The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00017

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisln ncridian

Volume 1 Number 16
and SHOP AH py GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Honda Friday. June 11. 1971
Price 20c
> imtwo*tw mm$
'Survival Means Sacrifice'
Motto Is Taken Seriously
EDITORS NOTEc Mr. Wentworth ra- qnor _, ..._____..
n.iy return.* from a n.w,p. *?/ thew enUre tax dollar to
cenlly
men'* tour of laraal arranged by UJA.
Hit particiaptlon in the trip came
about through the effort! of Greater
Mollywood'i Jewnh Welfare Federa-
tion.
By ED WENTWORTH
Editor, Hollywood Sun-TuttW
Where do you start in attempt-
ing to write about Israel?
You could begin with the gov-
ernmental structure, the kibbut-
zim, the military, ahsorbtlon of
immigrants, social, economic and
educational problems you
could center on any of these top-
ics.
But when you talk of Israel, that
country sandwiched between such
relative territorial giants as Egypt.
Jordan and Syria, you must start
with the people themselves.
How, you wonder, nn a state
like Israel possibly exist when it
is surrounded by hostile entities
such as Egypt, Jordan and Syria?
How can a country about the size
of New Jersey with a population of
about three million even hope to
contend with such apparent over-
whelming odds?
It boils down to one thing: Peo-
ple determined to maintain their
freedom and independence, no mat-
ter how difficult; no matter how
costly.
A familiar slogan in Israel is
"Survival Means Sacrifice." The
slogan is interpreted literally. Sur-
vival does mean sacrifice and the
I>eople acceut that fact.
Perhaps even more astounding
when considering this attitude is
that here is a people of every ori-
gin, religion, background and make-
up you care to name. Contrary to
popular belief, Israel is not a land
occupied entirely by Jews, although
Jews do comprise most of the
population.
If any one factor could be sin-
gled out as the most important
and most vital to the survival of
Israel, it would be the military.
Without doubt, it is the most
costly in terms of dollars: In 1971
Israelis will devote approximately
defense. Obviously, this means
very little tax money will remain
for health, education, social wel-
fare programs, or anything else.
The army is the mainstay. We
visited several army camps during
our trip, two on the Syrian and
Jordan borders, where the sun and
heat made it almost unbearable.
Yet it is not unbearable to the sol-
diers. Their pastimes consist of
playing ping-pong (in.the blister-
ing sun), reading (in the cool un-
derground bunkers), or just sitting
around talking about what they
plan to do when their army serv-
ice is up.
Every Israeli male is required
to be in the army until age 55. He
serves a certain amount of time
on active duty and the rest in a
ready reserve, subject to call on
short notice.
Every Israeli female also serves
in the army, for a period of three
years. They train hard and carry
out many duties which relieve the
men for actual combat readiness
assignments.
The women have no qualms
about serving in the army; there
are exceptions, of course, but gen-
erally, the women realize their
importance in uniform and com-
plete their terms without com-
plaint.
One day while visiting a wom-
en's army camp near the Golan
Heights, we were in a barracks
around lunchtime. One of the edi-
tors in our group, pronouning his
English words very slowly (as
people tend to do when attempt-
ing to converse with someone of
a different country), was talking
to a couple of the girls, begging
their forgiveness for our interrup-
tion of their free, pre-lunch break.
He was struggling along, when a
girl's voice from the other side of
the room broke in with, "Oh, that's
all right, don't worry about it."
She spoke perfect English, with a
slight southern accent. We spun
around and saw a beautiful girl,
about 18 or 19 smiling at us. She
started joking with us and soon
we discovered she had been in
Israel for only one year, being
born and reared ia North Carolina.
"What," we asked, "are you
doing in the Israeli women's
army?"
"Of course I'm in the women's
army. I'm an Israeli, aren't I?"
she retorted.
Her father came to Israel with
her and now is a professor at
Haifa University.
The point is that even a young,
completely US.-raised girl had
become an Israeli in less than a
year, even to the extent of hap-
pily serving in the army. (Inci-
dentally, this girl, even though she
spoke very little Hebrew, was the
leader of her platoon. She also had
been nominated by her leaders as
a candidate for officer training).
As typified by this young lady
from North Carolina. Israel is a
country of immigrants, for immi-
grants, by immigrants.
Not all immigrants, however,
come to Israel for altruistic mo-
tives. Witness the reasons of two
Americans we interviewed at an
absorption center in Ashdod: Mrs.
Paula Ostrow, from Los Angeles.
Divorced. Has been in the absorp-
tion center four months. Has her
12-year-old daughter with her.
"One of the reasons I came here
was that I was wry active in the
peace movement. But the Panthers
seem to have taken it over and it
became anti-Semitic and there
didn't seem to be any place for
me there (in politics) and that
was a very important part of my
life.
"Another thing was that my
children were fooling with drugs
and I wanted to get away from
that. So I really didn't come to
Israel because I've been a Zionist
all my life ... I came al-
though I always wanted to visit
Israel I came to get away from
the problems in America. I do love
the country (Israel). If you are a
Jew you feel you should live in
Continued on Pag* 6-
Jewish Refugees
Adjust Rapidly
Ed Wentworth (center) editor of the Holly-
wood Sun Tattler, and the group of news-
papermen with whom he recently toured
Israel. In the background is the Port of Haifa.
A study of 100 Jewish refugee
families from Czechoslovakia and
Poland who settled in New York
City between July of 1968 and
December of 1969 reveals a re-
markable beginning adjustment to
their new homeland Philip Soskis.
executive director of the New York
Association for New Americans,
an immigrant aid agency, has re-
ported.
At the agency's recent annual
meeting, Mrs. Jerome I. Udell, a
founder of NYANA in 1949, was
elected president, succeeding How-
ard M. Harris, who was elected
chairman of the executive commit-
tee.
The 100 refugee families sur-
veyed after less than two years
in this country were picked at
random from the agenc/s files.
The survey was conducted by
questionnaires and through home
visits .The families, composed of
292 individuals, represent 29% of
the 350 families. (988 individuals)
resettled by NYANA from Poland
and Czechoslovakia during that
period.
Freedom, political and religious,
was the overwhelming reason giv-
en for emigrating. The 78 families
from Poland, particularly, had felt
the weight of anti-Semitism in-
crease following the Arab-Israeli
war of June 1967.
Beginning in 1968, they were per-
mitted to emigrate to Israel and
other countries, although they
could only take with them some
personal possessions and five dol-
lars for each family member.
The 22 families from Czechoslo-
vakia escaped during August 1968
as Soviet troops were poised to
march in. Some, who were on va-
cation, did not return; others made
a pretense of vacationing in near-
by countries to get out. They left
everything behind them.
These families had no financial
resources when they arrived in
this country and very few spoke
any English. Ninety-one families
were entirely dependent on
NYANA for funds to establish and
furnish homes, for medical and
iental care, for initial maintenance,
and for jobs. Nine were aided fi-
nancially by relatives and five of
these also received vocational aid
from NYANA.
The majority of the men are
earning between $100 and $200 a
week; 15 are earning between $200 "'
and $300 a week. Women gener-
ally are earning less than men
even within the same occupational
categories; the majority earn under
$100 a week; 21 earn between $100
and $200 a week and only two
earn over $200.
One hundred and five adults and
young people were sent to full-
time intensive English language
courses at university level by
NYANA immediately after their
i arrival. These were mainly pro-
\ fessionals. technical workers and
college students who could not
hope to continue their work here
without a basic knowledge of
English.
France Speeds Delivery Of
Mirage Jets To Libya
PARIS (JTA) At the re-
quest of the Libyan government.
France is speeding up Its deliv-
eries of Mirage jets to that na-
tion, according to reliable In-
formants connected with the
Dassault firm which manufac-
tures the supersonic aircraft.
France agreed last year to sell
Libya 110 Mirages; deliveries
were to be spaced through 1972.
More than 20 of these have al-
ready been delivered and the
pace is to be stepped up during
the coming months, observers
report, because Libya wants as
as many as possible in its pos-
session before the referendum is
held in September for ratifica-
tion of its federation with Syria
and Egypt.
Early delivery is being de-
manded as a precaution against
a French decision to embargo
the planes after the Federatiori
agreement is implemented. One
stipulation of tne contract with
the Tripoli regime is that the
planes must not be transferred
to a third power, and French of-
ficials declare that if that stipu-
lation is violated, deliveries will
be halted.
France is maintaining an em-
bargo against nations it regards
as belligerents in the Middle
East conflict. Libya has not been
regarded as a belligerent, but its
federation with Egypt and Syria
may put it in that category, m
the French view.
,
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
COMBINED CAMPAIGN
1971 Pledges.........772,677
1970 Pledges Still To Be Solicited 68,234
Potential 1971 Total.........840,911
COVER YOUR CARDS



Page 2
vj&vistinoilcttan
Friday, June 11, 19?i
Temple Sinai's Mura
Was A Labor Of Love
i
About a year ago, Dr. Howard
Faerar, Temple Sinafa ReUgkras
School chairman, commissioned
: ie school's art Instructor, Stan
Tupler, to survey the temple's art
i eeds and suggest an overall pro-
gram for fulfilling thom.
Mr. Tuplor suggested that the
temple grounds needed landscap-
ing, and the interior demanded
some pieces of sculpture and |ht-
haps a mural depicting something
of Jewish history.
A contest was the next stop;
<-ntrants submitted ideas for the
design of a mural, and when all
the entries were in, Stuart Hopon.
;i student at Nova who will be en-
tering Princeton University this
fail, made a composite design, in-
corporating the ideas of all the
contestants a 4 x 60 ft. mural
depicting the Pilgrimage Festivals
wMob now adorns a wall of the
litigious school building.
More than 300 poisons, includ-
ing the children of the religious
.M-hool and many enthusiastic older
people, became involved in the
construction of the mural under
the guidance of Mrs. Miriam P.
Schmerler, Temple Sinai's educa-
tional director. The huge piece of
p.rt work is formed from some
K0.000 bits of colored glass and
i. presents a labor of love by both
young and old.
In addition to Hie beauty of the
workmanship, one can detect a
closing of the so-called communi-
cation gap as a direct result of the
project. Both the youngsters and
their elders entered into its con-
struction with love and devotion
luring school-hours and on week-
ends.
Both the mural and the metal-
and-cement sculpture presently
being completed will be formally
d( cheated this fall, at which time
the final touches will have been
given to the landscaping. Rabbi
David Shapiro, spiritual leader,
and Jacob Mogilowit/, president of
Temple Sinai, report.
District Five Holds
Annual Convention
Thome of the 31st annual con-
vention to bo hold by District 5.
IVnai B'rith Women in Atlanta.
Ga.. June 26-29 is "Age of Aware-
ness," it has been announced, and
workshops will bo conducted on
"Confrontation: Urban Crisis."
The conclave's keynote speaker
will be Philip Klurznick, past in-
ternational president of the B'nai
B'rith organization.
Hollywood delegates will include
Mrs. Fred Klein. Mrs. Angolo Pa-
lumbo, Mrs. David LaVine, Mrs.
Anthony Zacola and Mrs. Mabel
Landau.
A bus has been chartered in or-
der to accommodate- South Florida
members who wish to attend. In-
formation on rates and departure
times may be secured from Mrs.
Otto Haengel of Hialeah.
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Isaiah Prophesied Current
Discord In Egyptland
By DAVID HOROWITZ.
UNWED NATIONS (\VUP>-
Past-moving Middle East events,
especially those occurring In the
Land of the Nile, in connertion
with developments hen- at the
U.N. Rogers' visit with Thant
and Jarring and the letter's con-
tinued uncertain status in the
face of a U.S.S.R.-U.S. diplomatic
tug-of-war have moved this
writer once again, as so many
times in the past, to turn to the
Hebraic Blueprint, the ancient
prophecies of the Bible, for an
answer. And lo, and behold, Isaiah
tile Prophet supplies one thus time
which fits perfectly into the cur-
rent divisive situation in the land
of the ancient Pharaohs.
Due to President Sadat's purge
of some of his leading Ministers,
among them Aly Sabry who had
aspired to succeed the late Gamal
Abdel Nasser, a condition has been
created in Egypt which is bound
to lead to an almost unending in-
ter-party struggle for power. We
have only seen the beginning dur-
ing thus spring 1971 season in
which some of the Egyptian lead-
ers had hoped for a blitz against
Israel. The Sadat purge of his
Left-wing Ministers has frustrated
this hope even as King Hussein's
purge of the Arab guerrillas has
prevented marauding and infil-
trations into the Jewish state
from the Jordanian borders.
Isaiah looked into the future
and opens his r-nnpter 19 with the
words "The burden oi Egypt." and
then proeseds t pBe#heejr-A|i *>
Ing, "The Lord rldeth upon a
swift cloud, and cometh Into Egypt
. and the heart oi Egypt shall
melt within it." Continuing, In Ihe
first person, he declares that He
will "stir "i> Egyptians agatart
Egyptians, and they shall light
every one against US brother anil
every one against his neighbor."
This' we see now happening,
But Isaiah goes further and pre-
dicts that another power un-
doubtedly the U-S.S.R. will roll-
over Egypt. "And I will give over
the Egyptians into the hand of a
cruel lord, and a fierce king shall
rule over them, saith the Lord, the
Lord of Heats."
Next Isaiah prophesies that 'The
rivers shall become foul and
that the mosses by the Nile, by
the brink of the Nile, shall become
dry and the fishers shall la-
ment, and all they that cast the
angle into the Nile shall mourn .
All they that make dams shall be
grieved in soul ."
This propnecy becomes signifi-
cant in the light of a recent re-
port by Miss Claire Sterling, a
freelance journalist, who, in a
Life magazine article dealing with
the completed Aswan Dam, stated
that the huge Soviet-supported
project has durned into a curse, a
Frankenstein monster, instead of
a blessing, for the Egyptians.
"Despite its potential for stor-
ing water and producing power,"
she said, "the dam has in fact
greatly impoverished an already
destitute nation, dvivon -the fish-
from the eastern Mediterranean,
exposed the whole Egyptian coast
to erosion, endangered every
bridge and barrier dan> astride
the Nile from Aswan to the tea
robbed Egyptian soil of the silt
that had made it the most fertile
on earth, threatened millions of
acres with the blight of salinity,
set off an explosion of water-borne
disease and squandered the very
water it was meant to save."
Isaiah, however, concludes his
chapter on a more hopeful note.
He set's Egypt, having learned her
lesson, at peace with Israel. Not
only that, together with Assyria
seemingly modern Russia -
a global 'trumvirate.' a troika, will
be instituted which will become a
blessing to the whole world. Ver-
ses M-25 read: "In Unit day shah
Israel be a triumvirate she-
lishia. troika with Egypt and
Assyria, a blessing in the midst of
the earth, in that the Lord of Hosts
had blessed it (the troika), saying.
Blessed be My people. Egypt, and
Assyria, the work of My hands.
and Israel Mini' inheritance.' "
What is sigmticant here is the
specific terms used for each of
these three former enemies, terms
which could certainly not be ob-
jected to by any one of them.
The entire chapter of Iiaiah is
worth re tiling and re-reading in
connection with Zechariah. chap-
ter 14 and Ezekiel. chapters 38-39.
The Hebrew Bible does not lie.
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phone 584-1864
or


Friday, June 11, 1971
-Jmlsti rkrrtter
ORGANIZATION IN THE SPOTLIGHT
American Jewish Committee
Page 3
The American Jewish Commit-
tre. a Wne-fieiary of JiewisH Wel-
fare Federation, is the oldest hu-
man-relations agency in the United
States, having been founded in
1906. It was the first of many
organizations In the Jewish com-
munity organized to combat anti-
Semitism and other forms of
bigotry.
Although the American Jewish
Committee was originally formed
to protect the lives and rights of
Jews, its leadership soon realized
that bigotry was not solely a
Jewish problem. Therefore, its
program today is aimed at pro-
moting dignity for all minority
groups and at heightening under-
standing and mutual respect
among all religious, racial and
ethnic groups.
The work is carried on through
more than 100 chapters through-
out the country and through an
extensive overseas program. AJ(
is the only American human rela-
tions organization to establish an
office in Israel.
On the local front, AJC chap-
ters deal with a wide variety of
local community problems such as
conflicts and tensions between
racial and ethnic grouis. organized
;uili-Semiti'-m and the threats af
extremism, inadequate jobs, educa-
tion and housing for the poor, dis-
crimination in employment, sectar-
ian religious practices in public
< lucation and bigotry in elections.
The Committee supported the es-
tablishment of Israel, United States
recognition of the new state and
its admission to the United Na-
tions. It backed U.S. economic aid
for Israel's development and was
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helpful in achieving restitution
agreements with West Germany,
which provided Israel with almost
a billion dollars in reparation pay-
ments. It helps interpret Israel's
role as a friend and ally of de-
mocracy in the Middle East and
has mobilized nationwide support
whenever its existence or security
has been threatened.
American Jewish Committee
seeks full participation of Jews
in every facet of American life
while believing that at the same
time they should retain their re-
ligious-cultural identity. Its mem-
bers include a diversity of views
and interests Democrats and
Republicans. Orthodox and Reform
Jews but each has a commit-
ment to advance man's understand-
ing of his fellow man.
The Committee publishes Com-
mentary, a journal of significant
thought and opinion on Jewish af-
fairs and contemporary issues, as
a public service, and edits the
American Jewish Year Book, which
is published jointly with the Jew-
ish Publication Society of America.
Zionists To Hear
Tattler's Editor
A special feature of the general
meeting to be held by the Broward
Zionists Districts at Temple Sinai
Wednesday at 8 p.m. will be the
illustrated lecture entitled "A
Mission to Israel" to be presented
by Sun Tattler editor Ed Went-
worth.
Mr. Wentworth will show slides
made during his recent tour of Is-
rael with a group of newspaper-
men participating in a mission
under the auspices of United Jew-
ish Appeal. His inclusion in the
tour had been arranged by the
Greater Hollywood Jewish Fed-
eration.
There will be no solicitation of
funds; entertainment will include
vocal selections by Dr. A. K. Colin,
a life member of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America.
BARRY-
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Michael Block of Hillcrcst as its
president.
A graduate of Eastern Michigan
University and the Detroit College
of Law. Mike wooispent .several
years in the Army before settling
In Florida in 1969, is managing
agent and vice president of the
Todd Development Corp. of Holly-
wood. An active Democrat all his
adult life. Mike played an impor-
tant role in the 1970 elections in
Florida..... ,
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Edward Rosenthal Morton Rosenthal Carl Grossberg Leo J. Filer
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Fctge-4
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Friday. Iun 11, 1971
I
wJewish FlvridHan
HOLLYWOOD OFFIC1 ,,
PO Bo\ :973, Miami Florida JJioi
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Out of Town Upon Requeit
Volume 1
Friday. June 11. 1971
Number 16
18 SI VAN 5731
Next Year May Be Too Late
Israel's social and economic problems are coming to
light during this period of uneasy peace, and stories of
Jewish "Black Panthers" demonstrating against discrimina-
tion are only one of many to surface. The latest issue of
Look magazine, for example, features the multitude of prob-
lems it is predicted Israel must face once the war in the
Middle East comes to an end.
With almost all the money from the most-heavily taxed
people in the world going into defense, it is not surprising
that there are great social problems brought on by inade-
quate housing and unmet educational and welfare needs.
The necessity to absorb thousands of immigrants from all
parts of the world, to teach them a new language and train
them for new jobs, is a monumental task. It can only be
done with the help of Jews all over the world, but it won't
be-done as long as so many of us here in America fail to
support the Combined Jewish AppeaWsraei- Emergency
Fund while we bask in the glory- that; Israel's heroic fight
ior life has brought all of us.
If you are concerned about these problems show it
now; next year may be too late.
Soviet Intentions In Doubt
Moscow's response to the recent visit of Secretary of
State William Rogers' to the Middle East was to surprise
Western diplomats by coming up with a 15-year friendship
treaty with Egypt.
The treaty goes beyond simply supporting the Arab
cause. It also gives the Soviets a legal basis for building a
Red army in Egypt, a feature which diplomats see us build-
ing a new colonial possession in the Middle East. In this
sense alone the agreement poses a threat to world peace,
not simply to that of Israel.
Important treaties such as this do not happen over-
night and it is obvious that at the same time Sadat was
sweet-talking the American Secretary he was offering his
country as a captive to the Russians. Whether or not this
latest move threatens the balance of power in the Middle
East, as the Israelis claim, it casts serious doubt on the
sincerity of the Russians in their parallel moves toward
negotiating differences with the United States. Much as
the world desires peace, not only in Vietnam but in the
Middle East, the constant shifts of Sobiet policy leave a lot
of doubt as to their intentions.
Educational Process Is Slow
It comes as no surprise that the latest ADL study of
anti-Semitism has discovered that religious orthodoxy
among Christian clergy is the beginning of a process which
ends in secular anti-Semitism. The key factor, say the emi-
nent sociologists who have just released their latest re-
port, is religious hostility which the clergy, who are less
likely than the laity to be anti-Semitic, transmit.
One solution the report offers is that the clergymen
must be aroused to preach on such social issues as preju-
dice, justice, peace and poverty. The problem is com-
pounded, as the recent Gallup survey of religion in Amer-
ica has shown, by the fact that the worshippers in the pews
are hostile to such preaching and, in conservative churches
in particular, few such sermons are delivered.
The process of education may seem slow but it also
as to be working for on the positive side, the study
reveals that Piotestant clergy are not only much less anti-
Sen: idc than their parishioners, but are much less anti-
Semitic than tlifiy used to be.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTONEvery word
exchanged between Secretary of
State William Rogers and
Egypt's President Anwar El Sa-
dat, all that passed between
Sadat and Rogers' main aide.
Joseph Sisco. indeed just about
all leading Egyptians' conver-
sations, over many months,
with the U.S. man-on-the-spot.
Donald BergUS all these must
have bean in Soviet hands a few
hours after the conversations
took place.
THIS IS only one of the more
obvious meanings of a simple
set of facts, nil well documented
by now and all full of interest
for anyone concerned with the
Middle Eastern crisis. As al-
ready reiwrtcd in this space.
after President Sadat had suc-
cessfully dealt with his main
enemies, his first act was to
send a group of Kast Bloc tech-
nicians packing.
The technicians were about a
dozen East Germans who ran
the vast domestic wiretapping
and bugging machinery former-
ly controlled by the Egyptian
secret police boss. Sharawy
Gomaa, who is now in jail. Of-
ficially, the East Germans work-
eel on contract. Officially, too,
the East Germans were not sent
home by Sadat.
THKV WKRE informed, in
very plain terms, that they were
no longer welcome in Egypt.
That was enough for them. They
piled onto the next plane home
as anyone would have done
in their position with the
thrent of interrogation hanging
blackly over them.
The East Germans' mere for-
mer presence in Egypt is a fact
of cardinal significance. After all,
if Soviet or East German tech-
nicians ran the domestic wire-
tapping machinery available to
the attorney general, what
should we think about our own
country? Certainly, we should
be very foolish to think that the
United States was any longer
really independent.
BIT THE wiretapping au-
thorized by Atty. Gen. John
Mitchell and carried out by the
FBI, is the merest fleabite com-
pared to the wiretapping and
bugging formerly controlled by
Sharawy Gomaa and directed
and managed by his East Ger-
man technicians. Every wire in
Egypt, of any importance, was
well known to be tapped. Presi-
dent Sadat has publicly declar-
ed that his own house was bug-
ged by the wiretappers.
If the "technicians" had been
Poles or Hungarians or Czechs,
one might construe the prob-
lem differently although with
small likelihood of being right.
But the "technicians" were East
Germans, no doubt personally
selected by the secret police of
the loathsome aging, now re-
tired boss of East Germany,
Walter Ulbricht.
IN THESE circumstances,
there co l be no doubt whatever
that carbons of every trans-
cribe! conversation were hand-
ed over, that same day. to Soviet
Ambassador Vladimir Vinogra-
dov, or to the Soviet military
viceroy in Egypt, Col. Gen. Vas-
sili V. Okunev. or maybe to the
local KGB representative, who
is faceless.
Since Sadat's house was bug-
ged, according to Sadat him-
self, all of the president's con-
versations must have been pass-
ed on with special urgency, as
above) noted.
AS TO BergUS1 endless "con-
fidential" talks with bis chief
Egyptian chum, Nasser's form-
er propagandist, Mohammed
Hassanein Helical, mayl>e Helical
knew the score and took Bergus
Into ltfc desert when he had
Romprhlne ma ior to say. But
Helkffl was much hated bv both
Sharawv Gomaa and the So-
viets' ehicf FVvptfan mranorter.
the Jailed vice president. Ali
Sabry. so Heikal. too, must have
been a prime target of the East
German wiretapping and bug-
ging experts.
The unintentional openness of
recent U.S. diplomacy in Egypt
is only the beginning of the
story. Moreover, consider, for
example, the former secret po-
lice boss, Gomaa. Can anyone
suppose that Gomaa hired East
Germans to manage his wire-
tapping and bugging apparatus,
without a very clear idea of
what he was doing?
CONSIDKKINU what some
people now believe in this coun-
try, the answer has to be that
someone probably can manage
to suppose that Gomna acted
innocently. But if you are real-
istic, or even rational, what
Continued on Page 5-1
/\s
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK New York is a city of hardened people, but
when two cops were shot coldbloodedly in a police car (they
barely survived) and then two others were shot in the back
and killed in Harlem, a wave of nausea swept the city. It suf-
fered a crisis of confidence in itself a crisis of belief in the
city's capacity to deal with the berserk terrorists without going
vigilantlst in the process.
Everyone is against killing cops everyone, that is, except
the cop killers, and everyone except those who wouldn't do it
themselves but in whose hearts little fires are lit when they read
that someone else has done it because they feel cops are
"fascist pigs." If you are going to speak out against kiHing cops,
you. must speak out against these little fires and the emotional
climate in which they thrive.
MM US PTJT AN end to this mindless killing of cops, but
put an end also to the ever-present granary of hatred and hating
of cops which feed the flames that finally produce these fciUings.
It is being said now in Now York, and other cities where cops
are being killed, that it' is just "plain and simple murder." True,
it is murder, but not quite so plain nor quite so simple.
An individual who kills someone he knows, out of a murder
impulse, doesn't infect others. But someone who kill* a cop
doesn't kill anyone he knows, against whom he nourishes a
grievance; he kills a category the way Hitler's storm troop-
ers did, the way lynchcrs in the South used to. the way the ter-
a category thinks he is a hero and basks in his belief that he had
somehow tapped a pipeline to history or justice,
rorist kidnappers did just the other day in Turkey. Whoever kills
He sparks the same impulse in others, and he gets support
from them, including many who would not themselves kill.
POLICE COM.MIsslo.NFli MURPHY, himself one of the
best of cops, says the killings are "undoubtedly the work of mod-
men." To call them madmen, bums, punks Ls one way of stripping
them of the mystique of "revolution" in which they try to
clothe themselves.
It is important to strip these murderers of their revolutionary
mystique. But I go further; it is important to strip revolution it-
self of the mystique of being somehow above the standards of
law, morality and language that bind mere eathlings to the
society and each other. I am not speaking now of toughs and
killers. There are presumably gentle people who seem sensitive
and tender but who feel that if destructive deeds are done for
the revolution whether black or white they are shriven
of guilt and washed in the blood of the Leninist or Maofet lam*
Epithets of "fascist pigs" and "racist pigs" may be uttered
in hysteria, or in cold calculation, but the collective violence we
call revolution cannot succeed unless it has first broken down
the necessary sense of confidence between police and the people.
25. i 71 hard-core revolutionaries mean to break down.
Don t let them.
fit o?nS.TS ft* T"E POLICE Edwa"1 J Ki<. ad a
SI L u n 7" ~ dUbtloSS a fit of union electloneer-
Ifwi, n C" hC advteed |,0,icc ,hy had *8* ** P*-
on the beat* ^ *"* with h*Buns. Riding shotgun
lions later. """^ "" ShtinK "" "* "K qucs-
easil^heeoZ I"11' 'inP WU,d inVO'Ve ,h PMce in "*** *
easily become a race war, with black cops and local black ci-
vilians caught in the middle. I, would give credibility to-the ... -
racism. ^^ ^ *" ^^^ charge of
Nor j if a solution (as some well-meaning people advocate)
haveUThe b^ks1',01 2 *? *"* ^5KS
na e the blacks in Harlem run their own police system The
C" nd 'oft.?""1 CrinU' ""ly W* who died at
Pigs' wit h1(r.,San,He,n'0riStS WWU '* kilUHl as "*** T<
pigs who had betrayed their race
uevesthat both the cop. ilI1(1 the citj ,lc.Si.m. fl W[Uv ^^


Friday. June 11, 1971
~ n<* n-r/rfifrv
Page S
^^^^^^M^MM^^OM scene around
............iVi'i rtWuvyiMU:
A Jowly relaxed evening at Florette and Dave Aranows
hrought out a large group of their friends. For the Aranows It
was a brief stopover between vacations; it seems as they have
done a bit of traveling these last few months. The weather
was delightful and their outdoor porch was breezy and cool
While we all munched on goodies we wandered around and spoke
to Elly and Herb Katz and Nancy and Norman Atkin about a
possible trip to Israel that Herb and Norm may make if they
with Jan Grossman who reported that her daughter Barbara
can break away. Another conversation about Israel was
and Barbara's husband, Dr. Martin Beckerman, have just fin-
ished five months in the intensive Hebrew program which is
required before you are allowed to work there. Jan says they
love it there. Other guests at the Aranow's included Sylvia
and Milton Graditor. Shirley and Abe Fishier (Abe had been
so busy all that day that he hadn't even taken time out to eat)
Ann andAl Yorra, Marilyn and Paul Anton, Joan and Eddie
Saltzman, Elsie and Dave Spechler, Tony and Louise Ledner.
Lois and Dick Solomon, Anita and Stan Kessel, Gloria and Stan
Greenspurr Gloria said that she and Stan expect to take
their daughter DceDee. on a trip to Europe this summer. .
*r -to
The same lovely weekend included another delightful din-
ner this one was served on Dorothy and Jesse Fine's patio.
There were just a few of us Cinde and Jesse Martin, Natalie
and Herb Heiden. Dorothy and Jesse, their daughter Norma
and Scott Fuerst (Florence and Howard's boy). Herb Hei-
den toW us that he is playing tennis almost dally now and has
put in two new couits at his Heiden House resort hotel up in
the Oatskills He'll need extra hours of tennis and Dorothy
will need extra hours of her Yoga after that calorie filled din-
ner she served two different kinds of pie, yet! !
fr -r ft
BITS AXD riKC'KS Eating lunch on" day (I guess they
eat every day but anyway .) we saw the Feinberg men,
father, Peter and his two good looking sons bet they were
lalking over new building projects. Also saw Ritchie Levine
and Charlotte Rosenthal and I know what they were discussing
- Charlotte's new job managing the Celeste Shop at the new
Diplomat Mall. Also met Mona Hotchkiss, who reported
she has become a tennis buff. Later the same day, we saw
Mona's son, Peter, with David Kline in the lobby of the Home
Federal Building, and Met Charlotte Ingalls on Tyler Street (her
first day back from vacation, Charlotte told me). She stayed
right at home and I can imagine she found plenty to do with her
time oft.
ft -it ir
Spent some time with Ed Wentworth, Editor of the Sun
Tattler, who had just returned from Israel. He was real
enthusiastic about the country he must have shown me 100
pictures taken there. But he was upset that some of his slides
had been lost en route for he is planning on giving a group of
lectures with a slide presentation Several of the local
organizations have already asked him to appear so watch for
him I'm sure he will have an interesting approach.
ft ft ft
Sid Panzer, former promotion manager of the New York
Daily Mirror, tells me that the National Enquirer is moving its
nth-" operation down to this area. Two other Daily Mirror alum-
ni, Selig and Adler, are prominent on the staff of this paper.
ft ft ft
With all the weddings taking place at this time of the year,
I'm about as close to one as one can be without being a partici-
pant because I'm a hajipy mother of a groom-to-be. Last week-
end I hosted a little party for my son. Buddy, and his girl, Fran
Renis ... A group of my friends joined me in wishing the
youngsters well. I was glad that Dorothy and Mac Kline, Doro-
thy and Jesse Fine, Sue and Harry Permesly, Abbey and Reuben
Klein. Natalie and Herb Heiden, Ann and Al Yorra, Bobby and
Wick Greene, Naomi and Stan Kurash, and a host of others
could make it ... I hope it was fun ... I enjoyed it anyway.
ft ft ft
Sam Perry and his wife have just been appointed public re-
lations chairmen for Temple Sinai by Jacob Mogilowitz, president
of the temple. Rose, who Is immediate past president of the
Sisterhood, Is now a member of the temple's board, one of the
few women so honored in its history.
c
\tu {calendar
omrnum
SATURDAY, WNt 12
Siitortiood Temple Beth El Dinner Dome P.M. TempU Beth it
ruiSDAr, unit is
Ho4$oJi-Hallandale Branch Meeting, NeM, HathmeMn Homo
Federal Bldg.
WfDNfSDAY, WNt 1
Hodossah Hollywood Branch Mooting 1 P.M. Hollywood Home
Federal Building.
Broward Zionist District Mooting I P.M., Temple Sinai.
TUlSDAY, 1UNI 22
Hadatiah, Hollywood Branch Mooting 10 A.M. Hollywood Homo
Federal Building
THURSDAY, WNt 24
CHAI Lodge Meeting 8:30 P.M., Hallandale Home Federal Building
JOSEPH ALSQP
Continued from Poge 4
Gomaa did must be taken as
meaning that he was a full-
fledged, knowing and consent-
ing agent of Soviet power.
And the same must obviously
bo said of a good number of
President Sadat's other enemies.
IN KKALITY, in short, Egypt
came close to being a subject
country before the near-revolu-
tion that President Sadat has so
boldly achieved. But it will he
surprising indeed if he has man-
aged to remove more than half
of the Soviet-contrived wiring,
both electronic and human, in-
cluding human wiring in the
all-important army.
So there is Sadat, who has
begun to pull out the Soviet wir-
ing, whose dealings with the
Americans are also known, word
by word, to Egypt's recent mas-
ters in Moscow. Thus the ques-
tion asked before in this space
becomes extra-vivid now. The
question is, what will the Soviets
do now?
Hebrew Department Will
Inaugurate 4-Year Program
Temple Beth El's Hebrew De-
partment will inaugurate a four-
year program this fall, enrolling
children who will reach the age of
nine by December whose parents
are members in good standing.
Religious School registiation
will be held Sunday, Aug. 29; the
oiiening Hebrew and Religious
School sessions are scheduled for
Saturday, Sept. 11, and Sunday,
Sept. 12.
Wir Do We Call Orsel.es
PANTS
SPECIALISTS
lecaiiM to Ire.
Our harllaaa kw km loll.,In, f
J aaaratlan>. W. k... aur #wn
w.rk.h., la Miami.
Wa kMw haw i. Hi a|| -,,,. w.
arry kaaairaaa laWici. Oar frtc-
i far tOfcMtl fan 11
Start at Itt.aj
PANTS KING
380 JOUTIt STATE ROAD T
Wtll Hallywaad ShaaMna Plot.
DAILY 10* iUN IJ
SSI "55
Hillel Day School Holding
'Open House' Event Sunday
Hillel Community Day School,
which serves North Dade and
South Broward residents at 1725
Monroe St.,- Hollywood, has set
aside a special day to invite the
entire Jewish community to visit
its classes and see it in operation.
Its "Open House"' will take place
on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The purpose of the "Open House"'
is to acquaint the community with
its accomplishments and goals. The
program will consist of tours of
the classes, visits with the teach-
ers and a panel discussion on 'The
Hillel Challenges and Oppor-
tunities."
Featured panelists include Rab-
bi Simon Murciano. principal of
the school, who holds a Master's
degree in Education Administra-
tion from the University of Pitts-
burgh; North Dade orthopedic
surgeon Dr. Joel B. Dennis, the
school's president; Rabbi Max A.
Lipschitz, spiritual leader of Beth
Torah Congregation and a mem-
ber of its Board of Rabbis; and
Abraham J. Gittelson, educational
director or Beth Torah Congrega-
tion and a member of the Educa-
tional Committee.
One of the newest additions to
the Board of Rabbis, Rabbi
Shmaryahu T. Swirsky. who is
Professor of History at Miami-
Dade Junior College and Rabbi of
Beth Jacob Congregation. Miami
Beach, will be among the honored
guests.
The Committee of Parent-Host-
esses will include Mrs. Murray
Kane, Mrs. Michael Scheck, Mr.
Ben Oenad, Mrs. Joshua Wein
berg, Mrs. Rudolph Mann, Mrs
Kenneth Calmenson, Mrs. William
Wotowitz, Mrs. Joel B. Denni*
Mrs. Lee Duff nor, Mrs. Brend;
Baron, Mrs. Meron Levitats, anri
Mrs. Meh/yn Drucker. With ttx
teachers' help, these Hostesses wil
conduct tours of the classroom^
and attempt to answer all ques-
tions concerning the school.
Information will be available re-
carding the classes that will star'
in September (nursery and sev-
enth grade) as well as the pre>-
cnt grades. Mrs. Harvey Baxtc
and Mrs. Morton B. Zemel ar.
serving as chairmen of the Open
House.
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2337



Page 6
JmMftcrkffan
Friday. June 11. 1971 0ndol
A Bar Mitzvah taking place outdoors at the
site of the Wailing Wall was photographed
ED WEHTWORTH REPORTS
'Survival Means Sacrifice'
Motto Is Taken Seriously
Continued From Page 1
Israel, I suppose. But I don't al-
ways feel that way. I have my
family in America, and my son.
It's not easy for a woman alone.
It's easier for a married couple."
Mr. and Mrs. N'oah Cnodes, 22
pnd 21, also of Los Angeles. He
claimed to be a graduate of the
University of Colorado at Boulder
and a student of atmospheric phys-
ics. He said he was not pleased
with the amount of money he
could make in Israel but that he
fcad c.ime because he and his wife
were disillusioned about the United
States and because they had met
with anti-Semitism in the United
States.
We also interviewed Chana Gor-
tlon (not her real name, from
Riga. U.S5.R.:
Question "Will you tell us
how you got out of Russia?"
Answer "It was very diffi-
cult. I waited for a year and a
half. When I arranged for my
documents, I was a teacher in a
school and there were meetings in
the school. There were 503 teach-
ers in the town and they called me
an enemy of the Soviet Union and
said that I haven't the right to be
a teacher anymore. They did every-
thing to have me leave my work
... I finally succeeded in my
pleas to Moscow and came to
Israel ... I still think about my
little town (in Russia!, the streets
the people, the books, the cinema,
but I don't think about the coun-
try. We Russians can never go
back. This is our place and we
must be here. There is no way to
go back."
Question "Do your friends
have hopes of getting out?"
Answer "Some of them don't
want to get out It is not all
that easy tD change one's world.
From the beginning, I felt like a
cat who is thrown into the water
and can't swim. Here in Israel it
was difficult. But now I am ac-
customed to the people; to the
ways. At first I was afraid to
speak because in Russia you don't
have the right to meet or speak
with a foreigner.
'I was the first teacher in my
town who had the courage to an-
nounce my intentions to come to
Israel. I had been working at my
school for 12 years. When I was
about to leave, not one of the
teachers, the Jewish teachers,
came to say goodbys none of
the 15 teachers. Later I wrote
them a letter and I said I was
not offended. I only pity them be-
cause they, too, didn't come."
During 1971 an estimated 50,000
new immigrants are expected to
come to Israel. It will cost the
government $1 million a day to
absorb them.
Obviously, with the bulk of
Israel's tax dollars going to the
military, most of the money for
handling immigrants and for other
needs must come through outside
sources, notably the United Jew-
ish Appeal.
The Jewish Agency's unofficial
proposed budget for 1971-72 is
$573,452,220 a huge sum.
If the determination shown thus
far in the short history of the free
state of Israel is any indicator,
however, the goal will be reached.
As they say, "Survival Means
Sacrifice."
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DELCO CONSTRUCTION CORP.
A DIVISION OF M. J. DELLAPORTA, INC.
WE ALSO RUILD ON YOUR LOT .
5809 PLUNKETT ST.
HOLLYWOOD
Mrs. William P. Rogers enjoyed a first hand view of
a modern day care center in Israel while her hus-
band, the U.S. Secretary of State, participated in the
recent Middle-East diplomatic peace talks in that
country. Here, she meets with the young residents
of Neve Taf, a children's home sponsored by Pioneer
Women in Tel Aviv for the children of working moth-
ers.
Announcing .
Drive Your Car Service
RENT AN
EXPERT DRIVER
GO WHERE YOU WANT TO GO-
WHEN YOU WANT TO GO IN
THE PRIVACY AND COMFORT
OF YOUR OWN CAR.
GO DIRECT, LESSEN TENSION,
ELIMINATE DRIVING OR
PARKING WORRIES.
RATES-------ON REOUEST
LET US DRIVE U INC
Phone Hollywood 920-6262
Moiling Address P.O. Box 200, Hollywood, Florida 33020
Every Drh/tr Is Covered By Workmen's
Compensation Insurance
JOE R0TTMAN. Preside*


kiddy, June 11. 1971
*-kmistncrMiM7
Page 7
OUR TOWN
by bobbe sclilesinger
Greetings and Farewells
When Jackie and Marcus Zbar eive an inti-
mate little dinner party they do it with style.
Here's their recipe for success: Take a Me-
morial Day weekend eve, add delicious food,
mix with gay music and blend with just the right
amount of congenial folk. It can't miss.
Enjoying the magnifico Zbar hospitality wore
attorney Paul Anton and his attractive red-
headed spouse, Maralyn; Dr. Dick and Shirley
iViiwI; and those four eye-catching blondes,
Audrey Finder, Iris Crane, Ann Sounders and
Barb Miller with their respective spouses. Dr.
Dick, Dr. George, Dr. Norman and Mr. James
Foxx. The Sultan clan was well represented: Ca-
mille and L*on, Fred and Henrietta and sister
Rachel Arrak, a gal most definitely on the Bar
Mitzvah circuit. She recently flow in from her
home in Caracas, Venezuela to attend young
Jack Sultan's (Leon and Camille's son) Bar Mitz-
vah and will be leaving for New York with Ca-
mille for another such celebration in honor of
still another nephew's big day.
Dr. Joseph Hopen brought his SeJma who, in-
cidentally, looked terrific. No doubt due to the
vacation at King's Bay in Freeport from which
they recently returned (or, could it be all those
superb exercise workouts conducted by Barbara
Bessey at the Sea Air Towers, Selma?) Dave
Vorra and Lenny Romanek wore "bacheloring-
it-up" for the evening. Seems Teddy Romanek
is visiting with her mom in Houston, Texas. Dave
just returned from New York where he and Lila
attended a wedding. Mrs. Y stayed on for a few
more days to do that very thing at which we gals
are expert shopping! According to Dave, Lila's
cleaning out the goodies at Bergdorf Goodman's
and Lord and Taylor's.
Most of the party chatter centered on the
Memorial Day weekend departure plans. Dr.
Paul and Ruth Rodensky were off to the Regency
in Atlanta for a yisit,witti Paul'*brother. Get-
ting together on departure times were the five
gents leaving on the Pequard for a 4-day men-
only fishing trip, to Cay Sals, the privately
owned island of Howard Hughes. No doubt
there'll be some pretty tall fish stories about the
one that got away from Fred Sultan. Leon Sul-
tan, Dr. George Crane, Dr. Don Barman and my
better half, Shelly. Meanwhile, huddled in ex-
cited conversation was the group leaving for
that grand and glorious skin-diver's paradise.
Grand Cayman, in the British West Indies: Dr.
l>ee and Marian Eggnatz, Mike and Mietto Burn-
stein, Dr. Bob and Mi mi Sabra, Dr. Alan and
Ertelle Podis and Dr. Norman and Ann Satmd-
ers (to be joined by their respective young'uns).
The Zbars and family will also be part of the
group of underwater adventurers. Marcus is more
than well qualified as an expert in that field.
He's been diving since he was a youngster. Al-
though wife Jackie's prowess in the underwater
world might leave something to be desired, she
certainly can't be topped in the party-throwing
field as far and away the most charming hostess
with the mostes* It was some party. And
there's every indication 'twill be quite a vaca-
tion to boot.
A Smash Hit
"Everything You Always Wanted to Know
About Temple Beth El Sunday School But Wore
Afraid to Ask" was the title of the original play
presented by the members of the sixth grade
class of Temple Beth El. The occasion was
Awards Day for scholastic and attendance
achievements and the auditorium was packed
with students and proud parents to see it all.
The clever and satirical play was written by
Lisa Demet. Jeff Dtckstetn, Sandy Goldman,
lodi Gruder, Mitch Howell, Ann Morton and
Julio YVcinMcin. Superb acting kudos go to
Mitch Hmvell. lletb Atkin, Stove Ldppman.
Korea RodensUy, Kerry Bumstcin, Karen Rob-
bins, Leslie CornfelU, Jo.li Sandier, Keith Ben-
nett. L.ttv Wolf, scott SchlesinKer and Stanley
Silver.
Some of the mommas and poppas spotted in
the audience beaming from ear to car wore Ruth
Rodensky. Roz Bennett. Judy Lippnutn. Lila
Demet, Mickey and Mike Sieg.il, Marcia Silver,
Abbe and Rubin Klein, NaOOJ Atkin, Gene Har-
ris, Joe and Lois Biegelson, Ji|| and Dick Trm-
lak. Dr. Bob and Judy < ornfeld and Pete and
Dodie Weinstoin.
Congratulations to all the award winners.
And, if you're looking for a strictly honest review
and critique of the original play and its partici-
pants, this writer (the mother of one of the par-
ticipants) can give you a strictly unbiased, un-
prejudiced and objective view It was terrific!
Comings and Goings
Gert Kluehin filling in neighbor, Esther Vy-
ner, on the exciting three-week tour of Israel
from which Gert and hubby, Ben, recently re-
turned.
Suntanned, rested and splendid looking was
Bohbi (Mrs. Norman) Landman after her "marv"
weekend at the Brittania Hotel in Paradise
Island, Nassau. Comprising the vacationing group
joining the Landmans for the delightful time of
tennis, boating and all those fun things one does
on a beach-type vacation were Dr. Harvey and
Barb Peretz, Sandy and hubby, Dr. Howard
Kellner (ho, a hit in funky red, white and blue
travelin' shoes). Stan and Barbara Berk. Sonny
and Betty Ftnkelstein and Dr. Lou and Natalie
Jobktve, A marvelous gourmet Italian spot
brought the group back for a second eve of gas-
tronomical delights "Villa do Este" is the
name, for any of you Paradise Island bound.
People and Places
Ann Pollard and Carolyn Castor doing the
coiffure bit at Rose and Clark's beauty estab-
lishment. Squeezing in some fast grocery
buys after a long hard day on the tennis courts
was Carl Lord's pretty-as-a-picturc wife. Sue,
. Annette Milloff spotted breezing through
the Noiman-Marcus establishment. If a buying
spree was her intent, the lady couldn't have
chosen a better place. ... Dr. BIU Richman
with liance, Anna Marie Olshin. among the many
Metropolitan Dinner Club Members on hand at
Pier 66 in Fort Lauderdalc to hear the most
eloquent J. Lewis Powell expound on the Col-
lapse of Time.
Judge Jay J. Simons and wife, Nancy, do-
lighting in the discovery of a simply "fab" newly-
opened dining spot in Plantation. The name Cafe
Don Juan. They were beaten to the punch in
their find, however. For, seated when they en-
tered were Dr. George and Eleanor Marnolen, Dr.
Harvey and Barb Pereto, and in another corner,
Ansel and Ida Wittonstehn. Doesn't take too lone.
for word to spread about superbo dining.
Hear tell Natalie (Mrs. Norman) Bluth look-
ed fetching at the Hollywood Dental Wives
Luncheon held at Emerald Hills Country Club
sporting a red linen skirt, white turtlenee* top
and white gladiator shoes.
Heartest Congrats to Dr. Richard and Sosan
Pyne on the birth of their new daughter, EKsu-
beth ... a lovely new sister for their 1% year
old. Jennifer. And, on the subject of coeeiWtulii-
tions, huge ones to the Sultans, Lean and C-
mille, on the splendid Bar Mitzvah performance
of their son. Jack at Teniple Sinai. A grand
party with hundreds of friends and relatives
celebrated the occasion at the Algiers Hotel. A
fabulous evening for one and all.
LE CAFE DE PARIS
TWO OF FLORIDA'S FINEST AUTHENTIC
V CONTINENTAL FRENCH FOOD RESTAURANTS
llMfctM ft DiRMf
Pits Yiar **
W-ZOQfrytciTiPfiwa&Mitcrt
Far Ratamtlw Call
523-2900 927-9724
XM I. Pasta Bch. *** *** Qi-C
m
Film Is Featured At JFS Meeting
One thousand years of Jewish
life in Poland was the subject o'
"The I^ast Chapter," a film mr-
ratcd by folk singer T.ieodor*
Bikol, shown at the recent moot-
ing of Jewish Family Service. The
movie showed the difficult life
endured by Polish Jews who suf-
fered through prejudice, pogroms
and Nazi domination.
The audience was visibly 01 \ 1
by the shocking treatment Jews
n ceived in such places as the War-
saw ghetto. Stunned silence follow-
ed the lust reel of the picture at
movie-goers realized the prejudice
I hi.\ saw on the screen was stil1
going on in Poland today.
The meeting also featured tin
elocllon .mil tlv installation of
officers oi .Jewish Family Services
foi the coming year.
Chai Lodge Presents
Brotherhood Awards
The Anti-Defamation I-eaguc of
Chai Lodqc of B'nai B'rith pre-
sented Brotherhood awards tro-
ihies to three higCi schools in Holly-
wood recently. The winners were
chosen by their classmates and
teachers.
Two different organizations
shared the award for South Brow-
ard High School the Anchor
Club and the school's Human Re-
lations Committee. Awards also
went to the Hollywood Hills High
School's Human Relations Com-
mittee and to McArthur High
School's senior class.
Groundbreaking Set By
Hallandale Jewish Center
The Jewish community of the
City of Hallandale will add a new
page to its history Sunday with a
groundbreaking ceremony for the
first Jewish temple ever to be con-
structed there.
The 10:30 a.m. ceremonies will
take place at NE 8th Avenue and
lth Court, off Hallandale Beach
Boulevard north of the Bank of
Hallandale. The entire community
has been invited to share in the
occasion; the program which has
been arranged will include music
and refreshments. (In case of rain
the ceremonies will be postponed
one week, to Sunday, June 20.)
ROOF PAINTING
VINYL ASBESTOS PLASTIC SPRAYED ON ROOF.
Waterproofs Will Mot Mildew
Insulates Will Not Fungus
WE ALSO BUILD NEW
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a sM**sasjBjBaBmmBB>>>*:
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on Roofs t Walls
IROWARD
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INTERNATIONAL
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1309 S. State Rd. 7 (441)
Hollywood
THE RAG BAG
6508 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. (Opposite McArthur High)
Phone 961-0580
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For Beautiful People
NEW SHIPMENTS DAILY
SILKY ARNEL JERSEY PRINTS, POLYESTER DOUBLE KNITS
BONDED ORLON ACRYLICS, KEY WEST PRINTS
SLINKY KNIT CHAVEZETTE, DACRON WOOL SUITING
KETTLE CLOTH
Jl YARD (Value to $10 yard)
WOW! PANNE' Amel and Nylon Spring Shades
PANTS SUITS $5
INCLUDING MATERNITY NfW STYLES JUST ARRIVED
Value to $20.00
FLEA MARKET
Saturday Only On Our Sidewalk
I brml\ '
^iJe-Jjif-^ide J-ashicns
at University Drive and Taft Street
FOR THE LADIES
POLYESTER PANTSWTS
FOR THE MEN
DOUBLE KNITS
with this Adi $1.00 towards any purchase
on our already lower prices
Open It AM.-10 PJM. Daily
PANTSUITS-BLOUSBS4LACKS | SUITS-COATS-SLACKS-SHIRTS


Page 8
let%l*ttl Friday, June 11, 197]
PERSONALITY PROFILE
Abe Salter
"I haven't too much time to
talk. M I'm due at a Jewish Fam-
ily Service meeting. Anyway, liow
about concentrating on some of '
the other men who do so much."
said Abo Salter when approached
about his many contributions to
the life of this community.
In spite of his modesty, one can
not rightfully overlook Abraham
J. Salter, for he has been a de-
voted man devoted to civic
causes, and to Jewish causes
and with all this still giving his
full share of devotion to his
family.
"It's h-ird to look back on life
and find the answers." Abe de-
clared. "I guess our family was
always interested in their fellow
human beings. My father was a
leader and we were brought up
in a background where we wore
accustomed to hearing alx>ut the
needs of the community, the world
and our fellow man.
"Through ihe years, my wife
Sylvia, my brother, Ben. and now
my daughters have been interested
in doing for others. Deborah, my
oldest daughter, served in the
Peace Corps after college gradua-
tion and Linda has just finished
a two year period of teaching
English in Japan."
His devotion to his family is
apparent for he constantly re-
fers to his wife and daughters. He
and Sylvia met in Brooklyn
their families were friends. They
were married in 1941 after he had
graduated from City College of
New York and earned his degree
in Accountancy from New York
University Graduate School of
Business.
War service dining World War
11 interrupted his career, and when
that was over, he and Sylvia de-
cided to find a different environ-
ment for their two little girls.
Abe's brother, Ben had come to
Hollywood on vacation and had
liked it so well that he had de-
cided to settle here; so with his
urging. Abe and Sylvia joined
him. It was a small town then
and the kind of community they
were looking for to build their
POSITION WANTED
Bar-Bat Mitzvah and Hebrew teoch-
er. Baal tfillah for High Holidays.
Reads the Torah. Knows how to
organize and administer Temple
business. Yeshiva trained. Call
983-6-140-evenings.
ABE SALTER
lives and to iai.se their daughters.
From the time of his arrival,
Abe Salter became an involved
man. In the forefront of his in-
terests was Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration where he served and
continues to serve on the execu-
tive committee. Currently a vice
president, he is active in its cam-
paigns in addition to utilizing his
fiscal abilities in the management
of the organization! Two years
ago he was the winner of the cov-
eted "Man of the Year" award.
He has used his talents and ca-
pabilities on many other fronts as
well. He joined Temple Sinai, and
through the years he performed
almost every official function there.
When Temple Beth Shalom emerg-
ed, h^ joined that congregation
and eventually became its presi-
dent.
When the Hollywood Commis-
sion on Jewish Education was
formed as part of the Bureau of
Jewish Education, Abe was made-
its chairman, a position he held
until just recently. He has been
a member of the Board of Jewish
Family Service and is a member of
the Board of the Jewish Home for
the Aged.
Although Mr. Salter speaks of
turning over the reins to other
men. it is difficult to picture him
not taking part in any good work
that is to be done. As he says, his
family really doesn't know any
other way of life. And it's good to
know that Be continues to give of
his talent, knowledge and r
enee to everything worthwhil
Hadassah Chapter
Holds Installation
When the Holly wood Chapter of
Hadassah held its annual installa-
tion meeting at the Home Federal
recently, the presidents and board
memlxrs of all six of the groups
now associated with the Chapter
aii prVsJ'nf.'
The Chapter presently includes
a new. still-to-bo-named group in
Miramar and the Hillcrest. Henri-
etta S/old. Shalom, Beach and
Mt. Scopus Groups
Mrs. A. J. Salter was Installed
as president of the Chapter. Vice
presidents include Mrs. Frances
Briefer, organizational; Mrs. Mau-
ry Taylor, fund raising; Mrs. Har-
ry Bagdan, program; Mrs. Archie
Kamer, membership, and Mrs.
Samuel Scheinbaum. educational.
Also taking the oath of office wore
Mrs. Irving London, treasurer;
Mrs. George Robinson, financial
secretary; Mrs. Abraham Pallant,
recording secretai"y and Mrs. Mel-
vin Freodman, corresponding sec-
retary.
si Million Is Goal
Of B.B. Campaign
WASHINGTON (JTA) One
million dollars Ls the goal of a spe-
cial B'nai B'rith fund drive honor-
ing Or. William A. Wexler as ho
winds up his sixth and final year
as president.
The pur[>ose of the fund is to
sustain expansion in B'nai B'rith
youth programs inaugurated dur-
ing Or. Wexler's tenure. Contribu-
tions will help overcome the fund-
raising difficulties created by the
current economic recession, and
will play a major role in achieving
I 'nai R'rith's 1971 goal of $7.5
million for youth services.
ENGLISH, MATH, SOCIAL
STUDIES, SCIENCE TEACHERS
Sept. 1971
Private School, Small Classes,
Certified & Experienced Teachers
HRltt DAY SCHOOL 922-34*4
BEFORE YOU
BUY... SELL... TRADE
Free Professional Analysis
Contact
GORDON D. McMANN
Realtor
Efficient Dependable Service
Established 1059
1115 Wiley 6130 Hollywood Blvd.
Wf-2366 964-7600
SELTZER
SERVICE
CALL 989-7447
(evenings)

NEED A CAPTAIN?
International Yachtsmen* Afto*
elation dadicotad to boat-
ing solcty. IYA It a member
of the American Boot and
Yocht Council ond Yocht
Safety Bureau.
IYA regulur members are ex-
perienced professional cap-
tain .. The owner who selects
on IYA captain is indeed en-
hancing the safety factor a-
board hri vessel.
Coll 583 7078
INDIAN ttTVU FRUIT
TROPICAL JEUItS
CANDItS
FANCY FRUIT BOXES
ORANGt BlOSSOm HONEY
GLAZED FRUIT
Bonded Gift Fruit
Shippers
Mail Order
1809 WILEY STREET
Opposite Breedings Parking Lot
Hollywood, Fla. 33020
PHONE 927-5447
LET US DRIVE U INC.
RENT-A-DRIVER on trips to airports, shopgjng, race tracks, dinner
and other places!
GO WHERE YOU WANT TO GO WHEN YOU WANT TO GO in
the privacy and comfort of your own car!
GO DIRECT LESSEN TENSION .Eliminate taxi, driving or park-
ing worries.
AVOID TIME AND LUGGAGE PROBLEMS, extra fares, car rental
expense!
DINNER-GOING is leisurely when you're chauffeured.
Carefree, too!
OUR DRIVERS drive your car anywhere, anytime!
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 200, Hollywood, Fla.
M.M.
Maurh Moves
Campaign Chairman
Apartments Division
of Jewish
Welfare Federation
says

Edward Dincin, a year-round resident ol Gulfstream Garden
Apartments, Ls building chairman for one of three buildings in
hLs complex.
In early January at Ed's urging, we brought the message of
the Federation and the L'.J.A. to the residents of his bulMint;
for the first time. It was an afternoon program attended mostly
by the moml>ers of the Ladies Social Club who gave us their
meeting for a platform.
In February, Ed, who had been in Israel several times pre-
viously, including a 3-year stint as an engineer under the British
Mandate, went to Israel for a week-long U.J.A mission.
He reported to his friends and neighbors about his trip in
the Home Federal Building, complete with lavish refreshments
courtesy of Eddie and his charming wife, Renee.
Not completely satisfied that the message of the campaign
and the urgency of the needs had reached all hLs neighbors,
Eddie was able to prevail upon the Men's Social Club to make
the community room available for an April showing of some
new U.J.A. films. The final meeting was enthusiastically received
by over 200 people.
Because Israel and its people mean so much to Eddie and
his wife, they will be returning for an extended visit in July.
Short of going yourself, a great way to get a personal slant
on life in Israel is to talk to Hnllandale's own unofficial ambas-
sador, Eddie Dincin.
We wish Mr. and Mrs. Dincin a wonderful trip and know
they'll be delighted to share their experiences with you upon
their return.
Bon Voyage to the Dincins!
-SALE a-
ROOF & SCREEN
ENCLOSURES
LIMITED TIME ONLY
All Aluminum Roof
Gutters Downspouts Included
Fiberglass Screen Included
Meets South Florida's Bldg. Code
* Installation Extra
HUGE 20'xlO' %CAQ*
Regular $798.00 040
PHONE HOLLYWOOD 961-1641
Fort Lauaerdale
584-774*
Sole Ena>
June 15. If71
SAL'S
ALES
ERVICE
5965 Lee St., Hollywood Ph. 961-1641
AIRPORTS SHOPPING
SPORTING EVENTS
Our driver will come to your front door; help load your luggage,
and take you to your destination.
Your car is returned to your garage for you by the same capable
driver.
He will stand ready to meet you on your return.
RATES* Miami Airport Ft. Lauderdale
Hollywood $6.00 $4.00
Rate includes one-half (Vz) hour free standing time additional
standing time, $3.00 per hour. Policy is to favor the customer
m computing charge. All incoming planes, trains and ships are
checked in advance for delays at no extra cost; courtesy calls
are placed to concerned parties informing them of deteye.
Please contact us for rates from your area, if they do not appear
fcoor To Door Convenient. Ptu. aoonomv
RENTA-DRIVER ANYWHERE, ANYTIME
STANDARD TRIP RATE
$4.00/hr. for first four (4) hours;
3.00/hr. for each additional hour
SPECIAL EVENING RATE
3.50/hr. (Minimum of 4 hr.)
LONG DISTANCE RATES ^ ,_,,
COMMERCIAL DELIVERY RATES on request
MONTHLY CONTRACT Minimum of 20 hours service a month at
53.30 per hour. Hours in excess of 20 at $3.00 per hour.
Every Driver Is Covered By Workmen's Compensation Insurance
LET US DRIVE U INC.
Hollywood 930-6262
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 200, Hollywood, Fla.
______ JOEL ROTTMAN, President


(day. June 11. 1971
+Jewish fkridHar
Page 9
i
. .: .iu-

SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
'Be-Ha-A-Lot-Echa'
"And the I-ord spoke unto Moses, saying, Speak unto Aaron
land say unto him, when thou lightest the lamps ." (Chapters
|viii-xin ,
DEDICATION OF THE LKVITES: Aaron was entrusted
I with the duty of arranging the seven lamps of the Menorah so
that the light projected forwards. Before formally entering upon
II In ir duties the Levites underwent a ceremony of purification by
I (Lansing themselves and their garments, and were presented
t>y Moses to the whole community. Within the tabernacle itself,
various symbolic acts were carried out which signified the dedi-
cation of the Levites to their sacred service.
DEPARTURE FROM SINAI: Whenever the doud arose from
the tabernacle, it was the signal for the camp to continue its
journey. Moses was commanded to have two silver trumpets
made, the sounding of which also gave the signal to march; they
were used, in addition, to summon the whole congregation to
the sanctuary, to sound the alarm before battle and to proclaim
JoyOUS occasions such as festivals and the new moons. After a
stay of almost a year, the lifting of the cloud gave the signal for
the Israelites" departure.
JEALOUSY OF AARON AND MIRIAM: At Hazeroth, the
next halting place, Miriam and Aaron spoke slightingly of
i Moses because he had married a Cushite woman, and claimed
[equal authority since they, too, had received Divine inspiration.
I Moses, a man of great humility, remained silent, but God de-
[scended in a pillar of cloud and called Aaron and Miriam to the
Jtabernacle. where He rebuked them for their presumption.
Though Divine revelations were sometimes made to other pro-
Iphcts through visions of dreams, Moses' position was unique,
Isince he was the only person to whom God directly revealed His
(will. When the cloud departed, Miriam was infected with lep-
Jrosy and Aaron, after confessing his error, pleaded with Moses
I for their sister's recovery. Miriam, healed after the intercession
lot" Moses, was isolated outside the camp for seven days, the ;
{minimum period for the isolation of the leper, before being re-
admitted to the community.
After this, the camp moved to the Wilderness of Paran.
,,.,.. .... ii,. ........ irvmwfflw km it. rx: i:rc:'f..- ff" -"i "'i '' *&
MdMaMMMUManManAnuaHNiBBaiaiMHMNMMMa
itiiUUMItuilim i ;-i!u;i |. .,, .... ,i.n.vi<
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wmimmm,W*WKmm\Mmimw**m*n**fiwn*mMmto\
Ml M BB I.....|
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Services
MAUANOMI
M.LANDALB JEWISH CENT*
\\2t N. E. 1 Av. *
H0UYW0O0
iTH EL (TEMPLE) 1S51 S. 14 AV
laform. Rabbi 8*ml Jaffa. a
hldny 8:13 p.m. I>r. Jaft> will cn-
lii a "Teach-lir on "The Kthluv of
Fathers" H Saturday 11 a.m.
. Mitzvnh: Hlovon Wafcnatein, wn
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Welnsteln. Jr.
SHALOM (TEMPLfV 1/
onroa St. ConaarvaUva KaM
orton Malavaky. Cantor Irvlaf
lold.
IAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johnton St
konaarvativa.- Rabbi Oavid Shapira
tantor Yahodah Hailbraun.
MMAMAT
)AL (TEMPLE) at20E.W. SStll W.
onaarwawva. Rabfct ElMat J. Wlno-
ia*. Cantor Abraham Koatar. 4
MUtOATI
1GATE JEWISH CENTER. aToi
I.W. th St.
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why do many ohwrvr the dia-
tom of eating dairy food on the
Shavuoa holiday?
A number of reasons are ad-
vanced for this practice. Since
Shavuos is the anniversary of the
Revelation of the Torah on Mt.
Sinai, some claim that the milk
of the dairy food is a representa-
tive of the Torah which has been
compared to "Honey and Milk"
(Song of Songs 4:11). The milk is
also considered to be symlxriic of
the grace and compassion in which
the Almighty gave us the Torah.
The mountain I Sinai I in which
the Torah was given was called by-
some "Har Gavnunim" which is
taken to mean "The Mountain of
Cheese," perhaps, because of its
appearance of purity.
Dairy products are also symbolic
>f humility. In this vein it was
considered that the acquisition of
Torah learning and the inspiration
ihi-refrom serves to make man
more humble in his ways.
Others ;laim that consuming
daily foods on Shavuos is a re-
minder that, after the Torah was
given on the original day now
commemorated as a holiday, the
Hebrews could not eat the meat
since the new laws of Schechita
went into effect which rendered
all previously slaughtered meat
non-kosher
'The
entic Jew9
Ksibni Shapiro
tcr of Hadassah in the Home
Federal Building. The chapter,
which aims to double its current
membership of 131, had only 50
members when it received its
charter, Helena Mandelstam rc-
IKirted.
Wentworth Speaking
At Chai Lodge Meeting
Ed Wentworth, editor of the
Hollywood Sun Tattler, will be the
guest speaker Thursday, June 24,
at the 8:30 p.m. meeting of Chai
Lodge 2374 in the Home Federal
Huilding on Hallandale Beach
Boulevard.
Mr. Wentworth, who will give
a first-hand report on his observa-
tions of conditions in Israel, will
include slides showing the various
places he visited in his presenta-
tion.
\Wrr do m>mi> peeple have, e*-
trm ton* toave* of bread (Chal-
hta) on Shavuos?
Some claim that this is rcminis*
cent of the two special loaves that
Hoilandale Chapter Meets
Plans for the coming year were
discussed at the general meeting
held recejrUy by Hallandale a^^^fSrtin the Tarn**attfi
time which was seasonably the
wheat harvest.
Others claim that the long bread
resembles the Torah which is the
spiritual food of man and of which
it is written in the Book of Job
"the measure of it is longer than
the earth" (Job 11:9).
Some claim that the loavrs are
rectangular in shape to indicate
the four meanings of interpreting
the meaning of the words of scrip-
ture (Simple, Mystical, Homiletical
and Allegorical).
(C) 11)71 Jewish Telonraphlc Aecncy
By RABBI DAVID SHAI
Tempi*. Sinai, Hollywood
One of the most beautiful tra-
ditions in Judaism is the tradition
of studying the Ethics of the Fath-
ers on the Sab-
bath afternoons
throughout the
summer begin-
ning with Pass-
over and ending
with Rosh Ha-
hanah.
In the first
chapter of this
book of Ethics,
we read the sig-
nificant saying
of Simon, the
Just: "The world
rests on three foundation Tor-
ah. Religious Worship, and deeds
dI loving kindness."
I find in these words of Simon
those Jewish valuta which char-
acterize the authentic Jew through-
out the ages.
The authentic Jew always had a
groat passion for knowledge, and
a deep reverence for the scholar.
Learning was always a predomi-
nant trait of our people. While not
"very Jew was a scholar, yet every
Jew was engaged in some form of
Jewish study, whether it was the
study of the Bible, the Mishnah,
? he Talmud, or the sayings of trt&J,
Fathers.
A' second basic Jewish value
characterizing the personality of
the authentic Jew is worship. Wor-
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
18 SIVAN 7:53
*vw*
>W^AP>AAA*ArV
flUmljuu of the Aflftt> Committees Who attended the Initial Meetings
ship may Ik- interpreted as our link
with God. The authentic Jew link-
ed his life with God. He was a
consecrated kind of human being.
He lived his life with a sense of
purpose, with dedication. He had
faith in God and man; he lived
with a soul.
The third basic Jewish value
that characterized the authentic
Jew was loving kindness. He had
a sense of justice; he had a pro-
found concern for the underdog,
the underprivileged and tne dis-
inherited. Thirty-six times do we
find the admonition in the Torah
"And you shall love the stranger
for you were strangers in the land
of Egypt."
Through the centuries, the Jew
lived in the midst of many cul-
tures and in many lands Rome,
Babylonia, Egypt, Spain. Germany,
Poland and Ettas a. Their languages
and cultures were all different
from ours. They all exerted an in-
fluence on the Jew and on Juda-
ism. They influenced our customs.
We absorbed many of their ways
and made them a part of our Jew-
ish way ol life.
Yet with nil these changes cer-
tain values in Jewish life remain-
ed permanent and unchanging, and
among these were the personality
traits of the authentic Jew. The
intelligence of the Jew remained
intact his thirst for knowledge
was never dimmed or diminished.
The soul of the Jew remained in-
tact. Isolated and oppressed, cut
off. always on the run. by all the
laws of history, he should have
emerged distorti-d, full of hatred,
yet he retained an amazing nor-
malcy. Finally, not only his mind
and soul, but h's heart remained
intact. Hv always retained a deep
sense of justice The heart, mind
and soul of the Jew always re-
mained intact: his )>ersonauty
remained wholesome and unblem-
ished.
Our supreme task in Jewish
life today i to raise authentic
Jews, mature Jews, dedicated Jews
whose hearts, minds, and souls
shall express the true qualities of
Judaism.
Philip M. Khitznick, interna-
tional president of B'nai B'rith
from 1953-59, is chairman of a
nationwide campaign to pre-
sent Dr. William A. Wexler, the
incumbent B'nai B'rith presi-
dent, a special "going-away"
gifi when he retires from the
post this October: enrollment
of 10,000 new members in the
Jewish organization. The goal
was set by B'nai B'rith's Mem-
bership Cabinet as a signifi-
cant way to say "thank you"
to Dr. Wexler for his six years
of "w'e otfnrt and much ful-
fillment" as president.
from left (seated) Joseph Schwartz, Dr. Nor-
aan Landman and Sam Perry; (standing)
Joseph Kleiman and Robert Baer.
Pictures Continued on Following Page
First Kindergarten Class
Graduates From Hillel
Graduation exercises for the
first kindergarten class of Hillel,
Community Day School will be
held Monday at 10 a.m., in the
school auditorium. Certificates will
be presented by the school princi-
pal. Rabbi Simon Murciano. Mrs.
Murri.-ino heads the kindergarten
staff.
The graduating class includes
l Betofl Lisa Drueker, Renea
Saudtneer, Kenneth Horowitz Eliz-
abeth Klondar, Amy Kobb, Shane
Malka, David Neuman, I
Solomon. Marc Toschcr, Reii i Wol-
>witz, Joseph Zcmel and Tal
. iinamon,
Sisterhood To Hold
Dinner-Dance Saturday
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El will hold a dinner-dance at 7:30
p.m. Saturday in the Tobin Audi-
torium of the temple. The eve-
ning will feature professional en-
tertainment and square dancing
in addition to regular ballroom
dancing.
Reservations for the evening
may be made at the temple office,
1351 S. 14th Av... Hollywood.
J$ar STEVEN' WEIN8TEIN
Steven Philip, the son of Dr.
and Mrs. Philip Welnsteln, Jr., will
conduct the worship service and
read from the Torah at Temple
Beth El Satur-
day, June 11.
Steven is a
student at Nova
Middle School,
where he is in
seventh grade.
Pulpit honors
will be accorded
to Dr. and Mrs.
Wiinstein Fri-
day evening in
honor of the oc-
casion, and Mrs.
Weinstein and daughters Susan
and Julie will Men the Sabbath
tapers.
Sharing bi the festivities will be
the celel andparents, Dr.
and Mrs, H. Lieber of Coral Ga-
blea and Dr. and Mrs. Philip Wein-
stein, Mr Paul Nagel of
I Miami, Mrs. Gendlin, Ed-
!ard and Judith Gendlin of Chi-
cago, and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
i Nt wton ol il Rlv r, Fla.


s*:
^mm^^m^m^^^w^^mp^m^^1
KfcpsiiiEieSji,
Page 10
vJtnist fkiridtftn
Friday, June 11. 1971
From left (seated) Dr. Sheldon Willens, Mrs.
Philip Weinstein, Jr. and James Jacobson;
(standing) Mark Fried, Dr. Howard Berman
and Max Sloane.
-
Michael Ruvel is standing behind (from left)
Ross Beckerman, chairman of the Over-all
Allocations Committee, David Goodman,
Dr. Alan Podis and Milton Forman.

S3
.... i
vi_.. i
Arthur Frimet, (left) Murray Smithline, Errol Rosen and Mrs. Stanley Greenspun
Terrorists Threaten
More Kidnappings
JKRUSALKM (JTAi The
Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine has threatened
to kidnap other Israeli diplomats
and Isra-li officials are taking
the threats seriously, the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency has learned
from authoritative sources.
The kidnap threats by the ex-
tremist Palestinian terrorist
group followed in the wake of
the kidnap-murder of Kphraim
Klrom, Israeli Consul General in
Istanbul, by Turkish terrorists
two weeks ago. The PFLP ap-
parently believes it has a good
chance of success and runs a
small risk in such an exploit,
the sources said, and would un-
doubtedly demand the release of
terrorists imprisoned by Israel
as the ransom price.
Israeli authorities believe the
Palestinian terrorists may have
deeided to reso"H to kidnapping
because they think it will he
more effective than past actions
such as aerial hijackings.
According to one report, the
Turkish kidnappers offered to
release Mr. Klrom to Israeli
agents, but although their in-
structions were followed to the
letter, no contact was made, due
probably to the face that there
were heavy Turkish police pa-
trols in the area. Mr. Elrom's
bullet-riddled body was found
the following day,
Official defended the Turkish
authorities' refusal to negotiate*
with the Consul General's ab-
ductors. "Any surrender to ter-
rorists ultimately harms democ-
racy." they noted.
According to the London Sun-
day Times, Mr. Elrom's death
has sparked a wave of anti-Arab
feeling in Turkey. Reports from
Ankara said that nine hangings
and possibly more may result
from the tragedy if the Turkish
police prove that the so-called
Turkish Peoples Liberation
Army" was responsible. The
JTA was informed that it has
definitely been established that
his killers were trained in Arab
guerrilla camps.
tanbul Tuesday, one of the two
Turkish youths holding the 14-
year-old daughter of a Turkish
Army major captive was fatally
wounded during the fight with
her rescuers. She had been held
hostage for more than two days
in her own home while an angry
crowd outside howled for their
execution.
The two had shot and wound-
ed a woman who recognized
them from the wanted posters
posted throughout the area and
n man bystander before fleeing
Into Maj. Dlncer Erkan's homo
and seizing the girl. They had
allowed her mother, 10-year-old
brother and the female servants
to leave, however.
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
140 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOUYWOOD
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"A Service Within The Means Of All"
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Vmple 3etkl
Wemoziat
(gardens
The only all-jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
_923-8255or write: f~& + \ 1
TEMPLE BETHEL fo$::*Ai?^
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020'
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: '
ADDRESS: ____
PHONE:
'-i
Joel Rottman, (left) Dr. Samuel Meline, Joel Schneider and Dr. Alex Buchwald.


June 11. 1971
*Je*%istincrHiar
Page 11
THE AMERICAN SCENE By: BEN GAUOB
Rabbis Urged To Participate In Politics
IlK WIDELY held belief that
ki-bbis should stny out of po-
bal nctivity may have been
[moded by the current strug-'
for re-di-stribution of politi-
power through which Amer-
|n minority groups includ-
JewJ are pressing for re-
fins in the American system.
is Rabbi Bernard Weinberger
it, Jews are becoming stead-
more discernible as a group,
it as other elhnic groups, like
the Blacks, the Italian-Amer-
icms and the Irish, are also be-
c.-ming more recognizable as
bloc vofrs. As Jews become a
voting group and thus a po-
tent force for change, the rabbi
has a responsibility to give
gu'dance and direction to this
force so that it may 1m> used for
the betterment of the Jewish
community, he said.
Rabbi Weinberger, the first
Orl'.iodox Jew to serve on the
Council A) lii.st Poverty, the New
York City policy-making agcncy
OOmniuniti's, Jews soon became
Wr^-anti-iMv.'erty programs, ex-
pressed a i>elief that there are
curcumstances, in the "new pol-
itics," which justify rabbis seek-
ing political office for the wel-
fare of the Jewish community.
Traditionally, Orthodox Jews
have had no political aspirations
and neither wanted nor sought po-
litical involvement, he declared.
They accepted with quiet resig-
nation the fact that not a sin-
gle Orthodox Jew occupied any
important [wsition in city, state
or federal"'government. It sim-
ply was not the place where an
Orthodox Jew could be comfort-
able.
As the local community in-
creasingly became a political
battleground, however, Jews be-
gan to feel threatened. Neighbor-
hoods that were once predomi-
nantly Jewish were becoming
unsafe for the Jew. In such
aware that they no longer had
anyone to turn to and would
have to become involved politi-
cally 'in the struggle for sur-
vival. As a result, he declared.
Orthodox Jews are no longer
ready to tolerate others mak-
ing decisions for them. They
want their own indigenous lead-
ership to represent their true
nerds and aspirations, and for
Orthodox Jews, that leadership
is the rabbi.
(C), Jeu-inh Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
Beating Plowshares Into Plywood
/EN RECENT PUBLICATIONS define the kib-
butz as a collective village, primarily agricultural.
fiends abroad, mindful of pictures they have seen
stories they "have read, conjure up images of the
ael kibbutz farmer as he plows his field, harvests
crops, feeds his chickens and tends his sheep
ll this in an idyllic, pastoral setting of cooperative
t>mmunal life.
But 'he industrial revolution has come to the
libbutz! Today more than 30Cr of the total kibbutz
production is industrial, and more than a quarter of
all kibbutz members are employed in the factories.
Furthermore, some 4,000 additional employees from
outside have been hired, a situation which is con-
trary to all kibbutz ideology and weighs heavily on
the conscience of the kibbutz members. The halutz
of 25 years ago would certainly not believe his eyes
were he to step, for example, into the mammoth
plywood factory at Kibbutz Afikim.
What do they produce? The products list shows
I W."1: ..... ill. .:'. m
800* REVIEW By frymow B. Uebmon
Books By And About Israelis
H ST AS ONK IS about to shout, "Enough!
Enough," on l>ooks about Israelis who fought in
ic Six-Day War, there comes to hand a rare book
which silences any protest. Th
Seventh Day (Charles Scribner's
Sons. $6.95) is "soldiers talk atxmt
the Six-Day War" recorded and
edited by a group of young kib-
butz, members.
This series of accounts is the
self-expression of young men and
women born and reared in kib-
butzim, most of whom were be-
tween 25 and 35 years of age. They had received
general and agricultural education until 18. All
lad done army service and ranged in rank from
l>rivate to lieutenant colonel. Their valor was the
horm so they were reluctant to use the word
[heroism." They fought because Nasser had preci-
>itat.-d events which made war inevitable. They had
lad no choice fight or die!
People on the outside find it difficult to com-
prehend that war for Israelis was an extension of
|ife within the State of Israel. Just as Israeli farm-
have their perennial battle with insects, pests,
frought and other vicissitudes of rural life and
acting a living from a niggardly soil, so battling
r survival against the blind hostility of hate-
ntoxicated Arabs is part of their lives. Social mor-
fcty ip part of the fibre of the Israelis. Paradoxical
it is, but while they shoot to kill, they grieve for
the lives of the enemies who die at their hands.
Some of the accounts are in the form of
dialogues. The questions put by the interviewers
covered a wide range from "Do you hate the
Arabs?" to "Can any war be justified?" with inter-
nediate probings of their reactions in battle. The
book compares favorably with i>ost World War I
classics such as Henri Barbusse's "Under Fire" or
Stefan Zweig's "Sergeant Grischa" and provides an
excellent picture of Israeli kibbutzniks. It serves as
an anti-war book to be read by all.
Arnold Sherman's In The> Bunkers of Sinai
i Amis Publishing Co. A Sabra Book, S5.95) opens
with an explanation of the Bar-Lev Line a name
given by Egypt to the Israeli fortifications along
the Suez which the Israeli Defense forces do not
use.
The book then offers a series of interviews with
officers and privates serving their tours of duty in
the below-ground bunkers and shelters facing the
Egyptians across the waterway. Sherman, an Is-
raeli sinoe 1963, has a deft style and a light touch
which removes the oathos and macabre from some of
the incidents which v*ccurred while he was doing his
research in 1970. He also provides interesting and
illuminating facets in the lives of the Israelis and
their characters which, when put together, create a
composite figure of today's civilian-military
personnel.
Panorama:
-*
Between You and Me: By BORIS SMOLAR

Happy 65th Anniversary
*
IE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE is now
celebrating its 65th year of existence. It feels
mid of its record and has all the reasons to feel
,j so. Its activities during the years
have proven to be beneficial not
only to American Jewry but also
to Jews in many lands.
There are very few Jewish
groups in the United States today
that can boast of 65 years of
existence and show as much vigor
in their activities as the American
Jewish Committee does. The
JCommittee is today the oldest Jewish body in
Iris country active in preventing infraction of civil
id religious rights of Jews in any part of the
^orld. It is one of the oldest Jewish organizations
the world standing guard to secure equality of
ponomic, social and educational opportunity through
vie action, not to speak of the other fields of ac-
uities concerning Jews in which the AJCommittee
engaged.
Age did not affect the rigor -wfei which the
AJCommittee is conducting its work. On the con-
trary, the technique of this remarkable organiza-
tion has greatly improved during the years and the
programs have expanded. It is -sjftunlly 65 years
young rather than 65 years old. It responds with
great energy to every Jewish problem that the
march of time brings forth.
als. the AJCom-
lization with a
"iv than 80 chap-
with offices itv
it is no longer
'ewish rights and
is today engaged
From a small group of
nut tee grew to become an
large national membership, w|
tors throughout the UnitedJ
Israel, Europe and Latin Ar
an agency merely protecting]
combatting anti-Semitism. It
actively in strengtl i identity among
American-born Jews. 11 I ikeB an ml -rest in pro-
moting Jewish education. It s^mulati s \vr> activ-
ity that strengthens J--wijjJj.|iie in all its forms.
Not to speak of the fact thu.i? is de-ply interested
in Israel and is playing Maiding role in the fight
against the antl-Jewish poiicv of the Snv'-pt Union.
, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.
such items as furniture, pharmaceuticals, machin-
ery, electronic equipment, leather goods, stainless
steel ware, plastics, fire extinguishers, chinaware,
wires and cables, hydraulic equipment, water me-
ters, flooring, and of course lines related to agricul-
ture, like irrigation supplies, canned foods and1
preserves.
The kibbutz first began to eye industry as a.
means of providing employment for women, the
aged, or others physically incapable of arduous
farm work. The idea caught on quickly. Each kib-
butz is still struggling to retain its basically agri-
cultural complexion, but there are some settle-
ments where industry already surpasses the farm
production.
Kibbutz industry is conducted at a peak of tech-
nical proficiency. The kibbutzim are sending more
and more of their talented young members to uni-
versity, and a large number go to the Technion in
Haifa to study in such fields as electrical, chemical
and mechanical engineering, industrial management
and the computer sciences.
A survey of kibbutz industrial productivity
shows that on the kibbutz there is far greater pro-
ductivity and higher net profit per worker, quicker
turnover of capital and lower administrative ex-
penses. A major cause, of course, is the personal
interest taken by the kibbutz members in their own
plant. They don't work by the clock. They draw no
salaries Whatever beyond the maintenance which is
their due as members of the kibbutz.
A private industrialist with whom I spoke pro-
vided another perspective. The kibbutz factory can
be more efficient, he said, because there is no
union to protect jobs, and no redundant workers
who cut down overall productivity. Short of hands,
the kibbutz seeks every possible short cut to re-
duce the number of employees; no private industry
could get away whh that kind of approach.
iiinoiiHSjnu mi mi.....i mi irnnninniiiiirnim iirimiiffliirni 11 mi in i in "iiiriiirnriiiiiirirniiirinrrim
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
Happiness Varies
AN ENGLISHMAN, a Frenchman, and a Russian
Jew were asked what was the most happy time
they could imagine.
The Englishman said that for
him enjoyment was at its peak
| when he can go hunting with his
gun and hounds. There was noth-
ing like hunting to stir the blood,
t he said.
The Frenchman said as for him,
hunting was a bore. His idea of a
1 wonderful time was a weekend
with a beautiful woman
The Russian Jew replied that his idea of happi-
ness was quite different from the two previous.
For him, the moment of bliss was something like
this:
It is midnight.
There is a knocking on the door and you hear
a voice calliqg, "Open up. This is the police. We
have come bjfarrest you, Alexis Maranovich."
And I' lives next sjpr!"
This is utter happiness.
I


Page 12-
*Je*i&n*r*l**r
Friday, June 11, 1971
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CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-1556
CORAL CABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Ave. 681-8541
MIAMI SHORES
8801 Biscayne Blvd. 759-4446
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEA*H
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 W. 49th SL 822-2500
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S. Dixie Hwy. 233-5241
SOUTH DADE
9001 S. Dixie Hwy. 667-7575
HOMESTEAD
30100 E. Federal Hwy. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD
6017 Hollywood Blvd.
at State Road No. 7 987-0450
FT. LAUDEROALE
1830 W. Broward Blvd. 525-3136
and
1740 E. Sunrise Blvd. 525-7583
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N. Federal Hwy. 943-4200
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Dixie 832-3044
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N. Lake Blvd. 848-2544
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4th St 4644020
EX.


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