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The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood ( July 9, 1971 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla
Creation Date:
July 9, 1971

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00019

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla
Creation Date:
July 9, 1971

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00019

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward

Full Text
wJewisti Floridi&n
and MUM All OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
folume 1 Number 18
Hollywood. Florida Friday. July 9, 1971
Price 20c
Breakfast Held By
Council's Officers
ie newly-elected officers of the
ng Leaders Council of Jewish
Ifare Federation held their first
pting recently in the form of a
ikfast at the home of Dr. Sam-
| Meline, president of the group.
esent at the meeting were
d Goodman, program vice
sident; Ira Larry Hunter, mem-
ship vice president; Mark
Youth Division vice presid-
lt; Dr. Alex Kobb, social and
cial projects vice president;
lies Jacobson, secretary and
Chell Guttenplan, executive
tary.
discussion was held on the
sophy of the Young Leaders
ncil and its future program,
jideration was given to next
f's schedule; a number of new
were presented by members
Jthe group including the pos-
Uty of a year round program
i monthly meetings each meet-
[ devoted to a specific area or
ne possibility of assessing each
liber with a minimal financial
litment so that outstanding
^kers could be brought in for
tings was also deliberated,
arrangement could also pro-
a means of helping to make
Council self-sustaining. Greater
eration with both Miami and
Lauderdale groups was also
lidered as a means of better
ramming.
the subject of gaining mem-
it was suggested that mem-
Lhip drives and orientation of
new members should continue year
round with orientation being han-
dled on a personal basis. The pos-
sibility of having a wider geo-
graphical base ol operation from
which to select men was discussed,
along with the desirability of hav-
ing representation from a greater
number of business and profes-
sional fields and the possibility of
involving previous members of
the Young Leaders group in its
activities.
The new officers agreed to meet
throughout the summer on a regu-
lar basis so that the new program
could be launched early in the fall.
The next meeting will be held
Wednesday.
^' .: i : .' iM'hi! i i ":.:. ., 'Y:i;;ti; ;i 10
Local Federations
Elected by NJCRAC
The Greater Miami, North j
Broward and Madison, Wis., j
Jewish Federations are now ;
members of the National
Jewish Community Relations \
Advisory Council.
Three groups were elected !
to membership in NJCRAC \
at the annual plenary meet- I
ing of the organization in i
Atlanta, Ga. Each of the
federations operates local
community relations com- j
mittees as divisions of the \
federations.
Court Decision Loss
For Jewish Schools
NEW YORK (JTA) Last
week's unanimous U.S. Supreme
Court ruling against almost all
forms of governmental aid to
non-public schools poses the
prospect of an annual loss in
such aid to Jewish day schools
totaling at least $30 million in
one area alone, according to a
preliminary and informal esti-
mate by a spokesman for a na-
tional agency for such schools.
In the 9 to 0 decision on cases
from Rhode Island and Penn-
sylvania, initiated and argued
by the American Jewish Con-
gress, the Supreme Court de-
clared that such aid would fos-
ter "an excessive government
entanglement with religion." Tho
Rhode Island cases involved a
15% wage supplement to teach-
ers of secular subjects in paro-
chial schools. In the Pennsyl-
vania cases, the High Court re-
versed a lower court ruling which
had upheld the constitutionality
of the state's purchases-of-serv-
ices formulas.
The High Court also held that
public aid to private schools
would have "divisive political
potential," a view repeatedly
advanced by tne AJCongress in
its fight against such govern-
ment aid.
The spokesman for Torah Ume-
sorah, the National Society for
Hebrew Day Schools, an Ortho-
dox agency, told the JTA that
\
..E..A
Mrs. Charlotte Jacobson, chairman of the Hadassah
Medical Organization, greets Samuel Rothberg. chair-
man of the Hebrew University Board of Governors,
and Mrs. E. L. Setshwaelo. wife of the first secretary
of Botswana Mission to the United Nations, at the 10th
anniversary dinner for Hadaseah-Hebrew University
Medical Center at Ein Karem. Jerusalem. Botswana is
one of the Afro-Asian countries receiving medical aid
[from Hadassah.
Temple Sinai Appoints
New Youth Coordinator
Dr. Howard Fuerst, chairman of Mrs. Seidel previously served
the Youth Commission of Temple as assistant to the Educational
Sinai of Hollywood, has announced Director of Beth Torah Congrega-
Mrs. Irving Seidel's appointment tion of North Miami Beach, spe-
cializing in "teenage education."
She served on the faculty of the
Leadership Training Institute and
has taught Bible Genesis and the
Melton Method to study groups
of teenagers.
Recently, the Bureau of Jewish
Education of Miami engaged Mrs.
Seidel to teach future Sunday
School teachers. The course of
study for this group of young peo-
ple included "Methods of Teach-
ing" and "Basic Judaism."
A graduate of New York's
Hunter College, where she ma-
jored in Psychology and Educa-
tion; she also has experience in
camp and day camp work, and
thus brings to Temple Sinai a fully
rounded background which quali-
fies her to serve as the Youth
Coordinator there.
Mrs. Seidel's staff will consist
of Sandy Kuttler, senior USY
leader and director of the USY
Study Group; David Segal, junior
USY leader; Mrs. Edward H. Le-
as Youth Coordinator, where she vine, assistant junior USY leader
will be responsible for the youth and leader of the Kadimah USY
activities of the temple. Group.
IMS. IRVING SEIDU
hi- preliminary estimate
based on an average of $850 to
S400 per pupil now provided an-
nually in "purchase of-service"
financial aid by states, multi-
plied by some 75,000 pupils la
Jewish day schools in the United
States. An initial evaluation of
the Supreme Court ruling indi-
cated the possibility that much,
if not most, of the federal aid
provided under a variety of pro-
grams as well as other forms of
state aid to non-public schools
might be imperiled by the ruling.
Comment from Jewish spokes-
men followed the split which has
divided Orthodox and non-Or-
thodox-liberal Jewish opinion on
the issue. Julius Berman, presi-
dent of the National Commis-
sion on Law and Public Affairs
and Nathan Lewin, COLPA vice
president, expressed the view
that the ruling meant that "only
narrow areas will be permissible,
requiring an in-depth analysis
of present legislation in New
York and Maryland" on such
aid. The other cases considered
by the Court involved school
aid programs in New Jersey and
South Carolina.
The decisions were called
"tragic'' by Rabbi Bernard GoM-
enberg, Torah Umesorah direc-
tor of school organization, who
called on the Jewish Federations
and welfare funds which "fought
so vigorously against federal and
state aid" to "apply the same
sort of vigor and the same in-
tensive energy to make sure to
obtain support for the Hebrew
day schools."
The president of the AJCon-
gress, Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld,
declared that, with the Court's
decision, the controversies and
quarrels are over and that ev-
ery segment of the Jewish com-
munity "must now join hands
to make sure that Jewish edu-
cation will not suffer for lack
of funds."
NJCRAC Holds
Plenary Session
By Special Report
ATLANTA, Ga. Both the
chairman of the National Jew-
ish Community Relations Ad-
visory Council and his immedi-
ate predecessor, in addresses at
NJCRAC's annual plenary meet-
ing here, called on the organized
Jewish community not to allow
its "priority concerns" regard-
ing the security of Israel and the
fate of Soviet Jews to isolate it
from the social problems con-
fronting American society.
Albert E. Arent of Washing-
ton, reelected NJCRAC chair-
man, and Jordan C. Band of
Cleveland, a former chairman,
drew a distinction between em-
phasizing "top priorities" in
which each placed issues of the
Middle East and Soviet Jewry
and "pre-emptive concerns"
which, they said, tend to sepa-
rate Jewish activity from the
mainstreams of American life.
Mr. Arent deplored the fact
that "too many Jews seem pre-
pared to withdraw into an ex-
clusive Jewish particularism."
Community relations, in its op-
erational terms, he told the 250
representatives of NJCRAC's
nine national and 90 local con-
stituents participating in the ses-
sions, is the recruitment of al-
lies.
"It would be arrogance," he
added, "for the Jewish commun-
ity to imagine that we can ef-
fectively communicate with our
fellow Americans in seeking pub-
lic support for Israel and So-
viet Jews while remaining indif-
ferent to crucial national prob-
lems."

Mr. Rand similarly urged that
the NJCRAC constituents be-
come more actively involved in
the problems of urban decay,
crime and drug abuse, poverty
and ecology.
A proposed policy statement
on Vietnam produced heavy de-
bate. The issue has been a divis-
ive one among NJCRAC agen-
cies in past years. A compro-
mise resolution was adopted
calling for American withdrawal
from the Vietnam war "at the
earliest possible date and, pend-
ing that time, immediate steps
by our government to initiate a
case-fire and to insure free elec-
tions in South Vietnam.
In another action, the NJC-
RAC members, with the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America dissenting, reaffirm-
ed their opposition to tax sup-
port of sectarian-sponsored
education.
Seymour Graubard, national
chairman of the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith,
struck back at those who have
criticized the League for having
responded to an FBI request for
information about the Jewish
Defense League.
The information itself," Grau-
bard said, "was inconsequential.
The director of the ADL re-
gional office in Philadelphia, re-
plying to an inquiry from an FBI
agent, had merely confirmed the
identity of three local JDL lead-
ers who had been so designated
in newspaper stories."


Page 2
vJmisMcridikM
Friday. July 9, 1971
NOW VWER CONSTRUCTION
First Synagogue For
Mentally Retarded
By BEN GALLOB
and Y1TT VllATBTfRTA3I"
Construction is underway on
what is believed to be the first
synagogue anywhere for Jewish
retarded persons. Ground break-
ing ceremonies for the unique
synagogue were held recently on
the grounds of Letchworth Village
for Retarded Adults and Children
in Thiels, an upstate New York
town.
Jacob M. Cohen, a Conservative
rabbi who has served as Jewish
chaplain at the Letchworth fa-
cility for 20 years, told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency that the
institution's Jewish residents total
more than 1.200 men, women and
children, and that many of them
V -hip regularly. He said that
Saturday and High Holy Day
services have been held in the in-
stitution's gymnasium for some
two decades, facilities he de-
scribed as inadequate. Plans call
lor the synagogue to be ready for
High Holy Day services in the
fall.
He said that while the service
is "Orthodox-oriented," it is an
abbreviated one. He said he ticsi-i
lated to label the type of service
he lc.tds for the retarded Jews but
th:it he did stress the "highlights
of an Orthodox service." He said
separation of the sexes is main-
tained. The men wear hats during
services and the inmates are Urged
not to work on Saturday.
Saturday services usually draw
more than 500 worshippers, he re-
ported. He said they display "great
interest, concentration and devo-
tion" during services. While mast
of the inmates cannot read He-
brew, they do know simple pray-
ers he teaches them during the
twice-weekly Bar Mitzvnh classes
for boys or at weekly Jewish study
sessions for adults.
High Holy Day services, he said.
also are abbreviated and held
only in the morning. On Yom Kip-
pur, services are held at night.
Several hundred residents also at-
tend the morning services. Rabbi
Cohen said those who are physi-
cally able to fast are encouraged
to do so. He reported that about
100 Letchworth Jews neither eat
nor drink during the Yom Kippur
period.
Jewish residents recently par-
ticipated ill Si "joyous celebration"
of Passover, said he, and more
than 800 attended one of the three
Seders he conducted during the
intermediate Passover period.
Kosher-for-Passover meals were
provided by a commercial caterer;
one Seder was held for ambulatory
residents and the other in the male
and female infirm resident wards.
"Each patient drank the tradi-
tional four cups of wine, reciting
the BleMlngt after me," he re-
ported. "Several asked the tradi-
tional four questions while mem-
bers of the choir sang traditional
Passover son;." He explained
that the Seder had to be abbre-
viated and only the highlights of
the Hr.ggadah were touched on,
"but the events were beautiful and
our inmates loved them."
The synagogue Is being built
under the auspices of Congrega-
tion B'nai Israel of Letchworth
which is not a congregation but a
non-profit organization incorpor-
ated in 1965 and comprised en-
tirely of several hundred parents,
relatives and friends of Letch-
worth residents.
The members of B'nai Israel
have managed to raise $125,000
toward the total $175,000 cost of
the synagogue, the JTA wits told.
The synagogue building will have
special inside and outside ramps
for wheelchair patients, four class-
rooms, a rabbi's study and seats
for 500 worshippers. In addition
to serving as a house of worship.
Rabbi Cohen said, the synagogue
will offer courses in Jewish his-
tory. Jewish literature and other
religious and cultural subjects.
Boat Show Plans Set
Marvin S. Perkins, president oi
Perkins Marine Lamp and Hard-
ware Corp.. has been named presi-
dent of the 31st annual Interna-
tional Boat Show, which will be-
held Keb. 18-23 in the Miami Beach
Convention Hall. Other officers
are Royce A. Hill, vice president;
L. Fletcher Proctor, secretary, and
Robert W. Gardner, treasurer. The
directors are William S. Sim|)son.
Jack W. Barnes, Jr., F. Braden
Dawson, Capt. Jack Manson and
Allen W. Mathews. John Rogers is
executive manager.
Scientists' Appeal
To Soviet Revealed
Three of the U.S.S.R.'s leading
scientists including Andrei Sak-
harov, nuclear physicist and head
of the Soviet Committee lor Hu-
man Rights have called on the
Kremlin to end the persecution of
Jews seeking to emigrate from
Russia and to'"stop violating their
right to leave the country"
A copy of their appeal, written
as a letter to the Presidium of the
Supreme Soviet in Moscow and
dated May 20. 1971, was smuggled
out of the V.S.S.R. by Rep. Bert-
ram Podell (D-N.Y. who visited
the Soviet Union in May.
Representative Podell presented
the document to the "Commission
of Inquiry" into the rights of
Soviet Jews which met last week
at the Carnegie Endowment In-
ternational Center in New York
City.
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809 N. State Rd. 7 (Hollywood) 911-3006
Open Daily :30 tH 5
QnlHA4Htw
Rabbi David Polish of Evans-
ton, 111., was elected presi-
dent of the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis,
the oldest rabbinic associa-
tion in America, at the con-
clusion of the group's 82nd
annual convention recently.
A native of Cleveland, Rabbi
Polish holds an academic
degree of Doctor of Hebrew
Letters and an honorary de-
gree of Doctor of Divinity.
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Mailing Address P.O. Box 200, Hollywood, Florida 33020
fvery Driver Is Covered By Workmen's
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We make our own ice cream_^
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Reservations Call 945-9075
Suggested OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 947-5661
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Friday, July 9, 1971
*Jenisti Fhridflan
ORGANIZATION IN THt SPOTLIGHT
Tech n ion
Page 3
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology in Haifa is Israel's ol*
est university. One of thejargest
institutes of terorlo'lrlg'y in the
world, it is the only one of its
kind in the Middle East. It is one
of the beneficiaries of Jewish Wel-
fare Federation.
In recent years, Israel's need for
skilled scientists and engineers has
increased greatly. Therefore Tech-
nion's plans for expansion are vital
to the country's security and eco-
nomic growth. However, the neces-
wiry rise in enrollment calls for
continual additional financial
resources.
Training scientists and engineers
in Israel increases the likelihood
of these young people remaining
jn Israel and giving their country
the benefit of their training. If
their educational needs cannot be
met there and they find it neces-
sary to go out of the country for
their scientific studies, adminis-
trators at Technion feel that the
possibility will be increased that
they will not return to Israel to
work. Therefore to supply Israel's
r.eeds in this direction. Technion
has a need for constant expansion.
Technion expects to graduate II,-
TYPEWRITER
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PHONE: 922-2633
MIAMI: 947-3941
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950 So. Dixie Hwy. at
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000 engineer* during the 1970's as
agamst ff.300 cRR-ing the Ws. This
-War in addition to the Israeli stu-
tTPhts? 9,C*X> -foreign students were
enrolled.
Temple Sold Services
On A Monthly Basis
Until September
Temple Solel will be holding
services on a monthly basis until
September, at which time weekly
services will begin.
At 8 p.m. Friday, July 9, serv-
ices will be held at Hollywood
Hills High School. Rabbi Robert
Frazin, spiritual leader, will con-
duct the services, and speak on
"How Incredible is the Credibility
Gap?" The Oneg Shabbat will be
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Kail.
The temple will be holding its
first anniversary dinner-dance at
Emerald Hills Country Club on
Sunday. July 11. Festivities will
begin with a cocktail party at
7:30 p.m. Reservations may be
made by calling Larry Hunter or
the temple office.
Religious Committee
Conducting Services
The Summer Religious Commit-
tee of Temple Sinai, Hollywood,
has taken the responsibility for
conducting the services during the
months of July and August. Serv-
ices will be held each Friday eve-
ning at 8 p.m.; Sabbath services
will be conducted every Saturday
.norning as usual.
The services will be conducted
by lay rabbis and Cantors selected
from the membership. This has
been so successful over the last
few years that it has become
necessary to use the main sanc-
tuary in order to provide seating
for all. Chairman for this commit-
tee is Martin Smith; cochairmen
are Joseph Kleiman and Dr. Bret
Lusskin.
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regional director of the Anti-Dcfa
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attend.
Saturday, Aug. 7 at 8 p.m. the
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Page 4
vjenist fkrtfian
Friday, July % 1971
fJemsti fiendiam
OFFICE and PLANT 120 N.B. 6th STMBt TfeUHMII 573-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Tllephonb 920-63V2
PO Box 2973, Miami Florida JMOl
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Eduor d.ul Publul.tr AiiisMnt to Publisher
MARION NEVINS, New Coordinator
Tha Jawiata Floritfi.n Dot. Not Gg.r.nte. TM Kujirrtl
Of The Merchandise Adv.rtiaad In It. Column*.
Published Bi-\VVfJr,ly b\ the Jeinsh Flondiun
Rccor.d-Cla< Port ace Paid at Miami, Fla.
JeifisH Welfarf Fimration of Crfater HoiXYWOOO Siiofar Editorial
Advisory Commiitie Dr. Sheldon Wilier.*, Chairn.an; Ross Bcrlerman. Ben
Sailer. Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Allan. Michael Rnvcl.
Th. Jewieh F.o.id..n h. .beorbed th. J.wi.h Unity and the ft"''* *{
Member of the Jew.eh Telegraphic Agency. Seven. Art. Featirre **"*
worldwide New. Service. National Edior..l Aociat,.n. American A..ocia.t.on
of Engli.h-Jewian Nenipiptn, and th* Florida f>ra*. Aa.oci.tion.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Yaar $2.00
Out of Town Upon Reqweat
Volume 1
Friday. July 9. 1971
Number 18
16 TAMUZ 5731
Survey Emphasizes New Dimension
The 1971 Gallup survey of Religion in America has
emphasized a new dimension in church and synagogue
life the alienation of ministers, priests and rabbis from
their mission as spiritual leaders. The latest convention of
Reform rabbis heard a report that growing tensions be-
tween congregations and their rabbis threaten the future
of synagogua life in America.
Although the problem has received considerable at-
tention in Christianity, this would seem to be the first time
the issue has been openly discussed among Jews and
should provide serious thought for those concerned with
Judaism in America. According to the rabbinical leaders
who opened the question, one of the major factors is the
challenge by laymen on interpretation of religious law and
involvement in social and moral problems.
The fact that this is not a new challenge does not
lessen its seriousness at a time when all religions are fac-
ing the problems of inter-marriage, economic recession
and mobile populations which threaten not only the older
urban congregations but even some of the post-war subur-
ban temples and churches with extinction.
Differences Inevitable But...
Abba Eban. the diplomat, Moshe Dayan, the military
man in those two names may be described the internal
crisis which is facing Israel at a time when unity of pur-
pose would seem desirable.
It may be said that each man is playing his role, but
the revelations of inner debates over the Vietnam wax in
our country in recent weeks has shown us and the world
how dangerous such division can be the diplomats
always hopeful that negotiations and compromise can
bring peace, the soldiers insisting that peace can be won
only on the battlefield.
This is not the only sharp division among the leaders,
as Prime Minister Golda Meir recently stated. There have
been a number of strikes, racial incidents and threats by
the religious parties to leave the coalition government
While we must accept the inevitability of differences in
democratic societies such as the U.S. and Israel, they still
remain a painful process until solved. We hope the Is-
raelis will get on with the business of developing peace in
the Middle East and a healthy economy at home with a
minium of internal conflict.
JDC's Humanitarian Programs
In our concentration on the problems of American,
Israel and Soviet Jewry we often overlook the fact that
there are Jews all over the world for whom aid is required
and assistance given. The latest report of the Joint Distri-
bution Committee again brings to our attention that help
is being given in places like Rumania, where 17,000 peo-
ple were aided, as well as in Yugoslavia and other nations.
France, the only country in Europe which today has a
Jewish population higher than at the end of World War
II it rose from 175,000 to 550,000 primarily because of the
immigrants from the former North African colonies also
has been an area of concentration for the JDC. In all, more
than. $23 million was spent to help 300,000 Jews in 25 cou-
tries, a continuing record of humanitarian programs for
which we can all be grateful and proud.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOf
' WASHINGTON The orgy
of public hypocrisy, touched off
by the New York Times' collec-
tion of stolen Pentagon docu-
ments, is really something that
has to be seen to be believed.
One must begin with the un-
doubted fact, repeatedly deplor-
ed over the years in this space,
that President Johnson took the
country into the Vietnamese
war somewhat obscurely, on a
salami-slicing system. Partly,
this was because the President
himself took each forward step
with extreme reluctance
whereas he is now being men-
daciously represented as actual-
ly planning to go to war before
the 1964 election.
THERE IS another aspect of
the events of the winter, spring
and early summer of 1965 that
is also very important, however.
This aspect was a fact known
to every competent reporter at
the time.
It was also a fact easy to as-
certain before The Times' stolen
documents began to be publish-
ed. And it is a fact that puts
much into proportion, if it is
added to the President's above-
noted reluctance to make the
ha I'd Vietnamese choices until
it was almost too late.
BRIEFLY, the whole U.S.
government was hagridden in
the winter-spring of 1965. and
it continued to be fairly foolish-
ly hagridden thereafter by the
recollection of the mistake made
when Gen. Mac Arthur went too
far in the Korean war. Violent
Chinese and even Soviet reac-
tions in Vietnam were there-
fore greatly feared.
On this side of the problem
the President's chief advisers
in that period were Secretary
of State Dean Rusk and the
wise man who was then the gov-
ernment's Soviet expert in resi-
dence. Ambassador Llewellyn
Thompson. Secretary of Defense
Robert McNamara and Mc-
George Bundy in the White
House concurred with the ad-
vice given by Rusk and Thomp-
son, but these two were the
prime movers.
BOTH OF thrill pressed
strongly for the salami-slicing
approach for "gradualism" as
they called it. For good or ill,
the Rusk-Thompson argument
was that the Chinese and Rus-
sians would feel directly chal-
lenged if the President went to
war in the normal and much
wiser way which is to run
Old Glory up the flagpole, place
the hard facts before the coun-
try, and call for a major na-
tional effort until the end.
Going to war bit by bit is un-
doubtedly deceptive to those
who are eager to be deceived.
Rather remarkably, The Times
has indignantly quoted four
cases in which its own analysts
wore apparently deceived, as
proof positive that President
Johnson was a wicked deceiver.
IN REALITY, any senator
who did his homework and any
reasonably realistic and hard-
working reporter could easily
have discovered what was ac-
tually going on in the period
covered by The Times quota-
tions.
By hindsights, it is highly
arguable whether Rusk and
Thompson gave the President
the right advice, as both now
admit. Probably, too. this ad-
vice was probably welcome
enough to President Johnson,
whose very great qualities were
always marred by secretiveness
and excessive hankering to
"keep the options oi>en."
BUT IT 18 not arguable,
however, that maximum precau-
tions to avoid a confrontation
with Peking and/or Moscow
were anything but a legitimate
national concern. Secretary
Rusk even feared that the So-
viets might react to an overly
direct United States challenge
in Vietnam by some such Euro-
pean action as a blockade of
Berlin. And he warned, that if
this happened, the United States
would have little support from
its EUiOf/tV* pl'ies.
In the light .-.f tvndsight. it
would have been tut tetter, be-
yond much question, to do the
thing the other way. It would
have been better to make the
Inchon-like U.S. landing at the
southern tip olNorth Vietnam,
desired by the military planners
in order to close off all supply
and troop movement to the
South.
THAT WOULD hav got the
war over with rather shortly.
Given what we know now,
moreover, any Soviet or Chinese
Continued en Page *h
fm.S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK What's wrong with the New York Times
publishing a segment of the secret history of the Vietnamese
war? From where I sit, nothing. Defense Secretary I^ird wants
the Justice Department to find the culprit who leaked it a
pretty leaky leak, incidentally, since it comprises 40 volumes
of text and documents, enough ol a security gap to fly a big
bomber through. Given the several scores of people who worked
on it during 1967 and 1968 at Secretary McNamara's order, a
lot of people must have known about it. The surprise is not that
it leaked finally but that it took so long.
If it was so top secret that President Nixon had no copy of
it and Henry Kissinger didn't know about it. nor the leading
senators and congressmen, then it had no business being top
secret. The history of the war is the possession of the people as
a whole, not a small group who main decisions and then try
to sit on them.
ONE CAN SEE WHY Nixon and Laird are disturbed. The
narrative of the secret documents, showing what discussions
and decisions were really behind the White House and PeutaKon
facade at the time, can have a dramatic impaet. On the Senate
end-the-war vote, for example, or on the course of the Viet-
namese elections, or even on the American presidential race.
But whom will the FBI arrest? Neil Sheehan. who dsi the
"investigative reporting" on the story? Will they charge him
with having done the investigating so well that he exposed a
crucial history of the war to the President and his chief foreign
policy adviser who didn't know about it?
IF A MEMBER OF the Nixon Administration, within reach
of its discipline, has betrayed his trust or a past mcmljer be-
yond his discipline that is setween him and his conscience;
but on the issue of newspaper ethics, the Administration and the
press each has its own thing the government's to make deci-
sions, the newspaper's to find out about them especially what
is secretive, to place it in its setting of the campaign of history
and to let the people know.
Else what are the uses of history, if they are not to be used'
There has been considerable talk about the flight of the young
from history. I have myself at various times urged a return to
Ure study and valuing of history. But if history is going to be
hidden from scrutiny by all but a few. it is hard to urge the
young or the old to value it. Or is it only the safe and
convent history that is worth studying, and not the account of
st" now!, Ut1,,\C,a8iC-My) "Wk es eigentlich g-wesen
ist how it actually happened?
AS I WRITE, THE account is still in progress, and f shall
be coming back to it. Meanwhile a few conclusions stand out
clearly enough. All of them are less about the war itself, whose
outlines are made sharper by what we are learning, than about
what happens when political movers and shakers get caught in
a web of their own making.
First, about presidential advisers. Five Presidents WON in-
volved, and each played his fateful role in extending or sustain-
ing the war. But of their advisers the two groups who were
skeptical of the process of slow but steady entanglement were
the Joint Chiefs and the Intelligence services, especially under
President Johnson. Kach. from its own angle, thought that the
Johnson policies would not succeed in stopping the Communist
momentum and pressuring Hanoi into peace on American terms.
The moral may be that those professionals who must assess the
actual crunch of military power are often less deluded than
those (mostly civilians) who play with power dangerously.
& & &
SECOND, Ainu t HYPOCRISY. Some months before Ton-
kin, and even before his election, President Johnson had pretty
much decided on enlarging the war through bombing the North.
He didn't tell the people in his campaign, nor Congress.
Third, about manipulation. Much of the documentary r-cord is
concerned with how to deal with homefront opinion. America's
allies and the Saigon governments. Every war involves u-anipu-
lation.
BUT THERE is A grim thought in this case: If the manipula-
tion had been better. McNamarat himself one of the manipula-
tors) would never, in despair, have ordered this history.
Fourth, blindness. These men were not just manipulators.
They were their own victims, sweating all day in conferences,
sitting up late with their endless memoranda, intent on saving
the war as they got more deeply entangled in it. unawase that
their options were closing around them and that the lethal game
P ayed with the counters of human lives had m*!* casualties out
of themselves as well.


Friday. July 9, 1971
*'Jewlsiifkrkti^n
Page 5
America Now Holds Key
In The Middle East
'Talking/'via a teletypewriter, to another deaf person with
similar equipment is Mrs. Judy Miller of Coconut Grove.
She and her husband, Stanley, both of whom are deaf,
were among the first South Florida recipients of obsolete
teletype equipment donated by Southern Bell. With her are
Mrs. Louise Denchfield, president of the Miami Council of
Telephone Pioneers of America, a community service group
of phone company employees which has adopted the refur-
bishing and installation of such machines as an after-hour
activity, and Jesse Hopper, local agent of Teletypewriters
for the Deaf, Inc., who screens applicants for such equip-
ment
By LEON I II.Dlllltc.
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Leon Fldberg,
who recently returned to the United
States from the Middle East, ie the
former editor of the South African
Jewish Times and is a feature writer
for United Prees International).
The key to peace in the Middle
East is now with the United
States and not with Russia. Pres-
ident Anwar Sadat's swift move
to eliminate the pro-Russian bloc
from his Cabinet was a very
shrewd move on his part. He was
the last man. so his comrades
thought, who would have the cour-
age to act so swiftly.
The opining of the Suez Canal
may come much sooner than many
politicians anticipate as a result of
agreement between Cairo and Is-
rael. The opening of the canal
would be the first move in a final
settlement of the Middle East
crisis. The opening of the canal is
vital to Egypt's economy. If Sa-
dat is interested in a real peace,
why does he demand an Israeli
withdrawal and the moving of his
army to the East Bank? This de-
mand is quite unrealistic and un-
workable.
Cairo'i swing towards the West
and particularly towards the
United States is not a sudden oc-
currence. The change in Egypt's
attitude started with Nnsser's ac-
ceptance, shortly before his death,
of the Rogers Peace Plan for the
Middle East. Nasser was not in-
fluenced, certainly not pressured,
by Russia; on the contrary. Nas-
ser grabbed the opportunity to
accept the plan for two urgent
reasons.
First, he did not want another
war. The debacle of the Six-Day
War had convinced him that he
could not win a war against Israel
particularly as America had in-
volved herself completely on the
side of Israel.
Second, Nasser came to the con-
clusion that acceptance of the
Rogers Plan gave him a wonder-
ful opportunity of winning the
confidence of America and the |
.Western world," ,7flfoi, flf .fnernjj.
Egypt from the Russian strangle-
hold. He realized that he might I
not get another such opportunity. '
Had Nasser lived, the Jarring
talks might never have broken
down. He would have succeeded
in leading the Arabs along the
road to peace. Nasser, who was
a man with visions of grandeur,
felt that here was an opportunity
to become the saviour of the Aral
world and to be hailed by the
Western world as a great states-
man who had succeeded in reduc-
ing Russian penetration In the
Middle East and in saving the re-
gion from another war.
After Nasser there was no sin-
gle man with enough power and
prestige to succeed him. His Cabi-
net, including Ali Sabry. the pro-
Soviet spokesman, and all the
rest of the ministers who are now
under lock and key, were not de-
cided amongst themselves as to
who should assume Nasser's man-
tle. So it was agreed (with Russia
exerting its influence) temjwrarily
to pick a weak member of the
Cabinet in order to avoid a split
and to appoint Sadat till such
time as it would be opportune to
eliminate him with a Sabry take-
over.
The Kremlin and its Cairo
henchmen had underestimated Sa-
dat. He played a very shrewd
game. He followed Nasser's line.
Probably he himself realized Nas-
ser's motives in accepting the Rog-
ers Plan., and behind the scenes
.ic tried all the time to follow up
the American approach while
keeping an eagle eye on his pro-1
Russian Cabinet until he caught
them napping and got rid of them
in one clean sweep.
Russia's immediate reaction was
not a wait-and-see policy. No less
than the Soviet President him-
self accompanied by the Foreign
i Minister and a Deputy Defense
Minister hurried to Cairo to in-
vestigate, on the spot, how Sa-
dat's etipn-'WiH affect the rela-
tionship between Cairo and MOS-
COW. The link between the two
nations has certainly been strained
by the firing of Sabry and his
supporters.
Where do we go from here?
Are we going to have peace in the
Middle East or are we going to
have another war? A settlement in
the Middle East now depends on
America if Washington plays her
cards correctly. Political influ-
ence has now definitely shifted
away from the Kremlin.
The suggestion to open the Suez
Canal is not new. General Moshe
Dayan came out with It nearly a
year ago. At that time it Was
ignored by all the parties con-
cerned. It was a clever move by
Dayan for breaking the deadlock in
the Rogers Plan and the Jarring
peace talks.
Sadat revived the plan under
different conditions. It is a be-
ginning, a way to bring the two
major parties, Cairo and Jeru-
salem together, but in a spirit of
give and take. While Sadat is
more than keen to open the Suez
Canal, his conditions are only a
face saving matter. But to Israel
they are a matter of life and
death. One wrong move and all
her gains and achievements will
be lost.
And here is whSTf* America must
come in. She must accept that
Sadat is keen to get out of Rus-
sia's clutches and to rejoin the
Western bloc. America must, at
the same time, show her strength
and give Israel political and eco-
nomic assistance in order to con-
vince Egyirt that there is not go-
ing to be a sellout of Israel. And
a warning must be given to Egypt
that such an opportunity will not
soon occur again. Israel must
stand firm. Sadat can only sur-
vive if he opens the canal and
starts talking peace and not
threats.
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Page 6
9-Jml^HcrSdiar
Friday. July 9, 1971
ji>uuvuwmr.vi...............*************
With so manj people In the area taking off for distant placet
time of Hi.' year, l. to took a few days ami believe mo it
- verj few to taki in some new sights and sites. It was
- much s.> that I might even try it acain soon. Along
way there were main- interesting people and when one feels
a rut or !ms things to think out, it's good t<> meet new people
I learn <>f different ways ol life ... it helps to get a new
spective.
One of the many fascinating folk I met was a fellow who
could easily have qualified lor "What's My Line" in the old
B. To skip the 20 questions routine, I'll tell you right away
that he is a "harbor pilot." His job and believe me, he says it's an
exclusive fraternity, is to guide big ships in and out of the har-
- He rides out in a pilot boat meets the vessel, takes over the
captain's wheel and brings it in to the dock. When the ship is
ready to take off again, the procedure is reversed.
It is a job that is handed down from father to son and re-
quires a lifetime of training and experience. With the tremendous
surge of cruise activity in South Florida and the Caribbean,
these men often dock two or three ships a day. Fees range from
S250 up to about $500, depending on the tonnage of the ship.
The port of Nassau, for instance, has only three licensed pilots
tc one can see that this is a profitable as well as glamorous
occupation.
ir ir On one of my hops, who should I meet but a large group of
B Uywood people! Members of the '49'ers of the Hollywood
P.- creation Department, they were off on a four day trip. .
One of the members reported that the club has over 1.000 mem-
> -s and these trips are arranged for them often. This par-
t.cular jaunt enticed 90 people and they all seemed to be having
a tall. Mrs. Rose Lurie arranged it.
iz <3 Nostalgia brought on by many things is really hitting me
th.s month. From my ever-dimmer years up North, friends have
gone and lives have changed. For those of us who knew
ti:m it was difficult to bear the knowledge that we no longer
would hear the one line philosophies of Joe E. Lewis. .
Booze, broads and bangtails made up his life, but the first two
tttre often overplayed. The booze was often watered down and
broads were never too important though he liked having them
around for window dressing. Horses were really his favorite
pti-ople, but all those losing tickets which he loved to tear up on
night club floors didn't spell poverty for him. ... As he said
Rich or poor, I've tried them both, and believe me, it's better
to be rich." His money was wisely invested, however, and no
or.e ever had to hold a benefit for him He lived in the plush
Hotel Warwick in New York right up to the end. He'll be
missed by many, along with Libby Holman, whose fame was
gained with a song "Moanin' Low" and who lived through low
times herself. She stood trial for the murder of her husband, one
oi the Reynolds clan, and later lost her only son in an accident.
She gave of her money, her time and her talents to many causes
through the years since her first t:me.
In the outdoor amusement business there was none bigger
than George A. Hamid. who lived here in Hollywood during the
winter months. For many years he had an animal farm attrac-
tion on U.S. 1. He was almost our earliest empl he first acquired the amusement end of the New Jersey State
Fair. He went on to own almost every attraction in Atlantic
City including the Steer Pier and most of the theatres there plus
circuses, carnivals and fairs all over the country. Starting as an
bcrobat with a traveling troupe, with the help of his wife, Bess,
be eventually became the outstanding man in outdoor show
business. His daughter still lives here in town.
In today's world, where I figure the "here and now." I
can't really feel sad for each of these people were fulfilled
tad each gave happiness. So one cannot grieve for them only
bf gratified for having known them.
There was much happiness when Gary Weitzner married
L<=li Jurrist this week. It was warm and happy and fun and we
can only hope that that grin on Gary's face as he walked down
the aisle remains forever. Hollywood people in the wedding
groop were Barbara and Harvey Peretz, Ann and Al Yorra,
Phyllis and Sid Stengel. Stan and Naomi Kurash, June and Bob
Gordon, Charlotte and Joe Rosenthal, Grace and Sid Finkel,
Dorothy and Ted Lifset, Jean and Nat Drobner, Miriam Freed-
man, Anna and Eddie Gross, Hilda Ginsburg, Mary Zinn, Ben
Stiter. Birdie Einstein, and of course, the mother of the groom.
Pearl Weitzner, glowingly attractive as she went from table to
table greeting her friends.
ir ir ir
BITS AND PIECES More than 65 couples have already re-
served tor th first annual dinner-dance of Temple Sole). .
People who attended Chai Lodge's Trophy Night were impressed
v. th Matt Taylor's talk to the young people. Buddy Nevins
a-"d Fran Benis were also married this week and with most of
the other young people about town, they're off to Europe.
Winners of the 12th annual National
Bible Contest sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Education and Culture of the
Jewish Agency-American Section. From
left (seated) are Joseph C. Klausner,
New York. 3rd, Advanced Hebrew; Si-
mon B. Lerner, New York. 1st, Advanc-
ed Hebrew; Tobi Cooper, Houston, Tex.,
1st. Comprehensive Hebrew; Steven
Fasoberg, Bethesda, Md., 1st, Intermedi-
ate Hebrew; Leora Reich, New York, 2nd,
Advanced Hebrew; Gary Schwartz.
Minneapolis. Minn., 2nd, Intermediate
Hebrew; and David E. Leeman. 3rd. Ad-
vanced Hebrew; (standing) Dr. Abraham
P. Gannes, director, Department of Edu-
cation and Culture; Donald Filler. Hous-
ton, Tex., 2nd, Comprehensive English;
Ilene Brooks, Bethesda, Md., 3rd, Com-
prehensive English, Moshe Avital, co-
ordinator of the Bible contest; Rabbi Na-
chum Muschel, guizmaster; Dr. Solomon
Skaist, judge; Dr. Samuel Grand, quiz-
master; Aaron Kaniel, judge; Dr. Chaim
Etrog, judge; Joshua Gross, Cleveland,
Ohio. 3rd. Intermediate Hebrew; and
Israel M. Back, coordinator, Bibta con-
test.
^Aiatttr of JmH ijfi
JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued from *# 4
reaction, going beyond the usual
public indignation, would have
been overwhelmingly unlikely.
But consider the people who
wailed that even the Laos incur-
sion would probably provoke a
Chinese military response on
the very eve of Peking's "Ping
Pong" diplomacy! Then remem-
ber that these same people are
the ones who most loudly ac-
cuse President Johnson of de-
ception primarily because he
followed the highest advice to
take every precaution against a
Chinese and Soviet response in
1965!
This is Uriah Heap-like hy-
pocrisy, sufficiently stomach-
turning to be so named in plain
print.
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Friday. July 9. 1971
*Jewist IfcmftftV?
Page 7
/an 29 Ceremonies At Temple Israel
Unite Fran Benis And Bert Nevins, Jr.
MKS. BKT NtVINS, JR.
Fran Benis and Bert Ncvins, Jr.,
were united in marriage Tuesday
evening, June 29, in ceremonies
conducted by Rabbi Joseph R.
Narot at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami. A ptc |>tion for the couple
followed at the Promenade Res-
taurant.
The bride, whose parents are
Mr. and Mrs. Mcrton Benis of
North Miami Beach, graduated
from Ohio State University and is
presently teaching in the Broward
County public schools.
The hridegroom is the son of
Mrs. Marion Ncvins of Hollywood
and the late Bert Nevins. A grad-
uate of the University of Miami,
his columns on youth activities
have been syndicated.
Mr. and Mrs. Nevins will tour
Europe, Canada and the United
States on their honeymoon.
I would like my friends to receive this paper. Mease
add their name to your mailing list.
-RSftT
ADOftBS
-OTT
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iifcow
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Slip Coven
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JOE KABB
Phone 919-1880
PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATES. P. A.
ANNOUNCES WITH PLEASURE THE ASSOCIATION Of
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IN THE PRACTICE OF PEDIATRICS
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SAVI I
Recognizing that anti-Zionism is fast be-
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have responded to the million member roll
call of the American Zionist Federation by
joining as members at large. From left
(top) are Dr. Abraham J. Heschel, theolog-
ian; Isaac Bashevis Singer, author; Ar-
thur J. Goldberg, former Supreme Court
Justice and diplomat; and Richard Tuck-
er, opera star; (bottom) Elie Wiesel, writer;
Dr. Haim Ginott, child psychologist; Her- 1
man Wouk, author; and Chaim, Gross,
sculptor. Rabbi Israel Miller, president of
the American Zionist Federation, said,
"This is their answer to the attacks on
Zionism and the security of Israel."
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MW


Page 8
J-Jewistt ftorikfrtrr
Friday. July 9, 1971
OUR TOWN
,,l. I...
by iiohbe schlesinger
Conventioning
From June 16-19 the Doral Country Club was
B-hummlng. Twas the convention meeting ground
of the Florida Bar Association and more than
1,900 lawyers, judge* ;ml1 ftUIlily descended uikmi
the plush premises for the DOW-WOW and partly
in celebration of the 21st anniversary of the
association
in between and around the various educa-
tional seminars, general assemblies and commit-
tee meetings, the legal eagles managed to nego-
tiate their share of tennis, golf, alumni gather-
ings, cocktails receptions and even a poolsidc
barbecue and square dance.
Both (iov. Keultin AslffW andFlorlda Supreme
Court Chief Justice B. K. UoImtN put in an ap-
pearance; Bar Association prexy, Burton Young,
kept busy keeping it all together.
Meanwhile, Or. Don and Lee Herman, looking
forward to a quiet Just-we-tWO weekend get-
away of golf, arrived at the Doral smack dab in
the middle of all the hoopla. Giving upon the idea
of solitude, they shared dinner-company with
pals the Bnl> KolM-rts and the tieorge Cranes who
drove on down from Hollywood. The party was
increased by three with the surprise arrival of
lady-lawyers Mlette Burnstein, Jackie /bar and
Ounillc Sultan. Their hubbies were off to Cay
Sal in search ol another prize-winning marlln.
So, the gals, foot-loose and fancy-free for the
evening, cruised on down to spend the eve with
the Hermans. Arnie Seamons and family (he's
general manager of the estabi were also on the
Dora', scene that eve. It turned out to be a large
party and a fun night for all concerned. Nothing
like getting away from all those familiar faces,
eh Don and Lee?
Champion for the state of Florida aboard Dom-
ari. Congratulations and tally ho!
Andrea Simons, 1.''.-year-old daughter of the
J. Jay Slinonses, recently received woixi that she
was among the top ten youth in the United
States selected tor points earned with her hor-e.
Billy Joe Dunn. The honor along with the cer-
tificate was awarded by the American Paint
Horse Association. Most recently, Andrea en-
tered a show in which she took five tint places
-.out of six classes, including Halter classes, Jack-
ix.t Western Pleasure, Knglish Pleasure and
Timed Event. She was joined by her wee 5-year-
old brother, Joey, who took a third place ribbon
in the walk-trot class for 10 year olds and
under. Brother Danny, who tore himself away
from basketball squad practice at Nova Junior
High School to compete in the painv horse show,
man aged to bring home his share of ribbons
loo. Incidently, little Joey might have taken \
first place award in his riding event had he not
been overly preoccupied searching for a lost
tooth. According to the adorable youngster, it
was "essential'" that the tooth be under his pillow-
that night to insure the arrival of the tooth
Fairy a far more important event than any
horse show competition, to be sure!
fr
it -b
People And Places
a it
ft-
Ifs Two For Tea
Lone Ranger grab vour Touto; or (if you're
more romantically inclined) Eddie Cox tote your
Trieiu: or. if neither of the aforementioned is
your cup ol tea. don thy thinking cap to come
up with your own brainstorm for a "Famous
Pair." For this will be the theme of tho costume
party tapped for an Oct. 16 date at the Emerald
Hills Country Club with Chart-Team as the
sponsor. That should be sufficient evidence for
one and all that the event will be a lollapalooza.
Proceeds will be going to the Broward Youth
Dnig Center and Teenage Hot-Line. Cocktails.
continuous music, dancing and buffet sup|>er will
Ik- the lull of fare for all you famous twosomes-
to-be Remember, it takes two to tango.

ft -ft
The Horsey Set
Dr. Sid and I.rudy Peck's daughter, Valerie,
does her share in the anti-air pollution cam-
i>a;gn. She rides horses! Having recently -e-
tlirned from a one-day hop to Atlanta to look
over some green horses < "green in this case.
folks, does not signify the color of the horse.
- "new" to the show ring and jumping
divisi :. V.i] | Demarl and Chance Step, for the Florida circuit
-e two Junior hunter horse> are
limns, the top 30 in the country, which entitled
the young lass to show them in Madison Square
' this past year. The most recent news
II 'in- the Peck household was that their pro-
ficiei 16-year-old was named 1970 Reserve
Looking fit as the proverbial fiddle after their
Bimini Power Squadron weekend were and Kleunor Marholeii. A 40 lb. dolphin was the
one that didn't get away from Dr. George on his
recent vacation afloat. Betty Kushner and
kiddies will be Capo Cod-bound for summer-time
cooling and recreation. Marketing most defi-
nitely in the "Royal" manner was CeUiia (Mm.
lrv) Fishinan dashing In for those tasty cooked-
up goodies that make for no-cooking night. Par-
ticularly great during these long hot summer
days. Dr. Martin Feuennun, late night sup-
ping with a raven-tressed lovely at the Embers
Restaurant
Heartiest congratulations to Norman and
Laura Yagn.l.i on the Bar Mitzvah of son, Scott,
at Temple Sinai. A reception for friends and
relatives at their home following the services.
honored the young man on a splendid j>erform-
ance. Ditto to the Paul Antons for a two-fold
celebration: The Bar Mitzvah of son, Jared. and
the wedding of daughter. Michelle, to Michael
( agnetto. both happy events taking place at
Temple Sinai.
At a recent coffee some exciting plans for
the Temple Sinai Sisterhood were announced by
Sisterhood president, Mrs. Joel Rottiiian. and two
of her \ice presidents, Jeri Ilornrek-h and
Jeanne Waldorl. And. on the subject of
Temple Sinai, hear tell that Roz Siedel will be its
new Youth Director Quite a pleasing prospect
since the lady has chalked up many >ears in the
education field and is tops when it comes to
communicating with the younger set.
Dr. Al and Terry (.eronenius happily an-
nounce the engagement of daughter. Lynn to
Jerry Bigelmau of Detroit. Lynn is a senior at
Wheelock College in Boston a\d Jerry, a gradu-
ate of the University of Michigan, is a second
year law student at George Washington Univer-
sity. Congratulations to the handsome young
couple.
PERSONALITY PROFttt
Milton Forman
To all of his friends or acquaint- Things were pretty bad in this
ances Milton Forman is known as section of Pennsylvania at that
.he cuv with a "quip" to fit any time with town after town sul-
tne guy m w f had money for movies, so the the-
atre businesses suffered too. Be
was offered a job with Warner
Bros, in California but Lssjisa's
family prevailed upon the young
couple to remain in Williamspoi t
and so he went into the insurance
business there where he was al-
ready an alderman and well-known
to all.
During this period he devoted n
good deal of his time to seeur n
affidavits with which to bring
people from Nazi Germany to t ii-<
country. He remembers the case
of the head judge of Austria's Su-
preme Court, for whom he made
a special trip to Washington and
uli i he was eventually able to gel
to this country by getting the
president of a Methodist School to
offer him a job as teacher.
Teachers at that time were al-
lowed to enter the United Stales
outside the quota and so this es-
teemed judge came to William-
port to leach. His wife was then
brought over by HIAS using a
circuitous route through the Ori-
| ent and entering on the West c wl
' if the United States. Milton tells
i how she arrived with two loaves
|