The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00021

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Floridian
and SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
folume 1 Number 20
Hollywood. Florida Friday. Aug. 6, 1971
Price 20c
Jewish Sources Deny Press
Reports Exodus Is Halted
NfttffT KATZ
Off. NOffMAN ATKIN
Special UJA Israel
Study Mission Set
special UJA Israel Study Mis-
has been scheduled by the
lish Welfare Federation of
rater Hollywood for men and
hen Intonated in Retting a
rial in-depth view of Israel, a
a- that is not available to groups
\er than those Study Mission
Bups.
The mission is part of the "Op-
It ion Israel" program of United
(rtish Appeal and the Hollywood
up will join a similar group
>m the Greater Miami area. The
Floridjgns will then join a
' R4H^trom other parts of
rite* States in Israel.
lLoeal cochairmen for this spe-
ll mission are Dr. Norman Atkin
kit Herbert D. Katz, both of
torn are members of the Execu-
te Committee of Jewish Welfare
deration and active In its cam-
|igns. The Hollywood group's
ins include an optional seven
|ys in London before their re-
rn home.
Special travel arrangements will
ible the group to fly directly
>m Miami on Nov. 14. Return
also be direct to Miami.
lile previous study missions
Israel have been designated ex-
usively for men or women, this
krticular trip planned by Dr.
Jkin and Mr. Katz will be geared
|r husbands and wives and single
iividuals who are community
iders.
|The itinerary will take partici-
knts behind the scenes for a
^eper, more penetrating, more
liman look at the accomplish-
ents. problems and needs of the
jple of Israel. There will be
^iefings by, and frank dialogues
1th. highranking Israeli officials.
Among those who have met with
Operation Israel groups in the
Bst are the Chief of Staff of the
Irael Defense Forces, the Minis-
irs of Defense. Finance. Educa-
m, Absorption, Israel Cabinet,
foreign Ministry and Parliament.
ie chairman and treasurer of the
Jewish Agency, and experts on
krab affairs.
There will be ample opportunity
(for mingling with Israelis from all
ivalks of life ranging from early
pioneers to the latest family ar-
riving from the Soviet Union.
The process of immigration and
[absorption will be seen at its most
[sensitive and poignant moment's:
upon arrival, during readjustment
in an absorption center, in the proc-
ess of resettlement in a develop-
ment town or urban immigrant
quarter. The group will also meet
with individuals and groups such
as the "Black Panthers" who are
active dissidents in this time of
social ferment in Israel.
Participants will have an inside
view, shared by no other groups
visiting Israel, of such typical
Israeli institutions as the immi-
grant hostel, kibbutz and nahal
(self-sustaining paramilitary bor-
der settlements), and possibly an
in-depth look at an immigrant de-
velopment town. Israel's unique
experiment in population place-
ment.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Press
reports that Soviet authorities
had called a sudden halt to the
Jewish "exodus" are seriously
questioned by Jewish circles in
New York, hitherto regarded as
having correct information on
the latest developments in the
Soviet Union.
The sources, which have pre-
viously provided the Jewish Tel-
egraphic Agency with accurate
Information, declared that the
report by Los Angeles Times
correspondent Richard Reston,
datelined London, and claiming
that only 180 Jews left the
The troup will also be received
at an .Army or Air Force base
where an attempt will be made
to give them a rounded view of
Israel's democratic citizens' army
as a force not only for peace-keep-
ing, but for education and social
integration. A wide-ranging talk
with the base commander is also
scheduled.
The hallowed and historic sites,
the cultural centers and many
impressive sights of modern Israel
will be included in the tour. Seeing
and learning about the country'
from the inside will make more
poignantly meaningful the group's
visits to the Western Wall, Yad
Vashem. the Martyrs Chamber and
Massada. They will also visit the
Golan Heights, the West Bank, the
Jordan and Beit Shean Valleys,
the Knesset, the Military Ceme-
tery, the Israel Museum, the Shrine
of the Book and the Old City of
Jerusalem.
Further information about this
trip may be secured at Jewish
Welfare Federation's office at 1909
Harrison St., Hollywood, or by
calling Dr. Norman Atkin or Mr.
Herbert D. Katz directly.
Reservations are now being
taken: because of the necessity of
limiting the size of the group, par-
ticipants will be taken in the order
of the receipt of their deposit
checks made payable to Jewish
Welfare Federation.
Prices Soar As
New Taxes
Are Imposed
TKL AVIV (JTA> A tax
on most types of fuel oil that
went into effect last week has
sent prices soaring from 10% to
140% on gasoline, kerosene,
diesel oil and domestic cooking
gas.
Government officials insisted
it was not a tax but a price hike
intended to bring prices in Israel
in line with rising world market
prices. Observers said, however,
that the price rise had been de-
cided by the Cabinet's economic
committee and approved by the
Knesset finance committee but
withheld from the public until
Finance Minister Pinhas Sapir
decided that time was ripe to
announce it.
The new fuel "tax" has al-
ready sparked demands for high-
er fare* in taxi* and other forms
of transportation. The price of
kerosene has nearly tripled, and
gasoline prices jumped 10%.
Hie public is waiting to see if
the Israel Electric Corp., largest
single consumer of fuel, raises
Its rates. Such a development
could result In higher prices on
almost every manufactured ar-
ticle in the country.
In a prepared statement, the
Finance Minister declared that
the government does not con-
template further taxes this year.
He denied that this implies that
new taxes are under considera-
tion for next year. "We have no
plans to raise any taxes before
the end of the current fiscal
year, contrary to all t*ie rumors
and stories in the newspapers."
said Moshe Neudorfer, director
of internal revenue.
USSR during the first week of
July and that there has been
virtually no movement at all
since then, was incorrect.
The article noted that Soviet
authorities had permitted an
average of 1.000 Jews a montth
to leave from March through
June, but that increasing ha-
rassment of those who have re-
quested permission to emigrate
ranging from threats of pros-
ecution to physical beatings and
loss of jobs -is being reported.
If the Kremlin maintains this
new posture. Mr. Reston sail,
it may signal a fresh crackdown
not only against the Jewish
community, but also against in-
tellectual dissidents and other
persecuted minority groups.
The cases of two men who ap-
plied for visas and were sum-
marily fired from their jobs
as a result were cited as evi-
dence of the Kremlin's policy.
One. a member of the writers'
union, is attempting to earn his
living as a porter; the other, an
economist, is reduced to service
as a postman.
I!!
ii .-mi ..i.i Mi "i mi., ii .i.i.i-: ... .. urn'
Diamond Grinder-Polisher
Developed By Technion
TKL AVIV (JTA) Two
machines which are expected to
revolutionize the diamond pol-
ishing industry have been devel-
oped at the Haifa Technion Di-
amond Research Laboratory by
Prof. Yeshaya Yarnitsky of the
Faculty of Mechanical Engi-
neering.
With the new grinder-polisher,
four diamonds can be handled
by one revolving wheel A semi-
skilled worker can supervise
several such wheels.
Starvation Diet Reported
In Soviet Labor Camps
aa|
NEW YORK (JTA) Five
Jews convicted last December
in the first Leningrad trial, and
two convicted in Riga in May-
have been interned in a forced
labor camp at Potmaa town
in central Mordovia, according
to informed sources. All seven,
including Ruth Aleksandrovich.
a 24-year-old nurse who stood
trial in Riga, were said to have
spent three weeks in a prison at
Pakov before being sent to the
Potma labor camp.
Hie nine Jews sentenced In
Kishinev June SO for alleged
anti-Soviet agitation and com-
plicity in a skyjacking plot were
reported to have been sent to
a camp in the same region.
Meanwhile, in London, Labor
MP Giwille Janner and Dr.
Arnold Bender, a I.ondon Uni-
versity nutritionist, charged
that the Soviet Union is slowly
starving Jewsand other prison-
ers in its "strict regime" labor
campsto death. They likened
the 1.200-calorie-per-day diet in
the camps to that provided in
Nazi concentration camps dur-
ing World War II.
"The purpose is the same." de-
clared Dr. Bender. "The aim is
to weaken the mental and phys-
ical health of the inmates and
so destroy their will to live.
Anyone on this diet would suf-
fer abominably after a few days,
and would lose both weight and
vitality steadily. Beyond a doubt
it represents a deliberate at-
tempt to undermine the health
and stregth of the prisoners."
A sample of the labor camp
fare pot on display on the side-
walk outside the Soviet Embas-
sy In London included 14 oz. (a
full day's ration) of hlaek bread,
one cup of hot water and one
ounce of herring for breakfast;
two-thirds of a cup of cabbage-
potato soup for lunch, and S'j-S
ounces of potato, one cup of raw
cabbage and tomato vinagrette
for dinner. No sugar and no fats
were included.
"No civilized country would
submit prisoners to anything
like it," said Mr. Janner. "Hav-
ing commuted the death sen-
tences after the outcry resulting
from the first Leningrad trial,
the Russians are now condemn-
ing them (the Jewish prisoners)
to slow death by starvation."
The Supreme Court of tttt
Russian Republic has rejected
an appeal for mitigation of the
prisoners' sentences. They were
not present to hear the verdict,
however; the decision was given
to their attorneys. Only a few
very close relatives and M>ma
"members of the public" who
had been given special passes
were present for the hearing.
The visitors reportedly taunted
*he wives of the convicted men
as they left the courtroom.
Intervene for Jews,
Rustin Urges Thant
NEW YORK (JTA) Civil
rights leader Bayard Rustin i3
seeking United Nations help for
nine Soviet Jews who last year
signed a plea addressed to U.N.
Secretary General U Thant for
aid in their efforts to go to Is-
rael and are now serving prison
sentences after being convicted
of "anti-Soviet activity."
Mr. Rustin, chairman of a
Commission of Inquiry on the
Rights of Soviet Jews, trans-
mitted nearly four pounds of
Commission documents to the
Secretary General with a cover-
ing letter. The documents in-
cluded the official police report
on the search of the home be-
longing to one of the defend-
ants in the Kishinev trial, who
had signed the petition.
The character of the alleged
crimes becomes clear through
the description of the papers im-
pounded by the Dolice, Mr. Rus-
tin wrote. Included were Jew-
ish history books. Israeli news-
papers, Hebrew texts and let-
ters of appeal.
School Named For Eshkol
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA)
The Governor of Guanabara State
informed Israeli Ambassador Itz-
hak Harkavi last week that Rio's
newest school will be named in
honor of the late Premier Levi
Eshkol of Israel who visited this
city shortly before his death three
'ears ago. The school will be
known as "Escola Levi Eshkol."


mm
Page 2
*Jadst flcriciian
l-riday. Aug. 6,1971
Rabbi's Daughter, Spouse
Will Live, Work In Israel
Mrs. MM Handler, who re- "Knee receiving tar Jgjf^
School iu Brooklyn, N.Y.
AW. and MRS. HtRSCHtl HANDIER
Thepaafticel Seminar) of Ameifca
vcently. and her husband, Her-
schel, v. ha graduated from tfesrriva
Univi vjv and lt W (rtzwellei
School Ol S id il Work, where he
oMaii i-d h > Mastei s d< jree, arc
making preparations lo visit fsrael
Mr. Handl r iil engage in so-
, i) work thi r Mrs Handler ex-
pects to t< ach English to young
Israel -
The I uighter of B
Moft< M i! ivskj ol T n | le B th
Sh I ; Mis. Handler w as an ii noi
N iva High S
State Department
Concedes 6-1 Ratio
WASHINGTON (JTAI U.S.
State Department officials have
donceded that Sen. Henry M. Jaek-
son w;is correct when he said the
Arnb state-; ontim:iilxTwi Israel
six to one in jet aircraft and main-
mined that the pilot-to-airer.alt
liitio "sharply fauns" the Israelis.
Tiny suggested that the Egyp-
tians had the preponderance of
planes Imi not onougtl pilot! train-
id lo fly them, and refused to
peculate whether the long* num-
ber <>f Russian pilots In Egypt
changed the ratio substantially.
Senator Jackson, a Washington
Democrat, had said that there
vvt re 200 trained Soviet pilots in
Egypt ai.il 100 Russians of Ad-
miral and General rank in that
I country. Th. officials said that his
figures tor higbsranking Soviet of-
ficers and combat pilots were on
the high side, Imi I thoj agreed with
his iv 11 ... GCO Soviet supersonic
m is in Rgypl and Syria, claiming
there was nothirg new in those
I'igui' -
'l >. officials maintained thai the
Soviet pilots were In Egypt for
put" ises btil li ive been
known t" fly actual combat mis-
ii for the Sue/ cease-fire
. ent Inl i el feel last Aim. 8,
CUSTOM FRAMING
CREATIVE CRAFTSMANSHIP
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HOLLYWOOD 983-7590
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BEFORE YOU
BUY ... SELL... TRADE
free Professional Analysis
Contact
GORDON D. McMANN
Realtor
Efficient Dependable Service
Established 1958
1815 Wiley 6130 Hollywood Blvd.
929-2366 966-7600
24 Hr. EMERGENCY Service
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OPEN Tm. Sat.
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PHONE. 927 5341
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Chen Joins Israel
Aliyah Center Staff
Ai)i:ui:iin C'ncn iins taken a leava
,l .('.i-j.-tkv fi'm liis position in the
Egged But Company's Division of
Transportation .mil Pkinnine to
join the staff of \\v brael Aliyah
Center In Atlanta, Go., where he
..in irve at Aaiteiate Reglorral
Director,
Mr. Chen, who wbj irn in 1923
on Mosrun Nahalal, the flrsl
moshiu In Israel, Joined the Jew-
ish BdflaaVi f Brittah Army
,ri,m- grajdpating Brom Inch school!
in 1941, and served wi'" ,,v'' 1!"''
until the end of World War IX Be
remained in Europe and helned j
atnuegle survivors of the Nazi holo-,
cniist Into Palestine in the Aliyah ,
11,'t after the war.
taring the IBM War of Inde-
pendence, Mr. Chen served in the
ferael Defense Roreea with th.-
rank of lieutenant. As a member
of the Reserves, he also took an
ve part In the conflicts of 1956
and 1967. Be joined Egged in 1951.
Tin- Israel Aliyah Center is a
service organization which offers
, vK ice and miidance to persons
Interested In settling in Israel, and
helps process those who decide to-i
i ime Olim I set tiers in Israeli.
The Center maintains 13 offices
IIn the United States and Canada.
TFhey are located in .New York,
I Queens, Atlanta. Boston. Chicago,
Cleveland, Lot Angeles, Montreal.
[ Philadelphia. San Francisco. St.
I. us. Toronto and Washington,
lie
ELMORE M. FIELDS. M. D.
wishes to announce the opening of his
New Office, on August 2, 1971,
for the practice of
GENERAL MEDICINE AND ENDOCRINOLOGY
at the Home Federal Savings Building
2100 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Suite 307
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Telephone 925-5656 By Appointment
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Decorating Doctor
A'e you stuck' Do you need advice about making that "nothing'
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You probably don't want tht cost of a decorator and coM do ths
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I CAN HELP YOU. I'll answer your questions, make suigestions,
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Oon't be afraid to call. One consultation will lake care of your
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Announcing .
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Friday. Aug. 6. 1971
rJewisli fhridliaiii
ORGANIZATION IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Yeshiva University
Page 3
Yeshiva University, which was
founded in 1886. is the oldest and
largest university under Jewish
auspices in the United States. At
present, it has the largest student
enrollment in its history with more
than 8,000 men and women from
every part of the world preparing
for 19 different degrees in 13 un-
dergraduate, graduate and affiliate
schools ait the four major teaching
centers In New York City. It is a
beneficiary of Jewish Welfare
Federation.
A private institution chartered
by the State of New York and
accredited by the Middle States
Association of Colleges and Sec-
ondary Schools and by specialized
professional agencies, it is a mem-
ber of the College Entrance Exami-
nation Board.
The undergraduate colleges and
graduate schools of natural sci-
ences, social sciences and humani-
ties offer programs leading to
Bachelor's. Master's and Doctoral
degrees. The Religious Affiliates
portion of Yeshiva University is
the oldest.
Among well-known institutions
BBW Lodge Fund
Raising Events Set
Hollywood's Lodge 725, B'nai
B'rith Women, has announced the
following schedule of fund-raising
events for the coming 1971-72
season.
Tuesday, Aug. 24, member-bring-
a-member tea in Henrietta Stom-
el's home. 5500 Pierce St.; Sunday.
Sept. 5, barbecue at the home of
Mabel Landau. 3908 Madison St.;
Sept. 16, card party at the home
of Adrian Cohen: Oct. 14, style
show and luncheon at a location
to be announced: Nov. 29. theatre
party at Hollywood Theatre; Dec.
16, Chanukah party in the Lions'
Clubhouse, 2850 Taylor St.;March
12, donor dinner and show at the
Carillon Hotel. Miami Beach;
April 16, installation and gold hon-
ors event at a location to be
announced.
incorporated in Yeshiva are Ye-
shiva College, Erma Michael Col-
lege of Hebraic Studies, Stern Col-
lege for Women, Belfer Graduate
School of Science, the Albert Ein-
stein College of Medicine, Wurz-
wciler School of Social Work, Tea-
cher Institutes for men and women
and a Cantorial Training Institute.
These institutions offer prepara-
tion for careers in education, so-
cial work, the rabbinate, medicine,
mathematics, physics, psychology
and various other fields.
Special projects include Sep-
hardic Studies and Community Ac-
tivities Programs, an Audio Visual
Center and Film Library, Special
Publications Department. Inserviee
Institute in Science. Mathematics
for Secondary School Teachers and
Psychiatric Social Work Training.
Jewish Labor Committee
Showing Three Free Films
As a public service, the Jewish
Labor Committee is showing three
films in its recreation room at
4141 Nautilus Dr. (northeast of the
intersection of Alton and Arthur
Godfrey Roads I Thursday, Aug. 5.
at 8:30 p.m. The films are "The
Hat," "Unusual World of Florida"
and a Sept., 1951 newsreel. TTie
public is invited; there is no ad-
mission charge.
National Groups
Emphatically Deny
Rabbi's Charges
NEW YORK (WNS Three of
the four national Jewish organiza-
tions that had been attacked by a
spokesman tor the Hebrew Day
Schools as giving only lip service
to meeting the financial problems
of the schools, denied the charges
and said they were devoting both
time and energy to the problems
of mobilizing support for the fi-
nancially ailing schools.
Following the Supreme Court's
recent ruling against government
Rabbi Joseph Kaminetsky, national
director of Torah Umesorah. the
National Society of Hebrew Day
Schools, charged that the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress, the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee, the Nation-
al Council of Jewish Women and
B'nai B'rith had answered his
"urgent pleas" for aid with "paper
promises, Xerox copies of paper
resolutions and press releases with
pat phrases.
The AJCongress. the AJCom-
mittee and the National Council
of Jewish Women denied Rabbi
Kaminetsky's charges. There was
no comment from B'nai B'rith.
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Page 4
* A* #**# IkrkUain
Friday. Aug. 6, 1971
*JemstJtorMiari
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--alter. Marion Nevfa* *-J^/****^A. Jewi.h w..K.y.
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local *T% O^yt.00
sw. qo4 ot T0wn upon Requeit
Volume 1
"riday, Aug. 6. 1971
Number 20
15 AB 5731
Danger Grows Greater
The steady, persisting flow of Soviet arms to the
Arab states must be a matter of continuing concern for
these who have hopes of eventual peace in the Middle
East. We know that the United States has long been
pledged to keep a decent balance of power in the area and
we believe it will keep that pledge.
But an insane arms race obviously is not the answer
to the problems that exist between Israel and the Arab
stctes and it is hoped that as the major powers move
tovrnrd talks of peace this will be acknowledged. Surely
the Russians recognize that, despite pressure on Israel to
be reasonable in negotiating, the United States will not
be a pcrty to any settlement that would compromise Israel's
legitimate security interests. And no settlement is in sight
when Egypt keeps changing its demands, not the least of
which is the unreasonable one of a strong military force
on :e more in the Sinai.
Diplomats, however, today see the Egyptians as less a
threat than the Russians to Israel and world peace. The
Soviets continue to strengthen their involvement in the
defense of the Nile Valley with an estimated 200 Russian
pilots new flying out at Egyptian airfields. Should the
present stalemate in negotiations continue much longer,
the danger of hostilities that would involve the Russians
and then the United States grows greater. The possibility
of such a confrontation may make the Soviets pause as
they see where their present policy is leading.
Tourism Significant Factor
The year of cease-fire has brought not only peace to
Israel but a tremendous influx of tourists 37% greater
then last year.
Many Miamians have become aware of this they
ate among the nearly 80,000 prospective foreign visitor*
who have been requested to stay home for the next months
because there is no hotel space for mem. Discouraging a
tni3 may be for many who had planned their vacations,
the Ministry of Tourism is to be commended for making a
difficult decision. The alternative, it was pointed out, would
have been chaos and unhappy visitors.
The steadily growing flow of tourists is one of Israel's
most important sources of foreign currency. But beyond
tHct. tourism is a significant political factor, (as we interpret
tHe figures given out) since almost half those who pouring
into Israel this year are non-Jews, many of them young
people from Scandinavia, the Netherlands and West Ger-
meny. Those who have encountered these youth recognize
their great interest in what is taking place in Israel and the
influence they may later have on their governments.
While it may not be for most American tourists and
they make up 38% of the total so-called "popular tour-
ism" is one approach to the hotel room problem, "Popular
tourism" camping out in the Sinai and Negev in tents
and sleeping bags provides an identification with the
Israel pioneers that none of the Hiltons or Sheratons can.
Legalists Ignore The Facts
The concern over Israel's plans to keep control over
Jerusalem the latest move is a Knesset bill to compen-
sate East Jerusalem Arabs for property requisitioned in
1948 is based on a United Nations ruling that forbids
such an act.
International legalists ignore the fact that the annexa-
tion of the Old City by Jordan in 1948 also was not in ac-
cordance with a U.N. ruling, an act which never bothered
them then, and doesn't now.
The essential difference, as a recent conference of
Christian evangelists stated publicly, is that Israel allows
universal access to the Holy places of Moslems and Chris,
tions, as Jordan did not, and that where Jordan destroyed
whole sections of the historic Old City, Israel is now trying
to rebuild.
MATTER OF FACT
IY1/^ by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON President
Nixon's immense forward step
with the Chinese Communists
can onlv be called a bright silver
could with a very black lining.
Fortunately, the black lining
does not concern the United
States, at least immediately.
The President has been both
shrewd and wise.
But the black cloud is there,
nonetheless, in the form of deep
fear in Peking. What has hap-
pened is clear proof, in fact, :
that Chinese Communist lead- I
en like Chou Kn-lai are now
deeply, viscerally alarmed by |
the ever-mounting Soviet mill- !
tary buildup on China's north-
ern frontier.
FAILURE to forsea this So-
viet buildup's impact on Peking,
has in turn made perfect fools
of a lot of people. Dr. John K.
Fairbank and his ilk. for exam-
ple have recently been leading
an unceasing chorus. They have
been intoning that the United
States really had to flush For-
mosa down the drain in order
to have good relations with the
Chinese mainland.
The more left-wing Demo-
crats, always eager to sacrifice
any American ally, have also
punctuated the Fairbankian
chorus with many a fervent
'hallelujah!'" Until a year or so
ago, moreover relations with the
Chinese Communist really did
seem to be impossible, while the
United States continued to have
relations with the Chinese Na-
tionalists.
YET THE President was able
to say, on Thursday night: "Our
action in seeking a new rela-
tionship with the People's Re-
public of China will not be at
the expense of our old friends."
No one at all hail foreseen
this kind of early result.
IT WAS suggested in this
space, for example, that the
Cnihese might make their move
in 1972. But all supposed the
Chinese would wait for another
half year, at a minimum, to
see whether the President
would give way to the Fair-
bankian chorus. Instead if
the President was telling the
truth about "our old friends"
the Chinese have given way
now, without delay or haggling!
It is precisely this that makes
the ltning of the silver cloud so
very black. It means that the
Chinese Communist leaders
think it urgent, even desper-
ately urgent, to take out every
possible insurance policy against
a Soviet attack. For the Chinese
Communists, relations with the
United States are primarily
such an insurance policy.
THERE HAVE been other
signs of this Chinese sense of
urgency. They have already be-
gun deploying a small number
of their earliest model nuclear
missiles. To do so. they have
quite HU-rally tunneled through
mountains. This is a Chinese
attempt probably a vain at-
tempt to make their first
missiles invulnerable to a So-
viet nuclear strike.
It has to be faced, in fact,
that what the Chinese fear is a
preventive nuclear strike by the
Soviets, to destroy the Chinese
nuclear capability before It
grows too great. That is a hard
morsel for soft-headed Ameri-
cans to chew on. Yet it must
also be faced that the Chinese
fear is thoroughly sensible.
BY THE beginning of this
year, the Soviet buildup on the
Chinese frontier had reached
the level of 45 divisions. The
troops had costly permanent in-
stallations and supporting units.
Large numbers of nuclear weap-
ons, both strategic and tactical,
were also in place
If you add the logistical and
supply units to the combat
units, the Soviet manpower on
the frontier is therefore around
800,000 men.
NOT LONG ago. in a private
talk with a foreigner, Chou En-
lai put the figure at a million
men. But Chou was probably
including the Mongolian army,
which is a mere dependency of
the Soviet armv.
Furthermore, this vast Russian
task force has been mainly de-
ployed over a two-track rail
line, the Trans-Siberian. The
right way to think of what the
Soviets have been doing, in
truth, is to ask yourself what it
would cost this country to put
800.000 men into Alaska!
THE FIRST cost of such an
Alaskan deployment, including
supporting investments, has
Continued on Page 6
1S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK Can you imagine Hubert Humphrey (if he
had won in iy>8> announcing that he would go to Peking and
getting away with it? He would have the artillery of all the
Republicans and half the Democrats in on him. and the pillars of
the temple would crumble around him. Rut Nixon, as a conserva-
tive President, has managed to do what the liberal Democratic
Presidents, John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, were unable to do.
It is the paradoxial genius of the American system that
liberals can do conservative things the right can't, while conser-
vatives con do liberal things the left can't. The gods that watch
over American policy have a sardonic sense of cosmic humor.
fr
CERTAINLY NIXON HAD political motivations. In making
foreign policy decisions a head of government has one eye on his-
tory and the other on the polls at home. If there is a conflict
between the two, the domestic eye is the decisive one. For if a
leader who wants to go down in history as a statesman doesn't
get re-elected he ends as a failed politician, and history passes
him by. But if he wins the sufferage of the people he has another
chance at the sufferage of history, and may combine them
both in a double victory.
Will this apply to Nixon? He ha= already won a personal
victory on a dramatic scale After the Pentagon Papers and the
new Hanoi proposals, he was a President beset and beleaguered.
Now he is off the hook, and in a new position toward his critics.
He has, of course, paid the price of having, in effect, to set
May 1 as aft outside date for American withdrawal, except for
the residual supporting force. But he would have had to do that
in any event, when the Republican presidential convention ap-
proached. He has now made the implicit explicit.
* *
THE IMMEDIATE VICTIM has been the campaign to stop
Nixon in the Republican primaries. The fate of Rep. McCloskey,
of California, worthy Don Quixote that he was. now seems more
dolorous than even a dolorous knight should seem. For the
China move, for a time, mutes the whole war-peace issue. It also
cuts considerable ground from under any Democrat nominated
to run against Nixon, whether Muskie, McGovem. Bayh or Ken-
nedy. The Democratic nomination will still be eagerly sought
but it is no longer an almost certain passport to the White House
For the earlier calculations on a Democratic victory in 1972.
quite aside from specific issues, were based on the widespread
feeling that Nixon doesn't have real stature as a national or
world leader. He has shown how dangerous it is to underestimate
him. The transformation in the domestic political climate has
beer, accompanied by a warming of the world climate. He is
still far from a charismatic figure, and you would still credibly
call him a devious one, but it is hard any longer to call him a
stodgy, soggy, gray man. Rightly or wrongly the theatrical qual-
ity of a presidential visit to Peking has rubbed off on the tourist
himself.
This doesn't mean that 1972 has become a sure thing for
Nixon. Anything but that. He will still be plagued by the poor
performance of the economy, by the strikes and the budget by
his mechanical smile, his awkward public image and the damage
that a succession of events and utterances have done to hts
credibility. He will lose conservative support inside his own
party and among Southern Democrats, probably to Wallace. (He
unlikely to lose them to a Democrat, unless the nominee is
Sen. Jackson, with his reputation as a hardliner on the Pacific
area). Nor is he likely to pick up many clearly liberal votes,
since most liberals seem to distrust him even when bearing gifts
from Peking. The chief impact of his move will be on the margi-
nal and independent vote. Yet despite all these reservations, who
can doubt that his political situation has been transformed.
h DID CHOU EN-LAI KNOW he was bailing him out? Un-
doubtedly: Chou is no fool, and follows American politics. Did
he intend to? Probably not. but China has its own political,
economic and imperial motivations and may not consider another
term for Nixon too high a price to pay for them. For a Republi-
can President, making commitments to a Chinese Communist re-
gime, may be in a better position to carry them out than a Demo-
crat. Besides, it is better for long-range Chinese propaganda to
have a hard-shell capitalist in the White House than a llbera.
refoi-mer.
Nixon's real problem will be with what Eisenhower encount-
ered when his summit with Khrushchev was blown to bits by
the U-2 incident. Hence Nixon's need to "walk on eggshells"
until the summit has shown its results, both for American policy
and his own political fortunes.


Friday. Aug. 6, 1971
flJet* isti fkradiam
Page 5
firsonality profile
Douglas Kaplan
"II -.. cms to riM that most of us
have choice in life cither sit
hack and watch things happen or
DOUGLAS KAPLAN
got in there and work for the things
we want to happen. I guess law-
yers an? In a |>osition to be in
the mainstream of things and sec
what's going on. Most of us in the
profession have the bent of mind
where we want to participate and
help our community grow in the
right directions."
These words are typical of Doug-
].is Kaplan's philosophy about pub-
sarvioe and they point out why
he has devoted so much of his
lime during the years to various
organisations. For ever since he
. rrived In Holly wood, be has given
his services and time to rnarfj
worthwhile causes. Just this week
an announcement was made thai
Douglas Kaplan has been ap-
pointed chairman of the South
Browetd County Drifted Fund.
In taking over this position.
Mr. Kaplan stated. "I feel that the
southern end of Broward County
has never fully realized its poten-
tial as far as United Fund is con-
cerned. This year we are formulat-
ing committees involving some of
the most dynamic and capable
people in our area. Through their
interest and work we feel that tin-
United Fund message will be
brought to everyone and the cam-
paign will have it s most successful
year."
Although Mr. Kaplan has always
had an interest in United Fund,
his interest has intensified during
his present tenure as president of
Jewish Family Service. United
Fund is one of the supporters of
Jewish Family Service, yd during
his presidency Mr. Kaplan has be-
come aware that many people with
whom has has had contact this
year do not fully realize United
Funds importance ami its contri-
butions to the community.
Mr. Kaplan received his higher
education at the University of
Miami and was an honor graduate
of the University of Miami Law-
School. His wife, Marci, graduated
Summa Cum Laude from U-M.
After Mr. Kaplan received his Law
degree, he took post graduate
work at Harvard University Law
School before settling down to
practice law in Hollywood, where
he is presently the Senior City
Prosecutor. He has been a mem-
ber of the board and is a past
president oi the Northwest Civic
Association. His religious affilia-
tion is with Temple Beth Shalom,
where has has been president and
remains a member of the board.
He has also been active In the cam-
paigns of Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion for many years.
Mr. Kaplan and his wife, the
parents of three young children,
Kusscll. Hilary and Karen partici-
pated in a UJA Young Leaders
tour of Israel this year.
RABBI TANINBAUM ASKS
Intermarriage-Jewish Suicide?
Calling mixed marriages "acts
of group suicide.' a leading Amer-
ican rabbi asked a radio audience
recently, "How can one justify a
demand to allow Soviet Jews to
perpetuate their religious contin-
uity, when mixed marriages here
ire resulting In TOfl of the chil-
dren being lost to the Jewish
community?"
Speaking July 19 on station
WINS. New York. Rabbi Marc H.
Eanenbaum, national director of
the American Jewish Committee's
Interreligious Affairs Department,
liseus-sed the controversial issue
BOBBE SCHLESINGER
Is Vacationing ...
Her Column,'OURTOWN,"
Will Be Resumed In
The Next Issue
of rabbis performing mixed roarri-
ige ceremonies.
The ciurs^ion, arose at a recent
convention of the Central "Confer-
er.ee of Amc> ican Rabbis (Re-
form>, where retiring president.
Rabbi Roland Gittelson of Boston,
formally proposed the adaption of
i resolution calling mixed marri-
ages "contrary to the tradition of
the Jewish religion" and urging
members not to officiate at such
ceremonies. The earlier position
of Reform rabbis, adopted in 1947.
had simply "discouraged" mixed
marriages.
Rabbi Tancnbaum said the Is-
sue has become Increasingly con-
troversial in recent years due to
the glowing rate of intermarriage
among young, particularly third
generation. Jews. The April .jour-
nal of the Reform rabbis disclosed,
for example, that in Los Angeles
40'; of the l.(XK) Reform wedding-
involved a non-Jew.
"Most of these weddings M
performed by a few rabbis who
set no standards; that is, they dii
not require as do other Refonr
rabbis that the non-Jewish per-
son agree to study Judaism to es-
tablish a Jewish home linked i::
some way to the Jewish commun-
ity, and to raise their children as
Jews. Tancnbaum commented.
That failure, he said, risks weak-
ening the Reform struggle for ac-
ceptance in the State of Israel as
a legitimate Jewish religious al-
ternative to Orthodoxy.
Studies of intermarriage among
Jews suggests that as many as 20
to 30'' of the current generation
is married outside the Jewish fait!'
be a
name dropper
1 ^ubinste'ns'
RED SOCKEYE
\ SALMON /
MARVIN M. SHUSTER, M.D. P.A.
Announces tho relocation of his
office for the practice of
PLASTIC SURGERY
to
4001 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
American Board of
Plastic Surgery
Tel. 961-5500


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Page 6
Je*lstiFk)rkteun
Friday. Aug. B, 1971
scene aWnd
by Marjo Nevjns
Desks are empty, stores are closed, machines are idle .
It 'a vacation time and routine i* interrupted while everyone takes
h^ allotted timo for a change of scenery Sometimes it
involves a trip with new faces and new places sometimes
it involves staying home and cleaning those closets which should
have been done long ago.
We miss our favorite cashier at the supermarket our
hairdresser who is touring Europe while our hair gets droopier
nd droopier our pharmacist is off on a camping trip with
his family our children among the throngs in Europe .
my rx.ris who has taken care of my family so well all these years
is away and her clean kitchen is beginning to look crummy,
literally our dogs are at the canine equivalent of Camp-Ka-
Dee-Mah (or more prosaically, a kennel I our publisher's
assistant is vacationing and making life too haid for our
publisher.
Our rabbis are officially on vacation. Dorothy Seldes
from Temple Sinai spent some time in her old home town of
Memphis. Rose Kite of Temple Beth El took time off to
catch up on all the things she never has time for during the
year. Sandi Katler of the Federation office spent extra time
with her three little girls. Sylvia Gordon of Temple Beth
Shalom vacationd.
Ellen Epstein got away from the adding machine which
totals up those Federation pledges and went riding again at a
ranch in Montana. Laura. Joan, Peggy, all the gals from
the Federation offices took time off to refuel for the coming
year. Lillian Kaplan up at Jewish Family Service spent
tome time visiting the Gaspe peninsula in Canada.
As for me. I'm waiting until everyone is back at work and
then I'm taking off looking forward to things is almost as
much fun as DOING them for me so I'm putting it off and
thinking about it.
fr
ft
Esther Lowenthal is taking time off from her position as
Dhx?ctor of Case Work for Jewish Family Service and will take
a combination work-and-play vacation. She is going to attend
the International Conference of Jewish Communal Workers in
Jerusalem in August. (This is the second such conference the
first, held four years ago, was also in Jerusalem). Esther tells me
that the United States had the largest representation there at
that time, but surprisingly, the country with the third largest
representation was France, although the size of their Jewish
population wouldn't warrant it Esther will also spend some
extra time in Israel before and after the conference and will also
take in the sights of London and Amsterdam.
ft
ft
For late vacationers, and those who want to learn while
vacationing. Herb Katz and Norman Atkin will lead a group of
localites o.i a study mission to Israel in November. They have
also arranged a stop-over in London and that should be extra
t-necial because what could be better than having Nancy and
Norm Atkin as Tour Guides in London? They lived there for a
year not so long ago and should certainly be able to point out all
the most interesting spots. ... It should be the perfect trip for
anyone who really wants to see Israel and London and have good
company while they're doing it.
ft ft
Abbey and Reuben Klein just returned from a month's vaca-
tion they took their three older girls with them and visited
Abbey's parents in New York and then went on up to Canada
. Abbey says that the girls were delighted to be out in the
country but didn't like big city life too much .the Kleins got
back in time to get busy arranging a "Hanging Party" for the
Hollywood Art Museum at their home. Aug. 15 is the date and
it's going to be a real New England dinner ... the $15 a per-
son includes booz', so the price of admission won't make them
rr>oncy but they hope to create a nucleus of interested people
who will match an anonymous gift which they have already re-
ceived on Jie condition that it be matched with a like amount
. the city has promised them a Young Circle location for the
museum when the money is raised
ft ft ft
BITS AND PIECES Jane and Andy Illowit moved to
Davie and right after the move gave a swinging party to cele-
brate. Esther and Allan Gordon have moved into their
Sc fche hates to leave the house. Tennis buff Mona Hotchkiss
tells me that she's playing better than ever when she gets time
off from taking care of her new grandson, Peter and Carmen's
child. Saw another tennis buff. Maddy Kest, batting them
across the net at the Diplomat Jan Levy, (Betty and Har-
old's daughter) will marry Gary Ginsburg, Hilda's son, come
September, after which they expect to live down here. The
Ted Sorins celebrated their 35th anniversary with a party at
Emerald Hills ... all their children came in for the occasion
and joined a host of friends helping them celebrate.
jh.h~ of 1>h_ | Jots And Teens Featured
In 2-Act Musical Comedy
JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued from P9 *
been estimated to this reporter
at around $30 billion. Add the
maintenance cost of such a
large force, over a long period.
You then have a bill no sane
government would pay without
being conditionally ready to use
the force in question.
Obviously, there are a lot of
people in the Soviet government
who want to put the force to
use, perhaps in another couple
of years. And obviously, this is
why the Chinese want an in-
surance policy so badly.
American Tourists
Forced To Leave
Before Tour's End
WASHINGTON (WNS)
American correspondents James
Yuengcr of the Chicago Tribune
and James Pieport of the Asso-
ciated Press reported from Mos-
cow that they had been harassed
by Soviet police while talking
to Soviet Jews.
Yuenger said that on July 21.
he and the man he was talking
to were arrested and taken to
police headquarters. Yuenger
was released after 10 minutes.
Pieport reported that on July
19. while talking to a Jew on
Gorky Street, the police broke
up the conversation and led the
man away. Pieport was told the
incident was none of his business.
That same week, two Ameri-
can tourists were forced to leave
the Soviet Union before the end
of their 22-day tour after being
accused of "anti-Soviet" activi-
ties. Irving Silverman, 51, of
Roslyn, NY., publisher of "The
Knitting Times" and Leonard
Shuster, 35, a businessman from
Winnwood. Pa., were charged
with "involvement with Soviet
citizens and the distribution of
anti-Soviet literature." They de-
nied the charges.
"We admit speaking with So-
viet citizens, Jews and non-
Jews alike," Silverman said.
"But it was mainly at the in-
sistance of those people them-
selves who wanted to know more
about the United States."
The Hallandalc Civic Center
Fund will present "tots and teens"
in "My Friend Curlcy" Wednes-
day, Aug. 18. through Saturday.
Aug. 21 at 7:30 p.m. (matinees
Wednesday and Saturday at 2 p.m.)
in the Hallandalc Junior High
School Auditorium.
The production is a two-act
comedy featuring music, song and
ballet with a cast that includes
some of the children who appeared
in the "Little Miss" pageant.
Choreographers are Claire Cohen
and Judy Manulkin. Assisting in
the production will be Fay Folino,
Lorric Davis, Shirley Italia, Tess
Esposito, Estelle Goodman, Judy
Blassing and Essis and John Men-
delsohn. Producer-Director is Flor-
ence Rose.
Tickets may be secured at the
Hallandalc Recreation Centre, the
Hallandalc Chamber of Commerce
and from the cashier at Hallandalc
City Hall at $1.25 for adults and
75 cents for children. "Love gifts"
from caterpillar star Curley will
be given to all children attending.
'Have A Circus' Theme Of
Annual Playcamp Program
The theme of this year's "Play-
camp" program sponsored by the
Hollywood Recreation Department
at David Park Center, 103 N. 33rd
Ct.,~and at Driftwood Recreation
Center, 3000 NW 69th Ave., is
"Have A Circus." Boys and girls
from kindergarten to sixth grade
are participating in the annual
program, sessions are held from
9 a.m. to noon Mondays through
Fridays.
The month of August will be
divided into two playcamp sessions
at both centers "Under the Big
Top" is scheduled Aug. 2-13; Three
Rings of Fun" from Aug. 16-27.
The sessions will include stuffed
animal shows, clown cut-ups, arts,
crafts, movies, field trips, penny
carnivals, a birthday party, awards
day and a "Big Top Show." "Have
A Circus" highlights will include
contests, dramatic productions,
games and dress-up parties.
Mrs. Rosemary Dowdle is in
charge of David Park's playcamp,
and Mis. Mariesta Spirkoff of
Driftwood Center's program.
Mrs. Irene Devin is coordinating
"Have A Circus." which is part of
the recreation department's "sum-
merful of fun" activities.
MARTIN W. TREIBER,
M.D.
Announces the opening of his new office
in the Practice of Internal Medicine at:
2100 East Hallandale Beach Boulevard
Suite 403, Home Federal Building
Hallandale, Florida
925-1439
Hours by Appointment
GREATER MIAMI CATERERS
DELUXE RESIDENTIAL DINNER SERVICE
OFFERS
w
DINE-AT-HOME"
A complete 4 course dinner prepared the day of your order with choke
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FOR YOU, 1 dinner 5 days 9.00 *..., 4 4*^
For a family of 5-5 days 35.50 ^num.**,^
Crffrour^n. ^^ by ^ ^^ Tol: 633-4616
PH0NI 5114317
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Kitchen Cabinets, Countertops, Flooring, Paneling
Acoustical Ceilings, Appliances, Bathroom Fixtures
GENERAL CONTRACTING
TRI-STATE
INDUSTRIES
5140 So. 5*. RcL 7 -Between Stirling Rd. & Griffin Rtj.
WhoU$#k-.Rt*il.
4
-- ; --


Friday. Aug. 6. 1971
fJewisti fkwidfiar)
Perg 7
Hallandale Chapter's
Plans Nearly Complete
Now completing plans for the
group activities for the 1971-72
season is the Hallandale Chapter
cf Hadassah, which is composed of
tix proups Including Chai Fair-
ways, Hemispheres. Imperial Tow-
eg, Parker Towers, and Plaza
Towers.
A paid-up membership tea is
planned for 12:30 p.m. on Tues-
day,, Nov. 16, at Temple Beth El.
Mrs. George Sass Vizenthal is
nerving as chairman of this event.
The Gold Donor luncheon will
he held in the Nassau Room ot
I
the Diplomat Country Club on
Dec. 15, with Mrs. Zachary Boosin
as luncheon chairman.
Mrs. Milton Kaufman will serve
as chairman of the Youth Aliyah
luncheon at Aventura Country
Club Jan. 19. The annual donor
luncheon will be held March 22
at Emerald Hills Country Club
*ith Mrs. Albert Tolin as chair-
man.
Mrs. Harry Zeiger will be hostess
of the education workshop, the
aate for which has not been set.
slra La La Troupers'
Embarks On Second Tour
Children from the entire Holly-
v their parents to see the perform-
ance of "Tra La La Troupers" as
it embarks on its second tour with
ii brand new repertoire.
Scenes from "Hansel and Gretcl"
end the "Wonderful Tar-Baby
Story" will be depicted by the
young actors under the direction
of Mrs. Jane Rose, performing
arts supervisor for Hollywood
Recreation Department.
Thursday, Aug. 5, they were to
appear at the Polk Street Recrea-
tion Center. On Saturday they will
e"ppear at Utopia and also perform
t.1 the Instant Playground site.
Monday at 9:15 a.m. they will b-
at Driftwood Recreation Center
and at 10:30 a.m. at Washington
Park, 5131 Pembroke Rd. The fi
nal performance will be at th
Hollywood Mall at 1 p.m. Wednes
day.
The Troupers program is spon-
ored by the Hollywood Recreation
Department with support of the
National Endowment for the Arts
and Fine Arts Council of Florida.
There is no charge for any of the
performances.
Auditions for another teenage
dramatic company will be held this
fall.
NEW a REMODELID FURNITURE
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DR. GERALD FRIED
Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons announce the opening
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iniht
ROWARS MEDICAL BUILDING.
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BEGINS AUG. 16
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Phone 733-0025
7950 TAFT ST.
on Taft Streer
off University Drive
INTERNAL MEDICINE ASSOCIATES OF HOLLYWOOD
(Drs. Milloff, Permesly, Fuerst, Silver and Goldstein, P. A.)
is pleased to announce the association of
PHILIP R GOULD, M. D.
and
JACK B. MILLER, M.D.
for the practice of Internal Medicine
at
750 South Federal Highway
Hollywood, Florida
baby, what a summer
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Friday. Aug. 6. 1371

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HOMESTEAD
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W. HOLLYWOOD
6017 Hollywood Blvd.
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2604 South 4th St 464*020


Aug. 6. 1971
fJewisli fhrkMan
Page 9
r/ie tiaeoi ^peaht J'rotn Jlie fTmpU
7e Can Stand At Sinai
Mil C.IXBF.RT KOLLIX
Temple Eiiunu-EI
B it known unto your chil-
hd your grandchildren con-
the day when you stood
the Lord, your God, at
i Yelioshua Ben Levi has
ted, "Anyone who teaches
his grandchild is account-
one who actually received
rah at Mount Sinai." An
lous teacher, refering to the
erse had the following to
nyone who hears his grand-
Interpivt a passage of the
bean it as if it came from
inai."
ug to aay: "Anyone who
Us grandchild interpret ;\
of the Torah hears it as if
from Mount Sinai."
of tlvsc comments bring
^he point that the relevance
imvdiacy of the Torah de-
jinon the active involvement
^ers and sons and grandehil-
the study of Torah.
chiH absorbs interest in
law at;1 tradition from his
[environment as a natural
Seminar On Prevention Of
Blindness Set August 25 27
aspect of his life, it is as if he him-
self stood at Mount Sinai. That is
the purpose of the Passover Seder,
to make the child feel that the
Exodus just happened; that it was
an event in his lather's and moth-
er's life.
The religious school is supposed
to be surrogate for the parent in
the teaching of Torah. Unfortun-
ately, most parents are concerned
only with having their children
"do a good job" at their Bar Mitz-
vah, and couldn't care less about
whether they actually acquire any
knowledge of Torah. Therein lies
the crisis of Jewish education,
which is actually nothing but a
reflection of the indifference of
parents to the quality of their chil-
dren's Jewish education.
The weekly section concludes
with Chapter Six of Deuteronomy
which contains the "Shorna" and
th" words "You shall love the Lord
your God. Teach the command-
ments unto your children."
When the root of Torah study is
permitted to die, the foliage of
observance and the very stock of
identity cannot long survive.
A seminar meeting on the pre-
vention of blindness will be held
in Jerusalem Aug. 25-27 under the
**.:?.*:'. -r-.T' ^ '..., -.^ -. .... ..
;;,-'
-.
m PI
Y *1 k 4 K an i
\ i
'': X m *i
ant phase in the history of the dis-
ease, because preventive measures
can be taken if the hole is de-
tected in time. For this reason, a
nationwide study has been made
by ophthalmologists throughout
eisman Attacked For His
tand On Emergency Visas
YORK (VVNS) Two Or- their primary demand to be per-
rabbts, Bernard A. Poupko
ent of the Religious Zionists
nerlca and Abraham Gross,
dent of the Rabbinical Alli-
in separate statements have
fcked Herman L. Weisman,
Jklent of the Zionist Organiza-
,of America, for urging Con-
to drop proposed legislation
would authorize 30,000
gency visas for Soviet Jews.
FWeisnnn had said the visas
only "divert attention from
9
IGHT1NG TIME
7:44 15 AB
*rVAAAAAr*e***
mitted to go to Israel.
Rabbi Gross called Mr. Weis-
man's statement "irresponsible"
and "unrepresentative of Jewish
opinion." Rabbi Poupko called on
Orthodox and Zionist organiza-
tions to rectify "the harmful ef-
fects of the Weisman statement"
by informing Congressmen of their
approval of the proposed legisla-
tion.
"It is regrettable, if not sinful,
that an obstacle is being placed in
the path Of Jews. We are no less
concerned than the ZOA about
the needs of our Soviet brethren to
live full lives in Israel, but their
safety and security, indeed their
physical survival, takes precedence
over this noble aspiration," Rabbi
Poupko said.
i.'IWMI'WHttW n""~4
,,. ,..,.. .,:,,.. '"' ..:.i: --' "">*'
SYNOPSIS OF THI WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Va-Etkha
"And I besought the Lord at that time ." (Chapters III,
11)
[APPEAL FOR OBEDIENCE: Continuing his first discourse,
related how he had entreated God to be allowed to pass
the Jordan, but his plea had been denied. He had viewed
[Promised Land from the peak of Mt. Pisgah and Joshua had
appointed to carry out the task of conquest. Moses appealed
people to adhere meticulously to God's statutes and
tents, for thereby they would be recognized by other
j as a great and wise nation. They should never forget their
prience at the foot of Mt. Horeb, where they heard the voice
proclaiming the Ten Commandments which he inscribed
two tables of stone. God did not appear in any form or
and this should serve as a warning against fashioning
?n images of any kind.
EXPOSITION OF THE COMMANDMENTS: Moses began
_ discourse by repeating the Ten Commandments, which
. the foundation of God's covenant with Israel. The people
snbled at Sinai, he recalled, had been terrified at all they
witnessed, and pleaded that Moses should address them in-
_ of God. Moses then affirmed the unity of God, whom all
4kl love and whose commandments should be transmitted to
younger generation. These laws were to be constantly re-
dbered bv means of a 'sign' upon the hand and 'frontlets'
veen the eyes and Inscribed on the doorposts of the house.
. generations should be trained to observe all of Gal's
indments because only In so doing will mankind be able
ve in peace.
MMMMHHHCVUaMn:>
DK. I. C. HKMIISON
auspices of the Israel Academy of
Sciences and Humanities, Dr. I. C.
Michaelson has announced.
Co-sponsors of the seminar are
the Hadassah Medical Organization
and Israel Ophthalmological So-
ciety. Dr. Michaelson, head of the
Department of Ophthalmology at
the Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center, is the convenor.
"There has been an explosion of
blindness in the world: where
there were 5 million blind in 1950,
there are now 15 million, and the
number of blind Jews in Israel
has risen from 500 in 1950 to 9,000
in 1971," Dr. Michaelson said.
The causes of this increase in
blindness, said Prof. Michaelson,
were threefold: pre-natal or hered-
itary; degenerative or the breaking
down of tissues; and environmental,
where infectious diseases play an
important role.
Dr. Michaelson reported that Dr.
Shaul Matin and his group at Ha-
dassah are making a genetic map
<>f Cyprus, where about 79r< is due
to pre-natal causes, as a first step
towards attempting to control
childhood blindness there.
Some Mft of the world's blind-
ness is due to pre-natal causes; in
the remaining 80r^, the cause is
either degenerative or environ-
mental, the proportion varying
from country to country. In the
developing countries, environment
is a more important cause of blind-
ness, as, for instance, trachoma or
other infectious diseases in many
African countries.
In the highly developed countries,
the role of degenerative diseases is
greater. In Great Britain, for ex-
ample, diabetic retinopathy. or
disease of the retina due to dia-
betes, and glaucoma, an eye dis-
ease associated with Increased
pressure in the eyeball, are more
prominent causes of blindness.
In Israel, a recent survey on the
prevalence and causes of blindness
in Jerusalem was carried out by a
team headed by Prof. S. Kark,
head of the Department of Social
Medicine at Hadassah. shows that
the proportion of blindness due to
infectious diseases is higher than
in a developed country such as
Canada.
However, it must be borne in
mind that a third of the blind per-
sons studied were immigrants from
Middle East and African countries
who were blind on arrival in Israel
and that there is much blindness
among them due to infectious dis-
eases. With regard to cases of
recent onset of blindness in Israel,
the proportions caused by infec-
tious diseases and pre-natal causes
ire similar to thoge found in
Canada.
Among degenerative diseases,
retinal detachment Is a major
cause of blindness. It can be
treated successfully, but surgery
often fails, and the treatment at
best is prolonged and exhausting.
The evolution from retinal hole
to a detachment is a most import-
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
(C), Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Inc.
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
(o 18T1 Jewish Telegraphic Agtncj
Why are three npeclal verses
from the Bible recited by the
worshipper before leaving the
synugaguc?
The first of these verses come
from the Book of Proverbs and
tell the worshipper "not to be
afraid of sudden terror" (Proverb
3:26). The second eomes from the
Book of Isaiah Indicating that the
counsel which the enemies of Is-
rael take together will be of no
avail (Isaiah 8:101. The third
verse also comes from Isaiah and
encourage* the worshipper telling
Israel to determine the incidence
of retinal detachment. From*^his
it has been possible to set up a
series of retinal holes retinal
detachment probability tables
which can be used to determine
whether an operation is indicated
or not.
Hadassah's Department of Oph-
thalmology, through the Depart-
ment of International Cooperation
of the Israel Foreign Ministry, have
cooperated with seven African
countries in setting up eye clinics
in countries where there were no
ophthalmologists at all. Local doc-
tors and nurses an being trained
in Hadassah to take over these
clinics, while doctors from Hadas-
sah run the clinics in the interim.
Ten doctors from developing
lands have been trained or are be-
ing trained by Hadassah. In some
of these lands, an infectious dis-
aaae called river blindness has
blinded 10 million people. Trachoma
Ls prevalent in all the countries in-
volved except Liberia: in some
districts of Ethiopia, the preva-
lancc is as high as 90'/-.
Through the eye clinics estab-
lished by Hadassah, medical as-
sistants are trained to fight in-
fectious diseases The Hadassah
ophthalmologists have examined
him not to be afraid of sudden, 500,000 patients in Africa and
fright because the Almighty wil
always be at his side (Isaiah 46:4i.
Some commentaries trace these
have performed more than 20,000
operations, most of them for cata-
racts, trachoma and corneal trans-
to the experience of Mordecai who I P'ans-
was threatened by the villain Ha-
inan with extinction both for him
and his ix>ople. On going out in the
street he met three children, ask-
ing each of them to recite some
verse in the Bible. The three chil-
dren recited the aforementioned
three verses.
It is quite possible that these
three verses are the ones that &re
recited before leaving the syna-
gogue because the synagogue rep-
resented a protected and sheltered
environment for the Jew while the
outside world was full of threats
front anti-Semites. The rabbis
wanted the Jew to carry the con-
fidence of the synagogue and his
'aith with him in the outside world
and thus they ordained that these
verses be recited before leaving
he svnagoue.
Religious
Services
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER 128
NE Ut Ava. 44
H0UYW0O0
BETH EL (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ava.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. 48
BETH SHALOM (Tample). 1728 Mou-
nt St. Conaarvativa. Rabbi Morton
Mataveky. Cantor Irving Gold. 48
SINAI (Tempi*). 1201 Johnaon St.
Conaarvativa. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yohodah Hailbraon. 47
-------
MiRAMAR
ISRAEL (Tampla) 8920 SW 35th St.
Conaarvativa. Rabbi Elliot J. Wino-
grad. Cantor Abraham Koatar. 48
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER.
NW 9th St.
810-
More than 500 specialists will
atteriH the 'Seminar on the Pre-
vention of Blindness in Developing
and Developed Countries." The
aim to to bring together eye doc-
tors from all over the world, par-
ticularly from developing coun-
Iiies, laboratory scientists who are
doing research on the pathology
and biochemistry of the eye, and
administrators who are battling
with blindness in the field.
"The great problem is that the
knowledge of how to deal with
blindness is concentrated in lab-
oratories and hospitals in developed
countries, and that there is a great
gap between knowledge and prac-
tice." Dr. Michaelson says. "The
International Seminar airrtB at
making the scientists aware of the
difficulties of the administrators
and bringing the knowledge of the
research workers to the practical
men. In fact, it will be like a uni-
versal or world fair at which the
eye doctors and the basic scien-
tists will be exposing their wares
to persons, such as director-gen-
erals of medical services, who are
in a position to apply them to the
different populations."
Among the participants will be
leading ophthalmologists from all
parts of the world. Including 50
leading doctors from the United!
States. Organizations represented
will be the World Health Organi-
zation, the International Society
of Ophthalmology, the American
Overseas Foundation for the Bund,
the International Society foe the
Prevention of Blindness. On the
administrative side, several minis-
ters of health and their director-
generals from developing countries
and many medical administrators
are exoected to participate.
K^ommunitu ^-^alendi
ar
miDAY, AUGUST 6
Hadassoh Beach Gr.ua Beord Meeting
SUNDAY, AUGUST I
Hollond4e Jewish Center Men's Club Meetino a.m. Hnllan-
ddle Jewish Center
MONDAY, AUGUST 9
Woman"! Amorieen 0RT HoHemdale Chapter Board Meeting -
Noon
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18
Hadassah Hollywood Chapter Mooting 1 p.m.
THURSDAY, AUGUST It "
Women's American OUT Hotlondale Chapter -1pm. Hallandol.
Home Federal Blag. ________________
I
I


JlT^
in )nagBnHPMHH
Page 10
vJewtstncrrtfrr
Friday, Aug. 6 I97
Rabbis Debate Proposal Of
Amnesty For War Resisters
I
By bkv <;au.0B' "
A proposal by a loading Ortho-
dox rabbi that after the Viet-
nam war ends the VS. govern-
ment should provide amnesty for
.wnscientious war resistors who
(led to another country and par-
.k>ns for those jailed for such re-
sistance has been endorsed by a
'onservative rabbinical leader and
issailed by a second Orthodox
rubbi. All three have been involved
tu providing service to Jewish men
111 the armed forces.
I"he statements by Rabbi Eman-
U6i Rackman who offered the
proposal by Rabbi Judah Na-
dich, the Conservative raibbi. and
by Rabbi Louis Bernstein, appeared
111 the current issue of Sh'ma. an
independent journal of Jewish opin-
ion edited by Rabbi Eugene B. Bor-
?witz. a Reform scholar.
Rabbi Rackman based hi* pro-
posal on the proposition there
i.lvHild be formal recognition of
he legitimacy of objection to a
particular war even if it is based
exclusively on moral grounds and
irrespective whether the object ant
believes in Go .1 livine will."
The U.S. Supreme Court has
vet to rule specifically on selective
.onscientious objection to the Viet-
nam war and local draft boards
liave refused to grant CO status
'<) draftees taking that stand.
K.ibbi Rackman stressed that his
liroposal would provide that such!
'clemency would be in order when
courts or administrators" were!
satisfied that' the' "passive resist
ance and the submission to the
indignity of a jail sentence or the
privations of flight was nobly
motivated.
Rabbi Rackman also argued that
such clemency "need not be auto-
matic and gratuitous" in that the
government "could easily provide
substitute forms of service" so
that the war resister would not
"altogether evade his duties and
responsibilities as a citizen." He
asserted that such governmental
action "would also induce a great
respect for law- insofar as citizens
would know that strict law is tem-
[>ered by mercy and the legal sys-
tem is sensitive to the moral con-
victions of individuals."
The number of such war resist-
ers who would benefit from Rabbi
Rack-man's proposal could not be
determined. There is no validated
information on the number of
Americans sentenced to jail on
such grounds of conscience. It has
been estimated that there are 80,-
000 war resisters now living in
Canada, of whom about one-third
are believed to be Jews, but that
figure has not been verified.
The three rabbis served as mili-
tary chaplains during World War
II. Rabbi Rackman is a member
of the Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy of the National Jewish
Welfare Board, which processes
rabbinical graduates lor the mili-
tary chaplaincy. Rabbi Nadich is
a member of the Association of
Jewish Chaplains of the Armed
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
Some Terrorists Confess
Others Die In Battle
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Vempte Set A t
tHemctutf
C/atdens
The only all-jew rsh cemetery in Browird
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
xaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923 825S_or write:
" TEMPLE BETH EL &&$&c\
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: _____________________________________i_
ADDRESS:
PHONE:-------------
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
140 S. MXK MI&MWAY, NOUTWOO*
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"A Service WHkw The fleam Of All"
Forces. Rabbi Bernstein served its'
chairman of the chaplaincy com-
mission of the Rabbinic Alumni of
Yeshtva University.
Rabbi Rackman disputed the
usual arguments that such liberal-
ity toward war resisters might en-
danger the nation's safety. He
argued that if too many Americans
would seek to take advantage of
such a standard, it would indicate
that those in power who had de-
clared war had failed to appraise
accurately "the general will" of
the American people against that
war.
"In a war supported by most
Americans, conscripted objectors.''
he argued, "would be fighters with-
out morale and it would be na-
tional suicide to rely upon them.
It would be wiser national policy."
he added, to conscript them for I
non-war duties."
*
In endorsing Rabbi Rackman's
proposal. Rabbi Nadich comment-
ed it might be difficuk to deter-
mine which of the men who fled
to Canada did so out of moral con-
viction but that it was his "guess"
that "the overwhelming majority
went into exile because of moral
conviction." He agreed with Rabbi
Rackman's proposal that such re-
sisters could be directed to un-
dertake services for the welfare
of the community. "Clemency di-
rected to men of conscience will
result in benefit to the United
States for the return of such peo-
ple will strengthen the moral fiber
of the totality of American citi-
zenry." he asserted.
Disagreeing vigorously, Rabbi
Bernstein noted that there were
troops "on the front lines in Viet-
nam who question the American
presence there but who have placed
the rule of law and democracy
over their private convictions." He
declared that public discussions
about exonerating "those who have
ignominously fled their country"
might .be demoralizing to those
still fighting in Vietnam.
Rabbi Bernstein, who argued
that Rabbi Rackman's thesis in-
volved a basic alteration of "our
current concept of democracy of
majority rule even if the ma-
jority is a single vote." asked
whether there should be two sets
of laws, one for a majority and
the other for a minority. "Such a
double standard robs democracy of
its meaning and reduces it to the
level of impotence and anarchy."
he contended.
He asked what yardstick should
be used "in measuring which extra-
legal acts can be condoned." While
a nation might grant clemency to
thou "who tore up draft cards as
an act of dissent." he asserted,
"there are those who blew up
college buildings and killed inno-
cent people because they disagreed
with the law of the land, and grant-
ing them clemency would be in-
herently wrong."
The "vitality and will" of the
American society which he de-
scribed as "still far superior to
any visible alternative, despite its
iniquities and imperfections" is
being challenged oy external pres-
sures in the Middle East as well
as the Far East," he argued. "It is
unreal to ignore this in such a
discussion." he said. "Our righteous
concern about individual consci-
ence becomes academic in view of
this threat to human freedom, and
only an America cognizant of this
danger and willing to resist
it can stop it."
Asserting that there were no
"particular" wars now, he argued
that "what happens along the Suez
Canal, for example, affects the
entire world."
(C) ITt Jewish Tl*Tphic Agency
TEL AVIV (WNSi Five
tvrmists, members- of a gang
responsible for 1969-1970 bomb-
ings in Tel Aviv. Haifa and Na-
tanya, have been arrested by
police here. The leader. Abdul
Malek, 26, is an Arab lawyer
from Nazareth who has defend-
ed a number of terrorists pre-
viously brought to trial. Three
of the members of his gang
were Israeli Arabs; the fourth
was a resident of Nablus. in the
West Bank, and a cache of ex-
plosives bazookas and bazooka
shells, light machine guns and
demolition was found in the
schoolhouse where he taught.
Police said KM five had con-
fessed setting off a bomb in a
parked car on Karen Kaya-
meth Blvd. near Dizeneoff St.
in Tel Aviv, another in a ear
parked in a lot near a Haifa
movie theatre and in two cars
parked in residential areas of
Natanya.
A terrorist who threw a gre-
nade at Defense Minister Moshe
Da van's car as it passed through
, Ga^a April H> 106*4183 gone or.
trial before a military tribunal
The grenade miss Dayan's ve-
hicle, but killed two Arab by-
standers and wounded eight
others.
Standing trial with the do.
feint ant. a member of the Pop.
alar Liberation Front, are (our
other members of the organiza-
tion who are chars;**! with %
lone list of offenses, including
11 murders in the El Shafti ref-
ugee camp in Oaza.
After an all-night pursuit and
a gun battle with an Israeli
patrol, five terrorists who were
on the "wanted list" were killed
last week in Gaza. Another ter-
rorist who was killed in the
Mouazzi refugee camp in the
Gaza Strip, was found to be car-
rying hand grenades.
After the capture of four ter-
rorists in the southern Golan
Heights, the body of a fifth and
five Kalaehnikof rifles weee dis-
covered nearby.
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Sdcy. Aug.. 6, 1971
*Jk*isli narktiar
Paqm lh
BOOK REVIEW
By Seymour B. Litbman
I
Books On Israeli Military Problems
UfllKN Isk.VKI. GAINED control of the West
" Batik which Jordan had seised by aggression
\r, 1948 it was faced with the unforeseen problem
of governing a million Arabs.
ShabbtniTeveth tell* the fcfory Wf'
Israel's capture of this territory
fg and the consequences. The pro-
I tagonist of the account in The
( ursed r.i.ssinu (Random House,
$8.95) is Zvi Offer, a man recalled
to service just prior to the Six-
Day War. Offer, a Lieutenant
Colonel (res.), who was named
the military governor of Nablus, recounts how he
* cured the co-operation of the Arabs who had con-
trolled the utilities and the economy of the area.
The progression from initial amicable relation-
ships to school strikes, terrorism and the discov-
ery of arms caches combine to make a siispcnseful
account. It is skillfully related despite occasional
slow pacing. The account is told from the point of
view of the Arabs as w'IL,a.Jsj-acjis. The removal
of suspicions, the initial flexible policies*of Dayan
(later reversed by his superiors in the Cabinet),
'fehtMtw volatile changes in some of the Arab func-
tionaries created additional complexities in Situa-
tions which were laden with significant difficulties
t tax the wisdom of Solomon.
The book offers no prognostications. It is a
journalistic account with little editorializing. The
Cursed Blessing is but one of several books, all
written by Israelis, which make one point: the gov-
erning elite of Israel have not known and still do
not know how to deal with the Arabs.
Shimon Peres, former Deputy Minister of De-
fense, in his book, Uaviu' SUng (Random House.
$8.951, may be cited in support of the above dis-
maying statement. Peres begins his inside story of
how Israel developed her military strength by say-
ing that Israel's security problem is unique because
"its prime factor is the totality of Arab hostility."
Peres, however, does not consider that Arab hos-
tility for decades prior to 1948 might have Mui
avoided if the members of the first and second ali-
yah had-known how to deal with-Arabs.-The inflexi-
bility of the early socialists, their chauvinism and
veneration Of their principles, and their lack of
eni]>athy toward the Arabs created some, if not
most, of the Arab hostility.
Peres admits that "neither the fathers of the
Zionist Movement nor the founders of modern Israel
envisaged the almost constant need to keep
one hand on the defensive sword." They saw Arabs
its they imagined or wonted them to be rather than
as they were.
More precise editing would have improved the
author's disjointed style. There are several personal
opinions of the author which are questionable. The
value of the book is solely in its contribution to
the military history of Israel.
Our Film Folk:
By HERBERT G. IUFT
Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
Richard Benjamin In Title Role Israelis Play Ping Pong
i> .,|i> i iiciu isti. JMvi*h Teii-Ki-aiiiiii- akcii.v, Inc.)
I yy\KNt.it BMP has signed Richard Benjamin
for the highly controversial role of the sex-
driven Alexander Portnoy in writer-producer- direc-
tor Krnest Lehman's film version
of Philip Roth's novel. Benjamin,
who starred in "Diary of a Mad
Housewife," will poriray Portnoy
both as a teenager and as the 32-
year-old member of Mayor John
Lindsay's New York administra-
tion. Lehman feels that Benjamin
has both the emotional range and
comedy skill for the title role of
I'I'oitnoy's Complaint," with Karen Black, Acad-
emy Award nominee for "Five Kasy Piecs" in the
I ;h i of the woman described by Roth as a highly
otic and highly exotic fashion model.
Phyllis -Wvvman portrays a top role in "To
IFind a Man." the Columbia picture now before the
[cameras in New York, with living Pincus produc-
ainl'Arrohi'Sch'.iltn.Tn directing from his own
If 'Mi play. In a sharp departure from her musical
^comedy roles, television and night club appearances.
Miss Newman essays the character of a society
link who finds herself coping with the problems
|of her sophisticated, psoaiiaouous teenage daughter.
Phyllis, in real life the wife of playwright-lyricist
JAdolph Green, has starred on Broadway in "Sub-
ways Are for Sleeping" and 'The Apple Tree" and
(replaced Judy Holliday in Bells Are Ringing" in
|the national road company.
Paul Marcus, one of Germany's leading column-
lists before the advent of Hitlerism who fled to Eng-
l md to join the British armies in World War II,
celebrated his 70th birthday in London where he
conducts a weekly Personal bulletin for the past .16
|yean. Long a British citizen, Marcus who writes
under the pseudonym of "Pern" reports on the
whereabout! of celebrities from the continent, such
at Otto Prcmingcr, Billy Wilder, Fritz Lang, and
Mailcnc Dietrich, who went into exile during the
period of the Nazi regime. "Pern" was the first
Jewish refugee from Germany to attack Hitler in
the daily press of London. The "Evening Standard"
of the British capital, remembering his courageous
stand, recently saluted him in a headline story con-
cluding w ith 'Pern' is mightier than the Sword."
Bernard Donnenfeld, formerly vice president of
Paramount, with Robert Wise and Mark Robson
has formed a new production company, the Ftltnak-
en Group, releasing via Columbia. The first pic-
ture to gi> into the studio is, "Craig and Joan," a
non-fiction story by Eliot Asinof which chronicles
the "Sulcide-for Peace" pact of two students, a
boy-girl romance disturbed bj war ending in trag-
edy. The factual account has been the subject of
COntTOVI ny ever sine" October of 1969,
Kurt Voimegut, Jr., Is the author of the novel,
Slauglilerliottse-Fivi ." now before the cameras in
Prague, C'SR for Universal Pictures. The story cen-
ters around the destruction of the Kasl German
city of Dresden by Allied planes In World War II
but it is no apology, rather a strongly-phrased
anti-war allegory with the past and present fusing
in an unique cinematic statement that takes the
viewer from Belgium and Dresden to a march ol
American prisoners of the Nazis i photographed at
locations in Prague', on to the non-existent city of
Ilium and to the imaginary planet of Tralfamadore.
George Roy Hill directs for producer Paul Monash.
with newcomer Michael Sacks in the much coveted
role of the ex-prisoner of war who travels in the
fourth dimension. Ron Ix-ibman. who achieved star-
dom in his motion picture debut as George Segal's
brother in "Where's Poppa?" appears opposite
Sacks and so does New York stage actress Sharon
Gans, who won the Obie Award in 1966.
As We Were Saying:
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Behind The Jerusalem Attack
IN KKCKNT VVKKKS, hard-linens op|M>sed to the
State of Israel's Jerusalem policies and plans
have unleashed a propaganda attack bearing signs
of originating at high international
levels. The obvious attempt is to
prevail upon Pope Paul VI to sub-
ordinate his fears over further in-
cursions by Soviet Russia in the
Middle Last and Africa while tak-
ing a tougher stand against Israel.
A hundred years ago, there were,
roughly, 5.000 Christians. 7,000
Moslems, and 12,000 Jews in Jeru-
salem. Today, the figures run to about 12,000
Christians, 54,000 Moslems, and 200.000 Jews
When Israel was burn, the Proclamation of
(Independence stated: It (the new State) will main-
'in complete equality of social and political rights
or all its citizens, without distinction of creed,
race and sex. It will guarantee freedom of religion
land conscience, ot language, education and culture.
I" will safeguard the Holy Places of all religions.
11 Will remain loyal t<> the United Nations Charter."
In the light Of that declaration, what has 1s-
ll.iels record been with regard to Jerusalem? And
piiat is the record of those who continue to try
It-' deny the right of Independence and sovereignty
I'" Israel;
When tin' United Nations, anxious to protect
|1hc Holy Places and to ensure access thereto, origin-
Uy tecommended internationalization of Jerusalem,
Israel voiced acceptance. Jordan not only refused
the proposal but went on to annex the Old City of
Jerusalem even after the armistice of 1949.
Having failed with its original call for inter-
nationalization of Jerusalem, the II.N. tried again
in 1949; but ihnt proposal was so unworkable that
the I'nited States itself rejected it. Israel sug-
gested functional internationalization, giving the
V.N. the opportunity to establish an authority to
supervise the Holy Places. Jordan said no. Israel
tried again Jordan remained adamant and went on
to establish a frightful record for maltreatment
Of Holy Places. No Jews were ever allowed bj
Jordan to worship at the Western Wall: the aneient
Jewish quarter was ravaged; all ol (>ld Jerusalem's
Seven great main synagogues and do/ens of smaller
ones were wiped out. Never has Jordan denied that
her forces took up Jewish tombstones and used
them as flooring tot- Jordanian legion barrapks and
fortifications perhaps the ultimate in desecration.
v i here we are today with a propaganda
claim on the pair oi latterly hispid Qhristians and
Moslems declaring thai Israel is tightening a ghetto
noose a html their throats .anil si it II v refusing to
have JerUSaletn oner more at the mercy ol Some
who in the past have proved contemptuous ol tin-
religions and civil rights ol .lews.
Catholics in America and elstwlwi't mav want
to search the facts carefully before they accept the
claims of the propaganda enlrepencurs now storm-
ing the gates of the Vatican.
KAY KKLLOW TOWNSMAN, one of Haifa's lead-
ing citizens, David Hacohen, has had an ex-
citing career He was educated at the Military Col-
lege in Istanbul; he served as vice
mayor of Haifa under an Arab
mayor; he worked in Intelligence
during World War II; he was Is-
iael's Minister to Burma; he had
many other dramatic missions,
tome of which he can not yet
talk about.
But in recent weeks he had oc-
casion to recall a significant mem-
ory of what might have been but was not. He
gave me the details freely.
It was the memory of how Israel had been on
the verge of establishing diplomatic relations with
the People's Republic of China, with warm cn-
couragemenl from Peking. At the last moment we
[altered; What would America say? We drew back.
in 1950, only four months after the Commun-
ists proclaimed their Republic under Premier Chou
lln-Lai, Israel formally recognized the new State,
the first country in the Middle Last to tio SO. In the
same year we voted al the U.N. to give the Chinese
Communists a seat. Tin' Arab slates either Opposed
or abstained.
Hacohen became Israel Minister to Burma in
1953. It is no reflection ui>on that fine country to
Say that the post was looked upon here as a gate-
way to the entire Orient. Hacohen, convivial and an
extrovert, made friends easily and quickly with all
memben of the diplomatic corps. When Chou En-
I.ai came to visit Rangoon, the Chinese Ambassador
introduced him to the friendly and sympathetic Is-
raeli. An invitation to visit Peking followed.
In response to that invitation Horohen headed
a commercial mission which spent over a month in
China in 1955. They were warmly received and were
given every possible hint that China was ready for
diplomatic relations, Hacohen told me. There was
evan talk as to which building would serve as
Isiael's embassy in Peking.
Addressing the Chinese Peoples Congress, Chou
Kn-Lai publicly announced that China was prepar-
ing to establish diplomatic relations with Afghanis-
tan and Israel.
Hacohen cabled his report back home and asked
for immediate decision so that he could proceed
further. "This was the right psychological mo-
ment." he recalled, and the excitement returned to
his voice. But the air in Jerusalem had chilled. Wait
until the Chinese send a mission here first, he was
told. Maybe we should woo India instetad. What
will our American friends think of this?
Hacohen fumed, but it was too late. The proud
Chinese did not wait to be rebuffed. The swinging
bamboo curtain suddcnlv hecame solid, and every
Israel effort thereafter to reopen lines of communi-
cation failed. A few months later the Bandung Con-
ference was held, and China made common cause
with the Arabs.
Today new winds are blowing. China's feud
with Russia puts things in a different light. The
reopening of the Suez Canal would expose the
coasts of China to Russia's massive fleet Chou En-
I.ai suddenly has discovered reasons of his own
for wauling to keep the Canal closed.
To l place over nighr, but in International affaire the
wise country must always be prepared for the un-
expected. Who would have thought, even a few
months ago. thai President Nixon would be making
overtures to China? Israel must be alert not to re-
peat the mistakes of the past.
The Americans an not the only ones who play
ping pong. We are good at that game too.


Page 12-
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