen undefeated for its final game in
the states. The team, a giant group, hustled off
their bus and mobbed the check-in desk at the re-
sort. The young lady in charge had me paged and
I hurried over to the lobby and watched the rowdy
antics of players for 8 moment, finally shouting for
silence.
"Don't these guys have any manners at all?"
I asked of no one in particular.
"Don't pay any attention to them." a dark
haired, handsome man volunteered, "they're nothing
but a bunch of animals."
It developed that the English speaking stranger
accompanying the team was a referee from Finland
assigned to travel with the team on its American
tour. Subsequently we became very good friends
and he tinned out to be an excellent referee and a
swell guy. He had been assigned several times be-
fore to Russian basketball tours and knew their
personnel well. My interest, of course, was in meet-
ing the Soviet coach, a tiny man, who was standing
in a rather forlorn fashion in the rear of the crowd
watching his players' boorish antics.
At dinner, I introduced myself to the officials,
(the doctor., commissar, interpreter, and the coach.)
The interpreter and commissar did a double take
when they heard my name was Cohen, the doctor
smiled and the coach gave me a quick hearty hand-
shake. I invited the group to be my guests at the
night club that evening.
The next day at practice on the Kutsher out-
door court, the coach grabbed a ball and began
shooting long set shots at one of the baskets. I
immediately walked over to serve as his retriever,
figuring we could converse in Yiddish. It wasn't to
be, however. The commissar, sensing that the
coach and I were too friendly, moved over and en-
gaged me in conversation as I returned the ball
to Gomelsky after each missed shot.
The Russians won the game and claimed our
pick-up team, which included Ed Mast, now of the
N.Y. Knicks. John Warren of the Cleveland Cava-
liers, and Connon of the Memphis Pros, gave them
the toughest game of their ten-game tour.



Page 12
vjewlstncrkttori
Friday. December 24,197j
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