The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00018

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewish IFiaridliiai m
and MIOI Alt OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 1 Number 17
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 25, 1971
Price 2Gc
Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds Committees Discuss
Development In Jewish Education,
Federation Programs, Social Welfare
NEW YORK (JTA) Final
recommendations of the Task
Force on Jewish Identity, a re-
view of the 1971 fund raising
campaign, a new executive re-
cruitment and planning program
for Federations, developments
and changes in Jewish educa-
tion, and the role of local com-
munities towards pending social
welfare legislation were among
the vital areas of concern high-
lighted at the quarterly meetings
here of the board of directors
and major national committees
of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds (CJF).
More than 200 Jewish com-
munal leaders and Federation
executives from some 50 com-
munities in the United States
and Canada attended the four-
day conclave which ended Sun-
day. Focus was the major areas
of Jewish concern and commit-
ment at home, abroad and in
Israel.
Embodied within the Task
Force's report to the board
the culmination of almost two
years of intensive study to for-
mulate means of strengthening
Jewish identity and commit-
ment were the results of the
recently completed community
dialogues in which a cross-sec-

News Briefs
New Cancer Diagnostic Tests
NEW YORK (WNS) Processes developed by Hadassah
Medical School scientists that permit early cancer diagnosis and
increase the body's resistance to cancer were revealed at a press
conference here prior to the Hadassah Medical Organization's an-
nual dinner which marked the 10th anniversary of the Hebrew
I'niversity-Hadassah Medical Center Complex Ein Karem. Dr.
Kalman J. Mann, director general of the HMO. described the
Medical Center as the largest of its kind in the Middle East, rank-
ing among the six greatest medical complexes in the world.
Court To Probe Bribe Scandal
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel's Supreme Court is going to
investigate an alleged football scandal, it has been disclosed. The
Cabinet has voted unanimously to have Supreme Court President
Shimon Agranat appoint a three-man inquiry commission to carry
out the probe under the provisions of a 1968 law. The commission
will investigate rumors that soccer players and teams were accept-
ing bribes to fix games in order to influence team standings in the
leagues and the results of football pools. The Cabinet decided that
the rumors were "a matter of vital public interest" that had to be
investigated.
tion of the Jewish population of
38 cities in the U.S. and Canada
offered their views, concerns and
priorities relative to the en-
hancement of the quality of
Jewish life. The nation-wide
canvassing by the Task Force,
begun in February and conclud-
ed early last month, involved
community leaders, profession-
als, rabbis, faculty, students and
others from communities with
large, medium-sized and small
Jewish populations.
In a series of committee meet-
ings, participants and delegates
also discussed and developed
guidelines for community action
and services to meet a score of
the more immediate social wel-
fare problems and responsibili-
ties of the American Jewish
community. These included an
analysis of the 1971 community
fund raising campaigns conduct-
ed by Federations and Welfare
tion Executive Recruitment and
Education Program to meet the
urgent need for qualified per-
sonnel in Jewish Federations
reviewed plans for financing stu-
dent stipends and the criteria
for Federation-oriented educa-
tional programs at schools of
social work; the committee on
Federation Planning for Jewish
Education explored Federations'
growing relationship with Jew-
ish Day Schools and plans for
the training of administrators.
The Overseas Services Com-
mittee addressed itself to some
of the major issues to be faced
by the 296 member-assembly of
the recently reconstituted Jew-
ish Agency, which will hold its
first meeting in Jerusalem next
week.
Allocations Committee
Work Near Completion
By MARION NEVINS
News Coordinator
More than 50 men and women
will soon be winding up their job
of allocating the monies that have
In the picture at right, Hollywood Sun-Tattler editor Ed
Wentworth, who participated in a newspaperman's tour oi
Israel arranged through the Greater Hollywood Jewish
Welfare Federation and sponsored by United Jewish Appeal,
poses on the beach at Sharm el-Sheik, on the Sinai Penin-
sula. Below is a photograph of a bridge leading from Jordan
to Israel, taken by Mr. Wentworth during his tour.
HEMHTT K4TZ
been donated to Jewish Welfare
Federation's 1971 Combined Cam-
paign. Coming together from all
walks of life, these men and women
have one goal in common and that
is to allot the funds most carefully
and most sensibly. Many agencies
apply to Federation for financial
assistance, the majority of them
with merit. It is the decision ol
these hard working volunteers of
the Allocation Committees as to
which ones shall receive aid ano"
how much.
These men and women that
make up the different Allocation
Committees are chosen from the
dedicated campaign workers whe
have themselves had an important
part in raising the monies. They
have devoted their time and tal-
ents to the furtherance of the
goals of Federation by soliciting
the funds in themselves donating
their share of the funds. Thus, in
a true portrayal of our democratic
system, they carry through by
again giving of their time and ca-
pabilities to research, study and
finally make the decisions as to
the allotments.
The committees that take part
in the Allocation process are pri-
marily divided on the basis of
locale. There is the Local Alloca-
tion Committee whose job it is to
investigate each fund request com-
ing from a local agency or one
whose work is of local nature
Members of this Committee are
Dr. Sheldon Willens, chairman:
Mark Fried, James Jacobson, Dr.
Rubin Klein, Dr. Alex Kobb. James
Fox Miller, Paul Nestel. Max
Sloane, Mrs. Philip Weinstein, Jr..
and Dr. Howard Berman.
The National Allocation Com-
mittee performs the same func-
tions for agencies of national stat-
jre. Its members include Joel Rott-
man, chairman; Morton Abram,
Jack Berman, Milton Forman, Ar-
thur Frimet, Mrs. Stanley Green-
spun, Dr. Herbert Heiden, Rabbi
Samuel Jaffe, Jesse J. Martin, Dr.
Alan Podis, Errol Rosen, Dr. Joel
Schneider, Murray Smithline. Dr
David Glassman, David Goodman.
Dr. Alex Buchwald. Ira Laurence
Hunter, Dr. Samuel Meline and
Mrs. Jack Levy.
In this group the third commit-
tee is the Overseas Allocation
Committee, whose job it is to allot
monies to overseas organizations
as well as most important UJA
including the regular and the
emergency campaign. (It should
be noted that the money going to
the emergency campaign goes di-
rectly without any money being
expended for administrative ex-
penses). This Committee includes
Robert Baer, chairman; Lewis
Cohen. Rabbi David Shapiro, Sam
J. Perry, Joseph Kleiman, Dr.
Norman Landman and Joseph L.
Schwartz.
This year, in addition to the
aforementioned committees. a
Budget Committee has been form-
ed. The purpose of this committee
is to analyze the financial needs
of Jewish Welfare Federation for
its campaign and its administra-
tive functions and to set up a bud-
get in advance of the campaign
period.
With over 400 volunteers work-
:ng on the current campaign and
the magnitude of the job, the
need for this advance type of bud-
geting has been realized and is
being handled by this new com-
mittee. Members of this commit-
tee include Herbert Katz, chair-
man, Mark Fried, Arthur Frimet.
A. J. Salter, Ben Salter and Ger-
ald Siegel.
A Final Allocation Committee
""ontinuod on Pago 2-
Anibassador Bush
Accepts Petition
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (JTA)
U.S. Ambassador George Bush
accepted an "urgent appeal" from
S.300 Christian leaders last week
and stayed on for half an hour
discussing ways of alleviating tho
plight of Soviet Jewry.
The petitions, expressing "pro-
found" concern with the situation
of Soviet Jews, were signed by
representatives of the Roman
Catholic Church and 19 Protes-
tant denominations white and
black in all 50 states and pre-
sented to him and to Deputy Am-
bassador Christopher H. Phillips
by an interfaith delegation headed
by Seymour Graubard, national
chairman of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith which for-
mulated the text of the appeal.
Mr. Bush said that his plea re-
garding the matter to Soviet Am-
bassador Yakob A. Malik had been
dismissed as baseless. "But," he
told the delegation, "we're going
to continue to discuss it very, very
seriously with the Soviets."
He added that he would seek to
present the petitioners' case to
President Nixon and to Secretary
General U Thant, and noted that
the General Assembly will prob-
ably consider the question of So-
viet Jewry next fall after receiv-
ing a report from the Commission
on Human Rights.
Ambassador Bush also recalled
that he recently advised a Soviet
delegation that this country is
tremendously concerned about the
problem. He stressed, however,
that the tactics of the Jewish
Defense League are "detrimental
to the cause of Soviet Jews."
!


Page 2
*Je*is*rhridliain __
Friday. jan 25, 1971
Allocations Committee
Work Near Completion
Continued From I*hb- 1-
i* the latest step In the detailed
;inrt thorough allocation process.
Thiir iolr is tw-reeewe 1h*> n-port* -trrifri
of (he committee chairmen and
to glv tlM final api>roval to the
amount! that have been suggested
i.r perhaps to discuss the facts pre-
sented further and then yive Uioir
decisions.
Members ol this committee aro
Dr. Norman Atkin, Stanley M.
Beokerman, Milton Formun. R'l>-
crt Gordon. William D. HorvltZ,
llci hert Katz. A. L. Mailman,
Seymour Mann. Jesse J. Martin.
I>r. Hairy M. Permesly, A. J.
Sailer. Hen Salter. Gerald SlCgel.
Mrs Cera Id Siege! and Dr. Philip
Weinstein. Jr. Ross P. Becker-
man is the over-all chairman of
the entire Allocation process.
Each committee meets separ-
ately. At the primary meeting of
the three committee* lhat cover
the local, national and oversea-
agencies, the memlxTS are pre-
sented with material describing
the work of lira many agencies
end their current financial needs
and requests.
The material is compiled from
facts supplied by the orfiani/ation
Itself and from the budget digests
and other material of the Tounci1
of Jewish Federation and Welfare
Funds. Each committee member
accepts the responsibility of stodv-
iiiR one or two specific agencies in I
depth.
For this study, detailed ma<
I fhsgl to particular com-
mittee members to absorb The
results of each member's study
is presented to fellow committee
members at a subsequent meeting.
and the entire proup then dis-
cusses wdelhcr an allotment should
be made and how much it should
The recommendations of the in-
dividual who researched the agen-
cy are carefully considered
for through his thorough study, he
becomes knowledgeable in the
workings of that agency. This
process encompasses several meet-
ings over a period of several weeks
but finally the lists have been
completed and the final recom-
mendations are made. The chair-
man of each committee is then
designated to present their opin-
ions and decisions to the Final
Allocation Committee.
Through this very thorough
proOBSS the large amounts of
money raised, bv Greater Holly-
wood's Jewish Welfare Federation
arc allocated. This large corps ol
volunteer workers with their deep
feeling for the welfare of their
fellow Jews have In essence, com-
pleted the job of the 1971 Com-
bined Campaign.
Rabbi Appointed To
Advisory Board Of
Teenage Hot Line
Mrs. Philip Levin, chairman of
"Teenage Hotline," has announced
the appointment ol Rabbi Elliot
Winograd to its advisory Ixjfird.
RabM Winograd. spiritual lead-
er of Temple Israel of Mlramar for
the past two years, had congrega-
tions in PensaCOla and St. Augus-
tine before coining to this area.
Horn in Jerusalem, his family
moved to the United States when
he Wiis a young child, and he was
raised in the Midwest. He received
his education at Yeahh/a Univer-
sity and Chaim Berlin Rabbinical
College in Brooklyn, N.Y. He and
Mrs. Winograd. a teacher at Nor-
land High School, have three
daughters, Vivian, Stephanie, and
Myra.
In addition to his membership
on the board of "Teenage Hot-
!hh'." Rabbi Winograd serves on
the board of the Brownrd County
Narcotics Guidance Council and
acts as Official liaison between
the Greater Miami Rabbinical As-
sociation and Governor Reubin O.
Askew.
Teenage Hotline provides 24-
hour answering service for North
Dade and Hroward teenagers with
problems. All calls are confidential;
Teenage Hotline operators do not
require the callers to give their
names.
Elections Held By JCRC
During Annual Meeting
Draperies
I
Slip Covert
- Free Estimates
l/oqiic Lt-Meffofttt <-fntc
>d
Residential Commercial
,l< IB K.MIII
Upholatery
riors
Phnm- SW-ltSO
MUNROEUDlll'S
JAXSON'S
IN OUR 15th YEAR
OLD FASHIONED
ICE CREAM PARLOR
RESTAURANT
Officers elected at the recent
annual meeting ol the Jewish
Community Relations Council in-
clude Joseph. Kleiman. president:
Jokn,ttwroen; -..*wme Jfrwdsoaw
and Jacob M. Mogilowitz. vice
presidents; Sam Kaltman. secre-
tary, and Richard U Lavy, treas-
urer.
members of the
Mori L Abram.
Mrs. Frances M.
J. Bursak, Sol
Copper! Mr. and Mrs. Milton For-
man, Mrs. Arthur Friend. Mrs.
Alan Jacobs, Mrs. Sclma J. Harris.
Mrs Jeanne Hill.r, Seymour Mann,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Pony, Nor-
man Prafin, Ronald Rosen, Joel 1
Rottman. Seymour L. Samet. Mrs..
Edward Shankman. Louis M.
Newly-elected
Iwurd are Mrs.
Paul Benjamin,
Briefer, George
Shanck, Rabbi David Shapiro and
Mrs. Irving Void'. Mrs. Charlotte
Tellei is serving a the coordinator
lor the Council.
-e,rnA oedai>nnljalb,i3jyam
Some of the activities of The
Council were brought before the
group. Jerome Friedman, chair-
man ol the Speakers Bureau for
the Council announced that he is
planning to set up a training pro-
gram for speakers. He anticipates
having speakers available for both
Jewish and non-Jewish organiza-
tions in the community.
Any Jewish organization can
arrange to have their organiza-
tion affiliated with JCRC. it was
pointed out. Leaders of the com-
munity are also eligible for eloc-
tino as delegates-at-large to the
hoard of director.*.
Lotqest Sundan & Sodas in the South
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OPEN
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COMPLETE DINNER Large bowl of soup
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PLUS k JUMBO SUNDIE*
lui a <
s1
Aviva Chapter, B. B.W.,
installs Its New Officers
When Aviva Chapter of B'nai (
B'rilh Women held its annual in-'
stallation at Emerald Hills Coun-
try Club recently, Mrs. Larry
Blumenthal Ix-camo president ol*
the organization.
Other officers include Mrs. Ron-
ald Apple. Mrs. Jeff Mann. Mrs.
Richard Stoll and Mrs. Joel Marks,
vice presidents; Mrs. Sandy Hirsch,
recording secretary; Mrs. Jack
Ketay, corresponding secretary;
Mrs. Nathan Schmelter, financial
secretary; Mrs. Michael Wallack,
historian; Mrs. Alan Herman,
treasurer and Mrs. Henry Kaye,
counselor.
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REGISTRATION NOW OPEN
FOR THE FALL TERM
19711972
6 year Hebrew School Nursery
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ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM
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Sundays ]l> a.m.-12 Noon Daily 8:30-4:00 p.m.
Only Liautted Teachen Comprvhentivn I'rogram
(CuiLslant Supervision of Miami Bureau o{ Jewish Education
Our Principal and our Rabbi)
JUNIOR CONGREGATION
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ACTIVE YOUTH PROGRAM
REMEDIAL PROGRAM
CONFIRMATION CLASSES
BAR-BAT MITZVAII PREPARATION
"Broward County's Fastest Growing Jewith Community**
Elliot J. Winograd
Rabbi
Srymour Godl
1'lr-iili-lll
1-*-
Dinmg & Dancing Nightly Till 2 A.M.
in Florida's Newest & Smartest Supper Club
Piano I
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Joe DeCarlo Trio Sonny Bell

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Serving Lunch Daily from 11:30 a.m.
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'


Friday, June 25, 1971
+ Jewish tk>rMian
Page 3
I ORGANIZATION IN THE SPOTLIGHT
American Jewish Congress
Trie American Jewish Congress,
which was founded in 1918 by
Stephen S. Wise, Louis D. Bran-
ded and other distinguished Amer-
ican Jews, works to strengthen
Jewish life, preserve democratic
freedoms, protect human rights
and advance the cause of peace.
It is a beneficiary of Jewish Wei-
fare Federation.
American Jewish Congress has
pioneered new strategies in fight-
9t mg anti-Semitism and all forms
of racism. It has led in the effort
to uphold the constitutional guar-
antee of religious liberty and pre-
serve the separation of church and
-fate. Through the World Jewish
Congress, which was founded in
1936, it has joined in democratic
association with the Jewish com-
nunities of more than 60 lands
to defend the rights of Jews wher-
ever they may be endangered.
Through its Commission on Law
(he law as a weapon in the fight
npainst anti-Semitism and other
forms of racism. It defends re-
.ijrious liberty while strengthening
the separation of church and state.
Among its specific achievements
was Miami's historic rcligion-in-
the-schools case barring religious
holiday observances, religious mo-
.les and use of the school facili-
ties for after-hours religious in-
struction.
TTirounh both its local units and
national headquarters the Com-
mission on International Affairs
works to educate and inform pub-
lic opinion in the Jewish and cen-
tral communities on issues affect
.nc world peace, the security of
1> ws abroad and the welfare of
Israel.
At the present time much work
.s being done to alleviate the plight
if the Soviet Jews. In this area a
Hot Line for Soviet Jewry" has
been established. A call to this line
Mippleis the caller with the latest
nformation on this problem an'l
filso explains what they can do
10 help.
A travel proeram which has
1
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Aluminum Discount
218N.E. IstAVE
927-7622
FREE ESTIMATES
AWNINGS-SCREEN ROOMS
CARPORTS PATH) COVERS
AWNING WINDOWS
TRAILER STEPS SKIRTING
WINDOW A DOOR GUARDS
RENT-A-CAR
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$3 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXIE HWY.
920-4141
HOLLYWOOD
M5-54M Miami
HOWfM FOR All ACCASIOHS
Hi on. 983 4367
JOAN'S
FLORIST
600 No. State Rd. 7
WEDfUVIR
enabled AJCongress members to
visit Israel has been established
which emphasizes direct encounter
with.overseas Jewish eomnmnHip*
to promote understanding of the
history, religion, culture and pres-
ent day problems of the Jewish
people. It sponsored the Louise
Waterman Wise Youth Hostel in
Jerusalem which serves as a meet-
ing place for young visitors to Is-
rael and also as a citizenship
training place for young visitors
to Israel and also as a citizenship
training and arts center for young
Israelis.
In 1962, the American-Israel
"Dialogue," which is an annual
cultural exchange bringing to-
gether leading Israeli and Amer-
ican Jewish religions, communal
and Intellectual leaders for dis-
cussions of mutual concern was
created. The discussions are de-
signed to strengthen the tics be-
tween American Jewry and Israel.
Two well read and influential
magazines are published by AJCon-
gress. They are the Congress Bi-
weekly and Judaism, which is
Issued quarterly.
Beth Shalom TJSY'ers
Tour Northern Cities
A group of teenage members of
Temple Beth Shalom's United
Synagogue Youth visited historic
and religious sites in Savannah,
Ga Williamsburg, Va., Washing-
ton, D.C., and New York City re-
cently under the guidance of ftaobi
Morton Malavsky, the temple's
spiritual leader, with the assist-
ance of Mrs. Shirley Goldman,
youth coordinator.
The USY'ers earned the privi-
lege of making the tour by attend-
ing worship services, religious func-
tions and organizational meetings
throughout the year. The expenses
of the trip were underwritten by
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Shapiro.
BARRY-
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PHONE: 922-2633
MIAMI: 947-3941
HARDWARE APPLIANCES
SERVICE HOUSEWARES
950 So. Dixie Hwy. at
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SHAPIROS GARMIZO
Hallandale Chapter Luncheon-Card Party
The Hallandale Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women was to hold the
final meeting of its season Thurs-
day in the Home Federal Building
on Hallandale Beach Boulevard
with luncheon following the busi-
ness meeting.
The group's annual luncheon and)
card party will be held at r.oon
Wednesday, June 30. at the Sweden
House Restaurant. Mrs. Bert Mas-
sing is in charge of tickets and
reservations.
CUSTOM FRAMING
CREATIVE CRAFTSMANSHIP
TOVA FRAME CO.
LEE ST OFF AA1 BETWEEN TAFT 6. SHERIDAN ST.
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1900 Tyler Street 923-8222
FOR CORRECT TIME
DIAL 922-7521

t
Over thirty jive years
of service to the communities
in North Dade and Broward Counties.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
1250 Normandy Drive: fifteen minutes from Hollywood
920-1010
19th and Alton Road: In the heart of Miami Beach *
Miami: Douglas Road at S.W 17th Street
Manhattan Brooklyn Westchester Bronx Far Rockaway
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
caH the nearest Riverside Chapel
Edward Rosenthil Morten Roscnthal Carl Orowberj Leo J. Filer
Murray N. Rubin. F.D.


Page 4
Mwrirf fkridaan_
Friday. June 2S, 1971
======== f,
wJewisti Meridian
HOLLYWOOD OlIICE *
PO Box 2973, Miami. Florida 55101
Si-.lma M. Thompson
Fred K Suoche, PuWwher
Editurund Publisher
MARION NEV1NS. News Coordinator
Published B.AV^ly b> lh JWlh Flor.dian
Sccor.d-r.l;,- Postage Paid at Miami, Fla. FoitoriaL
Jewish Welfare Federation op Cheater Hollywood Siiofar Editorial
AdVRORT COMMH I BE Dr. Sheldon WiUcns. Chairn,an; Ross Bcrkcrman, Ben
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Vr $2.00
Out of Town Upon Reqoeat
Volume )
Friday. June 25, 1971
Number 17
2TAMUZ5731
Positive Contribution to Development
The continent of Africa is often overlooked by Jews in
this country who do not realize the important role we play
there, particularly in the underdeveloped nations. Just
recently, representatives of Ethiopia, Botswana, Liberia.
Malawi, Swaziland and Rwanda were among the nations
which paid tribute to Hadassah for its extensive network
of medical and social services which has provided teams
of doctors and nurses, established clinics and hospitals and
trained students for those countries in cooperation with the
Hebrew University Medical Center.
Israel has been one of the major suppliers of agricul-
tural, industrial and banking experts to many of the African
nations and the strong Jewish community of South Africa
has been instrumental in expanding economic relations
between the two countries. There are political hazards in
all this, as Israel found recently, when its tiny donation
(S2.857) to the Organization for African Unity, reguested by
the United Nations, brought angry statements from the
South Africans that it was supporting a "terrorist" outfit.
And from another angle, Arabs at the U.N. charged that
Israel was providing arms to South Africa and, in this way,
approving South Africa's racial policies which heve been
condemned by the United Nations.
On balance, the Israeli-Jewish contribution to African
developments continues to be a positive one of which we
can be proud.
Counterattack Had Desired Effect
There aie a number of reasons for the noticeable de-
cline of support of Arab terrorists by the New Left, not the
least of which is the fact that information about the true
nature of many of the Arab states and their political par-
ties has finally penetrated the hitherto closed minds of the
radical left.
American Jewish radicals have played a significant
role in turning the tide which had caused much concern in
recent years. Particularly on the campus, these Jewish
groups have launched a vigorous attack against the pro-
Arab, anti-Is-rael posture of the New Left, distributing litera-
ture and providing effective speakers.
For the first time in many years, the Young Socialist
Alliance convention and the SDS had no resolutions on the
Middle East. While it is true they also are preoccupied
with other matters mainly survival the fact is that the
by American Jewish Committee and Hillel, has had the
counter-attack by positive young Jews, aided particularly
desired effect.
CARE Projects Continue
The impact of CARE's humanitarian activities, now a
auarter of a century old, has been felt strongly in the State
of Israel during the Jewish nation's 23 years of independ-
ence. The concern of the people of the United States and
Canada Jew and non-Jew alike for the innocent vic-
tims of World War II has carried over into the present day.
For some 22 years, kosher food packages were sent
through CARE by American donors to families and friends
in Israel. This project was terminated last year by mutual
agreement, since Israel no longer requires this type of help.
Rut other CARE projects continue, creating a perma-
nent bond between Americans and Israelis. These include
supply of equipment to youth vocational rehabilitation
ers, old aged homes, schools and other welfare and
educational institutions throughout Israel. And the areas
which Israel occupied in 1967 have received large scale
feeding programs and self-help development programs
through the non-partisan vehicle of CARE.
We salute this superlative endeavor. CARE, on its 25lh
versary.
MATTER OF FACT
IYI/^ by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON One of the
most interesting straws in the
Democratic wind in many
months is the vigorous retrench-
ment now going forward in the
camp of Sen. Edmund Muskie of
Maine.
The net figure of the persons
departing from the large and
costly Muskie campaign organi-
zation ranges from about six to
about 15 thus far, dejx-nding on
which Muskie insider you credit.
Among those removed from the
payroll rather recently were the
chief Muskie idea-men on both
foreign and domestic policy, An-
thony Lake and James Camp-
bell.
IN PART, what has been go-
ing on is a sharp shrinking of
the mini-university the Muskie
organization assembled some
time ago in its local headquar-
ters. Thinkers are being drop-
ped. Political field workers are
being hired.
But it does not really stop
there, by any means. For ex-
ample, the Muskie preeonven-
tion effort was originally esti-
mated to cost the whopping sum
of $10 million, including the ex-
pense of all the planned primary
contests. And, besides trimming
current organizational costs,
there is rather clear evidence
that the Muskie people are cull-
ing their list of primaries their
man must enter, with a view to
making major future economies.
IT IS bewildering that this
should be the situation of the
Democratic Party's undoubted
current front-runner, who is al-
so one of the most decent and
attractive men in American poli-
tics. Under more normal con-
ditions, every Democratic fat
cat's checklwok ought to be open
for Sen. Muskie, including a lot
of checkbooks that may also be
accessible to other members of
the gaggle Democratic aspirants.
But present conditions are not
normal. It is a historical truism
that the two major sources of
political financing for Demo-
crats have been big labor and
the richer members of the Amer-
ican Jewish community. As to
big labor, there are unconfirm-
ed reports that Son. Birch Bayh
of Indiana is getting his seem-
ingly limitless campaign funds
from the Teamsters" union
an interesting thought!
BUT WITH this possible ex-
ception, the majority of the Dem-
ocratic aspirants have little ap-
peal, at present, for big labor.
The preferred candidate of
George Meany, the boss of the
AFL-CIO, Ls in fact Sen. Henry
S. Jackson of Washington. And
Scoop Jackson has not yet gone
into the phase of his campaign
that calls for real money.
That leaves the American Jew-
ish community. American Jew-
ish money, in overwhelming ma-
jority, is public-spirited money,
liberal money and politically ac-
tive money. In certain cases, one
must add, it also tends to be
"radical chic" money.
THUS ONE of the chief bank-
rollers of the radically chic as-
pirant. Sen. George McGovern
of South Dakota, is reported to
be the former majority stock-
holder in Scientific Data Sys-
tems, Max Palevsky. Since Pa-
levsky sold his company to
Xerox for somewhere in the
neighborhood of a billion dollars,
he can easily afford the support
he has been giving Sen. McGov-
ern.
In the main, however, and up
to this time, the solid, middle-
liberal Jewish money, which
really counts the most, has not
begun to be available on a big
scale. That, basically, is Sen.
Muskie's retrenchment.
IN SOME aspects of the re-
sulting situation, there is con-
siderable human comedy. Sen.
Hubert H. Humphrey of Minne-
sota, for example recently held
a triumphant Washington din-
ner of large contributors, main-
ly from the American Jewish
community. But behind the "We
It > *
love Hubert" auld I ing syne
atmosphere, there was the sim-
pie fact that a fair number of I' *
those present wanted a good ex-
Continued on Pae 5-1
As...
Max Lerner
Sees It
S \N JOSF Calif I St met John Bunzel when he was
a student in 1948 and was Stirring the placid waters of Prince-
, / v a new liberal activism. I watched him go through the
,.,,. (urnace several years ago as a politics pro nssor^whom a
mindless "Third World" gang tried to dnve off the campus_
San Francisco State by breaking up his classes and_didn
succeed It was good to see him inaugurated as president ol
S ,Iol State Sege the other ^^JJ^J^^
Hvering the commencement talk to the graduating students.
One of the pleasures and pay-offs of the teaching vocation is
tosoe those whom you once knew as fledglings emerge to edu-
cational leadership.
There is a new breed of college president and Bunzel is
Zm who as professor, have been through toe cm-
cb of witnessing the recent university violence and be* ten-
Pere,l by the experience, who have lost their mnocer.ee an t ha
. ved a ...end of realism, empathy and a tough-minded I,,
eralismwhich should make them viable in the difficult decade
ahead for a dangerous profession.
& ft &
I TRIED TO SAY to the students that commences-its no
,onger mean as the old myth used to have It) that they are
-going out into the world." because they are already in it up -
to their neck and brain and heart University is part of Lie tur-
moil of the times. But it is also, by its history and ewent.a
nature, like a clearing in the jungle where for a moment of
time you can map the forest and prepare yourself for the eep-
est plunge into it. As McGeorge Bundy puts it, "A plane ls for
flying, a university is for learning" but we are having U do
our learning with the jungle around US.
We have been bemused by the cries of 'Repression.' which
are true enough in a very limited way, but we have lost Sight
of the extraordinary openness which is far truer of America
today. The decade of the 1970's. with whatever turmoil it "ill
have, is likely to be one of the most open in American history.
The university is open to students who are the first college
generation in their families, often the first beyond elementary
school. The media are hungry for whatever seems innovative
and dramatic. The theater, movies, magazines and book pub-
lishing are open to all kinds ol experiment. There are a.I kinds
of new "encounter groups" opening up. The individual is Open-
ing himself to new experiences, new life-casts and lifestyles.
The civilization is an 0|>en one.
The open university is in part the result of an explosion in
a closed room. We are rejecting the image of the classroom
as a repository of congealed boredom, where lectures from a
decade back are dusted off, drowsily delivered and handed back
to the instructor in a catatonic exam book. The question is nut
whether we shall grade or not (the whole "pass-fail" debate to-
day is a tempest in a cul-de-sac), but how we can learn l>y
give-and-take between students and teachers, using the longer
experience of the teacher as a class resource but drawing also
on the student experience.
d -fr -to
THE WS SAW A FLIGHT from history, as if the put had
nothing to teach the present except its bankruptcy, and also a
rejection of science and of due process of reason. I feel fiat the
retreat and flight are over and that the current is setting i"
the other direction. But the questions we are putting to history
are more sharply focused on the present, and the uses to
we put science and technology are more insistently human uses.
There are two basic views of man. One sees him as a
neutral technician, lord and master of the universe, measuring
everything by power and materialism. This view is refuted both
by ecology and ethology. The second sees him as an Imp
bundle of potentials with drives both creative and destructive.
Man must direct these drives by a code of values, by which I
mean the questions that he puts to life. The revolutions of
power that are going on currently will not, I am convi;
lasting ones.
The revolutions of value will. They will in the end.
ably, transform man and his societies, unless man destroys him-
self first.
I see all sorts of signs to suggest that the generational
struggle is no longer as intolerant and uncomprising on both
as it has been in the past decade. The traditional val.....
ture carried over from our immigrant and pioneer Boreb" art
has not proved nourishing to the young. But the challei.
of values, especially in the form of the minority counter-culture.
has not proved adequate even for the majority of tlv younK
themselves and stands in need of rethinking. We have a chance
for a synthesis of what is strongest and most salable from tlv
past ethos and what is most viable in the challenge of ethos-
That, at any rate, strikes me as the prime task of the 70*S tot
both generations.


Friday. June 25, 1971
u. =
fj&wist fhirUdSairi
Page 5
scene around
kv Marin Nvins
The Young Loaders Council of Federation held a Splash
Party at Kmerald Hills but there was nary a ripple in the pool.
I Is hard to explain to newcomers to this area but parties are
nut always as advertised ... A beach party doesn't necessarily
entail a dip in the ocean a splash party at a country club
doesn't necessarily involve swimming. Barbecue party hosts have
been known to serve gourmet meals and formal parties can
often wind up with someone in the pool a la the Kennedys. Living
in year-round good weather makes us all a bit jaded as far as
outdoor activities are concerned and many of these parties turn
out to be places to show off the newest in "casual" clothes or
the latest in bathing suits that dare not get wet.
Newly-elected Young Leaders president Dr. Sam Meline
and nil Audrey and lots of his fellow members and their fraus
were on hand at Emerald Hills Although rain came earlier,
it cleared and a large group wore on hand for this strictly social
evening including the Steve Tobins. the Alex Buchwalds, the
Joel Schneiders, the Reuben Schneiders, the Arthur Frimets,
the Loon Cutlers, the Mark Frieds. the Errol Rosens, the Jim
Millers, the Joe Schwartzes, Jill and Larry Hunter, Norm and
Nancy Atkin. Pete and Dodie Weinstein, and Gerry and Perle
Siegi I.
I've been told that it would be easier to list the people in
Hollywood who weren't at the Anton wedding than to list those
who were there for It seemed that everyone was there to see
Michelle marry Michael Cagnetto. The ceremony and the wed-
ding u-ception were held at Temple Sinai on a Sunday afternoon
and in mentioning a few of the people who told me about It I
mast include Ann and Al Yorra, Lila and Dave Yorra, Dorothy
and Mae Kline. Lois and Dick Solomon. Celina and Irv Fishman,
Ann and Jack Lansky and Florettc and Dave Aranow. They
reported that the bride was radiant and the entire celebration
was lovely.
fr -tfr BITS AND PIECES There's another new doctor In town.
Dr. Morton Diamond has joined the Yale Citrin office. He and
his wife, Louise are living on North Lake. Ruth Golden, the
fabulous Yoga teacher is back in town permanently. She and
her husband have given up their New York residence and are
now living at Hollywood Towers. She plans on setting up classes
again so all you guys and gals will have a chance to "shape up"
the Golden way soon. The Kurash Dalmatian puppies have
worn out their welcome and are up for sale Wonder wheth-
er they're on multiple listing? Saw Sam and Audrey Meline
in the Rascal House and counted five children. Sam said they
had "borrowed" a niece for the evening to add to their four.
. Simon Hecht is back from Israel and as enthusiastic as
ever. Rabbi Malavsky will have three days to recuperate
latter taking a group of teenagers to Washington and Virginia>
before he leaves June 28 for Israel. On this trip he is leading a
group of adults. Maurie Meyers is back from Florida's
Mineral Springs. He and his wife took an apartment there while
he enjoyed the baths. They will be leaving for a more extensive
vacation up North later on.
ir -to *
Charles and Anna Wolfe celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary with a reconstruction ceremony presided over by
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe recently. Joseph Kleiman and Charlotte
Teller of the Jewish Community Relations Council attended the
nations) convention of that organization in Atlanta. Elise
Simori Weil is coming to town for a few days to see all her old
friends.. Elise lives in Denver since her remarriage.
H ft ft
Many localitos have been playing host to foreign visitors
introduced to them by the Council for International Visitors.
There have been Doctors from San Salvador and businessmen
and government officials from Brazil. What a great way to
learn a bit about these other countries!
Jon Young 563-8940
THE FURNITURE SPECIALISTS
Ref in'nhing Repair Reupholstery
Repair and Restoration
Free tsttmales
268 HE. 32nd Court
Ft. Lauderdare
IH 11 II I
Warren and Chick cordially invite you
to attend their 3rd anniversary celebration
Saturday, June 26 1 to 4 p.m.
CHICK'S TIRE SALES
1520 S. Dixie Highway
Hollywood 920-1153 929-1263
Open House Entertainment Prizes Refreshments
Hollywood Summer
Recreation Plans
Hollywood's Recreation Depart-
ment started its summer program,
which will continue through Aug.
27, this week.
The range of activities will in-
clude art. band, ballet, bowling,
seramics. dancing, golf, gym, gui-
tar, horseback riding, judo, model-
ing, rollerskating, sewing, swim-
ming, sailing, symphony, training
orchestra, tennis, wrestling, all
typea of arts and crafts.
Classes will be planned for boys
and girls from the age of six to
12, teens, and adults. Swimming
classes will be held for all ages
at South Broward. McArthur and
Attucks pools.
Mrs. Lee Dunn. Hollywood Rec-
reation Department adult super-
visor, has announced the start of
the adult summer program, al! ac-
tivities of which take place at the
Recreation Center. 2030 Polk St.
Cards 'n Chatter takes place
each Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30
p.m. with Mrs. Bcrniee Kennedy
serving as chairman. Adults may
participate in numerous card
games and table games including
Scrabble, Checkers, Monopoly and
Yahtzee. Refreshments are served
and prizes arc awarded.
A now attraction will be the
showing of weekly movies Wednes-
days at 7:30 p.m. Square dancing
is featured Thursdays at 2 p.m.
with Jay Fenimore doing the call-
ing. A nominal fee is charged for
all programs.
For specific information about
recreation class registration, it is
suggested that interested parties
contact the Hollywood Recreation
Department through City Hall.
Deborah Chapter
Officers Installed
The Hollywood Chapter of Deb-
orah held their annual installation
of officers at a luncheon meeting
recently. Mayor John Wulff of
Hollywood was guest of honor;
Rabbi David Shapiro acted as in-
stalling officer for the group.
Mrs. Ruth Jacobson was in-
stalled as president; Mrs. Ann
Davis and Mrs. Ida Pormosly, vice
presidents: Mrs. Gertrude Wine-
burgh, treasurer; Mrs. Rose Mesch,
financial secretary; and Mrs.
Louis Vogel, secretary.
This picture of the state's too high
school tennn player, Steve Yellin, con-
tains an optical flakefive stars in the
tallest trophy were a reflection from
the camera flash. But the stars belong-
ed there. Steve, who lives at Emerald
Hills, was named Hollywood Hill*
High's outstanding boy student, its
ufjftmdmg athhTe, and was chose*
to give the graduation address. Cur-
rently ranked No. 1 among Florida's
18-year-old tennis players, he won't
be able to defend that ranking in the
state championships. He's gone t*
Camp Akiba in the Poconos as a ten-
nis counselor and will enter the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania in the Fall on
a scholarship.
Tutoring Program Being Conducted
A Summer Tutorial and Enrich-1 lected by principals and trained
ment Program sponsored by the I teachers supplied by the Broward
Broward County School Board, the [ Tounty School Board.
Broward County Community Re-
lations Commission and Special-
ized Urban Ministries will be con-
ducted during this summer's school
vacation period.
Th program which will be
called STEP, includes an academic
tutoring program for youngsters
of kindergarten and fourth grade
levels. Participants in these two
important ae grouns will rx> so-
Emphasis is being placed on
reading and math; science and
social studies will be covered also.
In order to .civo the children an
opportunity to discover hidden
talents, volunteers are being
sought to work with the young-
sters on a one-to-one basis or in
group situations in art. sports,
sowing and other subjects.
JOSEPH ALSOP
Continued from Page 4
cuse to delay unlimbering check-
books. Humphrey is Just such an
excuse, at least for now.
The fact is that the American
Jewish community Is now Being
tugged two ways. One strong
tug comes from the community's
traditional liberalism, which fa-
vors the more fashionable Dem-
ocratic hopefuls.
BUT THE tug comes from
the perilous situation of Israel.
Israel's situation has taught
and has quite properly taught
the hard lesson that all free
nations now ultimely depend on
the strength and resolution df
the United States.
In these circumstances, there
are natural doubts about the nu-
merous Democratic candidates
who loudly advocate a policy of
national weakness. There are
also many checkbooks assecci-
ble to Sen. Jackson's new mon-
ey-raiser, Victor Carter. But in
the longer run, how the check-
books are unlimbered and for
whom in largest number will
probably depend on further les-
sons taught by Middle Eastern
developments.
TUESDAY, IUHI 29
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Board Meeting
fKIDAY, JULY 2
Hadassah Beach Group Board Meeting 10:30 A.M.
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
140 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOttYWOOD
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"4 Service WHhm The Means Of All"
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
_

4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Vempte 3etk '(
WlemotiaC
(jazdent
7S.K
The only all-jew ish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
_923 8255_oc write: v.'J^
~TEMPLE BETH EL '"""' F&$&P~
1351 S. Mth AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: ,____________________________________l_
JXk
m
ADDRESS:
PHONE:_________
\


Peg 6
f-Jewish Hcrktian
Friday. June 25. 1971
Thin Message Sponsored by
ACE SUPPLY
1201 No. State Rd. 7, Hollywood, Fla.
Phone 981-7424
Sprinkler and Fence SuppliesPump & Motor
ALEX JEWELERS
Pasadena Plaza, 1728 University Dr.
Pembroke Pines Phone 983-3111
ATLAS PENCIL & PRINTING CO.
908 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale
Phone 922-8555
BARNETT'S of HALLANDALE
Home De'cor Accessories
100 E. Beach Blvd. 927-0566
THE BEATLE SHOP, INC.
V. W. Specialists
101 N.E. 1st Street, Dania 922-0573
THE BEDSPREAD WAREHOUSE
120 Ansin Blvd., Hallandale
1 Block E. of Hallandale Exit 1-95 920-4451
BOB & RAYS AUTO BODY PAINT SHOP
430 N. Dixie Highway, Hallandale 922-5344
HARVEY BREEDINGS DRUG STORE
1400 S. Federal Highway, Hollywood 922-7561
BUDGET RENT A CAR
1702 N. Federal Hwy., Dania 927-2536
Airport Valet Parking
BUY RITE CARPET
1069 N.W. 1st Court, Hallandale 920-7375
1 Block N. Hallandale Blvd. 1 Block East of 1-95
CAMERA WORLD
DIPLOMAT MALL East Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hearing Aid Bat. Repairs 920-9862
CAMERON LUMBER
Prompt Free Delivery
301 N.W. 1st Street, Dania 922-3919
CARE 0' THE HAIR BY LEMAY
Certified Mens Hair Stylist
1760 N. University Drive, Pasadena Plaza
Phone 966-8034
CARVEL ICE CREAM SUPERMARKET
1756 University Dr., Pembroke Pines, Fla.
Pasadena Plaza Corner Of Taft & University Dr.
Phone 987-5495
CHICKEN UNLIMITED
201 N. Federal Highway, Hallandale, Fla.
Phone 927-8404 WE DELIVER!
CHICK'S TIRE SALES, INC.
WHOLESALE RETAIL
1520 S. Dixie Highway (1 block north of
Pembroke Rd.) Phones 929-1153 1263
ANN CUMMINGS HOLLYWOOD HILLS
DANCE ACADEMY
4549 Hollywood Blvd. 987-9290
TOTS TEENS ADULTS
DAVE'S PAINT & BODY SHOP
735 Stirling Road, Dania 923-0373
DIPLOMAT MARKET INC.
3505 S. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
Diplomat Tower Bldg. 922-5618
PHIL DAVIS MEN'S SHOP
Diplomat Mall, Hallandale 920-2370
Botany 500-Diplomat Montini
Palm Beach Kuppenheimer
DIPLOMAT CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY
Drapes and Shades Phone 983-3400
5959 S.W. 23rd Street, Hollywood
DRIFTWOOD KINDERGARTEN & NURSERY
1911 N. 66th Ave., Hollywood 983-6954
DRUG WORLD
Diplomat Mall, Hallandale 920-1901
FANTA'S BAR
201 N. Dixie Highway, Hallandale 922-9187
BECKY FANTA'S BEAUTY SALON
422 S.W. 1 lth St., Hallandale 927-5341
Half the world is\l
UNLESS WE HELP THE HUNGRY feed and support themselves, their need
can never end. CARE does more than feed people.lt also uses food to help
educate children, to nourish preschool youngsters to full growth, or as
pay while villagers build schools, roads and water systems. It adds seH-
help seeds and farm tools, trade tools, construction materials and school
supplies. It sends doctors and nurses to heal the sick and train medical
personnel. In all these ways, the money you give saves lives and makes
those lives worth living. Mail your check.
r
..
4 f
FEATHER and FLOWER CRAFT
827 South 21st Ave., Hollywood 929-2711
corner of Washington St. ft 21st Ave., E. of Dixie
FRAMES & FRAMES
1081 N.W. let Court, Hallandale-920-1210
(Just East of 1-95 at Hallandale Exit 1 Block N.)
THE GALLERY HALLMARK CARDS & GIFTS
Diplomat Mall, East Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Phone 920-8333
STANLEY FRANK'S WS-L.
CRIMPING PARLOR A BOUTIQUE, INC.
2080 S. Ocean Dr., Hallandale 925-6464
Open Seven Days Wigs Cosmetics
GEORGE'S T.V. INC
1796 University Drive, Pasadena Pin*
Pembroke Pines 961-1720
HALLANDALE MOVING & STORAGE
205 N.E. 1st Ave., Hallandale 923-0402
ONE PIECE OR HOUSEPUL


Friday, June 25, 1971
vJewlsli florMian
Page 7
slhungry and...

r
..


t Everything it does
depends on you.
From food and schools fa
doctors and tools, your
dollars send the means to
build a better world. Mail
your check: CARE-New York,
N.Y. 10016 or local offices.
What's the big idea,
CARE building roads?
The roads take poor villages out of isolation.
CARE equips the villagers to do the building.
So farmers can go to markets with their crops.
Teachers, agriculturists, technicians, doctors can
come to heal and train and educate the people.
Yes, CARE starts by feeding the hungry. But
it does a lot more. Roads, schools, clinics, tools
whatever it takes to help needy people develop
the ability to feed and support themselves.
It js a big idea, to build a better world. Will
you help? Send your contribution.
CLIP .
AND MAIL
TODAY
i
CARE
wov m Avnu#
New York, N.Y. 10016
Her* is $........ ton D F*
-rricM, or a CABS to
Stlf-Helf D MEDICO
n Tforu Jwir your
JMM *4Ckl Ml U CARP
HALLANDALE TRAVEL SERVICE
The Diplomat Mall, East Hallandalo Beach Blvd.
Air Lines and Steamship Tickers 927-4271
HILL'S ALUMINUM PRODUCTS
2405 N. 21st Avenue, Hollywood
Storm Window Awnings 925-4608
HILLTOP PAINT and BODY SHOP
3035 S. State Road 7, West Hollywood
Phone 913-2644
HOUSEWARES WAREHOUSE
1074 N.W. 1st Court, Hallandalo 920-7282
JULLAR'S BAKERY I RESTAURANT
1832 N. University Dr., Pasadena Plaza
Pembroke Pines 961-3400
LONDON TOWNE HAIRSTYLISTS
1762 University Drive, Pasadena Plaza
Phono 966-2011
MAX'S STANDARD SERVICE CENTER
4091 S. State Road 7, West Hollywood
Phono 989-9262
MEDCO DISCOUNT
1855 Hollywood Blvd.
19th and Blvd., Hollywood 922-8689
Thin Message Sponsored by
MIKE MICHAELS TROPIC CRAFT
Aluminum Furniture Manufacturers, Inc.
1055 N.W. 1st Court, Hallandalo
(Warehouse Shopping Center) 920-0251
MIL-RICKS OFFICE SUPPLIES
6643 Taft St., Hollywood 981-2050
Rubber StampsPhoto CopyingGreeting Cards
MIRAMAR TERRAZZO CO.
Mr. and Mrs. Danny Mascia 983-7269
MR. JIM'S HOUSE OF PRIME
6232 Pembroke Road, Hollywood 966-7850
ONE ELEVEN MIRACLE PAINT & BODY SHOP
Ouality Painting and Body Work
129 N.W. 4th Ave., Dania 922-9355
PAL JOEY'S
Men's Hair Styling and Barber Shop
Manicure Phone 922-9300
PEMBROKE SCHOOL DAY NURSERY
& KINDERGARTEN
6150 Pembroke Road, Hollywood
Special Summer Program 989-6264
PHYSICAL HEALTH COMPLEX
213 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale
Massage Sauna Colonic Irrigation 920-5050
PINK FLAIR BEAUTY SALON and WIG STUDIO
5801 Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hollywood
Free Pick Up And Delivery 966-5740
THE PLACE Rods Reels Fishing Tackle
7631 Hollywood Blvd., Pembroke Pines
Shopping Plaza (Across from Perry Airport)
Phone 966-2990
POLLOCK'S DAY NURSERY
117 S.W. 1st St., Hallandale 922-1888
Ages 1-6 Reasonable Rates
PROTANO'S ITALIAN-AMERICAN MARKET
Finest Imported and Domestic Foods!
1814 Harrison Street 920-4661
THE RAG BAG
6508 Hollywood Blvd. 961-0580
The Most Unusual Store In The World
RANDS AUTO BODY FENDER-PAINTING
513 N. Dixie Hwy., Hallandale 929-9109
SAMPLE ALLEY
Ladie's Fashions Discount Prices
123 N.E. 1st Ave., Hallandale 920-7888
SCARBOROUGH'S HEALTH FOODS
623 S. 60th Ave., K-Mart Shopping Center
Hollywood, Fla. 966-8488
SIDE-BY-SIDE FASHIONS
1874 N. University Drive, Pasadena Plaza
Pembroke Pines 961-1781
STAR PRINTING
2025 Tyler Street, Hollywood, Fla.
Tel. 929-2666
The Authentic Western Gear Is At...
TEPEE WESTERN WEAR
3560 N. State Road 7, Hollywood 983-4352
VILLAGE INTERIORS
2152 Tyler St., Hollywood 922-9991
Custom UpholsteryMr. and Mrs. Samuel Turner
WIG & BOUTIQUE SHOWCASE
Complete Wig Service 961-9690
1792 University Dr., Pasadena Plaza
WIGOTEQUE WIG SALON
Catering to Men's 8 Women's Hair Styling
1942 Hollywood Blvd. 927-0200
YANKEE CLIPPER BEAUTY SALON
1628 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale, Fla.
Phone 923-8883
THE YARDSTICK
Florida's Most Unique Fabric Store
805 N. Federal Hwy., Hallandalo-923-0564
SAMUEL ZASLAV OF FLORIDA, INC
115 S. 20th Avo, Hollywood 923-2403
Plumbing Supplies Bath Boutiques


**^^^^^y3g^lSS^SS!fBlf^ll^s^lS^^
Page f
fJewisti fk>ridlifor
Friday. June 25, r971
PERSONALITY PROFILE
Frances Briefer
Once upon a time when any-
ne in Hollywood thouht of Fed-
< ration, the Image included thai
fKANCtS BKItfttt
i 1 Fiances Briefer, who was at the
I elm; for many years she might
have been called Mrs. Federation."
Per more than 10 years she' per-
I irmed the many functions neces-
Bary to running Its campaigns and
mere was hardly a Jewish family
in Hollywood that Frances didn't
I now. What's more without
even looking at her files she
C mid give you a pretty complete
1 tndown on their participation in
'immunity affairs.
"The years fly by, but it must
J ive been 1949 or '50 when Ben
Baiter called me and asked would
2 serve on the Board of Federation
Snd work with them. Stanley Beck-
I rman was president then." said
Mrs. Briefer.
"In those early years we op-
erated froril a desk in the Holly-
wood Inc.. offices. It was a small
town and things were done on a
firt of person-to-pcrcon basis. In
the days before we were affiliated
With Jewish Family Service, a
needy family would come to my
Office seeking help and I would
talk one of the men invoked with
Federation ihto reaching down in-
to their own pockets and giving mo
money to help. It wasn't too sys-
tematic but I can think back to
many families that we helped
through difficult times."
Before coming to Hollywood.
Mrs. Briefer had been in business
in New Jersey for many years
She had taken over her husband's
business after his death, and al-
though tremendously successful.
.'he sold out and retired in 1941.
From then on she concentrati d
on organization work, which had
Plways interested her from the
time she was a little girl. She
loved to Hollywood with her new
husband. Jack, who had family
ving here.
Once settled in her new home,
Frances and a local group of
women organized Hadassah and
Shortly afterwards she became its
| resident; she has been active in
M ever since. She also shared her
talenu and used her capabilities
INDIAN KIVfR fnun
tropical mtmi
CANDItS
fANCY fRUIT BOXCS
ORAHGt BLOSSOM HONEY
GLAZED rRUIT
/Rafted fiwved
Bonded Gift Fruit
Shippers
Mail Order
1809 WHEY STREET
Opposite Breedings Parking Lot
Hollywood, Flo. 33020
PHONE 927-5447
V^iMiAi\Wi'WWA^VWWV
to serve as treasurer for the Holly-
wood Anxiiiu-> of the Jewish
Home for the Aged when this
group wa-. formed.
Mrs, Briefer was a founding
member of the Brandols Women's
group, ant. a charter member ol
the Hollywood Scholarship Foun-
dation: she has worked with United
fund, the Red Cross and the March
of Dimes, in fact, hardly an or-
ganization in town has not had
the benefit of Frances's helping
hand, for her interest has always
been in helping others.
Ill tin r'.ays before Memorial
Hospital became a reality she was
among those walking from door
to door garnering votes for a
referendum that would approve
the building of the hospital. With
Ida Brill, she helped organize a
benefit performance at the then
well-known gambling spot. Co-
lonial Inn. so that the nurse's
home for Memorial Hospital could
be built. It was the most success-
ful fund-raising event Hollywood
had seen up to that time.
Through her many years with
Federation. Mrs. Briefer saw the
organization grow many-fold -
from an oliice with one lone desk,
to a si/." retiuiring a full-time
executive director.
Moves were made to various
buildings as tpace was needed and
became available. Frances saw the
beginning of the affiliation with
Jewish Family Service, the start
of Camp Ka-Dee-Mah, the birth
of the newspaper originally known
as the Shofar and many other
projects.
In May of 1968. Frances felt
that it was time to step down from
her post as executive secretary.
However, her retirement from that
job only slightly slowed down her
activities As soon as it was
known that she might have a
little free time, she was prevailed
upon to accept the presidency of
Hadassah once again. Now there
are six local grou|>s in the chapter
and the organization is growing
by leaps and bounds. She has
worked this year on the Commun-
ity Survey and has been campaign
Chairman of the Women's Division
of Federation. She Ls also a mem-
ber of the Board of the Jewish
Community Relations Council.
The only noticeable difference
in her life since retriement is the
fact that now she indulges herself
by taking time to travel each
year. Her travels carry her North
to visit her daughter and her
pride and joy. her 21-year-old
grandson and on to Israel, the
country for which she has worked
so hard and well for all through
the years.
SELTZER
SERVICE
CALL 989-7447
(evenings)
ENGLISH, MATH, SOCIAL
STUDIES, SCIENCE TEACHERS
Sept. 1971
Private School, Smell Classes,
Certified I Experienced Teachers
HIUEl DAY SCHOOL, 922.3464
3B
NEED A CAPTAIN?
International Yochlimem Also.
ciolion it eediceied to eees-
'"9 y. IYA i o menteer
of the American Soot and
Yoeht Council and Yacht
Sofoty Bureau.
IYA rogulor members aro .
perienced profeiiionol cap-
tains. The owner who selects
on IYA captain it indeed en.
hancinj the safety factor a-
boord hit vessel.
Coll 583 7078
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlesinger
'Twos Teddibly Posh
Hollywood social circles have been buzzing.
The talk of the town these days was that swing-
ing soiree at the exclusive Palm Bay Club hosted
by that ever-so-charming twosome, Dr. Juan
Svcn-Aagc Wester and his fairest of fair ladies.
Jiirdauu. She, incidentally, was an absolute
knockout in a blue knit hot pants number a
little something she picked up at Henri Bendel's
during her recent New York shopping spree.
They took over the upstairs discotheque of the
P.B.C.. filled it with yellow and white flowers
and rollicking music and supplied abundant liq-
uid refreshment to a group of 200 of the most
interesting and divine-looking guests ever.
Jordana, a Yugoslavian beauty who has quite
a background in modeling, lived for a time in
Buenos Afres. It was there that she met and
married her surgeon-husband, Juan, an Argen-
tinian of Danish parents. Since the Westers have
traveled extensively and are fluent in many lan-
guages, they know oh so many people from all
over the globe. And, they all seemed to be there
that night chattering away in their native tongue.
The parly was a marvelous mix of fellow mem-
bers of the medical profession and mates and a
dazzling array of artists, actors and models.
The guest list read like the roll call of the
United Nations Assembly. There was Dr. and
Mrs. Israel Budasoff (he's from Buenos Aires I
talking Spanish with Juan. Tito and Elsa Fuentes,
he's a pianist and they both hail from Agrentina:
Mtshets and Richard Marx (she's from Amster-
dam i and upon her arrival was immediately in-
troduced to Femme (Mrs. Victor) Hochberg. who,
incidentally, is from Holland, too. They got on
famously, in Dutch, of course.
Everyone's head turned when Irene Mallon
walked in on the arm of husband. Henry. She's a
striking beauty from Persia and her conversation
was all in French with Silva Mladinov, the de-
lightful Yugoslavian hottseguest of the Westers.
Along with them were F.ngene and Althea Peck
(she's a dark-eyed lovely from New Delhi, India)
and red-headed all-American beauty, Mary Fwte
was in their group, too. Another head-turner was
one Ruta Lorenzo, a fashion model originally
from Germany, marvelous in a purple pants out-
fit and red afro wig. She and Ron Vogler"!* wife,
Hermine, fared handsomely in their native tongue
of German while the King's English got a good
play from that couple from England, Norman
and Kitty Leo.
And then, there was Murray and Marina Pol-
vay. She's a fascinating gal with many irons in
the fire. Originally from Russia, Marina is an
accomplished artist, interior designer, president
of the Miami Ballet Society and, currently ap-
pearing on her own gourmet-cook television show-
star of the on Ch. 2. Another TV personality on
the scene was Ottwaldo Calvo, the handsome Cu-
ban star of the Ch. 23 Sunday night series. He
came with film director. Harold Fulson. It was
all so "global" that even the photographer, Hun-
garian Jules SzaJay, picture snapping the bash's
l>eauteous ones, was in search of one to whom
he could speak in his native tongue. There just
had to be another Hungarian there!
The famous party-giver himself, Bill Foernt,
was on hand, too, as well as Joe Blaltes, the
Fred Sultans. Leon Sultan, Jay and Naney Sim
ons and Bobby and Sharon Collins. IrU (ran.-,
great in fringed black hot pants, gyrated to the
beat of the rock band with hubby, Oeorire. They
had to make room, however, for those dancing
whizzes Abbey and Rubin Klein and Roz. and
I -on Bennett.
Amon;,' the many medico; and their wives
caught up in the gaiety were Bo* and Gall Ma-
nner, Don and Lee Berman. Bud and Annette
Taim, Mitt and Marilyn Myers, Sender and Joan
stovoie. the George (.lantrm. Ed and Joan Salti-
mun. William Gluntz. the Davtd ShlffrliM, Dtek
and Audrey Finder, Dave and Maryann Lehman.
Joe and Selma Hopen. Dave Tepperwn (escort-
ing a dark-haired lovely) and Ernie and Judy
Sayfie, who flew in that day from Memphis, all
enthused with news of dear pals Danny and
Rosemary Thomas*, and the celeb golf classic
beneflttlng St. Jude's Hospital. Frank Sinatra,
Sammy Davis. Jr. and Bob Hope took part in
that one, so the Sayfies had quite an earful to
relate.
Well, if that's not enough excitement for one
night, what is? But the Westers will have am-
ple time to unwind from the party whirl. They'll
be occupying two suites with their tots. John
and Stephanie, aboard the Queen Elizabeth II
leaving from New York for a 5-week European
holiday. Bon Voyage Westers. Living beautifully
is an art!
a a *
Party On Wheels
Ben>min Lusshin, son of Dr. Bret and Mar-
lene, celebrated his seventh birthday in grand
style on eight wheels at the Gold Coast Skat-
ing Rink in Fort Lauderdale and a darling
group of kiddies joined him for the festivities.
Mark and Scott Levin, Lee Cohen. Lee Bumttner,
Lanee Rader. and of course, brother Davtd and
sisters Sarah and Miriam were the birthday
skaters. They all had their work cut out for
them in keeping up with Benjamin, a 41 pound
dynamo who zoomed around the rink as if he'd
been born on wheels. Afterwards, the young
ones regrouped ai the LunkhYs for a bit of sail-
ing on North Lake to add a great finish to an
already perfect day.
Same day. same time and same place, another
birthday party on roller skates was being Cele-
brated. However, it was a much older crowd (at
least five years older i. They were David Pereta,
Bobbie Siegal. Gary Miller, Cralg Hopen, Keith
Bennett. Maurice Marholen and Seott Crane, The
lads were celebrating the 12th birthday of a
very handsome, intelligent (please bear with me,
folks' outstanding and special young man a
good friend of their's and our heart's delight,
Seott Sehlesiiigcr. His equally outstanding eight-
year-old brother, Gregg, was along with the
older gents Cor the birthday party that began
with a big "Lum's-style" lunch and ended with
18 tired legs.
ft it ft
People And Places
Euro|>e-bound h;r thit>e weeks are Dr. Chuck
and F.laine Kahn with Palm Beach pals, the Bob
Gerard*, Anita (Mrs. gy) Sllverman accured a
grand total of $30,000 to become top money win-
ner at the Diplomat's Las Vegas night. She
happily turned in her loot ('twas only play
money i to receive a combo radio-phonograph
for her efforts. ... The new Eagle Scout at
the home of Dave and Diane Snyder is 15-year-
old Scott Alan. The Sam Mellnes are as proud as
the parents. Scott is their nephew. It's two
weeks in Israel, and then to Switzerland and
Holland for the Fred Blumenthab and the Leon
Cutlers.
Dr. Dave Lehman was happy with his hrtest
plans for summer nocturnal enjoyment for the
youngsters. It Was "Summer Festival '71" an
8 p.m. to 11 p.m. rock concert at Dowdy. Tickets
were $1 and 80'v of the net proceeds were ear-
marked for the "Starting Place." A winner for
everyone concerned. ... Dr. Howard and Flor-
ence MM and A| and Gloria She-man dining
at Joe Sonkens. The foursome looking positively
marvelous no doubt due to the lingering glow
of their exciting trip to Rome, the French anil
Italian Riviera, Switzerland and Germany.
Congrats to Zaehary Telch, Ellen Pollack.
Mark SUber and the Nova High cast for their
hilarious presentation of "Don't Drink the
Water." And, on the subject of congratula-
tions, hearty ones to the new slate of officers of
the South Broward Bar Association Auxi.tary
Lynne (Mm. Jack) Packar, president; Joann
(Mrs*. Sherman) Kai, vice president; Janet (Mm.
lack) Weinn, recording secretary; Kathy (Mrs.
Charles) Finkei, corresponding secretary; and
Sylvia (Mrs. Sidney) Annum, treasurer. An at-
tractive boost for jui-isprudence.


Friday. June 25. 1971
fJewistincrkfiar)
Page 9

Week Of Orientation For
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah's Staff
The entire staff of Camp Ka-
iJcc-MaJi has completed a full
week of orientation under the
guidajit-e rff'-RicnnrVT Oetdsteftl*
camp director. The training period
was the most thorough and length-
iest that has been offered to the
counselors since the start of ('amp
Ka-Dee-Mah five years ago.
The program of the only camp
in Greater Hollywood sjmnsored
hy the Jewish community is slant-
ed so that the children receive
contact with their Jewish heritage
as well as their American heritage
through music, drama, story
lane and special events.
Daring the period of counselor
I raining, every phase of camp-
craft was rehearsed and each
counselor was required to take
part in each activity no matter
what his own speciality involves.
Experts in various fields appeared
at the sessions to share their cx-
pcrtlse w itti the group.
Mrs. Joan Levi, a caseworker
for Jewish Family Service, worked
with them in assessing behavior
problems that might arise. Mrs.
Lev! used s method of role-play-
ing in emphasizing her point of
view, showing how to avoid such
problems as ways of coiling with
them should they arise.
Also on die program during the
we ek was Michael Ruvel, execu-
tive director of Jewish Welfare
Federation, who spoke on "The
i unselor's Role" and "How Su-
pervisors Can Help in a Camp
Program."
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah is one of the
agencies of Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration. It has been operating fa-
cilities provided by Temple Beth
F.l.
'MM^^MWW^VWMWW
9
CANDUUGHTING TIME
2 TAMITZ 7:56
*
' '" '^"''.!'.',' ';,"':!. ; ,;H i .,!- wiwi m.,bi: i Ujtti MMM-M
SYNOPSIS OP THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
spd
Korach
Religious
Services
rlAUANDAU
HALLANDAI E JEWISH CENTER
12 N. E. 1st Avi. 4*
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (TEMPLE) 1351 8. 14 Av.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. 41
Friday i:16 p.m. Topi, iiy Mr. Samuel
l. Benin: "In These Modem Times
. win Needs The Bmbbath?"
BETH SHALOM (TEMPLfV. 172
Monroe St. Conservative Rabb
Morton Malavsky. Cantor Irving
Gold. 41
SINAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. 4
MIRANUR
ISRAEL (TEMPLE) 6020 S.W. SSth St
Conservative. Rabbi Elliot J. Wino
grad. Cantor Abraham Koater. 4s
MARGATE
MAROATE JEWISH CENTER. S101
N.W. 9th St.
Israel's Prime Minister Golda
Meir was among the Israeli of-
ficials who received the first
five volumes of the "Encyclo-
paedia Judaica" during the past
two months. She expressed
great admiration for the scope,
quality and character of the en-
'eipprise and emphasized its
importance and value to world
Jewry.
By K.VIUil SA.MIM. J. I 'OX
Linda Friedman, supervisor of Senior Camp and Richard
Goldstein, Camp director, are shown discussing Camp Ka-
Dee-Mah's summer program during Counselor Orientation
Week.
Joan Levi, case worker for Jewish Family Service, describes
some of the possible solutions to problems that might arise
with the campers during the coming summer session. From
left cere Ester Shapiro, Robert Bogdanotf, Marilyn Brown and
Linda Susa.
Why Is it that the word
"Uokenu" fat added to tlw sec-
ond part of the sun i urn Ms when
a Minyan of tern male*, is pres-
ent and that otherwise it is de-
leted w lun tUr leader says "f^et
us bless Him from Whom we
haw eaten'.*"
Tradition has it that when ten
males are assembled together in a
| common function of prayer the
spirit of the Almighty joins them.
(Therefore, when there are ten men
present the Almiglity is specifically
referred to since His presence is
felt to be amongst the group.
When the number is smallci
than ten. the group has to reach
out to Him, while with a group of
ten males it is felt that His spirit
is close by. The word "Llokenu'
means "Our Gad" and indicates
that there is a close relationship
between God and I he group.
When should a boy begin to
pet on Tefillin?
Basically, the obligation to put
on Tefillin comes when all other
obligations come upon the lad. at
the age of 13 years and a day
tile age when h? becomes Bar j
Mltzvah.
Rabbi Mosea Lsserles in his gloss
to the Shulchan Aruch actuallv
specifies this day as the first
day that the boy puts on the Tefil-
lin. (Orach Chayyim 37:31.
Because the Tefillin require a
certain amount of familiarity am
skill in order to put them on prop-
erly, the custom developed of !ia\ -
ing the boy start to put on the
Tefillin several months before his
Bar Mitzvah so that when he
reached the age of Bar Mltzvah
he would be putting the Tefillin on
in the proper manner.
There is also ttie general rule
which requires a boy to be trained
in performing the commandment*
of the Torah bofore he Is obligated
to observe them so that when the
time of his obligation arrives there
would be no doubt that he would
perform th"m in as perfect man-
ner as possible.
Special tmphasLl seemed to have
been placed on orphans, probably
because there was a fear thai in
the absence of parents to train
them, they might neglect the obli-
gation. Thus, some claim that an
orphan .should start to put on the
Tefillin at least a year in advance.
n'l !*Ti Jewish Telegraphic Agency
"Now Koreb, the son of Izhar took men. and they rose
up before Moses ." iChapters XVI-XVIIIl
KORAHS REBELLION: A group of Levites led by Korah. a
cousin of Moses and Aaron, and a group of Reubenites, led by
Hainan. Abiram and On. were joined by 2.30 prominent but dis-
contented laymen in revolt against Moses and Aaron. Korah
considered he had as much right as Aaron to be elevated to the
high priesthood. Da than and his associates sought to depose
Moses and based their claim to t'.ie leadership <>n their descent
from Reuben, the firstborn of Jacob. Moses challenged Korah '
and his followers to appear next day at the sanctuary before
God with censers filled v\ith lighted incense, and God Himself
would show whom He had chosen. Wciv Korah and his com-
panions, he added, so discontented wif.i the privilege of serving
as Levites that they sought the priesthood from Aaron whom
God had appointed'' Dathan and Abiram, however, refused
Moses' summons to attend, and accused him of making fine
promises which he had not fulfilled, angrily Moses asserted his
Integrity, for lie bad never abused his power by accepting the
slightest gift Irom the people.
Korah and his associates, followed by many sympathizers.
appeared next day to undergo the test. God, in anger at the
people's lack of faith, threatened to destroy the whole com-
munity, but Moses and A iron successfully interceded, arguing
that through one man's sin it would be wrong for the masses
to be punished. Moses, having warned the people to stand aloof
from the tents of Korah, Dathan and Abiram. announced the
test by which the true leadership would be decided. If the
rebels died a natural death then Moses would be proven in the
wrong; should, however, the earth swallow them alive, then it
would be proved that they had despised God.
No sooner bad Moses spoken than Korah and the other
rebels with all their possessions were destroyed in an earth-
quake and the people tied in terror. In addition fire came from
the Lord and consumed the 300 men who offered incense.
aes* .."



f\.. at hi nice* I *Jelt
c vision
v.
roarantg
ilunr *-(
Ch. 1':. '<::;<) a.m. The Jewish Worship Hour
Host: Rabbi David Raab, Temple Beth Raphael
atone 27 Ch. 7. 10 a.m. The Still Small Voice
When the Young Leaders Council of Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration hosted a gala Splash Party at the Emerald Hills
Country Club earlier this month the guests included (from
left) Mrs. Norman Atkin. Dr. Atkin, Mrs. Gerald Siegel and
Mrs. Philip Weinstein Jr,
Dr. and Mrs. Joel Schneider (left) and Dr. and Mrs. Alex
Kobb were among guests at the recent Splash Party spon-
sored by the Young Leaders Council of Jewish Welfare
Federation.
BhoUM b* \\ aster Ormi


P^ttSK^^s^vs?- nBSJK ggr.g^'arrgjga^g^^ffg^^
BC HS 9
.^jai.iK^jfealai'aii;
Page 10
* Jewish Hcrklian
Friday. June 25, 1971
Saga Of EH Cohen, Israel's Master Spy,
To Be Released By Publisher This Month
NEW YORK (WUP) Of all
the Mideastern espionage cases
ttiat have made headlines in re-
cent years, none has left such an
impact on the Arab political scene
as that of Ell Cohen, the Israeli
Intelligence agent arrested in Da-
mascus by Syrian Security in Jan-
uary, 1965. just days before the
ruling Baath Party was to nomi-
nate him Deputy Minister of
Defense.
Cohen's fantastic career is the
subject of a new book. "The
Shattered Silence."' by Zwy Al-
douby and Jerrold Ballinger. to be
published June 25 by Coward. Mc-
Cann & Geoghegan. Inc. It is the
story of the life, training and ex-
ploits of a modern master spy,
along with the complex political,
social and international milieu in
which he moved.
It is, moreover, a story which
illumines the dark and hidden
corners of the silent war of in-
trigue in the Middle East and the
complex Arab-Israeli war. Cohen's
four-year mission in Damacus. un-
Diamonds '' Jewelry
Appraised
STATE LICENSED
APPRAISERS
'S
1T1V1I1
119 N. 20th AVENUE
Hollywood
923-2372 923-2373
der the cover identity of Kamal
Amim Taabet. through which dis-
guise he became one of the pillars
of the Syrian regime, was high
lighted by several incredible coups
By means of contributions, lav
ish entertainment and his own
charm and plausibility, he ingra-
tiated himself so thoroughly with
Syria's military and political heir-
archy that he was taken along
with his Army friends on weekend
tours of Syrian military installa-
tions, where he photographed un-
derground artillery emplacements
that later allowed Israeli jets to
*ipe out crucial Arab fortifica-
tions along the Golan Heights,
nnd he microfilmed charts describ-
ing and locating all the most re-
cent military equipment received
from Russia and China.
Privy to a staggering number
of top-drawer secrets, including
the complete design of the Arab
plan for the diversion of the Jor-
dan River, he was also personally
responsible for finding and liquidat-
ing the notorious Nazi war crimi-
nal, Franz Rademacher, known as
Eichmann's negotiator, and ex
posed the terrorist El Fatah group.
Caught, alter four years, through
an error. Cohen was sentenced to
death. He was executed May 19.
19t!5, before a crowd of some
10.000.
COLD $ COIN
Jewelry)
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Sfog Luncheon Every Tkuridoy, 12 Noon, S2
IRING GUESTS
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$2.50 Entertainment Reservation! pleaie.
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Elmo, Dedert, Soe. DICK HUNTER. Prof.
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IY APPOINTMENT
20-W1
Dr. Joel B. Dennis
Reelected by Hillel
At the annual meeting of the
board of governors of the Hillel
Community Day School, Dr. Joel
B. Dennis was unanimously re-
elected president for the 1971-72
school year.
Officers serving with Dr. Den-
nis will include Don Solomon, vice
president; Arthur Lipson, treas-
urer, and Morton B. Zemel secre-
tary.
Dr. Dennis appointed the follow-
ing committee chairmen: Leonard
Schreiber, executive; Irving Can-
ncr, finance; Irving Kuttler, edu-
cation: Arthur lipson, budget;
Saul Schreiber. scholarship; Don
Solomon, personnel; Judge Arthur
Winton, food services, and William
Wolowitz, transportation.
Harvey Baxter, Ben Genad and
Theodore Lerner were named mem-
bers-at-large of the executive
committee.
Wkf Bo H* Call Oirtiim
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MIKE MICHAELS
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Opens New Modem Plant
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Anodized and Painteu Aluminum Furniture
Tropic Craft
ALUMINUM FURNITURE MANUFACTURES, INC
1055 N.W. 1ft Curt
(WAREHOUSE SHOPPING CENTER)
H.II....I. M00KI
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5140 So. St. ML 7 Between Stirling Rd. & Griffin Rd.
Wholesale Retail
Cabinets Vanities Tile
Paneling Carpet Marble Tops
BATHROOM VANITY-COMPLETE WITH MICA TOP $29.95
18" x 20" STEEL SINK $5.95
12" x 12" CARPET TILE ASSORTED COLORS 29c EACH
12"xl2" GAF TILE-SELFSTICK 32c EACH

""Builders Invited
3mMt^*M4mi$*t


Friday. Juno 25. 1971
*At*i*t>ncr*aratjn
Page II
Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
I

The Mysterious Take-Over In Zichron


pp LOVKUT TOWN OF Zichron Ynakov on the
fouthcrn spur of Mount CarrnpJ wjn established
in p82 by Huron de Rothschild. It is noted for its
vineyards, winecellars, lovely
I homes, magnificent view and nu-
merous historical associations.
Today it is the site of one of
Israel's puzzling mysteries, an enig-
r j ma which is just beginning to be-
f, come cleai
About five years ago a German
| Christian bought property in Zich-
ron. Shortly thereafter he and his
associates quU-tly bought more, and then another
building and still another. Today large areas in the
choicest part of the town have passed into the hands
of whom?
No one is quite sure. Residents to whom I have
spoken tell me groups of Germans come over as
tourists and stay for 14 days. They plant gardens,
paint the fences, till the soil. With industrious work
I hey have made their properties showplaces of neat-
IMH and order. They walk the streets, but mingle
almost not at all with the Jews, of Zichron. They
greet passers-by with a friendly "Shalom," but mat
is all.
They continue to buy property. No matter what
price is demanded, they are ready to pay. Their re-
sources seem limitless. When they arranged to pur-
chase the famous Dora Schwartz Sanatorium and
Rest House last year, the lid blew off, and court
proceeding! were begun which have thus far pre-
vented the Germans from occupying.

*
i
The immediate neighbors tell stories about the
ip. They are a brand-new Christian sect, formed
s|ice the last war. They believe that the resurrcc- -''
tion of Jesus is imminent, and they want to be here
and ready when he come*.
Their buildings bear names in Hebrew and
German: Beth Zion, or Beth El. On H.ishaked,
Hanassi, Hagefcn Streets, their presence is domi-
nant, and they surround their buildings with stand-
ard style stone fences, painted pink.
...... ,.
Israel Newsletter By ELIAHU SAIPETER
4 Aid9 To Sudanese
(Copyright 1971, .Towlnh Trlcgntphk- Agency, Inc.)
?UK GBKQeiDAL CIVIL WAR in the Sudan has now
been going on for 10 years. Scores of My-Lais took
place, tens of thousands of unarmed villagers, men, women
and children in jungle villages of the
Christian and animist South have been
shot or burned alive in grass huts set
on fire by the well-armed soldiers from
the Moslem North of the country. Yet
the leftists, peaceniks and pro-Commun-
ists in the free world, who are so often
concerned with the "Palestinian Libera-
tion Movement," so far display little
interest when the babies murdered are
victims of a "progressive" Arab country .
Then is little doubt that what is happening in South
Sudan is a genuine independence movement of an op-
l ssed African people, though all that the Southerners
actually demanding is autonomy and not full inde-
l ndence. Sudan's military ruler, General Numeiri, main-
tains that it is the Israelis who keep the rebellion in the
South alive by arms and training. A typical "proof" of
this was an official statement that one of the captured
rebel officers carried on him "a personal letter from
Golda Meir."Of course the letter was never produced nor
was its alleged content published.
It is true, of course, that what is happening in South
Sudan is of considerable significance for the Middle East,
including Israel. Thus was demonstrated last month when
General Numeiri felt obliged to withdraw from the
Benghazi Conference where the rulers of Egypt, Libya
and Syria decided to form a new Arab Federation. His
domestic troubles were clearly the main reason why the
Sudanese dictator could not join the latest venture of his
colleagues.
But even more significant are the implications of the
Soviet involvement in the bloody civil war in the South.
It is the only place in the world where Soviet pilots in
MIGs and helicopters are now directly and personally in-
volved in a civil war. It is the place where Soviet officers,
with their own hands, kill Africans, thus giving a demon-
stration of another facet of Moscow's "aid" to under-
developed countries. It is certainly no coincidence that
the only other such direct involvement took place a few
years ago in the civil war in Yemen. Both Yemen and
the Sudan are situated on the eastern and western shores,
respectively, of the southern part of the Red Sea. The
Russians "helped" the Yemenis to build a new port and
they are now reported to be developing Port Sudan into
their main naval base cast ei Suez.
Ships stationed there could interdict Israeli naviga-
tion to and from Eilat But Port Sudan could easily be-
come the home port of the Soviet fleet operating in the
Indian Ocean. For that, of course, the Russians need to
"pacify" South Sudan to ensure their position.
Book Review By SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN
The Middle East:
Temple Of Janus
WO QLOTK "THK SAYINGS OF THE FATHERS,"
v:25; "Ben Bag-Bag said: Study the Torah
again and again for everything is contained in it..."
After uttering "1'havdil" between
the Torah iuid Desmond Stewart's
The Middle East: Temple of Juiuu
i Doubleday & Co., $8.951, one finds
Bag-Bag's statement appropriate
to this latest comprehensive his-
tory of the Middle East from 1869
(the opening of the Suez Canal) to
the present.
The book will please and dis-
please Arab Moslems. He has damned the Jews with
faint praise, misinterpreted history, and smeared
the Israelis with his occasional virulent anti-Israel
bias. Historians and others familiar with the area
and subject will have nightmares about "facts" and
interpretations. These faults may be explained by
the facts that the author is an Englishman who
taught Shakespeare in Bagdad. His interests have
been in the Arab world. Nothing in his book indi-
cates any personal knowledge of Israel or familiarity
with Israelis.
A considerable portion of the book is an ac-
count of the history of the Turce-Ottman empire
and its semi-autonomous dependency. Egypt, and
the sordid 19th century account of European power
poetics. The role of Islam as a force stultifying
progress, intellectual and otherwise, is revealed by
his sentence, "Since Islam believed that it poss-
essed absolute truth, there was little free inquiry at
nl-Azhar (the largest Islamic university in the
Middle East)/'
He claims that Orabi, a former Egyptian leader,
acquired from al-Azhar only a command of classical
Arabic to use 'on a people uniquely sensitive to the
power of words ." No one can question his state-
ment that "Islam was a stronger bond than nation-
ality The family, and the tribe, the village, the
world community of Islam, these were the precise
and accepted ties ." The Arabs will undoubtedly
find offense in his comment that they enjoy myth-
making and cannot be stirred from a continuous
belief in myths. He also avers that Arab Christians
from Lebanon and Syria introduced nationalism to
the Moslems.
Stewart repeats the stereotype of the Jew as a
"usurer" although he concedes that Jews were
forced by gentiles to practice it and little else. In
the Middle Ages, usury meant lending money even
at the legal rate of interest. He errs in stating that
(n 1927 "world trad* had recovered and prosperity
had returned. In 1927, Europe was already in the
throes of the depression that hit the U.S.A. in 1929.
His anti-Israel bias appears in his statement
that on May 15, 1948. when David Ben-Gurion pro-
claimed the birth of Israel, he did not specify the
state's new boundaries. The fact is that Israel had
accepted the internationalization of Jerusalem and
the boundaries fixed by the U.N. Any enlargement
that -ensued later was the result of the war begun
by the Arabs to nullify the U.N. Resolution and to
try to cause Israel to die aborning.
While fedayeen attacks on Israeli civilians are
not noted by die author. Israeli retaliatory attacks
arc excoriated. Israel's "confiscation of Arab prop-
erties" is denounced but Stewart fails to mention
Israel's standing offer to pay for property taken
under the sovereign right of eminent domain or
when it had been abandoned.
To lump Ben-Gurion with Beigin is to be ignor-
ant of the animosity n"nd ideological differences be-
tween them, unless the lumping together is a de-
liberate propaganda ploy to smear B.G. with the
expansionist slogans of Ueigin and his minority
Revisionist party. Other errors appsar which may
have originated in Arab propaganda. The bxtk is
prolix, tedious and the litterateur often displaces
the pseudo-historian.

I phoned Beth Zion to ask for an appointment,
exiflaminr-that'L wanted to get aecurafc"informu-
r.'.n. antl'-not J^iy dn n^gh^pi.s' gossip!. After.'a
whispered consultation at the other end. I was told,
"Don't come; we don't want you. We will give no
Information.11
I observed that this sounded as if they had
secrets; it would be only fair of me to report their
side of the story, and net Just street gossip.
"We have no secrets." I was told. "We are
working under God and under Jesus."
The neighbors tell of numerous converted Jews
among them. I talked briefly to two women, one of
whom spoke Hebrew with what sounded like the
Rumanian accent of new immigrants. When I
pressed for information, they fled.
Head of the community is Schvcstcr Emma
Berger. No one to whom I spoke knew the name of
the sect, and even members of the group, otherwise
talkative identified themselves only as Christians
doing God's work.
In Israel they observe Friday night and Satur-
day as their day of rest: in Germany they observe
Sunday. They see no movies, watch no television,
reid no l>ooks but the Bible. They dress modestly.
Every neighbor agrees they are quiet and pleasant.
Their presence has increased property values many-
fold. Anyone who wants to sell to them, can com-
mand any price.
Two neighbors' comments I noted especially.
Said one: "What Hitler could not do to the Jews
by force, they now seek to do with money and
honey, with a smile and a New Testament."
Said another, with less bitterness. "Yesterday
for the first time I became upset. A group of them
Was walking in the public road. They did not move
aside, and I had to drive my car slowly behind
them. It was as if as if th. whole place belonged
to them!"
x


panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Poll Reflects Changes
(Copyright 1971, Jewish Telegraphic At.my, Inc.)
fOW TIMK BACK, the Gallup poll asked which woroci
were most admired and the two at the top were Mrs.
Ghandi of India and Golda Meir. Probably some of the
votes for Goldi were rooted also in an
Iadmiration foi Israel a little fellow
[daring to stand up against the mighty
I Arab-Russian combination. It may b:
taken as a kind of- world approval of
Israel's stand. There is an instinct I
people which gflnSQI what is right an
express route for reaching the trutii
| without the quibbling and painful ratic-
cination of the academic mind.
But the poll is also a manifestation of the world-wiri
change as far as women are concerned. The women hpv
(I--linitely emerged. Today, Prime Ministers; tomorrow,
presidents of General Motors and United States Steel.
(If the men wore smart, they would start learning ste-
nography. The girls may soon have their jobs).
Recently it was announced that a leading rabbinical
college would graduate the first unman rabbi. This ii
not really as great a revolution as some suppose. Basically
there is nothing entirely new. We talk with some amaze-
ment of Golda Meir as being Prime Minister but way
back in Biblical days a lady known as Deborah was not
only the Golda Meir of her day but also the Moshe Dayan.
She was Prime Minister and directed the Lsraelites in
battle as well.
Russia, it was reported hist week, has a rabbi prob-
lem just as we do. As is well known, Russia allows few
synagogues, and one would think that when a vacancy
occurs among the rabbis, they would at least see that it
is filled. But Russia has been, very slow in replacing va-
cant rabbinic posts. The jokers say that the Soviet gov-
ernment really is anxious to fill the posts, but they can't
find suitable candidates. Either the rabbis who apply are
not Communists or they are Jews. So they have no one
to appoint.


>|*#i|gw*fe'JK* ***5s?*lilws
Page 12-
*Je*Ut> ncridian
Friday, June 25, 1971
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