The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00020

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Wfemsti Floridian
Volume 1 Number 19
and S1IOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood. Florida Friday. July 23. 1971
Price 20c
DfrTNft MINISTER CLAIMS
Egyptian Pressure Delaying U.S. Arms
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two Is-
raeli leaders have voiced con-
cern that their country's best
friends do not regard its se-
curity needs with sufficient
urgency. Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan, interviewed on
Kol Israel radio, has charged
that Egyptian pressure on the
United States was preventing:
Israel from getting the combat
aircraft it needed and warned
that the withholding of Ameri-
can supplies was a barrier to ne-
gotiations for a peace settle-
ment.
Premier Golda Meir, address-
ing a Labor Party rally at Ra-
mat Gan said, "the main argu-
ment with our best friend, the
U.S.A. (and we have no greater
friend) as well as with other
friendly nations, is to try to
bring home to them the basic
premise of Israel's security
which is secure borders. The ter-
rorist rocket attack on Petach
Tikvah last Wednesday night
was the best demonstration of
how important secure borders
are for Israel, she declared.
"Europeans tell us they want
to ensure our security through
the United Nations and even
Introduce foreign forces In a
protective cordon. Does this
mean that once peace Is achiev-
ed with the Arabs, Israel has to
be specially guarded? I should
like to know where they have
stationed special guards along
the European borders after sign-
ing peace treaties," Mrs. Meir
told West German Foreign Min-
ister Walter Soheel during his
visit.
General Dayan said recent bel-
licose statements by Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat raised
the possibility of a resumption
of hostilities within the next
six months. He said the Israeli
Army has made good use of the
year-old cease-fire. "It has nei-
ther wasted time nor spared ef-
forts to consolidate and strength-
en its positions. Egypt will not
be able to change the situation
by force," he said.
Asked if Israeli forces would
cross the Suez Canal In the event
of a new outbreak of warfare,
Dayan repHed, "If I am faced
with the alternative of winning
the battle on the West Bank
and losing one on the Eastern
Bank, I would prefer the one on
the Western Bank.
Asked to comment on the pos-
sibility of Israel's integration
> .." ;ji -
I
hsm
rrnniiiiirimimMiimMssBOTssnssm^
ScheeVs Visit Called
A 'Limited Success'
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
first visit to Israel by an incum-
bent West German Foreign Min-
ister ended last week when
Walter Scheel flew to Bonn after
a four-day stay which included
two days of political talks with
Israeli Foreign Minister Abba
Eban, meetings with Premier
Golda Meir and other officials
and a courtesy call paid to
former Premier David Ben-
Gurion.
The visit was a friendly one
and there were no serious inci-
dents to embarrass the German
statesman or his hosts. But in-
formed circles analyzing the po-
litical results today decided that
from Israel's point of view it
was a "very limited success."
The Israelis apparently failed
to bring Herr Scheel around to
their point of view on two cru-
cial matters Soviet penetra-
tion of the Middle East which
according to Israel is a flank-
ing maneuver aimed ultimately
at Western Enrope and the
Middle East policies of the
European Common Market of
which Bonn Is a member.
In a brief statement on his
arrival in Bonn, Mr. Scheel said
that there was now greater un-
derstanding between Israel and
West Germany and that he had
invited Eban to Bonn to con-
tinue their discussions. Political
circles here also noted that
Seaman It Convicted
TEL AVTV (JTA) A 32-year-
old Israel merchant marine sea-
man was sentenced July 6 to six
years in prison for spying for
Egypt The prosecution protested
the lenient penalty imposed upon
Albert Mclech by the Tel Aviv
District Court, and said it would
appeal to a higher court. Melech
was convicted of contacting Egyp-
tian intelligence in New York and
Paris and giving details on Israeli
Army depots and training.
Scheel said at a press confer-
ence Friday that "the desired
clarifying effect of our talks
has been achieved.
However true that may be,
the source* said, the positions
of Germany and Israel on glo-
bal political subjects have not
been brought closer. Israel ac-
cepts Bonn's assurances that
Chancellor Brandt's "OstpoU-
tik" rapprochement with the
.Soviet Union will not be al-
lowed to adversely affect its re-
lations with Israel. But Israel
disputes the very basis of the
Ostpolittk and holds that So-
viet actions In the Middle East
pose a potential threat to West-
ern Europe, a theory the Bonn
government refuses to buy.
Furthermore, while Israel ac-
cepts West Germany's assur-
ances that she will not sub-
ordinate herself to French poli-
tical interests in the Common
Market, Israel has not realized
its hope to make Bonn a pillar
against French efforts to im-
pose its Mideast policies on all
Common Market member na-
tions. Israel fears that the
French attitude, which it re-
gards as pro-Arab, will per-
meate the Common Market na-
tions.
Referring to the Mideast docu-
ment prepared last May by
Common Market experts and
fostered by France, Mr. Scheel
said he saw no contradiction
between the desire of his gov-
ernment to constantly improve
its relations with Israel on the
one hand and a reconciliation
with France on the other. (The
document urges Israel's total
withdrawal to its pre-June, 1967
borders and calls for the inter-
nationalization of Jerusalem).
Israel's Premier Golda Meir celebrated her 73rd
birthday in an unusual way she donated the
numerous bouquets she received from well-wishers
to wounded soldiers in the Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
versity Hospital. Mrs. Meir's birthday flowers were
delivered to YAAL. Hadassah's Women's auxiliary,
for distribution to the soldiers. Among those who
received flowers were Abdul Rekev, a Druse soldier
wounded while on duty in the Beit Shean Valley,
an 18-year-old girl soldier and a veteran of the
Six-Day War.
into the NATO defense network,
Dayan said he did not expect
such a development although
the NATO chiefs recognize that
increasing Soviet strength in
Cr &
the region changes the balance
of power. He said they do not
realize yet the importance of
Israel being in the area and
holding bases in the Sinai.
State Dept. Spokesman
Declines To Comment
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
State Departments spokesman
declined to comment on the
charges which wore made by
Israel's Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan that Israel does not re-
ceive a regular flow of arms
from the United States because
of Egyptian pressure on Wash-
ington.
The spokesman also refused
to comment on the New York
Times story which said recent
shipments of the latest Soviet
MIGs to Syria and Egypt have
upset the military balance in the
Middle East. He assured report-
ers that the United States has
a long-standing commitment to
maintain the military balance in
that region, but would give no
details on how the Administra-
tion policy would be imple-
mented.
According to the Times story,
the UAR has received nearly 100
MIG-21s and 80 transport heli-
copters since the ceasefire went
into effect some 11 months ago.
Last month alone, eight planes
and 16 helicepters were deliv-
ered in what intelligence experts
see as a Soviet effort to provide
the Arabs with greater mobility
in both desert and mountain
warfare.
Syrian shipments have includ-
ed a total of 21 of the latest
MIG-21S. nine MIG-17s, five
Sukhoi-7 fighter-bombers and
22 MIG-8 helicopters. The par-
ticulars of Soviet aid to Egypt
and Syria revealed in the Times
story were confirmed by State
Department officials.
Soviet Jews And The
New Abolitionists
By BAYARD JUSTIN
Executive Director
A. Philip Randolph Institute
When I am asked why I, as a
black American, speak out against
the oppression of Soviet Jewry,
my reply is, as a black person,
how can I not speak out? How
can I not be sensitive to the op-
pression of a national minority?
Having experienced during slave-
ry a brutal attempt to stamp out
our freedom, our history, our lan-
guage, and our identity, we can
well understand the meaning of
the spiritual death that accom-
panies oppression, and we can ap-
preciate the overwhelming power
of the rebirth of spirit that is
part of the struggle against op-
pression. Black Americans, there-
fore, ought to be among the first
to be concerned with the effort
of the Soviet Union to destroy the
identity of Soviet Jews and to
crush their struggle for freedom.
It will be said, quite rightly,
that there are other oppressed
peoples (especially in the Soviet
Union) besides Jews, and as a re-
cent report on "Dissent in the
Soviet Union" pointed out, "The
problems with which Soviet Jews
are faced are regarded not
as a question of one people, but
rather as a question of all people
who are deprived of their individu-
al rights." But there is a special
urgency to the problems of Soviet
Jews which is the result of several
factors.
One of these factors is the So-
viet Union's policy in the Middle
East. The Soviet Union is com-
pletely committed to the enemies
of Israel. It has already made an
enormous investment in military
and economic aide, personnel, and
political prestige in the Arab
world, and it now must justify
that investment to the Soviet peo-
ple. It does this by painting a
grotesque picture of tiny Israel as
a giant enemy and also by playing
upon anti-Semitic prejudice in
order to make Soviet Jews who
want to go to Israel seem the
most dangerous enemies of the
Soviet Union. This is the main
reason behind the massive anti-
Semitic campaign which the Mos-
cow government is now sponsoring
in Russia.
A second factor which makes
the problems of Soviet Jew especi-
ally urgent has to do with the in-
creasing internal instability within
the Soviet Union and also in the
satellite nations dominated by
Moscow. We have seen signs of
this instability over the past few
years in the protests of Russian
intellectuals, nationality groups,
and religious minorities and in the
rebellions in Czechoslovakia and
Poland which were so brutally
put down.
When the Soviet government
branded the leaders of these rebel-
lions "Zionists," it was not sim-
ply looking for a scapegoat on
which to blame all its troubles. It
Continued on Page 6


Page 2
+JewishHer Mian
Fridgy. July 23. 1971
'Summer Fun' Program Offered
By Hollywood Recreation Department
The Hollywood Recreation De-,
partmant is ottering a summerful |
of "tun" activities for adults and
children all season, it has Ixvn
announced.
Sports <>f every description, arts, i
emits and K|>ocml activities arc
open to boys and tjirls from the
ol six and up in -10 areas M*
: rised by the city's recreation
department. Schedules arv avail- j
Me at the central office. 3030 Polk
St.. and panaMl may call for tpeoi-
flc information on classes.
Adult programs take place at
the Polk Street Center. The Mon-
day schedule includes a oncer
workshop at 9 a.m. with volun-
teers preparing cancer pads for |
Btoapttal and nursing homos under i
the guidance of Mrs Anna Turner
and Ray McKlnley. This group
v. s n ognized by The American
Cancer Society tWs month for
turning out over 7,000 pads this
j
Bernie Eilerman teaches wood-
carving at 9:30 a.m. Whlttters
carve decorative nieces, fragment-
ed silhouettes, animals and unusual.
nal works of art.
The Greater Hollywood Mando-
lin Orchestra practice session is
. so held at 9:30 a.m.: newcomers
;,r. we* n to Iota the musical
oi_:ui:/.itMii. The orchestra his
been cited by many homes for tit
i. Lighthous for the Bl n
- and children's schools In
whose behalf Its Mstandtng con-
cert ma h ive been played.
"Cards and Chatter" parties an1
held at 12:30 p.m. The afternoon
:s spent in games and good fellow-
ship. Refreshments are also served
and prizes awarded.
Yoga classes are held at 7 p.m.
under the direction of Ginger Rus-
sell and Dick Bret-d. Square danc-
Ing steps off at 8 p.m. under the
direction of Jay Finimorv.
Tuesday's schedule calls for
home decorating classes at 10:30
a.m. Mrs. Zara Kalisher lectures
on the basics of home decorating,
budgets, color schemes, coordlnat-
ing accessories and how to ineor-
narate one's personality into her
decorating scheme. Chess enthu-
siasts meet and play at 6:30 p.m.
and the Hollywood Stamp Club
convenes at 7:30 DAB.
Wednesday begins with yoga
classes at 10 ;i.m. with Ginger
Rsasell and Dick Breed. The 49ers
Senior Qtii ns meeting is called
to order at 1 p.m. At 7:30 p.m.
there are games of progressive
with Mrs. Eunice Decker
sop I I '
Thursday's schedule begins with
"danc :- ol --- at 10:30 a.m..
Maxine Edwavds will teach the
ladies how to stretch their bodies.
muscles, lose inches and feel
II to the rhythmic
beat of "pop" music. Chess buffs
meet and play at 6:30 p.m. Dupti-
e tourneys are held :it 7
p.m. with Mrs. Teseie Stasko in
chare. "Introduction to Art' SSS
ins are conducted by Dr. Ray
ts it 7:30 p.m. Guest teach-
ers who are experts in water col-
CUSTOM FRAMING
CREATIVE CRAFTSMANSHIP
TOVA FRAME CO.
LEE ST OFF 441 BETWEEN TAFT (, SHERIDAN ST.
BEH1N0UNIROYALTIRE
HOLLYWOOD 983-7590
HOURS MON-SAT 9 A M.-5.30 P.M.
ors. oils, acrylics and other me-
djums are scheduled regularly.
On Friday's, the M2B4Vn
Orchestra practices nT*9:30 a.m.
Progressive bridge and pinochle
games are played at 1:30 p.m.
Ballroom dancing classes are con-
ducted by Arthur Bourbon at :30
p.m.
Saturday mornings. Mrs. Lynn ;
Smut teaches macramc (decora-
tive knotting i at 10 a.m. Adult
dances are open to the public at
H p.m. and live music is provided
There is a novel theme each week
and prizes are awarded. Tickets
are available at the door.
Swimming classes for adults of
all ages are offered from 7:30 to
I 9:30 Tuesdays and Thursdays in
: the McArthur High School iol,
| 6501 Hollywood Blvd. John Mala-
! tak instructs the sessions for be-
ginners and intermediates. Senior
citi/i ns are encouraged to take
I the classes. Mr. Malatak also of-
jfers special "floatation" sessions
for those contemplating cruises, so
! they will feel more secure in case
of an emergency.
Orthodox Group Campaigns
NEW YORK iJTA) An Or-
thodox group calling itself the
''Committee for the Preservation i
| of Judaism" has started a world- :
[wide campaign to get Jews to
send letters and telegrams tO|
Premier Golda Metr protesting the
wording of Israel's Law of Return.'
The group claims that the omis- j
sum of the words "by hatecha" i
religious law from the text per- ]
- the registration of converts
as Jews even though their conver- j
' sions did not comply with halachic '
standards. The committee is eir-
I dilating a pamphlet which
As a result of this outrageous'
law your own children may some _
' day face the dilemma of not know-
ing whether they are marrying a :
Jew."
Announcing ...
Drive Your Car Service
RENT AN
EXPERT DRIVER
Go where you want to 90 when you wont to 90 in the
privacy and comfort of your own cay.^
Go Direct, Lessen Tension, Eliminate Driving
or parking worries.
RATES_____ON REQUEST
LET US DRIVE U INC.
Phone Hollywood 920-6262
Mailing Address P.O. Box 200, Hollywood, Florida 33020
Every Driver Is Covered By Workmen's
Compensation Insurance
JOEL R0TTMAH, President
24 Hr. EMERGENCY Service
GUARANTEED
961-1955
SATISFACTION
leeward County Plumbing Service, lac.
1-AllT-i- O-t
.
THE AIR CONDITION!D
Waldi
^8
UftTCI
man
STRICTLY KOSHER CUISINE
Served in the WALDMAN Manner
under u Supervision
Enjoy the ^^H
HIGH HOLY DAYS
1 the WALDMAN Family Service, on Premises
Conducted by Prominent Canlor
RESERVE NOW!
if
ALL THIS (
FREE! {
For Reservations Phone: JE 8-5731
ON THE OCEAN AT 43rd ST. MIAMI BEACH
SELF PARKING CHAISE LOUNGES
KIDDIE POOL
TV in Every Hoom- Appropriate Entertainment
KOSHER CATERERS
Ua*liiiimalm iii
BAB MITZVAHS
WIDOSJGS ATS
'.HCai.HNG IN HOMf CATH1NG
no Monu woe*
888-3469
ifNOmwuM 866 5278
4*0 IWALLOW OS. MIAMI SMIMSS
tainment Jk
Awnings Carports Screen
Enclosures and Repairs
SALS
ALES
ERVICE
5965 Lee St., Hollywood Ph. 941-1641
VREK CONSULTATION ON
(COLOR PERMANENT WAVlNCf
OR PROBLEM HAIR
COMPLETE WIG SERVICE
OPEN' Tuee. Set.
dosed Monday
9:00 A.M. -5:00 P.M
PHONE: 927 5341
422S.W. Ill St.. MIL
MONROE UDELLS
JAXSOH'S
IN OUR 15th YEAR
OLD FASHIONED
ICE CREAM PARLOR
RESTAURANT
Largest Sundaes & Sodas in the South
WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM

OPEN
7 DAYS
A WEEK
COMPLETE DINNER Large bowl of soup
or juice. Entree, potato, vegeloble, salad,
YOUR OWN INDIVIDUAL LOAF OF
BREAD, butter and beverage. Plus a com-
plimentary relish tray.
PLUS* JUMBO SUNDAE'
s1
25
128 S. Federal Hwy, DANIA 923-4445
If YOU THINK YOU'VE HAD G00I)
CHINESE FOOD BEFORE...TRY
CHRISTINE LEE'S GASLIGHT
Wo also serve Prime A Sirloin Steak Direct from Now York
ENTERTAINMENT BY DEL STATON, GUITARIST
located in the Golden Strand Hotel
179th Street and Collins Avenue
Reservations Call 945-9075
Suggested OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 947-5661
Dining & Dancing Nightiy Till 2 A,M.
m ttoridfs Newest & Smartest Supper Club
Joe DeCarlo Trio Q So^Y Be"
P[ano
Organ
Serving Lunch Daily from 11:30 a.m.
HaroW&fMi Lunch's STAGECOACH INN
4620 Hal la-dale Blvd. Hollywood Phono: 983-4068
11 "' iii"'i ii "..... i in i iinu'icaBaa
C.i-e- '.oe
: = "E8 ES
end
BED STEADS

INTfSIOt DECORATING
FASHION FABRICS
805 N FEDERAL HWY.
HAllANOAlt. FlOftlOA
Prone. 923-0564
SHADES
S.'P COVERS
' TTflWfK .,

-til.
r*
THE
TRAVE
u
m
Ansel Insurance Agency 3 fund
fpin BP
TTTTT
i_
Ansel Wittenstein
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
________9239518 9453527
AMERICAN
irVMMC CewMVMf
l


Friday, July 23. 1971
+Jewish norldian
ORGANIZATION IN THt SPOTLIGHT
United HIAS Service
Page 3
United HIAS Service 4s a world-
wide Jewish immigTaJion agency
with offices, affiliatejL and com-
' mittecs in the OTUttt*Sta8, Ed*,
ope, North Africa, Latin America,
Canada, Australia, Israel end
Hong Kong.
A service designed to enable
Jews to migrate to countries (ex-
cept Israel) where they can make
en economic and social adjustment,
preferably where family reunion ia
possible, it is a beneficiary of
Jewish Welfare Federation.
HIAS was formed in 1884; in
1954 a reorganization took place
which consolidated It with the
United Service for New Ameri-
cans (USNA) and the overseas
migrations services of the AJDC,
thus forming United HIAS Serv-
ice. Through the years, more than
three million migrants have been
assisted as they establish them-
selves in resettlement countries.
HIAS field offices are located
in areas where there is a signifi-
cant demand for migration oppor-
tunities by Jews as well as in
countries of destination.
Beyond arranging and financing
TYPEWRITER
TUNE-UP
PRESSURE CLEAN
CLEAN TYPE A ROLLER
OIL* INSTALLHEWRIBBON
^488
All FOR
(Offtf 6a* at MM Location)
HUB
OFFICE SUPPLIES
TY PEWRITERS-ADDERS
C30S MIR A MAR PKWY.,MIRAMARt
9S1-MCS
OR
BROWARD
TYPEWRITER CENTER
Complata Offica Supplies
SMS Johnson St., Hollywood
987-6550 ______
BARRY-
JAMES
PHONE: 922-2633
MIAMI: 947-3941
HARDWARE APPLIANCES
SERVICE HOUSEWARES
950 So. Dixie Hwy. at
Washington St.
HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33020
SHAPIRO'S A GARMIZO
tho._physical movement of immi-
gttmts and their reception and
lyfrl housing in entry ports, a
*&!mj^Jr^ffvices at different
phases of the migration process is
provided. These include screening
of applications to determine eligi-
bility, representations to govern-
mental officials, preparation of doc-
uments for submission to consular
officials, client orientation to fu-
ture environment, location of rela-
tives and friends of prospective
immigrants, individual counseling
related to migration plans and
naturalization and protective serv-
ices to aliens and integration as-
sistance in Latin America.
In keeping with their ongoing
program of solving the problems
of homeless, persecuted and up-
rooted Jews throughout the world,
the organization helped resettle
some 76,000 Jewish men. women
and children during the '60s.
In the first year of this decade,
more than 6,000 migrants were
assisted. According to Harold
Friedman, president of United
HIAS. Soviet Russia is expected to
ease the exit barriers for the 7>\k
million Jews there in the immedi-
ate future and United HIAS is
prepared to assist in their emigra-
tion and resettlement where
needed.
Here in South Florida. United
HIAS has worked to integrate the
majority of Cuban Jews resettled.
It has also been instrumental in
resettling huge numbers of Cu-
bans in almost 300 other cities in
31 states throughout the country.
Dr. William A. Wexler, presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith, was elected
chairman of the World Con-
ference of Jewish Organizations
at its annual meeting in Ge-
neva. He succeeds Dr. Nahum
Goldmann, president of the
World Jewish Congress, chair-
man of COJO since its founding
14 years ago as a coordinating
and consultative body embrac-
ing major Jewish groups in the
United States, Great Britain,
Europe, Canada, Latin America,
Australia, South Africa and Is-
rael. Dr. Wexler, who is also
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, has been
COJO cochairman for the past
six years.
In Wometco Theatres
Opening Friday at the Miami,
Miracle, 163rd St., and Palm
Springs Theatres is "The Light at
the Edge of the World." "This
Man Must Die" begins its run the
same day at the Mayfair and Sun-
set. Holdovers include "Carnal
Knowledge," Carib and Twin I;
"Blue Water, White Death," at
the Patio, Twin II, Byron, Hallan-
dale and Gateway; "The Andro-
meda Strain," Plaza; "Plaza Suite,"
at the Normandy, and "Taking
Off," Boca Raton.
MOVED TO OUR
NEW HOME
35 Years of Wallpaper Selling
Flocks Foils Murals Grasses
At Big Discounts
MARSH BERLAND
WALLCAPERS, INC.
4397 W. Hallondale Beach Blvd.
Hollywood, Flo. 33023
PHONE 961-0771
C. VIRGA
Aluminum Discount
218N.E. IstAVE
927-7622
FREE ESTIMATES
AWNMrGS-SCREEN ROOMS
CARPORTS PATIO COVERS
AWWNC WINDOWS
TRAILER STEPS-SKIRTING
WINDOW 1 DOOR GUARDS
Rent-A-Car
$*% LOW AS
3 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
im s. Mm mvr.
20-4141
45-Sett RMeaat
@U4tom WINDOW AND WALL TREATMCNTS
MAIMS KOSMfAOS. OCCOMIM SHUTTKS, SUDIW MINUS, SHOII
SCttDO, KOWM ( AUSTDIUI SHAHS. AKHB,
cornices, vauncis. toon r mows,
LAMWAtlO SHAMS, BUH1INS.
VISIT OUK
FACTORY SHOWKOOM
Creative Shutter S Shade
ASK ABOUT OUR
COMPUTE
jDECORATjNC^ERVICEj
Mil,
sm win mm
mumtt.HA.imi
961-6688
.
CAN OPENER
JUICER DRINK MIXER ICE CRUSHER
$7.97 each
aa***^"^^ o*
HARDWARE & PAINT. INC
HOUSEWARES & GIFTS
HOME DECOR ASSESSORIES
100 E. Beach Boulevard
Hallandale, Florida 33009
3k\ 927-0566
Registrations Being Accepted: Shapiro Religious School. 4601 Ar.
Ro^ic^.i^^ v !,hur St for th<> fall school term.
Registrations are now be.ng ac The school includes nurscry-kin-
cepted at the office of Temple | dergarten. Hebrew and Sunday
Beth Shalom's Jack and Rachel School departments.
iJfew,
m
TU
HOLLYWOOD DANK
""TRUST COMPANY
The Hollywood Bank with The Human Interest Added
1900 Tyler Street 923-8222
FOR CORRECT TIME
DIAL 922-7521
.
Over thirty five years
of service to the communities
in North Dade and Broward Counties.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL, INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
1250 Normandy Drive: fifteen minutes from Hollywood
920-1010 -
19th and Alton Road: in the heart of Miami Beach
Miami: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street
Manhattan Brooklyn Westchester Bronx Far Rockaway
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Edward Rosenthjl Morton Rosenthil Ctrl Crossbert Leo J. Filer
Murray N. Rubin. F.D.


9-jenistflcridiain
* Friday, July 23. 1971
Page 4
^Jemstijlcrjaian
aw* -^r- **- gSS35
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE
l'O Box. J7S, Mum. Florida JilOl
SEUU M. Thompson
Fkid LfcNCHII .WiantloPublfcr
Ji:or anil PuMulif
MARIOX NEV1NS. N*S CoonJin.tor
PuUulifd Bi-Wedft bj Jewi* Flondwn
Banci'CUM Postage Paul at Miami. Ha. -,,.
BUBSCR.PTION RATES: (Local AM.) J>tr
.-, Out of Town Upon Reqi
MATTER OF FACT
,Tir by JOSEPH ALSOf
Volume 1
Friday. July 23, 1971
Number 19
I AB 5731
jews Have A Particular Stake
The American Jewish community cannot ignore the
implications of a recent study and findings of a Gallup
survey which showed thai close to a million American
Jews most of them senior citizens, are living at a below-
poverty standard. In this most affluent of nations we have
been concerned with the total picture of poverty but as
Jews we have a particular stake in the lives of our own
people as well.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation has made a
beginning in studying the problem, particularly on South
Beach, and in providing some services and direct assist-
ance. But this is only scratching the surface, it would seem,
and little will be done until the public is informed of the
depth of the problem. There is not much awareness that
.poverty among Jews exists to the extent it does and there
seems little purpose in not making the facts known.
Israel Commended For Its Care
Evangelical Christians from the United States, meeting
in Israel, have commended that nation for the scrupulous
care with which it has protected Christian places and
people.
The significance of the statement lies in the fact that
the group "takes note" thai Jerusalem has been the capital
only or the Jewish people throughout history as well as the
fact that since the Six-Day War in 1967 all peoples are free
to worship in the place of their choice, unlike the 1948-67
pgrjocv.when.the ojd.aty, of Jerusalem was. under Jordanian
control
Decision Doesn't End Controversy
The American Jewish Congress has been the leading
opponent of public aid to parochial schools, in part be-
cause of its brilliant counsel. Leo Pfeffer, and in part be-
cause in recent years the Protestant opposition seems to
have become diminished. AJCongress has viewed its
tight as strengthening religious liberty but this opinion
is not shared by religious Jews, in particular the Orthodox.
Recent Supreme Court decisions, which upheld the
Congress' contention have been called by the Religious
Zionists of America "a defeat for equality within our edu-
cational system and a blow to the thousands of youngsters
who are entitled to support in religious day schools." From
another side, the National Jewish Commission on Law and
Public Affairs also an Orthodox group charges that
the collaboration of AJCongress with the American Civil
Liberties Union "is another sign of the increasing seculari-
zation of American society."
The position of the Supreme Court in reaffirming the
traditional separation of church and state in this area
does not end the controversy, at least for Jews. The debate
must inevitably shift to the Jewish community and Its
rund-raising functions as it has been evident in recent
years. We see an obligation to work for increased support
for Jewish education, including the day schools, for all
those who beHeve that parochial education is necessary
.but not the government's responsibility.
Crisis Had Adverse Effect
Approval of a new contract has ended the strike of the
500 professional and clerical employees of the Israel Bond
.organization. The 39 days had an adverse effect on the
.sale of these %-ital bonds and it is hoped that some means
,of arbitrating such differences wjll be found before tie
next contract is negotiated. Too much is at stake for the
Jewish comrnuniry to permit another such strike .and its
accompanying bitterness.
WASHINGTON "Don't look
now." one is inclined to say.
But the doom of Israel may
just possibly have been pro-
nounced in Malta."
Here, in truth, is a good meas-
ure of the strange pass we have
now reached. The front pages
teem with misinterpretations of
stoleh documents concerned with
long-past stages of the Vietnam-
ese war. But a current strategic
development of enormous po-
tential danger, the election in
Malta, has passed all but un-
noticed.
MALTA, "the unsinkablc air-
craft carrier" of World War II,
is so important because the
Mediterranean is so important
And for the moment (although
only for the moment', the Medi-
terranean is chiefly important
because of the ever-dangerous,
never-ending Middle Kastern
crisis.
For nearly a year, throughout
most of 1970. the Soviets were
busily, rather openly preparing
a direct assault upon Israel to
be made by the Egyptians with
heavy and active Soviet military
support The Kremlin finally
thought better of this plan, at
least temporarily, for two main,
rather demonstrable reasons.
THE FIRST reason was the
sheer guts of the Israelis, under
extreme stress. And the second
reason was President Nixon's
tough and wise management of
the Jordanian crisis in Septem-
ber. 1970 -- which must have
suggested to the Kremlin that
die United States might also
have some guts.
In the Jordanian crisis, of
course. President Nixon's main
instrument was our Sixth Fleet.
The Sixth Fleet has long been
charged with maintaining a rea-
sonable power balance in the
Mediterranean, in the face of
continuously increasing Soviet
naval strength. And without its
base in Malta, the Sixth Fleet
can hardly do its job.
AGAINST this background,
then consider the fairly ugly
facts concerning the Maltese
election. It was held in mid-
June. By a very narrow major-
ity, the pro-NATO. pro-Sixth
Fleet nationalist leader. Dr.
George Borg-Olivier. lost the
prime ministership to the boss
of the Maltese Labor Party. Dom
Mintoff.
When this reporter was in
Malta last November, there was
already a good deal of talk, all
of it unproved, to be sure, about
Soviet money coming into Malta.
In any case, the Soviets will un-
questionably be the main gain-
ers by Dom Mintoffs success.
BEFORE his election. Mintoff
loudly advocated a policy of "pos-
itive neutrality." He was fur-
thermore, conducting a rather
open flirtation with various radi-
cal Arab leaders. These Arabs
well aware, of couse, of Malta's
strategic importance In connec-
tion with the Middle East.
As prime minister. Mintoff
first fired the British governor-
general. Sir Maurice Dorman.
He then ordered NATO's naval
commander. South, the brilliant
and courageous Adm. Gino Brin-
delli, off the island.
HE HAS since ordered Malta's
vital port and naval facilities to
be closed to ships of the Sixth
Fleet. And he has demanded im-
mediate renegotiation" of Mal-
ta's defense treaty with Britain.
The general thrust of the poli-
cies of the new Maltese prime
minister is therefore easy to
determine. The permanent de-
nial of Malta to the U.S. Sixth
Fleet is an obvious possibility.
It may even be a serious prob-
ability.
THE THREAT could hardly
come at a worse time. Since No-
vember, to be sure, some effort
V...
has been made to strengthen the
Sixth Fleet, But to quote a high
naval staff officer, the Sixth
Fleet has for some time been
"out-numbered, out-gunned and
obsolete" in relation to the new
Soviet naval power in the
Mediterranean.
To give just one grim illus-
tration, tin re were 14 Soviet
Continued en Pas* 4-
/\.S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK It ended well. By ruling against prior re-
straints of the publication of the secret Pentagon Papers the
Supreme Court in an extraordinary set of opinions ga\c
the people a July 4 present, and reaffirmed a Declaration of
Press Independence. "Great cases makes bad law," Justice
Oliver Wendell Holmes once said, meaning that the intense
publicity and pressure often distort the calmer judgment-.
Chief Justice Warren Burger evidently felt tbis, hence his re-
mark that the court had been "almost irresponsibly feverish"
about the press cases.
My own feeling is that this was one of those "great cases."
but that it made good law. not bad. In the current context <>i
widespread disbelief both in the government and in the press,
the nation needed some kind of guideline that would delimit the
powers of each and restore faith in both. The court weighed
two prime national objectives against each other the right of
the people to know, and the right of policy-makers to keep
sensitive matters secret. A majority of six judges decided that
prior restraint blanking the story before publication is
unconstitutional unless the government can make a petsuaslve
case for it on security grounds. It didn't.
This the First Amendment is given priority in future clashes,
and the government is placed on notice that it must carry a
heavy burden .of factual proof about actual dangers, in order to
make a prior restraint stick.
it THE FIRST EFFECT of this will be a Hooding of ttagren
with chapters from the Pentagon story, on which the New York
Times no longer has a beat. The next effect will be a revamping
of the overclassified system of classifying confidential govern-
ment documents.
The best plan still seems to me to be the idea of a cut-off
point in three or five years, with a review board of disinterested
men other than the classifiers to rule on the exceptions.
Thus one could make certain that a "top-secret" designation
doesn't become a self-protective dodge to keep blurders or
shenanigans hidden.
Beyond that the effect would probably be to tighten secur-
ity inside future administrations, lest similar leaks occur at the
hands of disillusioned staff people. But the best way to handle
that is not by censorship of the press but by picking .asaffer-
carefully maintaining their morale and their trust. This, in turn
can be achieved only by greater prudence of decisions and greater
candor in letting the people know. An administration that k*i '
credibility with the people will lose credibility with its .own
staff. Tougher policies won't solve it, because once the cement
of trust crumbles the leaks are bound to multiply beyond any
policing control.
THE NIXON-MITCHELL decision to ask for a rei training
order must look, in retrospect, even to the Administration of-
ficials like an unwise one. They must have done it as a con-
tainment measure, to keep the lid on disclosures beyond this
particular set of papers. The move to indict Daniel Elbberg was
probably also part of the containment strategy. -It would, fc^ve
been wiser all around, even politically, for Nixon to ay that
history is history, that the war decisions were not of his msjdna,
that the people deserve to know what happened, and that lt<*
would focus on disengaging. But that would have meant a daring
and imaginative leap beyond Nixon's habit or personatit*. St
Nixon and Mitchell took the more conventional path of bur-
eaucrats, and stumbled, and got pretty bruised.
As for the Supreme Court, it has re-established its qentr.-l
place in the attention of the people. As the judges showed in
their questioning of counsel during the arguing of the cafS.sn in their opinions, every justice is-vary much an individual. But
they are also part of a larger operation, in which they too like
the press and the Administration must remain cresJWe if
constitutional government is to work. I
PRESIDENTS MAKE MISTAKES. Even Jefferson plund-
ered for awhile in moving to suppress newspapers for, .their
"torrent of slander." But he regained his balance, and h> deep-
est thinking lay in his query. "Whether freedom of discussion,
unaided by power, is not sufficient whether a government,
conducting itself with zeal and purity, and doing no act which
it would be unwilling the whole world would witness can be
written down by falsehood and defamation."
For some years successive Presidents have been unwilling
for the world to witness the context of the decisions made on
the Vietnamese war. But the process of resolving the clash
between necessary freedom and necessary security has been
enacted with the whole world as witness. And that is decidedly
on the credit-side for America.


Friday, July 23. 1971
*JmH* fk-radian
Page 5
'Violence Only Way,'
Says Rabbi Kahane
NKW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
Miir Kahane. claiming that ho
aiul his Jewish Defense League
'represent a new t>pe of Jew,"
told a press conference last week
thai violence is the only way to
persuade the Soviet Union to
free its Jewish citizens. The JDI.
would not rule out the use of
dynamite, if necessary, he de-
clared, as long as innocents are
not harmed.
The 88-year-old Orthodox
rabhl denied that his militant
1HIHtm WW responsible for
leaving 197 sticks of dynamite
behind some shrubbery on the
r.ilis;ii Interstate Parkway,
hownve'r. Federal authorities re-
ceived an anonymous call from
.someone claiming to be a mem-
ber of the JDI. Sunday, giving
the location of the cache.
The JDL's national chairman
;m Bieber, 41. ami Stewart Cohen,
1S. had previously pleaded guilty
to a conspiracy charge involving
the manufacture of explosives;
in return,' government attorneys
agreed to drop charges of con-
spiracy lo transport firearms
across male lines, stipulating
thai the JDI. turn any Illegal
weapons and firearms in its pos-
sessibn to Federal authorities
and submit to an Inspection of
iis Woodbtirne. X.V.. camp site.
Interviewed li\ the JTA ut
Camp Jedel, Kalihi Kuhane de-
clurcd, "The JDI. trill not lie |
turning in any illecul weapons,
becaSMC we have none." The or- i
fcani/jition has quite a few guns, |
at the camp, he said, but all are
'rej-istered and legal."
The controversial leader ex-
plained that the manufacture of
explosives at the camp got him |
into trouble because he was ig-
In The Mail
11 ItlTOH Jewish-Floridiaii-Shof.ir:
On b-h;h of the Broward Zion-
Ssl DLstrict, I wish to thank you
lor the prominence you have giv-
[ii to thi' million-member roll call
f the American Zionist Federa-
tion.
It is worthwhile repeating that
liiany prominent American Jews
liave responded by becoming mem-
P" rs at large because they rccog-
pize that anti-Zionism is fast be-
soming a code word for anti-Semi-
Itism and anti-Israelism. This is a
|feature of Arab propaganda.
Since our District is making ef-
I forts to offset this propaganda by
[its public relations work and regu-
llar meetings, and since our mem-
Ibers are automatically members of
It he Federation. I sincerely hope
that many Jews in this area will
respond to this important roll
I Call.
HAM J- PHRRY, President
Broward Ztantot District
norant of the law requiring pur-
chase of a $250 Federal stamp
before detonation of explosives,
even on one's own property. He
explained that his purpose in
making and detonating a bomb
was to demonstrate methods
used by radical groups.
I'slng instruct ions published
in a Hlack Panther newspaper.
Rabbi Kahane reported, he will
hold a similar demonstration for
the press next week, but this
time he wiU invest 8250 in a
stamp, as required by law.
Rabbi Kahane, who charged
that the U.S. government is out
to "get" him solely because the
Soviets hold the United States
responsible for JDL actions, de-
fended his philosophy that vio-
lence in a righteous cause is
justified during an appearance
on a segment of the David Frost
TV show. He and two prominent
critics of JDL taciics play-
wright Dore Schary and Prof.
Hans Morgenthau of the Uni-
versity of Chicago -were guests
on the network show taped on
June 28.
The rabbi's view|ioint was
phallcngi d by Mr. Schary, who
said I hey were agreed on only
one thing that Soviet anti-
Semitism is real and denied
that established Jewish organi-
zations did nothing for Soviet
Jewry until the advent of JDL.
"This is, in effect, a war be-
tween the Soviet I'nion and the
Jews." Rablii Kahane declared.
"Soviet diplomats' lives should
lie made as bearable or hiiImmi -
able as Soviet Jews' lives are ...
I am in favor of any violence if
STOP.'
>, ^ at v
THE TRANSPARENT
"Reflecto-Shield"
THAT PROTECTS
THE ASTRONAUTS!
... Thii Is wkol % n#w
opply to exitiing windows
to ptatfd your furnish-
ings
DttPONT
MTUI
WINDOW TINTING
SsscsaMs*
SUN SHIELD. INC
113-13*3
ANHOUNCIHG...
THE OPENING Of A COMPLETE
MJUOR APPLIANCE REPAIR SERVICE
*
lOVEJOY REPAIR SERVICE
WE REf AIR ALL MAKES
WASHERS DRYERS
DISHWASHERS
CAS A ELECTRIC RANGES
WATER HEATERS
AIR CONDITIONERS
REFRIGERATION
"eV
In Bosinass Ovor 20 YaaiV
LOVEJOY REPAIR SERVICE
5*24 S.W. 21st Street- HOLLYWOOD
Phone 981-2865
It Is necessary, even tin.null vio-
lence is ugly," he continued.
Prof. Morgenthau said he was
"amazed at the naivete ... of
thinking that by insulting Rus-
sian diplomats on the streets of
New York you are going to sway
the government of the Soviet
Union. It is very easy to incite
young Jews in New York to the
kind of misdeeds which we have
witnessed," he said, "and it is
very easy to forget that three
million Jews are hostages to the
government of the Soviet Union.
And the Kremlin can do with
those Jews whatever it wants.
This, I think, is a danger which
is completely overlooked in the
self-satisfying, narcissistic activ-
ities which we are discussing
here, which require absolutely no
heroism," he declared.
Zealots Stone Bus Despite Promises
JKRUSALKM (JTAI De-
spite the Egged bus cooperative's
promise not to operate bust's in
Jerusalem before the close of
the Sabbath, religions zealots
in the ultra-Orthodox Mea
Shearim quarter pelted a bus
with stones, injuring a' woman
passenger, ana 'tVfockVd "Irattrl?*
with garbage and stones.
The incident occurred half an
hour after the Sabbath ended
and normal traffic had been re-
sumed through the quarter. It
was one of a series of demon-
strations in what appears to be
a "war" between the religious
'nrfrt-oeeular seotow of the poi>-
ulation.
AZAR'S SEWING CENTER
2725 SO. STATE RD. NO. 7. HOLLYWOOD
PHONE 989-8881
NEWEST TOUCH I SIW sawing machine with
carrying case On* touch-you twitch from
straight to lig-iag. Sew 7 stretch stiches, tee.
mttt^f^^^1^
ALLIGATOR WRESTLING
BRING THE CHILDREN
See Authentic Seminole Indian Village, Arts & Crafts
Being Made Indian Artifacts Museum pieces,
exact replica of Old "Fort Lauderdale/' Only Deep
Water Alligator wrestling ... Guided Tours.
< fw
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE
SEMINOLE TRIBE OF FLORIDA
STATE ROAD 7 (U.S. 441) W. HOLLYWOOD, FLA
TELEPHONI 587 4500
POWER SWEEPING SERVICE and
PARKING AREA MAINTENANCE
SERVING SHOPPING CENTER AREAS AMD LARGE
PARKING LOTS FOR IUSINESS AND INDUSTRY
Mk rtfir* jniir splSMit ted skilled perniel trsltid to do i protessloe.il Isstall tassjt pallet steal.
TV Da oesl sf josr twi sipemni eqetaseitisl tto frtra-
itsMd lists! Cat! taydlm Mir it '" as! y MTMIS to
disast tst srsWat l jw particular parkHif sea.
PHONE
MuVoSOO
iMd control ionic*. .
irattlc sips MsM sal
rflitfd- wnlcti.

eluarbiati
PARKING AREA MAINTENANCE, INC.
2234 A HAYES ST. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020


Page 6
|*VWMVVMVS*MVVVMVM^VMMVM^VM^^^^,>^^^^^^**^^^^^^
scene around
by Marjo Nfvjns
*>
For me antl for ninny of us, one of the plus features of
BU nmers in Hollywood is the lack of traffic. My ai>ologies
to the storekeepers whom I'm sure don't enjoy the attendant lack
of business but anyway, it Is nice to be able to sail through
the streets and have my choice of parking spaces, head or or
parallel, either way there's plenty of room to pull in easily.
I remember when it used to be this way all the time and
when the big debates were going on about whether Tyler and
Harrison should be one-way streets Harrison remained
two-way and as I drive down. I remember when Norman Yaguda
used to have a drug store right there next to Lewis Brothers.
1 remember when the Post Office was directly across the street
and in early days seemed plenty big enough. Right next
door to the Post Office was an open front delicatessen where we
lucalites used to stop on Sunday morning and pick up bagel and
*ox for brunch after we had picked up our children at Sunday
School. We all met over the pickle barrels and sauerkraut.
Our first friend in town was Jesse Martin, who sold us our
house and were we thrilled when we found that he had
Stocked the refrigerator for our arrival! We remember that it
was Stanley Beckerman who told us about the new Reform
temple, Beth El, and we found it just as he said in the Holly-
wood Beach Golf Clubhouse. The Bank of Hollywood was
a tiny structure; now we see where it is expanding and will be
skyscraper size taking in the oki Woolworth store and Sig's
which was the only all night place down here years ago (and
may still be as far as I know. .
Lazy Summer days thinking back.
ft ft ft
Spent a wonderful few hours at Camp Ka-Dee-Mah's "par-
ent's visiting day." Sitting next to Dodie Weinstein added to my
fteling of how great this camp is, for her enthusiasm is con-
tagious ... I loved the giggling, laughing, sunburned faces and
1 joved the spirit of consideration for each other when "instant
Quiet" came alter a signal from Dick Goldstein, their director.
We in the audience couldn't help laughing when a really tiny tot
who was awarded a certificate for achievement in pre-school
swimming piped up in a voice that matched his size, "But I
don't know how to read it!" Fortunately, he seemed satisfied
* on ft. ... I loved the play put on by two of the senior groups.
2 found the plot a bit confusing but I must say that the mes-
sage which told of the preparation for the coming of the Sabbath
was touching. To sum up the day and the whole camp season
what could be better than Camper Leah Simonson's little
jrece in the Ka-Dee-Mah Kibitzer, the camp newspaper?
Ingredients: boys, girls, camp, a playground and sunshine.
Mix the boys and girls in camp, then pour them into
the playground and sprinkle some sunshine over them.
When baked brown, send them home."
Only thing I can think of to add to Leah's recipe is one
e/Jilional ingredient: a loving and capable staff.
ft ft ft
Florence and Howard Fuerst celebrated their 25th anni-
\ %ary by inviting a large group of their friends to a wing-
.r.g party at Emerald Hills ... To try to name them all would
v- as hopeless as trying to name all those who attended Temple
3c lei's First Anniversary Dance which was also held at Emerald
H-'lls on a recent evening. Almost the whole membership of
it-.* new temple showed up. They all seem to share Abe Durbin's
er.ihusiasm tor this temple.
When Eli.se Simon Weil came down from her new home in
Denver to visit some of her old friends and to see her Aunt
E^tty Marcus, she stayed with Maxine and Bud Tanis. While she
was here Annette Milloff and Dorothy Fine invited some of the
p"^rLs to luncheon at Westview. Besides Annette, Dorothy,
Elise and Maxine there was Carolyn Caster, Sue Permealy,
Miriam Brennan, Hazel Sharenow and June Wolf.
ft ft ft
BITS AND PIECES: Jack Berman tells me that he went
ic the National Conference of JCRC with Joe Kleiman. Al
Snetman was seen lunching at the Hollywood Beach Golf Club
Restaurant. The Diplomat Country Club has reopened
after several weeks of refurbishing and vacations. Many of
gut localites will be happy to see Cal again at their lunchtime
hangout.
CAPI, AVELLONE & KLEIN, P.A.
RADIOLOGISTS
ANDRE S. CAPI, M.D.
TCO M. AVELLONE, M.D.
RUIIN KLEIN, M.D.
ALEXANDER I. KERNISH. M.D.
MARTIN E. HARRIS. M.D.
JOEL A. SCHNEIDER. M.D.
TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
THE ASSOCIATION OF
Richard I. Hendra, M.D. and Philip N. Freedland, M.D.
IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY
AND
NORMAN E JONES. M.D.
IN RADIATION THERAPY
m mri mi imu
MUTMM, FLOW* 33070
I2S-NM
MO 0TH FEDERAL DIMWIT
P0MPM0 REACH, FIWIM 330*2
141-5(30
+Jewish fk**&un
Friday. July 23. 1971
JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued from Page 4
submarines operating in the
Mediterranean in late Novem-
ber. Yet our antisubmarine war-
tan equipment was so anti-
quated that we knew the actual
locations of no more than two
or three of these Soviet subs!
NO IVONDKR. then, that the
Sixth Fleet had hardly dared to
operate in strength in the cru-
cial eastern basin of the Mediter-
ranean for at least a year before
the Jordanian crisis! No wonder
that the American ships only
ventured into the eastern basin
on President Nixon's direct or-
der and mostly scuttled out again
as soon as last September's cri-
sis ended. And remember that
if Malta is denied to the Sixth
Fleet, the Mediterranean's cen-
tral basin will also be hardly
tenable, and even the western
basin will be wide open to the
Soviets!
It can be seen, then& how pro-
foundly Malta must affect both
Soviet and U.S. calculations
about the Mediterranean and
the Middle East with all that
this can mean for Israel. And
one must add to this rather grim
demonstration the further un-
pleasant fact that the recent
election in Iceland, also unre-
ported, may easily cost the U.S.
Navy its control of the North
Atlantic.
Hollywood Hadassah Chapter
Sets Plans For The Season
Hollywood's Hadassah held a
| meeting recently at the home of
' Mrs. A. .1. Salter in order to make
I plans for the coming season.
Executive officers from the six
local groups Mt Scopus, Reach,
H'Atid, Henrietta Szold, Hillcrest
! ind Sholom attended. A tenta-
tive program was -set up at the
meeting and preliminary plans for
; the year ahead were instituted.
It was decided that the annual
| paid-up membership coffee for all
members of the Hollywood Chap-
ter will be held Nov. 23 at the
Sheraton Beach Hotel. 19400 Col-
lins Ave. Mrs. Archie Kamer. mem-
bership vice president, wi[| oe in
charge of this event.
The Ami Luncheon will be held
Dec. 7 at Emerald Hills Country
Club. It will be followed by tin
Youth Aliyah Brunch Jan. 16 at
the Hemispheres.
The Educational Forum on Feb.
15 will be hosted by Mrs. Irving
Voice, and the annual Donor
Luncheon will be held March 21
at the Diplomat Hotel with Mr*
Robert Berman serving as the
chairman.
It was also announced that t'n
"Hadassah Bargain Box" will b-
reopened in September after thu
summer hiatus.
FREE INSPECTION
CALL
961-8181
PEST CONTROL
5927 Jali St I
LEE23
DIRTY
CARPETS
10
STEAMCLEANEO WALL-Tt-WALL
/Tl I m#l'f hiim
(PENTIAL |W COMMERCIAL
FACTORY OWNED AND OPERATED
guarantee! ion safe .tflm&ml
JADCO STEAMCLEAN
CARPET CLEANERS
For Estimates Coll; 989 0359
PLANTATION SHUTTERS
(Alto Drapery, Mesh & Plastic Insert Shutters)
Beautifully PAINTEO and expertly INSTALLED in your home
:;...........;. ,..;.:.-'.' ..... ............. ........
:-.-:... .. .-.'..... .;. r.: ..'.:- ::" .:':;..-.. -.'.
I 555

!~TT Mt l(
trf
Sam* r**h Quafitv and W m*z:zm* comrari thsu very low hmcis TiNe..;;;^es;::am*
iOlio MASS HIMCIt AND IAKIMCORATIVI
Mem
* *"'"" "AMI All A OUMO WITH A RIAL
COflMCL
MICH 1UOW All MHtlY TYMCAl MUCH ...
ANY ITPI O* Mil AVAHAKI AT SMMtAt MC
Why net ihtcV ytur wmdew m with tht tritii
wiiTKniiurr
ITiM".............SM
irn.............w
71"*M".............STt
w"..........tin
itr-di"..........tin
*(.......tilt
WltniKIMT
wmr.............tM
war.............J7i
irar............sin
mw..........sm
ww..........tin
e* Wf ......tiotitltt
WtRTRWwWT
*W.............IT1
"w............tin
WW............$144
JSEJ;..........*m
]*""..........Mil
irir..,.,,,.....sm
WIRTRKMMT
"*".............
H"m"............SIM
M"*1"............UN
1M"*1..........SMt
tSTNl"..........StW
W ........tut Mil
I
f AINTiNG ANO MSTAIUTMM.
ootrr ROftflir tmim mm mum fumm i
We Will Brint Samples mnd Pictures I* Your Hmt
Phone Hollywood 923-7776
eUT Of TOWMM CAtt COUKT
FLORIDA WOOD FABRICATORS
202 N.W. 2fW ST.. HAtLANOAU, HA


Friday. July 23.1971
*Je*ist>ncrMton
-^CKJ 7
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah Marks End
Of First Three-Week Period
I would like my friends to receive this paper. Please
add their name to your mailing list.

NAM
ADDRESS
TfTT
STATI
ZIP CODE
Pltm mail completed coupon to Jewish Floridian-Shofar
1909 Harmon Street, Hollywood, Florida 33020
Friday, July 9, the first of two
parent's visiting days for Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah's 1971 season, mark-
ed the end of the first three week
period of camping. The second
visiting day, which will follow the
second three week period, will be
held Thursday afternoon, July 29.
It will include a gala carnival.
The first visiting day was plan-
ned so that the parents would
have a chance to see and experi-
ence the camp as it actually is,
according to Richard Goldstein,
director ot the camp.
"We had no intention of showing
off for the parents," he said. "We
only invited them to come and
see exactly what camp is like.
Nothing special was planned in
their children's individual groups
but they were invited to sit in and
watch the various activities and
learn just what a camper's day
eonsists of."
At a general assembly follow-
t*+0*
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
1 AB 7:52
ing the classroom visits the camp's
philosophy and program were de-
scribed by Mr. Goldstein, and Red
Cross swimming certificates and
cards were awarded to qualified
campers on varied levels.
"Fun and Fundamental" certifi-
cates for ore-schoolers were award-
ed to Kim Ader, Amanda Bell,
Sharon Botnik, Mark Desky, Lisa
Fisher, Bradley Fleisher, Louis
Friend, Richard Golden, Barbara
Goldstein, Susan Gutterenplan, Jon
Lack, Mark Levitats, Richard Man-
ulkin, Julie Rifkin, Arnold Rosen-
baum, Gaye Schneeweiss, Tracey
Schreft, Grant Smith, David Si-
monson, Brett Stone and David
Topping.
Beginners Course cards were
presented to Lise Ader, Keith
Fingels, David Sabra, Lisa Vein-
grad, Abby Drescher, Mark Grand,
Brian Sugarman and Phillip Piatt.
Advanced Beginner Cards went to
Barbara Gorlin, Glenn Meyer and
Michael White. The sole Inter-
mediate Card was awarded to
Kathy Robins.
Swimming instruction is under
the direction of Peggy Martin,
aquatics director at the Ha Han-
dale City Pool, where Ka-Dee-
Mah campers swim. Other Red
Cross instructors at the pool in-
clude Mary Pribanich, Susan Matt-
son, Richard Sullivan, Dorothy
Ho land, Ralph Pirn. Betty Hewlett,
Bette Abernathy and Cleo Lind-
stedt.
GARYL GOLDFADEN M.D.
Announces the opening
of his office for the
Practice of Dermatology
at
Academy Circle-4001 Hollywood MnL
Hollywood, Rorlde Phono *eo-S40l>
HOURS IY APPOINTMENT
C.W. BROWN, INC.
RREBBURB aROUTINa
SOIL STABILIZATION FOR NEW
CONSTRUCTION-SLAB RAISING
-SEAWALL RESTORATION
s2M,i *..* mm
Following the presentation of
the swimming awards, a program
was presented by two of the sen-
ior groups. It featured the prepa-
ration for the Sabbath as experi-
enced in a Jewish family and was
climaxed with the lighting of can-
dles and the Sabbath blessing.
The celebration of the coming
of the Sabbath is a ritual perform-
ed each week in a Friday assem-
bly of the entire camp. It is pre-
sented each week by a different
group of campers.
Thyrt.
LINDA'S BEAUTY GALLERY
119 S.W. 41 ST TERRACE
(1 BLOCK SOUTH OF HOLLYWOOD tLVD.)
CLOSED MONDAYS *66-2332 ------
MOWS
APPLE NECTARS
TASTE IKE
LIQUIFIED
FRESH FRUIT
FOR PEOPLE
WHO LIKE APPLES,
PEARS, BANANAS
ANDVHAMINC
APPLE NECTAR 1
mrrs
APPLE-PEAR NECTAR
APPLE-BANANA
NECTAR
K CERTIFIED KOSHER PARVE
Your family will love these luscious neclaru from
Mott'sthick, rich, outrageously delightful and
refreshing. Not a new juice. Not just another fruit
drink. But an entirely different experiencelike tho
taste of liquified fresh fruit I
And they all "have vitamin C addedgreat for break* |
fast, lunch and dinner, too. Geshmakste for between I
meal noshes I You'll find Mott's Nectars in the fruit
juice section at your supermarket. Treat your family
to all three soon.
AMD YOU THOUGHT MOTT'S JUST MAM GREAT APPLE SAUCE.]


Page 8
*J tikridKiain
Friday, July 23. W71
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlfcsingef
"25" FOR THI FUERSTS
Though it was nil orange and yellow from
the invitations and the table linen to the mag-
nificently bountiful floral arrangements it all
came up roses. Twas the gala party at Emerald
Hills Country Club that Dr. Howard and Flor-
ence lateral threw tor their oh-sc-many friends
in honor ol I heir !?5th wedding anniversary. And.
it couldn't have been more splendid, ftmn the
individual picture-taking of the arriving couples
to the hors doom res, dancing, set umptuous din-
ner and fun entertainment offering, 'twas a de-
light tMn beginning to end but then every-
thing the Puersts do always seem to turn out thai
way.
Mid-evening, after Howard took the micro-
phone to pay tribute to wife Florence on their
splendid 25 years together; the guests gave a
standing ovation to the happy couple and later
presented them with a scroll of tribute and the
establishment <>f a fund in their name at Temple
Sin ii ll was jusi thai kind of an evening. The
gaictj match d only by the friendship and
warmth of all Ihose on hand.
Ot course, sons Bandy and Scott, and daugh-
ter Naacj were there, as well as Muriel Foersl
(Howard's maiharJ to round oul the beautiful
family picture, Some ol the very many guests
enjoj ng it all were newly^tppolnted Judge Art
Iriui/a; Hie fun Vorras, \l and Ann. Dave and
Llla (the latter iimiij; summertime leisure for
another of then- "routine" home additions); the
SheMoa Gasaona, Bill and ititu Ilewlt, Man and
Esther Garden (Just about to make the "big
mover to their new lakeside home); the Al
SliortiiuiiH, \ih\ii\ and llernle Spirits, the Alan
Finks. BUI and \llc- Foster, Boh and Sharon
Collins, .Mar and DorotJi.v Kline anil the Joel
Kottmins. And, Mien there were the (icroiieiiius
bgothers, Al, Otom and Baal with their rcs|>cc-
tiVe femmes, Terry, Berlc and Adelc. 'Hie Holly-
wood, ine. contingent was a-pavtying, tixi, in
the persons of Mr. and Mrn. Bill llorvit/ and
Jejae and Clnde Martin.
Many of theai on the scene were either just
bank from or on their way to summer-time frolic.
Dr. Norm Atkin and wife, Nancy, recently re-
turned from Sarasota, will he cooling il at home
(or the remainder of the summer. ticrt and Nat
Allen will be combining a little Work with pleas-
ure on their upcoming Hawaii-Hong Kong jaunt
while Bab and Barb Roberta and ramily will be
cooling their heels up North Carolina way,
The goodl) group ol medicos and mates on
hand lor the festivities Included the l.eo tetas, the .Martin TrelhiTs, Beruie and Aiim-tte
Millolr, Harry and Sue I'ennesly, Dave Trppnr-
son, the Milt tsastsn, By and Slmone Dunn, the
Don Baraajna, Norm and Cloria Wrubel, the
Aster HoUandera, the sender Ktolovr*, Bob and
Sutnui .lum-ll, and Mnrcu* and Jackie Zbar (Dr.
in I Mrs. 7. getting a bead start on anniversary
celebrating since their 18th. was coming up the
next day), linn and Juan Rodenherg were there,
too, Joan related a harrowing but hilarious tale
of license renewal and her brush with the Flor-
ida Motor Vehicle Bureau.
To add to all the excitement Jack Pollard
and Stan Graaresjaai arrived mid-evening to the
raiting arms ol tJit-ii- respective spouses, Ana
and f-loriu. and the bravos of those in attend-
ance. Seems that the Bimini fishermen ran out
of ga and were adrift off the Fort Lauderdule
shores. Alter tjcinj* towed in by the Coast Guard,
the gents arrived at the party scene suntanned,
smiling and ju*t in time for dinner with words of
Ik--it wishes to the host and hostess. And, on the
subject ol words and wishes, there arc a f*v
more this writer would- like to add at this point;
Our heartiest and warmest congratulations to a
simply grand twosome, Howard and Florence, on
their quarter of a century of wedded bliss.
JULY 4th-ING
Fred and Judy Iappiuaii with their sons.
Steven, Petal and Matthew at the Hilton Inn
on beautiful Riviera Beach for a fabulous fourth
. The Ocean Reef Club welcomed three Holly-
wood families for the long holiday weekend of
fishing and boating; Dr. Jerry and I.aura Maasjl
and their brood, June Uaa and Stuart: Shel and
l.ihby Willciis with 11-year-old son, Mark (he
recently was aw aided the President's Physical
Fitness Awardl; and Mori and Marcy LeaOai with
o-ycar-old Matthew Bill and Alice Foster
were Port St. Liicic-lsmnd with offspring Bill.
Jamas and Marilyn, and Panama pal, Mr*. Kit-
ward Bear and her two children. Bob and Irene.
Heading out wilh two Cars, two boats (one's a
Whaler) and an armada of bicycles, the happy
contingent occupying two viUaa had a fun-
peeked weekend ol ClreWOFks, river and water-
way cruising and good old-fashioned family
togetherness,
PARTY TIME
Marcy (Mrs. Mort) Levin and BUIe (Mrs,
Herb) Kats hosted a luncheon al Emerald Hills
Country Club in honor of Marilyn Kaplan, who
H i!i hubby Kd and their three offspring are
current!) on the grand (our of Israel with the
Kaliai Malavsky group. Lunching and "bon voy
' were Selnia (.Mrs. Joel Ilopen, Cookie
i Mrs. Geerge) Berman, Mar/.l (Mrs. Doug) Kap-
lan, ('harlotle (Mrs. Myron) Brodle. Jill (Mrs.
Larry) Hauler and I.aura (Mrs. Jerry) Slegel.
And. speaking of I.aura her weeks of se-
cret planning for hubby, Jerry's surprise birth-
day parly came off without a hitch. The party
took place ai Joe Sonkens Gold Ooaal Restaurant
and all their pall were there to share in il: the
Dick KeinsK-iiis. Dave Kllshner, the AIm- Flseblers.
Sbe| and l.ihby Widens. Leonard and Barli.ira
Meet (he. newly ensconced in his lioautiful of-
fice on Ihe circle I and the Mort levins. Kd and
.Marilyn Kaplan were there, too, as well as Ike
and Baiter Feiler, the Don; Kaplan-.. Dave and
Marta Bernstein and the soon-to-be F.mcrald
Hill residents, Jerry and 1-tln-l Sayfier. Several
Fl Myers friemts cruised on down to join the
fun, too. The Sicgels lived in that west COBSt
City prior to their Hollywood move 10 years ago
It was a grand evening and one had only to
gaze upon .leiry's surprised expression to know
ih.it the secret was a well-kept one.
PEOPLE AND PUCES
C'nl and Ina Linda walking on air al'ler a lux-
urious day of pampering at the plush Palm-Airc
Spa in Pompano. The Sonny Wolflngcrs
and the George Cranes wining and dining at
Plantation's Cafe Don Juan.
The Emerald Hills Homeowners Association
will be well represented for the upcoming year
by its new officials. Installed recently at the
group's second annual banquet at Emerald Hills
Country Club was Roger Newman, president;
Arthur Kail, second vice president; Mrs. Judy
Xewnwn, recording secretary: and Joe Bauro-
gurten. treasuner.
When-the mammoth British aircraft carrier
HMS Ark Royal docked at Port Everglades with
more than 2.500 officers enlisted men aboard.
Aaita and Sy BUvermaa and sons Mike and
Richard were one family among hundreds in line
for the tour. However, they struck up a fast
friendship with Chief Normaa CowV-y of Liver-
pool, England which resulted in "the grand tour
and treatment royale" aboard the 50,000 ton war-
ship. The Silverman family reciprocated, inviting
the British gent to a home-cooked dinner and a
sight-seeing tour of our area. The kids are still
talking about it.
mSOKAUTY HtOFIti
Jack Berman
Jack Berman has had an in-1 more important thing happened
tereat hi 4e***" organizational thou -,, the thinfcVtnrthar.Ka ny
Woxk eve- since, hew** a yeung entina.ilUa I ,net my-wife"
1 (Shirley was also a student there
and when they graduated they
married .
While in college, Mr. Berman
continued his work tor Jewish
organizations and helped conduct
the drives for Federation besides
serving as president of the Hillel
chapter. Fraternities were im-
portant to college life in those
days and Jack became president ot
Kappa Nu.
Finishing college, he spent a
short tune as a social worker at
the Jewish Center in Mobile, Ala.
However, his wife was a Ftorwlian
by birth, so they soon decided to
Battle in Miami where Shirley's
family lived, and Jack begun a
career In the insurance buatneaa.
They liked living in Miami but
in 1858, they decided to move a
bit North all the way to Holly-
wood. Jack went into the inaui-
ance business for himself, and
from then until now he has taken
part in local Hollywood Jewish or-
ganization activities.
Jack his worked in the Fede i-
tion campaigns every year since
1958, and organized the first AZA
m town, tor his interest in young-
.i' n has always been strong.
Almost as soon as he moved to
Hollywood, he joined the JVVV's.
Victor B. Freedman Post and be-
came i'- Commander in 1961. He
, eli i led State Commander in
1965,
Jack and Shirley joined Temple
iieih Shalom, where he has been
a member of the Board for ;'
number Ol years. At present he is
also the temple's recording secre-
tary. An active inemls-r of B'nai
B'rlth, he waa recently elected
vice president of the Brovrari
County Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council.
As a result of his professional
associations, he has become active
in many other organizations. He is
a past president of the Broward
County Mutual Insurance Agenta
Association and the Hollywood
Exchange Club, and Current presi-
dent of the South Broward Insur-
or's Association.
JACK HUMAN
hoy in Sharon, Pa., where he waa
born. As a > tung student, he help-
ed to organize A/A chapters tot
the Jewish boya of thai area.
World War il interrupted his
schooling and lie entered the Army.
During his three-year stlnl In the
South Pacific, he attained the rank
Of sergeant, And alter the war
ended, .lack entered the Univer-
sity of Alabama where he eon
tinued his education, earning his
I! A. degree in Sociology.
However," lo quote Jack, "i
Temple Belli VA
Engages Teacher
Kenneth Tarnovc, who has been
il by Temple IJcth B] as the
principal teacher In the Hebrew
Department, will be teaching all
grades,
Mr. Tarnovc received his B.A.
degree from Ihe University of
Miami where lie majored in The-
ology. He attended the Hebrew-
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in New York City; and
received his Teacher's and Prin-
cipals certification from the afore*
mentioned schools, Mr. Tarnovc
who has dene graduate work in
Jewish siudies and Innovated many
educational programs, has taught
at Temple Kmanu-Kl, Ft. Lauder-
(iale; Temple Belli Tikvah. Wayne.
N.J., and Temple Israel, New
Rochelle, NY.
All Ins organizational honors.
however, cant measure up to his
pride when be repOTta that his
daughter, Carol, is currently car-
rying on the family tradition by
attending the University of Ala-
bama. Another daughter, Sandra,
17, and Son Joseph, 11. complete
I lie Herman family.
I
MALANDRINO'S
BIT
OF
Fine Italian
family Restaurant
* f LL ITALIAN Mtsj
Come In For
Daily Special
COMI> ICIt 0 1*111 S
FRESH HOME MADE DOUGH
, Take out Antf Delivery
k Open 1:00 r\M. 983-06T6
I'Til 12:00 P.M. 6516 Hollywood llv.


Friday. July 23. 1971
rJtnisllkridlKiil
Page 9
Jpit I
t jBrnnirtrrr-in.....-------1.....1.....mil iiiinnm inrii.....-.....iimn mi ...........ui n iiinmnm. in i_.u-m__*
'The Image of The Enemy'
By RABBI S. T. SWIRSKV
Beth Junob ConjrregatioH '
An unusually bold and dlthyram-
bic command is issued by Mosos
in DM Sidruh ol' this week, name-
ly, to execute
summary ven-
geance on the
Midianitcs. The
orotund man-
date is given to
harass the Mid-
ianitcs an'1 smite
them, and one
perceives added
fury and indig-
nation in the
edict not to
spare even the
women.
o**i 5w,rsky ,jjkte tom.bl..f_
ic directive is so much out of con-
sonance with the commission and
tenderness that are the hallmarks
of the character and demeanor of
Moses that wc are baffled by the
ruthlessnc.ss and total lack ol
ckimcncy.
Tbis enigmatic passage sheds
much light on the weave of the
pattern of Jewish ex|>erience.
Though the Rabbis were wont to
declare Unit the righteous of all
nations will share in the bliss of
the world to come and inherit
paradise, yet the verdict of his-
tory has an ironic denoucement.
Individuals of the nations may
achieve a level of ethics and moral
conduct, but the nations, as a to-
tality, aa depraved even as their
aetions reflect pernicious turpitude.
Jofhro of Midian is a friend and
kinsman to the liberated Children
of Israel; he counsels sage advice
and his i-eoondHc directions arc
profound. But the Midianitcs, as
a national entity, reveal the slime
ol hatred and each compliment
is turned into anathema. To
thwart the march to the I-and of
Promise, Midian will place every
stormy petrel in the way, silting
up the fountains of hope, and
eroding every oasis of strength.
Moreover, the actions of the
Midiunites which aroused and so
stirred Moses betray the perfidi-
ous stratagems of the anti-Semites
"f all ages. In grave denunciation,
Moses explains his wrath M stem-
mini; from the loot that the Mid-
i- niti s lured the Israelis to in-
dulge in licentious rites in the
worship of Bnal-Peor: it was
throtr-ii tlve wiles of the women
thai they wee ensnared to commit
11 spas* .against the Lord.
The incontrovertible fact of
'wish history is that we have to
i'iir the b/arnhxlmicnts <>f our en-
emy more than his physical as-
Hallandale Center
()f fers Activity For
All Age Groups
A Kalii -water show has been
planned In the pool facilities at
'he Itellundale Recreation Center,
Ml SK 1st Ave., Thursday evening,
July 29, according to Emilio Mcn-
''Ulo, reensrtion director.
ffalUmdak-'ii center ix ottering a
full variety of programs geared
I" all group* from pre-sehool age
'-> Senior citizens this summer.
The facilities are open -Monday
through Friday from 9 a.m. to 9
I'm., except tor an hour at noon
and Hvo hurs from 5 to 7 p.m.
Activities for children include
'irohr-ry, arts and crafts, baton
twirling, l>askerbill, baseball, golf.
lx)wliog, dancing, guitar lessons,
hwHemansbip. wiling, sol tball. ten-
nis, wallcyhed and weekly movies.
There is also a daily swimming
l-f>grnm for children of all ages.
At th<* Kuan.' time there are
aduht class"* in sewing of all kind*
bvipu' taught at the Hallundale
Junior High School. At Uie.rec-
'citajn Cemrr adults can take
yoga lesson*, square dance and
tennis, instruction.
saults. The Jew may remain im-
pervlodH-to'thc blows of a pogrom,
yet he will succumb to the allurc-
nents of the Sirens" deadly melo-
dies. Amalek may be crushed, but
the enticement of the Midianlte
women will bring about a hideous
cacaphony through which Baal will
bewitch and charm the multitudes,
resulting in unmitigated despair.
H..\v shall the Jew face the fu-
ture? Neither the knout of in-
grains nor the mirages of assimi-
lation will be the determining forc-
es in our survival. We must stop
tearing the calumnies of our neigh-
bors or courting their favors. We
must learn to live only by the ful-
ness of our own spiritual life and
rely solely on our own divine
resources.
I-et us raise a generation of men
with supreme spiritual fortitude
who will seek the life-giving wa-
ters of Jewish knowledge and
klealism and thereby functify the
menacing desert called civilization
and help turn it into a garden of
blessings and days of paraousia.
SaaaaaaaaaSBaaaaaM......mi i'!."ii'
'1,1.:'.i I ,v ii'i'i1 ti'H' i ;ti* '
Question
Box
SYNOPSIS Of THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Matos-Masai
By RABBI SAMUEL i. FOX
), JyvlB)*T'JwUlt '. Inc.**. *, <"And Mesrs spoke unto the heads ol the tribes
drcn ot Israel, saying ." iChapters .10-36
'of the*fttfr*
Religious
Services
HAIUNDA1E
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER 12f
NE lit Ave. 44
HOUYWOOO
BETH EL (T.mple). 1351 8. 14th Avi,
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. *i
Friday X:lfi n. m. Mr. Hubert W. Gor-
don will offlclute.
ETH SHALOM (Temple). 1728 Mor-
roa SI. Conaarvatlva. Rabbi Morton
Maiaviky. Cantor Irving Gold. 4
SINAI (Tampla). 1201 Johnson St.
Conaarvatlva. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. 47
--------
ISRAEL (Tampla) SMO SW SMh St.
Conaarvatlva. Rabbi Elliot J. Wino-
grad. Cantor Abraham Koetar. 41
--------
MAHGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 101
NW 9th St.
Noodle Pudding
A Delicious Treat
Hare is a recipe lor an excep-
tionally delicious treat a pareve
noodle pudding which should serve
10-12 persons.
'a lb. medium or broad noodles
1 stick (M lb.) margarine
4 large eggs, very well beaten
(or 5 medium size)
White raisins, washed well,
soak' 11 nnd drained
1 can Dole crushed pineapple
(13'a oz. size)
Vanilla
Corn Flakes or Kice Krispies
(crushed)
.Maraschino cherries
Cinnamon
Sugar to taste (1 tablcsi>oon
or more)
Melt margarine, watching care-
fully to prevent browning. Cook
noodles until tender; drain and
rinse with hot water. Add mar-
garine, well-beaten eggs, sugar,
cinnamon, vanilla, raisins, end
pineapple, including the liquid.
Add a little Uquid from the cher-
ries also.
Grease an oblong pan with mar-
garine; shake some sugar and cin-
namon together In a small jar,
and sprinkle generously over
the margarine, lop with a thin
layer of Corn Flakes or Rice
Krispies and scatter a few cut up
maraschino cherries. Add the
noodle mixture, top with crushed
cereal, cinnamon-sugar and cher-
ries. Dot with butter and bake at
350 F. about 45 minutes or until
nicely browned on top. Cool com-
pletely.
Pudding may be enjoyed cold,
or it may be cut in portions and
reheated in the oven until warmed
through.
Note: Dieters may use imitation
sugar and low calorie pineapple
Contributed by:
Mm. Kthel A. Pomerantz
North Miami Beiufi
What In m Tiilltli Katan?
It is traditional for a Jewish
male to wear a four-cornered gar-
ment under his coat so that he
could fulfill the commandment
Milch the Bible prescribes order-
ing a Jew to attach fringes to the
four corners of his garment.
Since our garments today are
not four cornered, this four cor-
nered garment is put on so that
the fringes can be attached there-
to.
The reason it is called a Talith
Katan is because it is not usually
as large as an outer garment
which is called Talith. Also, the
largo outergarment of four cor-
ners which is worn during the
morning services imd to which the
fringes are attached is called Tal-
ith. Therefore, the smaller gar-
ment is called Talith Katan.
From what age are hoys in-
augurated into the. praetlrw of
wear inn this Talith KuUm?
The usual age for starting this
custom is three years. Some say
that this is the age when the child
speaks fluent'y.
Some authorities say that a
child under this age should not
wear a Talith Katan. The reason
for this is that the life of a hu-
man being is compared to the life
of a tree. In the case of a tree, its
fruit is forbidden I'or three years
' the first three years of its
existence (Deuteronomy 20:19).
Thus, some people regard" a
child of loss than three years as
not being ready for dedication to
holy commandments. It Is Inter-
esting that some p:v>ple will not
cut the hair of a child younger
than three years old because of
the same reason i.e., just as a
tree docs not have its fmit plucked
in the first three years so does the
"human tree" not. have its hair cut
during the first three years
It is interesting to note that
recent psychological and educa-
tional developments have shown
that a child begins to be very
alisorbtivc at the age of three.
Why Is It customary for the
bride (or the bride and groom)
to be hiewted by the rabbi and
the parents before the ceremony
of marrlagr?
This has been said to emulate
the action of the Almighty Him-
self whom the scriptures depict as
having hlrilSfl Adam and Kve in
the Garden of Eden (Cent sis l:2Hl.
The parents, who gave birth to
the couple, and the Almighty Him-
self, represented by the rabbi who
oversees the religious performance,
are like the partners in the Crea-
tion of the individuals who are to
be married. They thus confer the
blessing on the Individuals just
as the Almighty did in the Garden
if Kdcn (Shulchan Aruch Harav,
91K
A blessing generally indicates
the wish and prayer that happi-
ness should grow and spread and
that the occasion be the beginning
of good tidings instead of being
an end In itself.
APPROACH TO THK PROMISED LAND: The attack of
the Midianitcs was made by 12,000 Israeli warriors, 1.000 from
each tribe. They wore accompanied by Phinchas the priest, who
, took with him the holy vessels and trumpets for soundin,' the
alarm. They met with a glorious victory and conquered all five
kings of Midian. The tribes of Reuben and Gad who had large ,
, herds of cattle, sought permission to fettle this conquered land
because it was good pasture and grazing land. Moses approved
their request providing they promised to CttfcM til.' Jordan with
the other tribes and help them in the conquest of Canaan
Moses recorded the itinerary of the Israelites through the
wilderness. They had encamped in 42 places during the 40 vears
of wandering. After they bad disposed of the Inhabitants of
^ Canaan, the Israelites were lold, every vestagc of idol worship
in the land was to be destroyed. The land would be distributed
by lot in proportion to the size of the tribes,
CITIES OF REFUGE: Six Ecvitical cities wore designated
as Cities ol Refuse, three on each side ol the Jordan, to provide
asylum for any man who killed another accidentally, thus en-
abling him to escape the vengeance of "The Avenger of Blood."
Hie willful murderer could not esca[>e the death penalty, but if
the death was caused by accident the wrongdoer could flee to
one of these Cities of Refuse when' be would be bi-ought before a
judicial tribunal for Judgment of his guilt ami for the determina-
tion and imposition of sentence.


I 4.....II
Terrorists Attack Camp
TEL AVIV JTA) An Is-
raeli soldier was killed last
week during a terrorist attack
in the Jebahyah refugee camp In
the Gaza Strip; a local woman and
a bay were killid in the exchange
of lire following the attack and
two girls were wounded. An hour
later, one terrorist was killed and
aiHither was wounded and cap-
tured by an Israeli patrol north ot
Jebaliyah. The dead terrorist was
on the wanted list of the Israel
security forces. Another terrorist
on the wanted list was killid in
the Gaza Strip Sunday night by an
Israeli patrol that shot him when
he refused to halt.
Universities Accused
Of ^Discrimination9
WASHINGTON (JTA) Jews
are discriminated against by liar-1 According to the article, eh.
yard and Wisconsin Universities Wiled "Are Jewish Studcnt.s D
because they are visibly in the
forefront ol change, according .to
an Article by-Dorothy Rnhinowit/
in the summer issue of Change
lerent'.'" Harvard has reduced II:
number of students from uhurb
schools, with a remilting d.--
crimination against Jews. Harvai-'
Magazine, a monthly on contro- Dt':'" of Admissions Or. ('ha-
versial social and academic, topics Peterson i.s quoted as saying th
supported by the Esso Education! ,he number of students from "f
demits" around the big cities Ii
been reduced. A Jewish faqul'v
member is quoted as having r. -
totted: "Those aren't donu' .
they're bpjfefc."
and Ford Foundations.
241 Americans On
Board Greek Liner
NEW YORK (JTA) Some
241 Americans, comprising 5f> fam-
ily's and 14 individuals set sail for
Israel this week aboard the Greek
liner Quoen Anna-Maria, Nahum
Golan, national director of the
Israel Aliynh Center, said. The
gitiup is part of the 10,000 Ameri-
cans expected to settle in [stael
this year, he said, and includes 47
professionals, 13 skilled and semi-
skilled workers und five business-
men.
The situation at the L'jiiversi
of Wison-sin is even more deli
crate, according to Miss Rabin- -
wit/, who rit.s a legislative
reducing the enrollment or out-i
state students to lift of the st I-
dent body. She quotes a legislut |
arguing against the bill as e
plaining its puuposo and effec1
"It was to get rid of the kik-
from New York and the dii
niggers."
Since the enactment of that
provision, Miss llubioowit/. .sn.v
A group of about 140 American ,no J(,w.is.h student p-pulntio i
and Canadian college graduates
will leave bv air lor Israel this
month to spend one- year as teach-
ers, social workers and instructor.
Another aroup of 50 Americans
iind Canadians will depart July 28
for a year at kibbutzim Shaar Ha-
golan und Magal.
At least 150 more college and
high school graduates will leave
for Israel in September and Oc-
tober. Together with the first
group which left for Jarad in
January, the number of Sherut
La'am participants in 1971 will
total 400.
dropped by two-thirds within i
year. She attributed the Adrru -
sions Committee dislike of Jewrta, I
studcnt.s to their Leadership I
students are over-represented g
the anti-establishment act.M
side" she tiuys, .adding that the
number is not statistically i
markable. The over-reprcei nl
tion does not constitute a ma-
jority of Jews and Is simply reflec-
tive of the genera! heovy m
Mentation of Jews in (rood h*rhi
educational institutions she I -
plains, attributing the situation O
Jewish use of education as I su
vival tool and Jewish eulteral l
milinrity with books.
rufSOAr, jvir 27
Mellywsed Chsjt.r Msdsssi* Ma.tin, 10 A.M. Hawt Federal
HoWywesd
Sl.tarhoad Hallondolt Jewish CisUr, DtMtrt Umch.an 12:30 P.M.
Ceeter, 124 NL 1st *., Meileweeie.
Tenasle Selel-Msmhership Cetfeo tM. lm*,a\* Hills C.C.
HIIDAI, AUGUST 6
Horfoitah ch Crave
re" Mcttina lOiJO A.M
II


Page 10
Jenist>Fk>riar*3""
Friday, July 23, 1971-
Reform Rabbis, ZOA Leader
Dispute Over Criticism
NEW YORK UTA) Rabbi
Roland B. Gittelsohn, past presi-
dent of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he stands
by the statement made by himself
and CCAR president Rabbi David
Polish that certain Zionist bodies
"embrace Americas most reac-
tionary politicians who would be-
tray Israel overnight if it suited
their purposes."
That statement, contained in a
joint message by Rabbis Polish
and Gittelsohn to the Reform rab-
binical body's 82nd annual con-
vention in St. Louis last month,
came under sharp attack by Rabbi
Joseph P. Sternstein, vice chair-
man of the Zionist Organization
of America's executive committee.
Rabbi Sternstein claimed that
these "invidious appraisals" were
"utterly naive and lacking in
responsibility."
Rabbi Gittelsohn. reached by
telephone at his study in Boston,
xetorted that criticism was in the
honored tradition of the Hebrew
Prophets and must not be sup-
pressed.
Rabbi Sternstein called the Re-
form leaders' remarks "distorted
and myopic." He told a meeting of
his committee that "Zionists are
not as quick to polarize individ-
uals by the terms 'liberal' and
'reactionary whatever these
terms might mean today. For
us," he said, "the issue is not
who is a liberal and who is re-
actionary. It is who is a friend
of Israel and the Jewish people
tried, tested and true and
who it not. There is no need
to apologize for the geo-political
reality which binds Israel and the
United States. We are gratified by
the assurances that America's se-
curity interests coincide with Is-
rael's survival for both serve
the cause of world peace and free-
dom."
Rabbi Gittelsohn told the JTA
that ZOA leaders were making "a
considerable effort" to dampen
Jewish criticism of Nixon Admin-
istration policies in Southeast Asia
on grounds that "we must not
make the Administration angry"
because of possible repercussion?
against Israel. Rejecting that atti-
tude, the Reform leader declared
"We must criticize American poli-
cies in Asia as if there were n<
Israel while supporting Israel's re-
lationship with the United States
as if there were no Asia."
Rabbi Gittelsohn said that de-
spite the ongoing crisis in the
Middle East, "the kind of state
that Israel will ultimately be is
being determined right now. In
the long run. Israel's security will
be assured more by adhering to
the prophetic ideals of Judaism
than trying to put them in the
freezer."
Rabbi Gittelsohn also complain-
ed that Rabbi Sternstein's state-
ment, released to the press Sun-
day, mentioned himself and Rabb
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
temple Set A 1
Wemozlal
Cjazdent
The only all-jew ish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
* .: -
rui iiiiomiaiiuii uan. i*"'*'."*'W
923-8255orwrjtK_ /*'/'*'/il
"TEMPLE BETH EL ."' %9W
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: ________________________________,___
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
140 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOUTW00O
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"A Service Within The Means Of Alt"
$24 Million Libel Suit
Is Welcomed9 By League
Polish by name while criticizing
unrelated statements by 'a third
American rabbi who Sternstein
refrained from identifying. The
third taget of the ZOA leader ap-
parently was Rabbi Arthur Hertz-
berg, of Temple Emanuel, Engle-
wood, N.J., a member of the
Jewish Agency Executive pres-
ently in Israel.
House Committee
Invites Leaders To
Express Opinions
WASHINGTON (WNS)
American religious leaders of
three faiths have been invited to
express their views on Jerusalem's
future at a meeting of the Near
East Subcommittee of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee.
Invited to testify as individuals
were Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum,
director of the interreligious af-
fairs department of the American
Jewish Committee; Dr. James
Kritzeck, director of the Institute
of Higher Religious Studies at
Notre Dame University, and Mu-
hammed Abd al-Rauf, director of
the Islamic Center in New York.
In- the Senate, spokesmen for
the Foreign Relations Committee
refused to confirm or deny that
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg had been
invited to testify at hearings on
the status of Jerusalem. They
said such hearings were not sched-
uled, but could be "in the air."
Soviet Jews and The
New Abolitionists
Continued From l-
was very clearly tryirfg to direct
the resentments of the people away
from itself and onto a small mi-
nority which has traditionally been
the object Of scorn and persecu-
tion.
The greatest danger is that the
anti-Semitic campaign now under-
way in the Soviet Union will get
out of hand and the world will be
confronted with a repetition of
Hitler's crimes. This possibility
makes more compelling than ever
the desire of Soviet Jews to leave
the Soviet Union.
Just as the white abolitionists
fought for the liberation of black
slaves before the civil war, people
in the United States, Jewish and
non-Jewish, white and black,
should fight for the liberation of
the Jews in the Soviet Union. The
Soviet Jews have their own Fred
crick Douglasses and Harriet Tub-
mans. What they need are more
people like Wendell Phillips and
William Lloyd Garrison a new
breed of abolitionists.
The issue is not black or wh,'p,
Jew or gentile, but man's respon-
sibility to fight injustice, a fight
in which blacks are in a unique
position. As a result of the injus-
tices that have been committed
against us and our struggle against
these injustices, we have gained a
certain moral authority which can
be effectively used to assist other
oppressed groups in their own
struggle for liberation.
What we must do is to clearly
and unequivocally make known
our position on this issue. Far
from detracting from our fight for
racial equality, any efforts we
make on behalf of Soviet Jewry
will strengthen our movement by
gracing it with a universal dimen-
sion. Nothing we could do would
be more in keeping with the spisit
of Martin Luther King who raised
his voice on all issues involving
basic human rights.
EDITOR'S NOTE: The foregoing col-
umn was scheduled to appear In more
than 100 Negro and Labor newspapers
this month.
The Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith said recently that it
welcomes the $24 million libel suit
brought against it by "Colonel"
Hassan Jeru-Ahmed, of Washing-
ton, whom the League charges
with anti-Semitism.
Seymour Graubard, national
chairman of the League, said. "As
of today. ADL has not been
served with the Hassan complaint
but upon such service the League
has directed counsel to take all
steps necessary to bring the case
to trial as quickly as possible for a
full and fair public airing of the
issues."
"The litigation." Mr. Graubard
said, "will bring Hassan's full ca-
reer of bigotry and anti-social con-
duct to public scrutiny. As re-
cently as July 4," he noted, "Has-
san repeated his long-held anti-
Semitic views on a WTOP-TV
(Washington, D.C.) interview
show."
Hassan, head of the Blackman's
Development Center in Washing-
ton, D.C, who was awarded $523,-
000 in federal funds for the pur-
pose of administering certain
remedial education and occupa-
tional training programs, also
claimed in his law suit that the
League has "conspired" to block
the grant.
The Blackman's Development
Center is part of a complicated
maze of operations directed by
Hassan, including a paramilitary
"Blackman's Volunteer Army of
Liberation," and an organization
he calls the "Provisional Govern-
ment of the United Moorish Re-
public."
In an April 21 letter to Elliot
AUTHORIZED JOHNSON DEAL-
ER. We atrvice all popular OUT-
BOARD and INBOARD OUT.
BOARDS.
BARRACUDA BOAT SALES
1316 N. Federal Highway
Hollywood 923-7884
HOME ADDITIONS
Quality with savings. New homes
eY Commercial. Florida rooms; bed-
rooms A. baths; garages; kitchens;
remodeling; carports; enclosures.
Licensed-Insured Free Estimates.
Arthur Biele 983-6075
NEILSON'S FLORIST
6 N.W. 1st Ave., Dania
Flowers tor all Occasions
Call 922-8051
Sundays Holidays
After Hours
Call 922- 15M-922-3197
TREESAJE
EVERYBODY'S
Richardson, Secretary of tie U.S.
Department ol Health. EdTjVation
and Welfare, the League had pro-
tested the grant to Hassan, con-
tending that "it is counter to pub-
lic policy for government to func-
tion through bigots."
Mr. Graubard declared last
week that "in view of Hassans
long record of anti-Semitism, in-
eluding his July 4 utterances,
there is absolutely no justification
for the U.S. government to en-
trust such a man with huge
amounts of taxpayers' money."
PAL JOEY'S
Men's Hair Styling
and
Barber Shop
1906 Harrison Street, Hollywood
Phone 922-9300
Manicure
PATTERSON'S
DAY A NIOHT
PLUMBING SERVICE
Repairs. Alterations, Contracting
Dial S45-083S
Dependable Service Since 1947
Covering Dade & Broward County
GL0RIANNE
CUSTOM COSMETICS
From New York and Hollywood
Summer Clearance of all
Boutiques and Accessories
Come in tor Complimentary
Make-up Analysis
1907 Harrison 8t., Hollywood
Phone 923-3704
501 Collins Ave. Ocean Pavilion
Preserve your Antiques and Art
objects. I specialize in repairs and
complete restorations of frames.
paintings, porcelain, china and
metals.
Call 981-0560 Mornings
Summer Special
Leave your soiled carpeting to m*.
ANY LIVING ROOM, DINING
ROOM HALL 23.95
New beauty luster technique
FAST DRY 1"2 HOURS
Coll Ritchie 966-7721 NOW
Gale's Golden Scissors
STYLE CUTTINGTINTING
PERMANENTS
For Hair Styling At Its Best
1108 N. University Drive
At Jonnson 981-2341
Dorothy DeGeorge Judy Gale
ROSE and CLARK'S
BEAUTY SALON
ANNOUNCES
Professional Stylists Catering To
Services For Men.
1903 Harrison Street, Hollywood
Wed.-Thurs. Evenings by Appt.
Only 923-7808
HALLANDALE
Highlander Coinamatic
Laundry and Dry Cleaning
All Typea of Alterations & Repairs
BLANCHE and NICK 925-9374
Fast and Dependable
Visit Us and See
1059 W. Hatlandale Beach Blvd.
Next to Zayre's at 1-95
CHARLES PHYSIOGNOMICAL
LADIES HAIR CUTTING AND
BEAUTY SALON
Hair Stylea That Really Last
Ladies Hair Cutting
Placed with Our Electric
Swias Comb
No Appointment Necessary on
Hair Cutting
On Beauty Work Call for
Appointment
927-2760
2858 Hollywood Blvd.
Molandrino's Bit of Italy
Fine Italian Family Restaurant
Fresh Home Made Dough
Take Out and Delivery
6516 Hollywood Blvd. 983-0616
Closed Mondays Open 12-12 P.M.
DAILY SPECIALS
Loree Beauty Salon
High Fashion Hair Styling
Expert Tinting Shaping Cutting
Wigs and Wiglets
Dorothy Kociaba Ownar-Opsrater
Ovr 2S Years Experience
. 923-6081
212* Tyler Street
Next To Ants Tag Agency


iday. My 23. 1971
*Jtisii fkx-kttan
Page 11
As We Were Saying; By ROBERT L SEGAi
Will Russia Heed The Message?
A\ (iUXXAR V. JARRING resumes his old .job
** of rcpresentihg'his nation In Moscow, he may
be in better position to help 'achieve'pcacc'ln the
Middle Kast than he was while
serving as the U.N.'s special ne-
gotiator towards that end. For in
sne grand moment of truth in
Moscow, Ambassador Jarring
might tell the Russians what the
sensitive Middle Kast watchers
have been saying right along: "It
is not nearly so important to
bring Israel to 'withdraw' as it is
to get the U.S.S.R. to pull out."
The large chunks of territory
Israel Is quite willing to yield will be delineated if
and when President Sadat and his colleagues really
sit down to.talk essential peace, the kind of peace
''iWstitthg' defensible' borders. -- '-
And. of course, of continuing concern to Israel
is the insistence that Russia be a part of inter-
national peace-keeping arrangements in the trou-
bled area.
Both Sen. Henry M. Jackson and Sen. Hubert
H. Humphrey of Minnesota have warned of the
danger to the United States, as well as to Israel,
of loading the dice of a truce in such a way.
Sen. Jackson, a prominent member of the Sen-
ate Armed Security Policy" to that body following
an extensive on-the-scene study. Ho expressed deep
dismay over the proposal that the VS. consider
Soviet participation in a military force keeping the
borders of the quarreling nations secure. "In my
view," he said, "the Administration is courting
disaster by considering a plan thai would have the
effect of legitimizing the Russia military presence
in Egypt. We should try to get the Russians out of
the Middle East, not design plans to dig them in."
He was supported firmly by Sen. Humphrey,
who reminded his colleagues that what Israel is
asking for is in the national interest of the United
States. The Soviet Union has penetrated into that
area far beyond her wildest dreams." Mr. Hum-
phrey declared.
Fortunately, Israel continues to have President
Nixon's word that the U.S. will see to it the bal-
ance of power in maintained in the Middle East.
The question remains: Will Moscow listen?
Book Review By SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN


Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
Two Recently Received Books An Ex-Soldiers story
y wo
' ject
I immort
BOOKS, RECENTLY RECEIVKD, deal with sub-
s that cried out for praise. One subject has been
alized lor many years. In its present treatment
one ran only say, "It shouldn't happen
to a dog." The other subject should have
been published a year earlier at least
prio>- to September 1970 or printing
shc.ild have been delayed so that the
book could have included events to April
1971.
Dona Gracia Mendes was a remark-
able woman. Heinrich Graetz rescued
her from oblivion and secured her place
Our Film foln:
:r:r":Mt.\iMi;mmmmtmMmmmiaimiinmmtmwi*m'tm
By HERBERT G. LUFT
Pasternak Nearly 70
Lit NCiAKIAN-BORN motion picture pioneer Joe
Pasternak, who started as assistant director in
Hollywood almost half a century ago, will be 70
this fall. After having produced
103 films, from "Zwei Menschen"
(Germany, 19281 to "Sweet Ride"
(Fox, 1968), he has been away
from the studios for two years
due to illness. He is now announc-
ing three forthcoming pictures for
the 1971-72 season. "Lala, She's
Only 16," a comedy-drama by
Ozzie Stemple, will be the first,
followed by "Have a Niqe For-
ever"," a yarn about college life
by Marianne Mosner and Bucky Searles; plus an
unnamed musical as his third project. Throughout
his long career, Pasternak specialized with musical
comedies, starting with the Deanna Durbin musi-
cals at Universal and continuing with lavish ex-
travaganzas and international star names s>*. Metro- .
Goldwyn-Mayer.
Ron Liebman, who zoomed to stardom in his
very first film role as the madcap brother of
George Segel in "Where's Poppa?." then appeared
in a serious role in the filmization of Vonnegut's
"Slaughterhouse-Five," now again joins Segal in
the Hal Landers-Bobby Roberts production of "The
Hot Rock," now before the cameras in New York
for Twentieth Century-Fox. Others in the star-
studded case are Zero Mostel and Robert Redford.
Peter Yates (of "Murphy's War") directs from the
William Goldman scenario based on Donald West-
lake's novel.
Samuel Goldywn's creative writing award went
this year to a 24-year-old Vietnam war veteran,
Brian Jones, in the competition at the University
of California. In his novel "Fox Song," Jones, now
a student at UCLA, dealt with his own impressions
of the Indo-China war and with war in general.
Lucille Ball, pinch-hitting for ailing Sam Goldwyn,
made the presentation.
Red Buttons appears on the screen in the star-
ring role or "Who Killed Mary What's 'ername?"
a murder mystery dealing with a retired prize
fighter's search for the murderer of a prostitute.
Ernest Pintoff directs and George Manasse pro-
duces; with locations now being filmed in New York.
-tr Jerry Orbach, who won the Antoinette Perry
award for the musical "Promises, Promises,"
switches character as a bumbling hoodlum in "The
Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight," now before
the cameras at MGM, with James Goldstone di-
recting for Irwin Winkler and Robert Chartoff.
!.

in
mMmmt
m'nnmiKisimiiiiiiimimmmirmmTMOTUiu.iI ni'i
I
i
in history. Cecil Roth romanticized her in his historical
novel, "The House of Naci-Dona Gracia." Now comes "The
Story of Dona Synagogue Commission on Jewish Education, S2.95) and
the only pleasant thing about the book is the photo of the
author on the jacket. She is pretty and has a beautiful
smile.
Only after a partial reading of the book does one
learn that it is intended for advanced teenagers. From
the initial conversation on page 3, one is affronted by in-
credulous conversations and abuse of English grammar
and capital letters. Example: converso should not be
capitalized while "inquisition" should be capitalized when
reference is made to a particular branch. The book fails
to differentiate between the three classes of inquisitions.
I have yet to see the point of many sentences of
which this is but one example: "In all her requests she
was accommodated, and although she paid a large sum of
money for the accommodation, the authorities treated
her with courtesy and kindness." There is a distinct fecl-
inf of writing down to readers. Even a 16, 17 or 18-year-
old would be offended by some of the childish style. His-
torians will be dismayed by some of the contents.
Strike Terror by Ehud Yaari (Sabra Books. $7.95)
Is the stoiy of Fatah. The book covers more than Fatah,
the most publicized of all the Arab terrorists groups, al-
though it and Arafat are the principal focus of attention.
Yaari is the commentator for an Israeli paper and
it is obvious that he reads Arabic well and is informed.
The book, unfortunately, ends prior to the fateful ten
day battle in September 1970 between the guerrillas and
the Jordanian army. Needless to state, the coup de grace
almost administered to these groups by Hussein in April
1971 is not recorded. The major flaw of the book is the
excessive recording of minute details. The book is over-
written.' '
Despite the foregoing, it could have served as an
excellent source for non-Arabic researchers and jour-
nalists who might need background material. However,
the unpardonable sin for a reference book was com-
mitted there is no index. An account of the Arab
Palestine Liberation Organization and its development,
the policies of the many groups that sprang up and the
events from 1951 to 1969 without an index is hardly
usable.
It la noted that Yassir Arafat is not a Palestinian
he was born in Cairo -- and that his name is really
Abd el-Rahman Abd el-Rauf el-Qudwa el-Husseini and
that he is related to the former Nazi collaborator, the
Grand Mufti, Haj Amin el-Husseini. Yassir, who used
only the Arafat part of his name in order to hide his
relationship to the Mufli, was the son of a wealthy
property owner.
There are many other interesting, esoteric and im-
portant bits of information scattered throughout the
book: e.g.. 50,000 Palestinians who fled in 1948-49 now
reside in Kuwait; thousands of Palestinian Arab students
are in West Germany; Arafat's exploitation of (he Arab
adage. "The Arab mind is influenced by words more than
by ideas, and by Ideas more than by action," and his
admission that "We took up arms and bo^an to fight
without thinking about our activities in relation to an
Ideology."
MEWS ITEM: "Eighteen young couples invade a
group of asbestos houses and squat there. The ~
flats, intended for new immigrants, were completed
almost six months ago.
In a piece of first-rate journal-
ism. Dov Goldstein of "Marriv"
interviewed Vitale Cohen, one of
the squatters, and the following
is the story he told.
"I'm not a rowdy and I'm not a
| new Immigrant from Soviet Russia,
so we have to live with Chava's
mother like dogs. Who gets the
privileges? Bullies who yell and
pound on the table and get what
they want because people are
afraid of them: or new immigrants. I'm tired of
being told to be patient and to wait.
"I was a baby when my family came to Israel
in 1950. We lived in a maabara, then another
maabara. first a lent and then a hut, and finally we
moved into a palace. It was only 30 square meters
(about 300 square feet1, a room and a half, and
there were nine of us in the family. But it had
electricity and running water. It was a palace
we thought.
"We were willing to pay rent to get a bigger
place, but there was none to be had. The Army was
a godsend for me. I had no worries. In the Six-Day
War I drove an ammunition truck: later I did border
service. I was helping my country, and maybe it
sounds cheap, but I was proud.
"I was not concerned with the future. I had a
profession. I was a truck driver, and I had no
trouble getting a job when I left the Army.
"I knew Chava since she was a little girl. We
wanted to get married. I thought that as an ex-
soldier I'd get some kind of priority for a flat. That's
what they told me. but I had to be married first to
qualify. We got married.
"Where to live? Until our promised flat was
available, we moved in with Chava's mother. She
was separated from her husband. There were eight
other children till one died, and the family was on
welfare. Yet we couldn't live in a field. We moved
into their two-room flat.
"I don't have to tell you what it was like, the
crying brats, the impatient mother. I knocked on
all doors: the Jewish Agency, housing officials, any
door I could find. They all had the same answer:
be patient. There was always a different promise,
but always: be patient.
"We looked forward to having children, but
wnere would we put them? I didn't want them to
spend the first 14 years of their life like I did.
Chava became pregnant. God, how we wanted that
kid. But I got the name of a doctor in Haifa, and
she had an abortion.
"I found there were others in a similar plight,
also ex-soldiers. And so we got the idea of taking
over these empty houses that stood here, completed,
waiting for new immigrants.
"I don't hate the new immigrants; I'm just en-
vious of them. Immigration must continue, but how
can the authorities give everything to them, and
nothing to people like me? It just isn't right. Next
month I go up again for 38 days of reserve duty.
I'm doing my duty to the state; they just got here.
Why do they get everything and me nothing? I'm
willing to pay rent, but there's just no apartment
to be had. If there's not enough money to build,
then bring in one family less and let Chava and
* me have a place to live.
"I'm against violence. We don't want to bring
a on a civil war. We just want a place to live/"______


fage 12-
,*..-.
+Je*istncrjdtori_
Friday, July 23, \fff\j
SUNDAY 1 o 6 P.M,
BAER'S STORE OPEN SKr'A*
SAVE
tJo-tt
KROEHLER
RECUNER
SALE!
%, P4d %mit9 Qi(t!
Ye* cm give ywr family the most outstanding a1*o wt have '*-
fered. Ifi on exceptional discovery to find a big comfortable
Kroehler Recliner at $68. We purchased 140 recliners from Krothltr
which qualified Boer's for the lowest price that Kroehler has etor
sold this recliner fer and we're passing the savings on to yoo. Come
to to Boer's and see this chair, look at its attract!** styto, try H
man-siied comfort, telect the color thofs perfect for yeor home, tort
horry, at this low price these recliners will not lost long.
IMMEDIATE FREE DELIVERY.
ALL OTHER
KROEHLER
FUTORIAN
BERKLINE
RECLINERS
ALSO ON
SALE!
Finest
Naugahyde
Upholstering
ft' oevy to keep theee chWm
cloonf Thoy are uphoUltr.d In
long wearing Navgany**e thof It
/ofh upportrf /or longer
life, waehoWo.
Regular 108
SPECIAL SALE PRICE... SAVE *40
SIT
Large 3 position
Recliner Is Comfortable
For Every Member Of
Your Family
RtCUNI
RELAX
CHOICE OF COLORS
FURNITURE
BROWARD'S FINEST FURNITURE STORE
tM DANIA
1025 S. Federal Hwy.
Just No. of Sheridan
927-0237
FREE DELIVERY TREMENDOUS SELECTION i QUALIFIED DECORATORS TERMS AVAILABLE NATIONAL CHAIN
DAILY 9:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M. MONDAY AND FRIDAY 9:30 A.M.-9.00 P.M. SUNDAY I TO 6 P.M.


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EJGZGHOHE_76GOK0 INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T21:49:06Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00020
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES