The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00014

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
and MIOI All OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Volume 1 Number 13
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 30, 1971
Price 20c
Campaign Chairman Urges Continued Efforts
With the 1971 Campaign well
under way, Jesse J. Martin, Com-
bined Campaign Chairman for
Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wel-
fare Federation declared this week
that he is confident that the re-
sults of this year's campaign will
mirror the enthusiasm, spirit and
support of his entire group of
workers.
According to Mr. Martin, the or-
ganizational strudture of cam-
paign workers is now complete
and chairmen have been appointed
to cover people in all walks of
life. It is expected that each and
every member of the Jewish pop-
ulation will be contacted and their
support secured in order to meet
the needs of Israel and the many
worthy local agencies.
"I have high hopes that with
continued effort on the part of
our many dedicated Federation
workers, we will once again have
i successful campaign." s-iid Mr.
Martin. "I am most optimistic
about the pledges and monies re-
ceived to date and about the en-
thusiasm that has been engendered one who is well aware of the
by our worker group. As a long warmth and generosity of our
time resident of Hollywood, and Jewish population, my expectations
are that by the end of the year
our goals for a successful cam-
paign will be realized.
"I can't help but echo the recent
statement made by Edward Gins-
berg, general chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal. He said,
'The next few weeks will tell the
critically important story of
whether or not we, the Jews of
America, are able to summon up
all of our strength, all of our ef-
fort, all of our dedication to make
the campaign of 1971 the over-
whelmingly successful one it
MUST be.'
"We in Greater Hollywood's
Jewish Welfare Federation must
continue to stay out in the field
and do our utmost to make every
community member aware of the
need for him to pledge his monies
and efforts so that this year's cam-
paign will surpass anything we
have done so far."


JtSSt MAKTIM
Future Of Jarring Talks, Interim
Arrangement Of Canal In Doubt
JERUSALEM (JTA The
announced federation of Egypt.
Libya and Syria has created un-
certainty here over the future
of the Jarring talks and the im-
mediate issue of an interim ar-
rangement with Egypt to re-
open the Suez Canal.
Israeli political circles seemed
to be of two opinions as to its
implications. One view is that
the newest federation, like the |
previous ones announced with
fanfare by the Arabs, will never
coalesce and poses no new chal-
lenge to Israel. A differing view
is that the federation announce-
ment links Eg> ;-t with two new
Attorneys And
Insurance Men
Are Organized
Under the leadership of vice
chairman Joel Rottman, two pro-
fessional divisions, have held or-
ganizational meetings and started
on the work of furthering the
Campaign of Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration's Combined Campaign.
Both the attorneys and the insur-
ance agents groups held meetings
at the Hollywood Beach Hotel
Country Club.
"This is the first time the in-
surance agents in this area have
been organized for Federation and
I am really impressed with their
acceptance of th.ir part in our
campaign," said Mr. Rottman. "It
was a completely satisfying meet-
ing and I am convinced that the
end results will be gratifying."
Stanley Greenspun is chairman
for the Insurance Division; Harold
Rosenberg is serving as his co-
chairman.
In the Attorneys' Division, Doug-
las Kaplan is chairman; working
with hhn as cochairmen are James
Fox Miller. David Klein and Bobby
Collins.
Arab countries that have con-
sistently taken a hard line to-
ward Israel and have criticized
Cairo's peace moves. This view
gained credence from the pre-
luuble to the federation poet
which echoed the 1967 Arab
summit meeting declaration at
Khartoum no negotiations, no
recognition, no peace with Israel.
Deputy Premier Yigal Allon
said that he would welcome the
federation if it were intended to
better the lot of the Arab peo-
ples. "Unfortunately, its estab-
lishment was accompanied by
warlike pronouncements," he
said, adding, "I was very- sorry
to hear that (Egyptian Presi-
dent! Anwar Sadat said he had
no intention of discussing future
Borders with Lsrael. I think this
is a big mistake especially
for Egypt itself."
The poMcy of no negotiations,
recognition or peace with Israel,
proclaimed by the presidents of
Egypt, Libya and Syria at Beng-
hazi Saturday, sharply contra-
dicts President Sadat's previous
acknowledgement to United Na-
tions mediator Gunnar V. Jarr-
ing that he was prepared to rec-
ognize Israel's sovereignty, at
least de facto, and enter into
peace negotiations. Sadat's agree-
ment was regarded as the most
hopeful sign that the U.S. peace
initiative launched last summer
might at last bear fruit.
Now, sources here said. Sadat
seems to have been influenced
by the uncompromising st.tn.ls
of Presidents Munmmer Qad-
dafi of Libya and Hafez el- As-
sad of Syria, who have been
urging mobilization for what
they regard as an inevitable
"fourth round" or war with
Israel.
Israeli officials meanwhile
are studying the effects of the
federation announcement on the
Arab world, the Soviet Union
which is Egypt's chief backer
and France, which has sold Mi- |
rage jets to Libya. Reaction in I
the Arab world was predictable.
The pact was hailed by govern-
ment officials and Palestinian
guerrilla leaders alike as a ma-
jor step toward the long sought
Arab unity against Israel.
The Soviet Union also hailed
the new federation. The Com-
munist Party newspaper, Prav-
da. termed it a major step to-
ward "ultimate victory over the
forces of aggression. Zionism
and neo-colonia!ism in the Mid-
dle East."
There was evidence, however,
that the Soviets and Egyptians
have not abandoned efforts for
an interim arrangement to re-
open the Suez Canal The sub-
ject was almost certainly on the
agenda of the talks between
soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
A. Gromyko and Egyption For-
eign Minister Mahmoud Ri id in
Moscow this week. But Iliad's
reported statement that reopen-
ing the Suez Canal was of sec-
ondary importance to Israeli
withdrawal from all Arab terri-
tories has dampened the pros-
pects for an interim agreement.
Some Israeli officials believe
the new federation may have a
degenerative e'fect on Franco-
Arab relations The French
agreement to sell more than 100
Mirage jets to Libya's tiny air
force p year ago contained the
stipulation that the warpl*~<*<
cannot be transferred to a third
power. France assured Israel at
the time that its stipulation
would be enforced. Under the
new federation noct hjrwT,
the armed forces of Egypt, Libya
and Syria would l>e interchange-
able and Egyptian and even Sy-
rian pi'ots could eventually be
flying Libyan Mirages.
Israel is almost certain to
make representations to France
on this matter. France report-
edly assured Israel recently
that it would ha't delivery of
the Mirages to Libya if it hsd
evidence they were being trans-
ferred to Egypt.
'The REAL Campaign Is Only Just
Beginning,9 General Chairman Says
"American Jewry is rising to the great challenge of intensi-
fied humanitarian needs in Israel this year. Yet, as positive as
this outpouring may be. we must all understand that the real
campaign is only just beginning. ." Edward Ginsberg, general
chairman of the United Jewish Appeal declared in summing up
the status of the 1971 UJA campaign.
In a general policy statement issued last week, Mr. Ginsberg
said, "Jews throughout the country are responding well, with
pledges showing a substantial increase over last year. But less
than half the gifts we are expecting this year have been re-
corded. It will take hard work unrelenting work to main-
tain acceptable levels of increase through the remainder of the
campaign.
"This is the heat of the campaign." the UJA leader con-
tinued. "We must continue to exert the utmost pressure on our-
selves and all remaining potential contributors, to keep our cru-
cial programs in behalf of Israel's people alive and growing.
"The uncertain conditions in Israel must mean MORE, not
less, concern on all our parts. The men, women and children who
arrive every day in Israel need housing, food, clothes, rehabilita-
tion, education, and training to be absorbed. And the thousands
who came before them need absorption of every kind in depth
in Israeli society. Who will help. If we do not?
'The next few weeks will tell the critically important story
of whether or not we. the Jews of America, are able to summon
up all of our strength, all of our effort, all of our dedication to
make the campaign of 1971 the overwhelmingly successful one it
MUST be," the campaign leader emphasized.
The UJA supports the United Israel Appeal, Inc., which main-
tains extensive programs for resettlement and absorption of Jew-
ish immigrants in Israel; the Joint Distribution Committee which
aids aged, chronically ill and handicapped Jews in 30 nations, in-
cluding Israel; the United HIAS Service, which provides for trans-
portation of oppressed Jews and for their resettlement in free
nations other than Israel; and the New York Association for
New Americans, which assists Jewish refugees in the United
States.

PASSED OH TO Kin
3 Requirements
Conveyed To U.S.
By Special Report
JERUSALEM Three ma-
jor provisions of Israel's current
position on the United States
peace initiative in the Middle
East were brought to Washing-
ton last week by Deputy Pre-
mier Yigal Allon. These points
were later passed on to Egypt
by the U.S. State Department.
In Mr. Alton's conferences with
Secretary of State William P.
Rogers and other officials there,
he stressed that Israel insists on:
1. An Egyptian proclamation of
an end to its belligerency:
2. An announcement that Egypt
pledges not to cross the Suez
Canal following any Israeli
withdrawal from the water-
way agreed to as part of an
interim agreement to open
the canal;
3. An Egyptian statement that
it will conduct overall peace
negotiations with Israel.
Sources here agreed that the
announcement of Egypt's pro-
iv>s*d federation with Libya and
Syria strengthens Israel's posi-
tion in the* current peace talks
by shifting pressure from Jeru-
salem to Cairo.
Pronouncements by all three
of the members of the new fed-
eration reiterated the "no peao^
with Israel, no territorial con-
cessions and no relaxation of
demands for Palestinians" posi-
tion previously taken.
As the first two weeks of the
undeclared extension of the
cease-fire with Egypt ended, the
only violations reported con-
tinued to be "fly-overs" of Is-
raeli territory carried out by
United Arab Republic aircraft.
Storms, Unseasonable Cold
Plague Israel; Crop Damage
Estimated Near $1.5 Million
TEL AVIV (JTAI Rain,
hailstorms and unseasonably low
temperatures plagued Israel for
even consecutive days recently.
A Ministry of Agriculture
c~'-'-" "'aced crop damage
at $1.57 million, sustained main-
ly by vegetables and fruits.
In the hills of Galilee the tem-
perature dropped below the
freezing mark two nights in suc-
cession, and overcoats were re-
quired for comfort out of doors.
In addition, roads all over the
count rv have been flooded or
blocked bv unrooted trees and
downed telephone poles.


Page 2
Friday. April 30. 1971
Social Security Aids
Both Young And Old
If you're in that half of the U.S.
population under 30 you may
think thai Social Security is-wen*
hinu remote and unimportant to
ou right now. Hut this is not the
. ase
won't be able to work for a year
or more, after six months', Social
- S**cuiity can start paying off. It
will continue paying off with a
cluck each month until you can
work again.
In this generally youthful group,
early 2'a million people receive
benefits because the> are disabled
ir are dependent upon disabled
workers.
Some three million widowed
lothers and young children get
nonthly Social Security checks as
survivors of workers. Half a mil-
ion students between 18 and 22
_;et monthly benefits as the chil-
dren of retired, deceased, or dis-
abled workers. Checks are also
eeeived by a quarter of a million
icople who became disabled in
childhood.
The youngsters who are getting
their first summer Job see only
the immediate rewards of the pay-
lu'ck; many young workers don't
jfalize that through Social Security
hey are beginning to build up an
"estate." To most young workers
this seems remote, but actually
he has begun to protect himself
[ltd his future famil) dining his
arly working years.
Should you be In thai wide age
_:i\>up which is a long way from
etiremenl age but still engulfed
ivith family responsibilities, and
ire injured or sick enough I you
Your Social Security benefits
will help your survivors in OBM of
your death. Your wife and chil-
dren will receive a monthly check
in addition to burial benefits.
More than three million young
widows and children receive such
assistance.
For the record, one out of four
Soda) Security beneficiaries Ls un-
der 65; one out of eight is under
18. Half the U.S. population is un-
der 30 and approximately one-
third is under IS. Nearly all are
protected by Social Security.
Cancer Prevention Sixth Annual Charity
Program Presented
As A Public Service1 Bazaar In Mall May 5
Diamonds '''' Jewelry
Appraised
STATE LICENSED
APPRAISERS
MORNINGSTARS
119 N. 20th AVENUE
Hollywood
923-2372 923-2373
Rabbi Weitz Asks Mayor To
Proclaim Independence Day
Rabbi Max w. it-/ oi the Hallan-
dale Jewish Center asked Mayor
Wilson to proclaim April 30 Israel
Independence Day in honor of that
nation's 23rd anniversary and has
announced his sermon topic will
be "The Birth of Isia< I and Whal
II Means to the Jewish People."
In honor of the occasion, the
Hallandale Chapter of Hadassah
will host the (meg Shabbat at the
Center, which is located at 1215
NK First Ave. Services will begin
at 8:30 p.m.
KOSHER CATERERS
BAR MIT2VAHS
we doings -MaTCS
SMCIAlllING IN HOMl CATtHNG
and HOlfl won
888-3469
If MO ANSWtt DIAL
866 5278
490 SWALLOW 01 MIAMI SMIMGS
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth El will have a program deal-
ing with latest advances in treat-
ment and. prevention of Cancer.
Wednesday, at 8 p.m."in the Tobin
Auditorium of Temple Beth El,
1351 S. 14th Ave
The featured speaker. Dr. Rubin
Klein, radiologist, will illustrate
his lecture with slides, and a dis-
cussion period will follow. This
program is being presented as a
public service to the community
with no admission charge.
Dr. Klein, treasurer-elect of
Temple Beth El, Ls serving as
chairman of the Adult Education
Committee. He was recently hon-
ored for his outstanding work in
medicine and contribution to ra-
diology, by being named a Fellow
of the American College of
Radiology.
Dr. Klein, who received his A.B.
degree from New York Univer-
sity and his M.D. degree from
State University College of Medi-
cine, New York City, did a rota-
ting Internship and radiology resi-
dency m Jewish Hospital, Brook-
lyn. X.Y., and was American C.m-
er Societ) Fellowship and Staff
Radiation Theraptsl at M.D. An-
derson Hospital and Tumor Insti-
tute, Houston, Tex.
Hi- is director of the Tumor
Board, O >lden Isles Hospital; Pro-
fessional Educational Cchairman
and a mem'ier of the Board of
Directors, Broward County Unit,
American Cancer Society, and As-
sistant Professor of Radiology.
Jackson Memorial Hospital ami
University of Miami School of
Medicine.
Hollywood Mall will !* a blaze
of color and excitement on the
occasion of the sixth annual char-
ity bazaar "Wednesday, May 5.
More than 50 booths, manned by
busy volunteer workers, will fill
every inch of space in the Mall.
If past yean offer any indica-
tion of the day's activities, the
Mall will be packed with traffic
for 12 full hours. Shoppers pour
into the Mall long before the of-
ficial opening time of 9:30 a.m.
to snap up bargains of every de-
scription.
This is a day of palate-pleasing
discoveries talented cooks
outdo themselves to prepare gour-
met national foods such as Greek
pastries, Syrian bread, Polish
cookies, and home-baked cakes
and candies. A vast array of un-
usual hand-crafted items rang-
ing from needlework to scentod
candies will also be available.
Every age group is represented
f. *. there are articles, made by
the handicapped, by small chil-
dren and by senior citizens .
there are gifts of international
nature, Czcchoslovakian dolls, Is-
raeli enamel work there is a
full range of gifts from brand
new merchandise donated hy man-
ufacturers to valuable antiques
and elephant items.
During the evening, tliero will
be a display of Greek dancing by
the teenage girls from St. Deme-
trius Greek Orthodox Church, who
will perform in their colorful 19th
century peasant costumes.
It is a fun day and one of im-
l>ortant financial benefit to the
nraticipating groups. Funds real-
ized from booth sales go directly
to the charitable organizations
involved.
CANDLELIGMTING TIME
5 IYAR 7:32
lAV^A^A^AAAAAWVWW
If YOU THINK YOU'VE HAD GOOD
CHINESE E00D BEFORE...TRY
CHRISTINE LEE'S GASLIGHT
WE ALSO SERVE THE FINEST STEAKS IN MIAMI
located in the Golden Strand Hotel
179th Street and Collins Avenue
Reservations Call 945-9075
Suggested 947-5661
K> cfc iDJC 0J0 faJC OjO i^JC JJC Of. OjC OjC JjC OjC OjC JjC jJC OjC 0{C Cft 3|t> <2JCi c
VISITING HOMEMAKER SERVICE
of Broward County,Inc. Est. 1959
QUALIFIED HOME CARE AIDES
7 doys-24 hours
VISITING REGISTERED NURSES
Hourly visits Personalized Telephone Service
1101 E. Broward Blvd. ,524-5582 Fort Lauderdol*
The oldest home nursing core service in Broward County
CLEANING
PRESSING
WYN0NA
Cleaners
PHONE: 922-5561
500 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
We Pick Up and Deliver


V.\%T7>-
tr*Zj&
THE
TRAVELERS
-^xAiStl iRSironce Agency ~|
Aisel Wittenstein l
All Forms of Insurance
Including
Homeowners Automobile Jewelry
2430 Hollywood Boulevard Hollywood
9239518 9453527
FIREMAN'S
FUND
AMERICAN



Friday, April 30. 1971
+Je*lsl> fhrteOmr
ORGANIZATION IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Page 3
Douglas Gardens Home For The Aged

Douglas Gardens, which was
established as a private, philan-
thrope horne1 for The aged' in 1945,
serves elderly men and women
who can benefit from the special
care and sheltered environment
which the Home offers. The Home
is one of the beneficiary agencies
of Hollywood's Jewish Welfare
Federation.
Any elderly person who is a
resident of Dade or Broward Coun-
ty and is mentally competent and
free of infectious disease is eligi-
ble. The Admissions Committee
bases its decision on need; each
case is judged on its own merit.
Since the Home is always filled
to capacity, approved applicants
must await their turn for ad-
mission.
No applicant is rejected be-
cause of inability to pay. The
Home's financial arrangements are
flexible and depend in each in-
stance upon the financial resourc-
es of the app'icant and their rein
tives. The Admissions Review and
Finance Committee has final re
sponsibility for working out equit-
able financial arrangements be-
tween the Home and the applicant
and/or relative.
The Home provides a full range
of skilled, professional and reha-
bilitative services to meet the
social, emotional and physical
needs of its residents. Douglas
Gardens provides a therapeutic
environment where residents are
motivated to be^in life anew. All
types of diversional and craft ac-
tivities are provided for the resi-
dents, all of them supervised by
trained personnel, mast of whom
^RENT-A-CAR *
*5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXIE HWY.
920-4141
HOLLYWOOD
945-569S Miomi
FACTORY TO YOU
Bilt-Rite
MATTRESS MFG., CO.
S>M LOCATION H YlAKi
MANUFACTURERS A RENOVATORS
FOAM RUBIER IMNIftSPtlNC
OCX SPRINGS HOLLYWOOD RIDS
BAHAMA REDS
KiRc size a mum bed specialists
FOAM MJMCR SPECIALISTS
947-3090
17100 W. MXII HWY.. M.M.R.
Remember Mother On
Mother's Day
THE
FLOWER
KOOK
m THE "MINI MALL"
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Fresh and Artilical
Flowers Candles
Soap Gifts
Member of lelitlora
0115 M'rramar Parkway, Mlrammr
Phone 961-5455
HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY
CATALDO'S
COMPLETE DINNER MENU
Lasagna Spaghetti
Hoagies Fettucini
Seafood Manicotti
Pizza Veal Parmigiana
Eat In or Carry Out
CLOSED MONDAYS
6749 Pembroke Rd. 989-7671
are volunteers. There is also a
synagogue on the premises for the
resident's use; every facility pos-
sible is provided to make the resi-
dents happy and content.
The Hollywood Auxiliary of the
Home, which has been active for
the last 15 years, has been instru-
mental in supplying the capital
funds for medical care. Through
their work the Hollywood Auxili-
ary Medical Center has been built
and in this Center are provided
x-ray, fluoroscopy, cardiograms
and all the other medical services
necessary for the resident's well-
being.
To the many elderly residents at
Douglas Gardens, the Home is truly
(as it has often been called > "The
Home for Beginning Again." for
everything is done to maintain
the residents as active, participat-
ing members of society.
Early Release May Be Arranged
When informed about the conflict between the opening date
of Camp Ka-Dee-Mah and the school's closing, an official at Nova
School indicated that an early release from school may be ar-
ranged. Each request will be considered on its own merits, he
said.
Parents who wish to register their children in Ka-Dee-Mah
should send in their applications with the understanding that the
deposit will be refunded should the child's release from school
not be allowed.
We are phased fo announce
tiie opening of a Branch Office at
THE HEMISPHERES
(Bay South Building)
1985 South Ocean Drive
HALLANDALE,FL0I.iIjA
-
Telephones: 305 920-6065 DADE 944-3426
LouIh 11. linnet and Edward Rualtln
Account Executirea-in-Charje
HI.ll\S, NOR111 M VV & CO.
established 1923
Members New York Stock Exchange, Inc. and other Principal
115 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 10006
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Installing New Officers
Being installed as president is
Mrs. Joel Rottman; Mrs. Melvin
Waldorf will assume the duties of
The Sisterhood of Temple Sinai
will hold a general membership
meeting Tuesday, May 4, at 8
p.m. in the temple. The installa-
tion of the new slate of officers
for the coming year is on the
agenda.
membership vice president, and
Mrs. Israel Resnikoff those of the
financial secretary.
I Exchanges A
FLOATING DRIVING RANGE,
GOIF EQUIPMENT PRO SHOP
SNACK BAR CIU8 RtPAIRS
PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTION
OKN9AM.iQI>M.- 7 DAYS
a ... --,- TJa
w
a
?' s F :
:
r>' ^*~ 2250 SOUTH PARK RD
jKVj *HALLANDAL DIAL 989-9254
HARDWARE & PAINT. INC
HOUSEWARES & GIFTS
HOME DECOR ASSESSORIES
100 E. Beach Boulevard
Hallandale, Florida 33009
927-0566
.iStay
sbqdj
HOLLYWOOD BANK
""TRUST COMPANY
The Hollywood Bank with The Human Interest Added
1900 Tyler Street 923-8222
FOR CORRECT TIME
DIAL 922-7521
Over thirty five years
of service to the communities
in North Dade and Broward Counties.
RIVERSIDE
MEMORIAL CHAPEL. INC. FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th Avenue
1250 Normandy Drive: fifteen minutes from Hollywood
920-1010
19th and Alton Road: in the heart of Miami Beach
Miami: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street
Manhattan Brooklyn Westchester Bronx Far Rockaway
To arrange a funeral anywhere in the United States,
call the nearest Riverside Chapel
Edward Rosenthal Morton Rosenthal Carl Grossberg Leo J. Filer
Murray N. Rubin. F.D.


tage 4
+Je*lst llcridllain
Friday. April 30, 1971
'/Klewisti Florid fan
rTICE WD PLANT 120 N.ti. 6TH 8TRJJ1 > Til.rPTioM J75-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 920-639:
P.O. Box 2975. Miami Fuhuda mot
pRBD K SlIOCHEl S.1.MA M. THOMPSON"
Editor id Publisher AsiilteW**
M^IIJON NKVINS.^N.-ws Ci.onlinntor
' The Jewish Florid in Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Column*.
Published Bi-ttV.-t.lv by the JewUh Floridim
coi.i-CAw Postage Paid at Miami, Fi.i.
bWish Welfare Federation or Crbatbe Hollywood Shofak Editorial
MmsORV COMMITTEE Dr. Sheldon Willcns. Chairman; Ross Beckcrman, Ben
Marion Nevins, Dr. Norman Atkin, Michael kmel.
-h. Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Artsi Feature Syndicate
Vorldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Association
Of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.________
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00
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'olume 1
Jriday. April 30. 1971
Number 13
5 IYAR 5731
A Strange Course Of Action
For the Jewish War Veterans to appeal to President
Nixon to give consideration to granting clemency to Lt.
Calley seems a strange course of action for this organiza-
tion based as much on Jewish principles as the special
interests of veterans.
No people are more concerned with genocide than the
Jews and if Calley is a scapegoat who obeyed orders of
higher-ups his own guilt is still as clear as that of Eichmann,
if not on the same scale. The tragic fact that this country
is the only major power which has not signed the United
Nations Genocide Treaty, is deplored by every Jewish
organization, including the Jewish War Veterans.
American soldiers are not trained to kill every living
tiling, even under the peculiar stress of the Vietnam war;
to give even implied support to such a policy under the
guise of "clemency" is to give support to genocide if, as in
the case of the six million Jews, the killers were obedient
only to orders from their superiors. Neither international
nor American law upholds this point of view and it is dis-
heartening to see a Jewish organization depart so radically
from our tradition of humane treatment of those innocents
caught in the teeth of war.
Douglas Gardens Celebrates
The Douglas Gardens Home for the Aged is one of the
cornerstones of the Greater Miami Jewish community. An
agency which has received natlcmai recognition for its
pioneering efforts in providing an environment for the
elderly which goes far beyond the nursing home concept,
Douglas Gardens this weekend celebrates its 25th anni-
versary of distinguished service.
Both the lay and professional leadership of the agency
are to be congratulated for their efforts which do credit to
the Jewish values inherent in the proper care for our aged,
whatever their station in life.
Deferments Perpetuate Unfairness
The protests against eliminating draft deferments for
divinity students, as proposed in a new House Bill, come
with particularly poor grace from the Synagogue Council
of America and the Rabbinical Assembly, especially since
the protests are tied to the students becoming available for
the chaplaincy services following ordination.
The fact is that the Jewish rabbinical associations and
their seminaries have, for the most part, avoided their re-
sponsibility for such service on a voluntary basis. It has
been a matter of concern that the seminaries were, for a
substantial minority, a convenient way of avoiding the
draft.
There has been no question of the unbalanced nature
of the military draft for a majority of American youth. It is
only perpetuating that unfairness by continuing to give
seminary students special consideration. Our religious
leaders need to take a hard look at the ethics of such
deferments.
Hospital Service Non-Sectarian
Jewish hospitals those under Jewish auspices, at
least recorded more than 655,000 admissions last year,
it has been reported. Services, of course, are on a non-
sectarian basis despite the Jewish sponsorship and, as has
been known for a good many years, in many of the 65
general hospitals surveyed the bulk of the patients served
are non-Jewish.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
df.

WASHINGTON There are
various ways to indicate the
present loneliness of Richard
M. Nixon, but there is no real
way to measure it. It is prob-
ably too great to be precisely
measurable.
One indication of the Presi-
dent's loneliness is that no mem-
ber of his Cabinet, Including the
secretary of defense, knew the
President's detailed decisions
about further troop withdrawals
from Vietnam before the Cabi-
net meeting Just prior to his
speech on Wednesday.
IS THIS TOWN leaky ;.s a
sieve, with a Cabinet not nota-
bly loyal, the President evi-
dently felt compelled to seek
advice only as to the guiding
facts. With the facts in hand.
he made his own decisions in
near-total isolation; and these
were then disclosed when al-
ready final.
Another indicator of this pres-
idential loneliness is the simple
fad that several of the White
House staff members have come
close to panic in the post-Laos
political atmosphere. The tough,
unflappable man in Mr. Nixon's
outer office. Robert Haldeman,
has had to use fairly strong lan-
guage to rally some of the troops
in the White House staff.
STILL ANOTHER sign of this
same loneliness is the further
fact that the President came
pretty close to mentioning it.
with considerable frankness, in
his recent report to the coun-
try. Altogether, whether or not
you agree with his judgment,
you have to admire the man's
guts. For it must take immense
guts to go forward almost alone,
on what he believes Is the right
course for the country.
The real meaning of the Pres-
ident's speech, of course, was
that he means to go forward,
come hell or high water, with
the orderly Vietnamization of
the war. A good summary of the
speech Is the remark of U.S.
Grant at the culminating crisis
of our Civil War: "We'll fight It
out on this line if it takes all
summer."
IN THE PRESENT case, alas,
it will take considerably longer
than all summer. The main rea-
son is that Vietnamization was
hardly even conceived of, much
less properly prepared for, un-
der President Johnson, and was
then the subject of active Initial
cheating in President Nixon's
own Defense Department.
As a result, the South Viet-
namese do not now have enough
of what our Army calLs "the
assets" to go it alone against
Hanoi's troops. Worse still, not
enough South Vietnamese have
yet been trained to use these
assets the helicopters, the
tactical air support and the ar-
tillery and training is always
a time-consuming process, espec-
ially with complex equipment.
THAT IS REALLY the main
reason the President was not
able to announce the Instant
Vietnamization some people are
calling for. Until the South
Vietnamese have the assets in
hand and are ready to use them,
total and immediate Vietnamiza-
tion is impossible, or rather. It
Is just a recipe for leaving tens
of thousands of American dead
on the battlefield and limply
accepting needless defeat with
all its worldwide consequences.
That is one key to the Presi-
dent's speech. The other is the
confident sentence: "As in Cam-
bodia, what Is important is not
the instant analysis of the mo-
ment but what happens in the
future."
THAT ONE. obviously, was
the President's comment on the
post-Laos atmosphere, which
has promoted a tendency to
panic in the government that
even extends, as above-noted,
into the President's own staff.
<
., : &
*
At the time, all the wiseacres
pronounced the President's Cam-
bodian gamble a dreadful fail-
ure. By now. it is universally ac-
knowledged that the gamble has
all but ended the war in the
richest, most populous, most im-
portant half of South Vietnam.
In reality, however, the pres-
ent atmosphere in this sordid,
silly city is more like that after
the Tet offensive of 19(18 than
after the Cambodian gamble last
year. H is ludicrous that this
should be so; for the Tet offen-
sive at least produced superficial
results that looked pretty hair-
Continued en Pag* 5-1
/\S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK It's rough going on the Broadway stage if
you're known to l>o Number One. I saw Edward Albce's "All
Over." found it (despite :, majority of the critiesi a striking if un-
fulfilled play, and marveled at how perilous the American theater
is for the established playwright even more than for the
fledgling.
"All Over" Ls not a play about death: Albee is still too young
to write about death with the hatred and exultation it demands.
It Ls a play about the life around a deathbed. At this arrested
moment of time at the death-watch by wife, mistress, daugh-
ter, son. best friend, doctor, nurse you get not the overview
of the man's life but glimpses of the lives of those waiting for
him to die. But the harrowing thing, more harrowing than death
itself, is that the life around the deathbed is itself a form of
dying, of death-in-life.
ALBEE is TOO much a veteran craftsman to push his point.
It Ls a raking play, but not lugubrious. The conversation is witty,
wayward, rambunctious, wandering, at times stilted, often per-
verse. George Bernard Shaw's plays of ideas are comprised of
talk full of paradox. Albee likes reminiscent talk to Hght up
life's cruelties and absurdities. You settle back and let the talk
lap over you like a not-so-gentle wave.
If you think talk must always point up to some dramatic
action, this is not the play for you. The action, what there is of
it, Is interior. In a flawless piece of acting and production the
rapier-play is verbal, the wounds and sears are in the mind, the
cruelties are done before your eyes (especially the mother's to
her daughter and son I while the characters sit almost as still
as in O'Neill's masque-like plays. Some playwrights throw their
lines away, but Alive seems so confident of what he could do
(If he chose) with theatrics that he throws his action away.
THUS IT ISN'T THE KINO of play where you see the
characters growing and changing in their conflicts with each
other. But you see unforgettably how they have become
what they are. One of the points Albee is making is how iso-
lated we are, how caught in the prison of our past and Its spent
dreams and its hurts. A captive, unwilling group gathered of
necessity like Sartre's people in their hell, these people reveal
as much of themselves as they know how, never quite facing
what they have done to each other and to themselves.
We are left with something which, if not pity and terror,
is at least an overwhelming sadness. If the critics (except for
Clive Barnes and Harold Clurman) have been unsparing of
Albee. one must add that Albee has been unsparing to life. None
of our important playwrights, from O'Neill to Beckett, Pinter
and Arbee, have been particularly happy people. One could twist
O'Shaughnessy's great line, "What was he doing, the Great God
Pan/Making a playwright out of a man?"
THE TROUBLE WITH being in Albee's position this wa
true once also of O'Neill, Hellman, Miller and Tennessee Williams
is that the critics and audiences want you to strike "12" each
time you write a new play. They love the sweet smell of a sure-
fire hit. In our witless concern only with the individual piece of
work, we forget that a new play is part of an arc of development.
We are too hurried to study its place in the arc.
If O'Neill were alive and had just written and produced
"Moon for the Misbegotten," or "More Stately Mansions," most
critics would cut it and him into little pieces, and say he
had become the club bore. But O'Neill was what he was because
each play was neither victory nor defeat, but a continuing war
with himself.
WE HAVE ENOUGH DISTANCE now to see what has
happened to the American theater during the past decade .of
storm. The prices have zoomed, as have wages and .demands; the
economics of Broadway are still impossible; the critics still exert
too much power in a too centralized media situation. The "revo-
lutionary" plays have largely proved to be duds; the regional
theater never really took off. The black playwrights have an
anger to express and something to say, and some will come
through.
Soinewhere between the theater of entertainment, the theater
of ideas, the theater of the propaganda platform, the theater as
outrage, and the theater as participatory therapy, the young
playwright of today has to find his confused way. But there ls
enough experimental work off-Broadway and off-off to convince
this theater buff, for one that a new breed of playwrights along
with the established ones, like Albee, can bring it off.
After all the screaming obscenities of language, after the
hair and the wearisome nudity, after the cacophonies, we may
get a reassertion that the theater has not become, like opera, a
museum piece, but is still the greatest of the performing arts.
BBBBaB__B_flBBBl


Friday. April 30, 1971
+.Je*lsl) Hcrldltori
Page 5
Post-season theatre brought Nancy Kolly |n -The Ginger-
bread Lady" to the Parker Playhouse. Zev Bufman was so
pleased with the huge success of the regular subscription sea-
son that he decided to try at least one more play The Ginger-
bread Lady and perhaps a second "extra added bonus" play
starring Mickey Rooney. This hasn't been definately decided on
at this writing, but the possibility looks good for Broward
playgoers.
Nancy Kelly was just super in her role of an alcoholic In
Gingerbread Lady. She plays it like a real old fashioned guzzling,
stumbling drunk and surely turned in one of the best perform-
ances of the Parker season. The play itself, while not one of
Neil Simon's best, still shows some of his sparkling one-liners.
He didn't manage to show much plot or even much character
motivation but oil in all it was a professional job and a produc-
tion that locals *an enjoy. And that Nancy Kelly well, she
just has to be the greatest!!:'!!
ft ft ft
Spoke to Marvin Cohen, who is now a full fledged real estate
saleejma working for S. and N. Kurash. It's been a while since he
sold out of Hollywood Lakes Club and he just got tired of re-
tirement; he's enjoying his start on a new career. Wife, Ruth, baa
just returned from New York, where she visited their children,
Steve and Judith Ann. She really made like a mother rapping
with Assistant Professor Steve who teaches at Princeton and
daughter Judith who is teaching under-privileged children in the
city itself. Steve graduated from Pinecrest School here in Fort
I-auderdale and Marvin says he never thought he was professor
material in those days.
ft ft
This seems to lie the time of the year to head for the North
and particularly to visit one's children. I'hyllis and Sid Stengel
visited their newlywed daughter. Louise, and her husband, Sieve
Keller. Steve has a job as a consulting engineer and Louise will
gntduatc from college in June and already has a job teaching
next Fall at Dwight York. The Stengel boys are also both teach-
ing. Buddy is here in Hollywood student teaching and John
is teaching in Oklahoma City. Sid tells me that John called home
the other evening to tell them that he will be getting married in
August ... the bride-to-be is a teacher too!!! Sid and Phylis
nre planning on a trip to Spain and Portugal in November. Holly-
woodites could start a colony there, judging from the number
of natives who are making the trek!!!
ft ft ft
HITS AND PIECES Carol and Karl Morganstein will be
new .residents of South Lake. Kail's an eminent N.Y. car spe-
cialist; Carol is Ceil Goldfarb's daughter. They're due here next
month and Ceil and Sam Goldfarb will be happy to have them
close by. Ruth and Joe Banff's daughter and son-in-law,
Susan and Bruce, were visiting them; they brought their three
children, too. EUse Simon Weil will be visiting Dorothy
and Jesse Fine for a few days and will spend the time seeing
some of her old friends. She loves Denver and her life there. .
Annette and Bernie Milloff just back from a short vacation at
Ocean Reef in the Keys. Annette tells me that it was fabulous
and she's ready to go back any time. Dorothy Klein
flew up and s|ent a few days with daughter Gerry and son-in-
law Joff. She says the time was too short (but that's the time to
leave before you've worn out your welcome). Dorothy and Mac's
son, David, is busy in the Attorney's Division of the Federation
Campaign.
ft ft ft
At a Young Leaders meeting in Alex Kobb's home, the dis-
cussion was on anti-Semitism and its prevalence in Broward
County. Norm Atkin. Howard Berman, Lee Duffner, Mark
Fried, David Classman, Larry Hunter, Sam Meline, James
Miller, Reuben Schneider, Errol Rosen, Joe Schwartz, and Pete
Weinstein were among those attending,
ft ft ft
TRAVELING Randy Fuerst, Florence and Howard's son
just back from making the college tour. While looking over the
colleges so that he can make his choice for next year, he visited
his older brother Scott at the Univeristy of Pennsylvania. .
Marta Rottman, Sylvia and Joel's daughter, also made the tour
to choose her college. Roy Qaronemus has already decided
he will enter Harvard in the fall. Judy Rinsky, Sid and
Grace Finkel's daughter, just returned from visiting her hus-
band, Art, a young lawyer stationed in Vietnam. Together they
visited Hong Kong and Bangkok. Another young Holly-
woodrte serving in Vietnam, Ralph Oser, also had a visit from
his wfte. He Should be hdme by the middle of June his tour
of duty completed, I hear.__________________
MAX RJ GOIF BALLS $.M per Dot.
NfW TITLHST OOtF BALLS $10.95 per Dox.
FULL UNI OF GOLF ACCESSORIES
POOt TAMJS 4x8 GENUINE SIATE 7/8 INCH $395.00
ATLANTIC
RECREATION SUPPLY
Cor. N. 60th Ave. Taft St. (Rte 441), Hollywood
Rhone 989-9172
Chai Lodge
Welcomes
Suggestions
Dr. Philip A. Levin, who was
installed as president of Chai
Lodge recently, issued the follow-
ing statement iiikjii assuming of-
fice.
"Hollywood's Chai Lodge No.
2574 of B'nai B'rilh cannot afford
to rely on its past accomplish-
ments, which include the founding
of "Teen-Age Hot Line," co-spon-
soring a "Get Out To Vote" cam-
paign, services to the children's
division of the State Hospital,
sponsoring athletic teams for the
youngsters of Hollywood, and
many other projects too numerous
to name.
"If we depend upon our reputa-
tion to carry us through these
next few years, we will be taking
a giant step backward.
'More important than our obli-
gation to the national organization
of which we are a part is our re-
sponsibility to the community in
which we live. Consequently, this
year will be devoted to projects
designated to make Hollywood a
better place to live and raise our
families.
"There are many things that
iieeil to be done and many people
with good Ideas. We of Chai Lodge
welcome any suggestions ;it any
time which will help us serve our
community."
Young Leaders
Elect Officers,
Adopt By-Laws
Officers for the coming year
were elected by the Young Lead-
ers Council of Jewish Welfare
Federation at a recent meeting.
The slate includes Dr. Samuel
Meline, president; David Good-
man, program vice president; Ira
Larry Hunter, membership vice
president; Mark Fried, youth vice
president and Dr. Alex Kobb, so-
cial vice president.
James Jacobson was named to
serve as secretary of the organiza-
tian; Dr. David Glassman will be
its treasurer for the coming year.
The group also adopted a set of
By-Laws outlining its functions.
the duties of its officers, and its
relationship to the Jewish Welfare
Federation, its parent body.
^Matter of \faci ij/f
JOSEPH AISOP
Continued from Page 4
raising. It took real knowledge
and independence of judgment
to see beneath the surface of the
horrific reports on Tet from
Saigon.
DAY AFTER DAY at that
time, one cannot too often re-
call, the blackest headlines an-
nounced total- diaster for the
United States and its allies. Only
about six months later, and with-
out any black headlines, the same
publications began to admit that
Tet had instead been a fearful
military and political disaster for
Hanoi. And thus they belatedly
told the truth!
The President believes that in
another six months there will be
the same startling contrast be-
tween the first excessively pes-
simistic reports on the Laos in-
vasion and the final good results
that can already be expected.
And the chances are very strong
indeed that the President will
after the Cambodian gamble last
be proved "dang right."
Nova University's Groups Combine
The Nova University Library
Society and the Hollywood Wom-
en's Division of Nova University
have merged into one group in
order to more effectively further
their aims. The newly merged
group will purchase hooks and
periodicals for the Nova University
Libraries.
The first joint effort for the
group will be a luncheon ami
fashion show Friday May 7 at the
Plantation Country Club under the
cochairmanship of Mrs. Bernard
Milloff and Mrs. Charles Nutter.
Mrs. Mary Fanning has been
named temporary secretary; Mrs.
Frances Briefer is the temporary
treasurer.
POOL & PATIO BARGAIN BONANZA
SAVE AT LEAST 25%
CHAISE LOUNGES, CHAIRS, GLIDERS, SAND CHAIRS
BEACH UMBRELLAS TABLES & CHAIRS,
PATIO UMBRELLAS
Complete Line Of Balcony Furniture
WROUGHT IRON & WROUGHT ALUMINUM DINETTE
SETS & FURNITURE
PATIO UMBRELLAS REPAIRED RECOVERED OR REFRINGED
YOUR ONE-STOP POOL A PATIO SHOP
im N. OtaK Miry, noaywood u i*ck N. ef Tafc st.l
PHONE 922-2289
WANTED
MALE COUNSELORS AND JUNIOR COUNSELORS
FOR CAMP KA-DEE-MAH
Hollywood's Jewish Community Sponsored Day Camp
7 Weeks June 14 to July 30
Salary level depends on qualifications
Minimum age 16 or entering 11th grode
Contact Richard Goldstein, Camp Director
by calling 927-0536
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
144 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, H0LIYW00D
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"A Service Within The Means Of All"
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
Temple 3etk 1
Wlemotial
(jazdens
The only all-jew h cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923-8255 or write:
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE.-HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature, on the above. .
NAME: _^_-----------------------------------
ADDRESS: .______________________
- Mm
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE" and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES


Page 8
vJewlsti ftcrMlairi
l-riday. April 30. 1971
Shown at a >-o/-or.t meeting of the Jewish War Veterans
where Dr. Harry Karpeles, (second from left) a member of
the faculty of Temple University's School of Medicine and a
former member of the Planning Department of Philadel-
phia's Jewish Federation, discussed the differences in Jew-
ish and Christian concepts of charity are Michael Rurvel,
(left) executive director of Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wel-
fare Federation, Jack Bermcm, past commander of Post 613,
JWV, and Arthur Sherry, (right) the Post's present com-
mander.
'Children Of The Exodus'
On Young Adults' Program
The Youth and Youns Adult Di-
vision of the Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration, represented by Mark
Fried and Joe Schwartz, in coop-
eration with the Religious School
cf Tempi.1 Both Sholom, furnished
ji program devoted to the Holo-
( ust .ind the United J wish Ap-
peal recently.
The proernm was highlighted by
the showing of a film called "Chil-
dren of the Exodus." narrated by
Z'-ro Mostrl which i i:i> Ihe suc-
cessful search for five children
who cscai>ed or were rescu"d from
concentration camps 20 years la-
ter in Israel. It also depicts life in
the "camps" a- seen through the
drawings of a 10-year-old inmate.
Included was th- lighting of a
six candle menorah commemorat-
ing the six million who were killed
at the hands of the Nazis, and the
Cantor concluded the pmgram
Hallandale B.B.W.
Chapter Installs
At the Hallandale Chapter of
B'nai IViiih Women meeting last
week in the Home Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Building on Hallan-
dale Beach Boulevard, the new of-
ficers elected by the chapter were
installed.
The guest speaker was Mrs. Ar-
thur Laufman. a past president
and chairman of major commit-
tees of both the national and in-
ternational B.B.W. organizations.
She spoke on "The Importance of
Volunteers."
Serving as the 1971-72 president
is Miss Mollye A. Ginsberg, who
accepted the gavel at the meeting;
vice presidents for .the coming year
are Mrs. Pauline Schweitzer, Mrs.
Yetta Levy, Mrs. Bert Massing
and Mrs. Ruth Solomon. Mrs.
Helen Rosenberg was installed as
recording secretary: Mrs. Evelyn
Albert as corresponding secretary,
Mrs. Rose Sherman as financial
secretary, Mrs. Bernice Safferson
as treasurer and Mrs. Betty Cohan
as parliamentarian.
Executive Board members in-
clude Mrs. Rose Bernstein, Mrs.
Minna Davidson, Mrs. Natalie
Schneck, Mrs. Lillian Goldman and
Mrs. Lillian Glasson.
FLORIDA'S
SHOWCASE
RESTAURANT
Viking Sized Cocktails
Superb Cuisine Priced from $2.50
Music for dancing
by Eddie Chavez & his orchestra
Banquet facilities for groups of 2 to 400
Open from 5:00 P.M.
every day except Mon.
Reservations: 927-2566
(Dade) 945-5621
* VIKWG
RESTAURANT It LOUNGE
% Mile ituth if Ft. Laufcrfale-Hillyvori
littraatitnal Airptrt U.S. 1, Dili*
with a rendition of the traditional
"Ail Molah Rachamem," used in
the memorial service for a de-
ceased parent.
The purpose of the program
in addition to teaching about the
holocaust was to educate the
children to the need for participa-
tion in the community-sponsored
Tzedokah program which collects
funds on the broadest possible
basis and disburses it, with the
involvement of the community, to
all major recognized Jewish agen-
cies and organizations.
Brandeis Luncheon Will
Feature Contemporary Art
The Broward Chapter of the
National Women's Committee of
Brandeis University will hold its
Spring luncheon Friday at the
home of Mrs. Rubin Klein.
The luncheon theme will be
"Who-What-How of Contemporary
Art." The program will also in-
clude an award of art work donated
by Evelyn Favus. Judith Stevens
Sayfie, painter and lithographer,
will be the guest speaker. Reserva-
tions may be made by contacting
Mrs. Harry Sommers.
J$ar *JMitzvalt
Eric, the son of Dr. and Mrs.
Arthur Stlilman, will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah Saturday, May 8,
at Temple Sinai.
-it it
Benjamin Scott, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Sheldon Shaffer, will become
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, May 1, at
Temple Sinai.
FOOD MART
27 W. IEACH ILVD.
HALLANDALE
DELIVERY SERVICE
SERVICE CHARGE
CHOICE MEATS
FANCY GROCERIES
BEER WINE
WE WILL DELIVER
ANYWHERE IN
HALLANDALE
9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
MON. THRU SAT.
m 949-1246
INDIAN MM FKUIT
TKOPICAL muis
CAMDItS
fancy nun floxts
0*AMGt BlOSSOm HONEY
GLAZED 'RO/T
OtOEl NOW TO*
MOTHER'S DAY
Bonded Gift Fruit
Shippers
Mail Order
109 WILEY STREET
Opposite Breedings Parking let
H*4l,wd, Flo. 33020
PHONE 927-5447
w
LADIES EYEBROWS
ARCHED PERMANENTLY!!!
NEVER TWEEZE AGAINIIf
s
MEN'S
IEARDS REMOVED OR
SHAPED PERMANENTLY!!
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Free Consultation
ROBERT A. LEAVITT
Rej. Electrolofist
213 I. Hallo.dol. Blvd*.
By Appoiitw.it 920-5050
M.M.
says
Mnoriv* Meyers
Ce.npoign Chairman
Apartments Division
of Jewish
Welfare Federation

Congratulations to the Buildinc. Chairman of the foil..wins
buildings through whose efforts more money was raised in 1971
than in any previous year in their building:
Baker Towers
Galahad North
Galahad South
Galahad Court
Hollywood Towers
Hyde Park Towers
Nottingham Hall
Presidential Towers
Sheridan Lakes (2300 Bldg.)
Trafalger Tower 1
Twelve Pillars
Windsor
Cambridge Towers
Wellington Towers
Ambassador South
Bldgs. 3129, 3133 & 3135
Beacon Towers
Chelsea Hall
Coastal Waterway
Fairways 400
Fairways 500
Fairways 600
Golden Bay Towers
Golden Sails
Guildford Plaza
Imperial Gardens
all 4 Bldgs.)
Imperial Towers (1817 & 1825)
Paradise Harbour
Paradise Towers
Park Layne Towers
Sea Edge
Temple Expansion Plans are Unveiled
Rabbi Morton Malavsky. spirit-
ual leader of Temple Beth Shalom.
Jack Shapiro, temple president and
Edward Kaplan, Building Fund
chairman, unveiled the plans for
a sanctuary and social hall to be
built at the Arthur Street location
during a recent congregational
meeting.
The new buildings will be erect-
ed adjacent to the temple's pres-
ent school facilities, it was an-
nounced. When completed, the
sanctuary will accommodate 600
persons, and there will be room
for 1.000 people in the social hall.
Groundbreaking is expected to
take place within the year; Morris
Lapidus is the architect, it was
reported.
The announcement was met with'
much enthusiasm, and substantial
financial support was pledged by
the group attending the function.
Dining .& Dancing Nightly Till 2 A.M.
in Florida's New$st & Smartest Supper Club
Joe DeCarlo Trio Q Sonny Bell Qrgan
Serving Daily from 11:30 a.m.
Harold & Ruth Lunch's STAGECOACH INN .
4620 HaJfsndalo Blvd. Hollywood. Phone: 983-4068
HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY
THE HUNGRY U RESTAURANT
FAMOUS FOR STEAKS SEAFOOD
CHICKEN CHOPS
LUNCHEONS I DINNERS
COMPLETE MENUS
1451 S State Rd 7 ................._......._...........___....._ 987-9860
Say It With Flowers on Mother's Day!
Flowers and Price* to suit everyone!
DIAL 922-8051
Open Till 9 P.M. Fri. Set.
All Day Sunday
NIGHTS SUNDAYS HOLIDAYS
CALL 922-3197
MOIRE-BOUCLE-XLITE ROOM DARKENING-WASHABLE
CUSTOM SHADES
40% DISCOUNT
CHOICE OF SCALLOP FRINGE
PROMPT DELIVERY
MANUFACTURED IN OUR OWN PUNT
MANY SIZES TO CHOOSE FROM
54" x 48" SALE $8.70
72" x 48' -SALE $17.39
LIMITED TIME ONLY INSTALLATION ARRANGED
-SAVE ON-
DRAPERIES BEDSPREADS CARPETING
KING INTERIORS
101 N. DIXIE HIGHWAY
HALLANDALE, FLA. 33009
PHONE: 929-2986
^oe^e*
^v\eca*v
otion
ooe*^


Friday. April 30. 1971
"Jtnisti fkridiair
Page 7
OUR TOWN
by bobbe sehlesinger
No Place Like Home?
How about getting away for a week to your
very own 4-beilroom penthouse pad, equipped
with private swimming pool, high atop an ex-
quisite 15-floor luxury condominium overlooking
the sand and surf of Acapulco, Mexico? Well,
that's exactly what Leon and CamiUe Sultan did
along with Dr. Don and Lee Herman recently.
They somehow managed to tear themselves away
from that plush setting to do some shopping and
sightseeing in Taseo and Mexico City during
their "South of the Border" sojourn.
Meanwhile, back on the other side of the
world, New Zealand, Australia, and Tahiti may
just never be the same after the whirlwind visit
made by our own Hollywood jet set: (and jet set
they were, literally, since the group spent 22 air
hours on their flight over) Dr. Tom and Joan
Rodenberg, Dr. Louis and Roth Sands Dr. and
Mrs. Richard Shafron, Dr. Danny and BilUe de
LaPenha, and the Drs. Sid and Leady Peck.
The enthusiastic travelers loved, loved, loved
New Zealand, the land abounding in flowers,
beautiful people and green velvet grass; took in
the sights of the very metropolitan Sidney, Aus-
tralia (including an antique show and even a
Bar Mitzvah); and marveled at the lush accom-
odations and exquisite beauty of Tahiti; black
sand, Gnugin Museum, Bali Hai and all! To top
it all off, during the flight home, the airline pro-
vided Kosher Passover meals to all comers.
Joan Rodenberg accepted. Not even the lone-
some omelet and single piece of matzoh in the
ico of the sumptuous offerings of pancakes and
French toast served at breakfast time was
t-nough to dampen the enthusiasm of that scin-
tillating femme, Joan, who kept the faith, faith-
fully!
A big welcome home to one and all. New
Zealand, Australia Tahiti and Mexico's Joss is
Hollywood's gain, sure'nuff. _,J
Habimah Happening
When the Habimah Players made their first
appearance at a Hadassah donor luncheon some
four years ago, little did they realize that their
fledgling offering would mushroom into a de-
mand for more and more appearances. Members
)f the talented group are Evie (Mrs. Fred)
Blumenthal, Sylvia (Mrs. Bob) Herman and
Elaine (Mrs. Monroe) Ruda. They present a
delightful 45 minute program of narration and
songs of Israel. Teba Baliek is the director and
Runny Sharf, the author. With four years of
performing experience tucked neatly under their
belts before such distinguished audiences as the
Women's Division of the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion, Miami Beach Chapter ot Hadassah and all
the local temple Sisterhoods, the group has been
most recently requested by the American Zionist
Federation to appear at the Miami Beach Audi-
torium. Tis all in honor of the 23rd Anniversary
of the forming of the State of Israel on April
29th. They'll be sharing the spotlight with a
most distinguished gentleman arriving for the
big doings. Sen. Birch Bayh. That's nifty com-
pany, to be sure, for those gals who are really
going places. Who knows, might mean Broadway!
Shades Of Bela Lugosi
It was a night of witches and warlocks, black
cats and hob-goblins when 150 of our local sor-
cerers and sorceresses were summoned to a
"Coven" by an ominous invitation that read as
follows: "Double, Double. Toil and Trouble, Fire
Burn and Cauldron Bubble, at Your Own Risk
Proceed to the Abode of Al and Carol Goodman
of the R.O.W.W. (that's "Royal Order of War-
locks and Witches" for you folks not in on
occult lingo) requesting HS.V.P.'s with "ritual
regrets only," but of course.
Carol, exquisitely garbed in a lavender jump-
suit and matching print hostess skirt, (undoubt-
edly the prettiest witch in these here parts) on
the arm of hubby Al who was swathed in a vo--
luminour black cape) presented each of their
arriving guests with a wolf's eye to be worn
throughout the eve as a protective force. (It
was of plastic, but you could have fooled me).
And, that was just for openers. The place jumped
until the wee hours with rock bands and caylpso
bands, native dancers, singers and guitarists,
fortune tellers, wizards, magicians and metal-
ists. At one point in the eve. a ghost slowly
inched its way out of a large can with nary a
soul within ten feet of it. (We're si ill trying to
figure how that one was pulled off).
Some of the many seen amidst the partying
throng of ghosts and goblins a-go-go were noted
artists, sculptors, judges and even a State
Attorney General: Floiida's own Robert L.
Shevin. Lewis Van Dercar, nationally-known
sculptor and Elmo (ildeon, artist extraordinaire,
were there, too, as well as the most honorable
"gents of the bench'' and their respective spouses.
Judge Hal Dekle, Judge Donald Stone, Judge
Arthur Winston and Judge Thomas O'Connell.
Judy and Fred Lippman (he's a Memorial Hos-
pital board member) seemed to be enjoying it
all as were Rena and Fred Riehman, Mickey and
Ruth KrgaU, Iris and George Crane, Herb and
Shirley Gold and Al Middleberg. That good-look-
ing twosome Leonard and Sally Bobbin* were on
hand, too, as well as Al Jacobs, the talented song-
writer of "This is My Country" fame. As parties
go, it went. Straight to the top of the list of
lollapaloozas!
Kosher Campers
If that caravan of campers at the Royal
Coachman Camp Ground in Venice, Fla., looked
vaguely familiar, 'tis no wonder. The eight fam-
ilies with a total of 24 children in tow were our
very own, Bob and Mimi Sabra, John and Donna
Eaton, Lee and Marian Eggnatz, Dave and
Diane Snyder, Andy and Brenda Greenman,
George and Roby Kline. Sy and Phyllis Levin, the
Sandy Yankows and Mrs. Morris Yankow. The
nature lovers relinquished the air-conditioned,
wall-to-wall carpeted comforts of their splendid
homefires for a four-day weekend in the great
outdoors. And what better time of the year than
at Passover? The franks and burgers were re-
placed, however, with the traditional Passover
matzoh and wine for the Friday night "seder al
fresco" conducted by Dave Snyder and Sy Levin
on the campsite. That just had to be a camp-out
without equal.
People And Places
An 1897 Morgan Silver dollar is the most re-
cent acquisition of Neil Stone, handsome coin-
collecting son of Dr. Dave and Shelly Stone.
Congrats, Neil, on your exciting find Play-
bill photographer picture snapping that photo-
genic twosome, Cal and Ina Linda at the Park-
er's opening night performance of "Private Lives"
starring Tammy Grimes. .
Those four indefatigable Yorras, Llla, Dave,
Ann and Al, fearlessly fought the onslaught of
fever-pitched fans for entrance to the Tom Jones
show at the Deauville recently. According to the
gals, it was well worth the battle. .
The American Cancer Society's second an-
nual "Race For Life" benefit at Gulf stream Race
Track seemed to bring out the best in people" as
evidenced by the sellout crowd on hand for lunch
and a day at the races. Putting their best fashion
forward were Dr. and Mrs. Harry Orringer with
guests Mr. and Mrs. Joseph NeuUnger and' Mrs.
Sam NeuUnger; Maralyn (Mrs. Paul* Anton,
Carolyn Caster, Annette Milioff. the TlFSor-
ins, Marcia Silver, Mildred (Mrs. Sidney") Lwrla,
Barbara Peretz, Dr. Mel and Shirley SdHfrand
a host of others who contributed their a!Mo* the
smashing success. .
That gal who excels in one field is a 'sure bet
to excel in another. She's our own dUtft (Mrs.
Stanley) Greenspan, the crackerjadc" campaign
chairman of the Women's Division of'the Jewish
Welfare Federation. Mrs. G. recem% won the
champion's trophy for the Women's Oltt Cham-
pionships at Emerald Hills Country Club for the
second straight year. One more victory and the
cup is hers forcvermore .
Hear tell that Dr. Shel Willeas In a powder
blue velour vest and trousers suit, stole the best
dressed male awards at a cocktail party hosted
by Dr. Jerry and Laura SlegeL Enjoying it all
were Doug and Marzi Kaplan, Leonard and
Barbara Fleet. Mort and Marey Levin. Marilyn
and Ed Kaplan, the Sam MeruMH; Die Fellers,
Hal Sabras, Manny Blans, Leon Mbrse and the
Myron Brodlea. These bridee buffs were on hand,
tod. Shirley and Abe Fishier, Sandy and Dick
Relnstean and Betty and Dave Khshner. 'Twas
a beauteous bash!
Mrs. William Kowitt, (center) was producer, director and mu-
sical aranger lor the show "Tevye, the Dairyman," spon-
sored by the Senior Friendship Club ol Temple Beth Shalom.
Mrs. Irving Feinstein (left) played the part of Gittel; Morton
Agen (right) played Tevye.
1 LEONARD MARGOUS
OPTOME T RIST
Eyes Examined Contact Lenses
ANNOUNCES
The Opening of New Offices
DIPLOMAT MALL
1799 E. HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD. PHONE 925 2112
BUY DIRECT FROM
FACTORY
SUIT
AND
DRESS
SALE
DOUBLE KNIT
POLYESTER
AT
SENSA TIONAL
PRICES!
SIZES \i\*nv*
OPEN 9 to 4:30 WEEK DAYS 9 to 12 NOON SATURDAY
CLOSED SUNDAY
"MAKt UP A CAR POOL...
IT'S SMART TO BE THRIFTY"
TAFT
MANUFACTURING CO.
2029 TAFT STREET
HOLLYWOOD


Page 8
+Jewish H&rMkM)
Friday. April 301971
, /,

The Jewish Welfare Federation Of Greater Hollywood
Exists Because Everyone
Is Not As Fortunate As You Are
It is the responsibility of everyone in Greater Hollywood to
help build a stronger, healthier community. And to help
plan far enough ahead to be able to meet our growing needs.
But since everyone is not as fortunate, everyone is not able
to share the responsibility.
That is why we must continue to maintain those pro-
grams that can strengthen all the people in our community.
Especially those who need help before they can begin to help.
And that is why the Jewish Welfare Federation is es-
pecially committed to helping the entire community of Great-
er Hollywood as well as Jews throughout the world.
By supporting the Jewish Welfare Federation we can
ease the burden of growing even older for those whose wisdom
can help us plan for the future of our community. We can
redirect the energies of our youth toward building up our
community. And we can offer guidance to those whose family
difficulties and emotional problems prevent them from lead-
ing meaningful, productive lives in our community.
With your help we can also infuse Greater Hollywood
with the ideas of tolerance, unity and community concern
which have strengthened the Jewish people through 4,000
years of oppression and injustice.
Through the Jewish Welfare Federation we can main-
tain the programs that will help all the people of our com-
munity help build a stronger, healthier place to live.
But to continue these projects and develop others that
will serve the future needs of all the people, the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood needs your active
support.
Because everyone is not as fortunate as you are.
Survival Means Sacrifice
Jewish Welfare Federation Of Greater Hollywood

1909 Harrison Street
Hollywood, Florida 33020
K


April 30. 1971
+Jc*isi>fk>rkliari
Question
Page 9
Box
i* Ule Hebrew month
Iknowu as thr "Month of
lebrew word "Abib" moans
and Nisan is, of course,
bth of -Spring.
are some commentaries
Itim that the word "Abib"
Imeans "Father" and the
Iword which has the letters
land "Beth" indicates the
twelve. This would signify
" month of Nisan is the
H" or thi? "Head" of all the
lonths of the year.
in most of Biblical lit-
the montlis are referred
numbers giving their suc-
vc relationship to the month
.an which is classified as the
I month. The month of Nisan
beginning or "head" of the
is because it is the month
(lg which the Exodus took
when the enslaved Hebrews
I Egypt. This event, being so
Val in Jewish theology, was
hashed as the first month
the peoplehood of Israel was
kjrmt-d by the event of the
3us which indicated the inten-
I of the Almighty to secure the
|ny of His chosen people.
hy M it that during this
nth of N isan th* usual penl-
i.-i prayer* in the daily wrv-
i am omitted?
st of the month has days in
bh festivity is noted. The first
Ive days of the month are the
in which the twelve tribes
special sacrifices in the
. Tabernacle of the Wilderness in
the spirit of dedication in the new
sanctuary.
The Passover festival Itself
takes up eight more days of the
month, plus the day before Pass-
over, which are festive days. This
throws a cast of joy over the whole
month which is thus character-
ized as a festive month in which
penitential prayers are deleted
so that a mood of festivity can
endure for the entire month.
Why is the Passover holiday
sometimes ealled Chug HamatzoN
and sometimes called Pesach?
Some commentaries write that
the name Chag Hamatzos (Feast
of the unleavened bread) is the
name given to the holiday by the
Almighty who is impressed by the
fact that His children In Israel
are so meticulous in cleaning their
homes and not eating unleavened
bread on the Passover.
The other name Pesach is a
name which the people of Israel
used to refer to this holiday be-
cause this name means to "Pass
Over" or to "Spare," the idea be-
ing, the Almighty is extoled for
sparing the first born of the chil-
dren of Israel while he smote the
first born of the Egyptians during
the course of the last plague.
Some explain that the two names
are used because the matzohs on
the one hand remind us of our af-
fliction and they arc for this rea-
Bon called "The Bread of Afflic-
tion" or the "Poor Man's Bread."
FLOWER'S FOR
MOTHER'S DAY
Phone 983-4367
JOAX'S
FLORIST
600 No. State Rd. 7
WE DELIVER
For Mother's Day
Order Ahead!
Take Out Service
WONGS!
| Specializing in Cantonese
Style Chinos* Food
I Mallandal* Beach Blvd.
Phono 981-5252
7 Day* 12 Noon-8:30
Order Ahead For ...
Mother's Day
Open Sundays 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.
KIELB'S
QUALITY BAKERY
All Baking Done on Premises
Place Your Orders Any Tim*
DAY OR NIGHT
987-5054
6857 Taft St., Hollywood
The Streeter's Have Owned &
Operated Kielb's Bakery For
The Past Four Years -
Treat Your Loved Ones With
One of These Fine Cakes
or Logs Ice Cream Cake Roll
Try Our Delicious
ITALIAN SPUMONI
CARVEL
ICE CREAM
300 W Hallandale Beeach Blvd
Phone 923-0340
They are thus reminiscent of the
state and |x>vcrty under which our
brethren worked in Egypt as
slaves.
On the other hand, the name
"Pesach" refers more directly to
the idea of redemption and cele-
brates the fact that our brethren
were redeemed from Egypt. It is
worth noting that this demon-
strates how the Jewish people re-
member both the blessings as well
as the tragedies and embarass-
ments that took place In the course
of their long history. The embar-
rassment served to humble them.
while the redemptive acts served
to make them most thankful and
indebted to the Almighty, the
Heaven!) Father.
rCeliqioiis <_5
ervicca
SOLEL (TEMPLE) 3300 N. 46 Avenue
(Temporary office) Liberal.
HAUANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
12S N. E. 1t Ave. **
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (TEMPLE) 1351 S. 14 Av
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. 4;
BETH 8HALOM (TEMPLWV. 172t
Monroe St. Conservative Bibb
Morton Malavsky. Cantor Irving,
Gold. 44
SINAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. 41
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (TEMPLE) 6920 S.W. 36th St
Conservative. Rabbi Elliot J. Wino-
grad. Cantor Abraham Koster. 41
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. S101
N.W. 9th St.
Dr. Norman Landman of Hollywood, shown on his recent
tour of Israel as a member of a United Jewish Appeal Study
Mission, declared "I honestly feel that every American Jew
has to get involved in order to maintain the democracy of
this country."
FOR MOTHER'S DAY
MARCEILA'S
RESTAURANT
No. 4 Broward 400 South State Road 7
981-4050-981-5101
Baked Lasagna .............._............................___
New York Steak ................._
Combination Platter .................................
Veal Scaloppini.................................._
1.95
3.95
2.95
2.95
K^^ommunitu \^alend(
ar
FRIDAY, AFRIl 30
Notional Woman's Comm. Brandeis Univ. Broward Chapter
Luncheon, Noon, Homo of Mrs. Rubin Klein
MONDAY, MAY3
National Council Jewish Women Hollywood Chapter, Meeting 12:30,
Temple Sinai.
Deborah Hollywood Chapter
TUtSDAY, MAY 4
Temple Sinai Sisterhoeod, Meeting 8 p.m.. Temple Sinai
Woomen's American 0RT Meadowbrook Chapter 12:30 Meeting at
Home Federal Bldg., Hallandale
Miramor Chapter Pioneer Women, Miramar Recreation Center
WfDHCSDAY, MAY 5
Temple Sinai Men's Club and Dinner 7 p.m. at Temple Sinai
Camp Ka-Dee-Mch Board Meeting p.m. Home of Mrs. Philip
Weinstein Jr.
THURSDAY, MAY 6
Women's American 0RT
FRIDAY, MAY 7
Hadassah, Beach Group, Board Meeting 10:30 a.m.
MONDAY, HIAY 10
Hadassah, Mt. Scopus Branch, Board Meeting
TUESDAY, AMY II
Jewish Family Service, Installation Meeting 8 p.m. Temple Sinai
WtDNESDAY, MAY 12
Hadassah Beach Group 1 p.m. Gahohad South
FOR MOTHER'S DAY
RESTAURANT
Something New In Florida
Delightfully Different The Finest In Food
La Crepe from Britany Presented In 40 Different Flavors
ALSO.. FRENCH GOURMET SPECIALTIES
PHONE 927-4100 LUNCH and DINNER
IN DANIA 1434 North Federal Highway
(Just So. of Ft. Laud. International Airport)
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
For Mother's Day Come To
The Corral
RESTAURANT & BARBECUE
435 S. State Road 7, Hollywood
The Oldest Barbecue House in Broward County
FEATURING, RIBS, BEEF and STEAK /
Phone 983-9976 Open 10 A.M. 4 P.M..
FOR MOTHER'S DAY
...i
genevieve larsjtd
FINE GIFTS FOR THE EPICUREAN
DIPLOMAT MALL HALLANDALE, FLORIDA
Telephone 920-2288
Complimentary Gift Wrap
THE RAG BAG
6508 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. (Opposite McArthur High)
Phone 961-0580
FABULOUS FABRICS ami BEAUTIFUL CLOTHES
For Beautiful People
NEW SHIPMENTS DAILY
SILKY ARNEL JERSEY PRINTS, POLYESTER DOUBLE KNITS
BONDED ORLON 4 ACRYLICS, KEY WEST PRINTS
SLINKY KNIT CHAVEZETTE, DACRON WOOL SUITING
KETTLE CLOTH
Cl YARD (Value to $10 yard)
WOWI PANNE' Arnel and Nylon Spring Shades
PANTS SUITS $5
INCLUDING MATERNITY NEW STYLES JUST ARRIVED
Value to $20.00
FLEA MARKET
Saturday Only On Our Sidewalk
PALM VIEW REALTY. INC.
EDWARD LICHTMAN and JACK BRADLEY
2310 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood
Telephone 920-1414


Page 10
* Jew!st florid/tor
Friday. April 30. 197.'.
PERSONALITY PROFILE
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M, Baer
Each year thousands of new red.
rtenta arrive in Hollywood and
plant their roots but it is doubt-
lul whether any young couple has
made as firm place for themselves
in the community in such a short
time as Mr. and Mrs. Robert M.
Baer. Each of them has found
their niche in this new place from
the business world to the world of
the tennis court from their in-
livjdual activities to their joint
ictivities; they are a part of the
Hy from every aspect.
Since Bobby was a boy of 12 in
South Bend. Ind., he has known
Jus wife, Aviva. When he enrolled
.it the University of Michigan, she
sis already there. The boy she
was dating at the time asked
Bobby to watch out for her while
he was away: Bobby obliged, not
only "looking out'* for her but
marrying her when she had fin-
isher her junior year. They con-
tinued their education; he obtained
.1 Master's degree in Business Ad-
ministration while she earned a
'! A. in English before they went
home to South Bend to take up
i heir life and at the age of 22.
Bobby started OUt as a worker in
Federation.
Both jf them had come from
families that were deeply involved
,ii Jewish philanthropy. Aviva's
father, Dr. Eugene Weiss, had been
resident of the Jewish Welfare
Fund drive there for many years.
Bobby's father, Meh/in H. Baer,
a part-time Hollywood resident
now) a business man in South
Bend, where the family lias dealt
in furniture for the past 25 years.
has always been a contributor to
Federation.
South Bend is a city with one 'I
the largest per capita donation
records in the United States and
the enthusiasm runs high.
Aviva joined the Women's Divi-
sion and eventually Bobby be-
came assistant campaign chair-
man of Federation. ihe was
i". irded a Certificate of Merit for
his work therei and Aviva was as
involved as her growing fantilj
> ould permit.
ROBERT M. BAH
/HRS. ROBERT BAER
Three years ago the Baers mov-
ed to Hollywood to open a Flor-
ida branch of their business here.
Since their arrival, they have
spread then wings in many direc-
tions. They joined Temple Beth
El and this year Bobby a member
o! Rotary and the Chamber of
Commerce, has become vice presi-
HALLANDALE B.P.
AUTO REPAIR & SERVICE CENTER
AIR CONDITIONING INSTALLATION & REPAIRS
126 N FEDERAL HIGHWAY
PHONE 922-6406
DICK ASNCRAFT
AND
BILL JESSUP
MUNROE UDELLS
JAXSON'S
IN OUR 1 5th YEAR
OLD FASHIONED
ICE CREAM PARLOR
RESTAURANT
Largest Sundaes 0 Sodas in the South
WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM
OPEN
7 DAYS
A WEEK
COMPLETE DINNER Large bowl of soup
or juice. Entree, potato, vegetable salad,
YOUR OWN INDIVIDUAL LOAF OF
BREAD, butter and beverage. Plus a com-
plimentary relish tray.
PLUS A JUMBO SUHDAE-
s1
128 S. Federal Hwy.. DANIA
923-4445 .
COMPLETE ITALIAN
AMERICAN MENU
STEAKS SEAFOOD
LASAGNA SPAGHETTI
EGGPLANT PARM1GANA
******&* ******
ANO.UET FACILITIfS TO 100
OP!N 11 .00 A M. TO 2:00 A.M.
WE DELIVER
945-7912 983-9935
ISMS lmv" "*
2MI5. M! 14 7 (US Mil
ft
dent. He is currently a Division
Chairman in the campaigns of
Jewish Welfare Federation: his
participation has involved working
with professional and business
groups. Few people in the com-
munity are unaware of his pres-
ence, for he has worked hard in
the cause of Israel and the many
local agencies that are benefici-
aries of Federation.
Aviva, who has also worked for
Federation, was the cochairman
of the High Lighters Luncheon
with Mrs. Jack Levy. Sending out
thousands of invitations to the
luncheon was one way to insure
attendance, so Aviva and Myrna
Levy each organized a marathon
addressing session at their home.
They got more than 50 men and
women to work through the better
part of two days and nights to get
the invitations out, and the lunch-
eon was o great success. Aviva is
also a volunteer lecturer for the
Fort Lauderdale Art Museum
where her work involves showing
slides at various schools in Brow-
ard County.
The Baer's enthusiasm for Holly-
wood and their life here is visible.
They and their three boys. Mike
9, Ira. 6, and Larry, 3, live in
Hollywood Hills.
NCJW Meeting Monday
The National Council of Jewish
Women will hold its final genera!
meeting of the current season Mori-
day at 12:.'s0 p.m. in the Home Fed-
eral Building on Hallandale Beach
Boulevard. Mrs. Lucille Alexander
president of the Hollywood Sec-
tion of the Council and Corinne
Porlner. vice president, will relate
their experi?nees as delegates to
the National NCIW Convention in
Detroit. Color slides will also be
shown of a Council trip to the
Orient.
HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY
Remember Mother Every
Day of the Year
JIMMIE'S HOME
STYLE CANDIES
20 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
DANIA
famous for Heavenly Hash
Come Watch Us Make It
Phone 923-9385
HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY
RONZA'S
CAPRI PIZZA
Fast Delivery To
MIRAMAR
PEMBROKE PINES SW
Fresh Dough Pizza
Lasagna Spaghetti
Complete Family Dinners
6329 Miramar Pkwy, Miramar
PHONE 981-4627
Slate For 1971-1972
Installed By Lodge
Herzl Lodge. B'nai B'tith com-
prised mainly of men from the
high rises of Hollywood. Hallan-
dale and North Dade County, in-
stalled its newly elected officers
for 1971-72 at its regular monthlv
meeting last week at Temple Si-
nai. Hollywood.
Taking the oath of office were
Bob Hoffman, president; Martin
Auerbach. Bill Broder, Sol Coo|Mr,
Joe Friedman, Jake Mogilowitz.
Joseph Perlstein and Bernie Pol-
len, vice presidents: George E.
Gordon, chaplain: Jack Hurwitz.
financial secretary: Michael Char-
niatz, recording ami corresponding
secretary: Ben Miller, treasurer,
and Al Diamond, warden.
Abe Bader. Leo Baer. Mike Ein-
horn. Ben Feldman, Harry Fisch-
hoff, Herman Gofman, Sid Holtz-
man. Otto Hyman, Harry Ladin.
Arthur Lezar, Martin Mandel. Max
Mogilowitz, outgoing president,
Solot and Oscar Wnchtcl are on
its new Board of Directors.
Awards were presented to Jake I
Mokilowitz. outgoing president, ;
and other officers who served dur- '
ing the 1970-71 year during the
evening's program.
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r. April 30. 1971
JewlsiinorMton
Page 11
Overseas Wewsfefter: By EllAHU S ALPETER
danger Threatens Agricultural Communities
OR '.KNKRATIONS OF Zionist pioneers, the re-
r',u!-r' *o the land was both the ideal and the realiza-
tion of their dream of life in Palestine. 11 meant
the rehabilitation of"'the "Jewish' "/
people twisted by centuries of dis-
criminatory social existence and
of the Jewish individual whate
body and soul were believed to
have been crippled by ghetto
or at least urban life. Tilling
the soil was considered the great
healing process.
The idea and ideal still
prevaill to a large extent, though the percentage
of Jews living on the land in Israel is growing
small).1 with the constant expansion of towns and
cities. Only almut W7< of Israel's Jews now live
in agricultural communities; the other 89^ live in
towns, cities and urban areas: only the traditional-
type of hulutz immigrants go to kibbutzim or mosh-
avim; most of the newcomers want to live in urban
'tofrtmutiities.'"" '........."-<. ..... v
Now, however, there is a danger that even exist-
ing agricultural communities will lose their popula-
tion. Israeli villages face the threat of farmers- flight
because of the constant drop in agricultural in-
comes. A warning was sounded by Agricultural
Minister Haim Gvati when he presented his Minis-
try's annual budget to the Knesset; while incomes
in all other sectors of the economy increased
steadily in recent years, farmers' incomes were go-
ing down.
The volume of farm production had, in fact,
risen last year, but prices of produce dropped. This
intensified the impact of soaring production costs.
Fuel, materials and machinery cost more, but the
main increase was in wages to farm laborers up
11%, and cost of credits up more than 10'-.
Citrus prodflMfffli, one of ther'fnainstays of Israeli
farming and its traditional No. 1 agricultural export
item, fared worst, Mr. Gvati said..The glut of
oranges on Europen markets last year created a
drop in prices, causing a severe cut in citrus earn-
ings despite an overall increase in crops. Consequent-
ly, farmers' incomes from citrus orchards fell
drastically.
Still, because of hopes for better prices in Eur-
ope in the future, and for more efficient cultivation
and harvesting methods, plans call for expansion of
citrus production in the next five years. But these
plans are not accepted without some worry and
hesitation by many citrus growers.
BOOK REVItW By Seymour B. Liebman
Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
Argument And Doctrines Preparing For Peace
|H!OR TO WORLD WAR II, Jewish thinkers sought to
cr ate an authentic Jewish community. Following
Mtiecai Kaplan's attempt to create a "kehilla" for all
New York many others sought to make meaningful
Judaism and to have it acculturate secu-
larly and to integrate it (not assimilatei
in the warp and woof of American life.
They sought to achieve "structural" cul-
turalism wherein Jewish culture would
parallel not be submerged or absorlx-d
- with American culture.
Arthur A. Cohen calls his book Argu-
ment and D.Ktriii.s: "A Reader of Jew-
ish Thinking in the Aftermath of the
plocaust" (Harper & Row, $11.95). He has selected 28
fays wiitten between 1947 and 1969 to exhibit some-
Panorama:
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
The Russian Stake
^( i ckium. TO ISRAELI General Herzog. the
Russians have supplied the Arabs with five bil-
lion dollars worth of arms and along with that,
thousands of Russian soldiers and
I instructors.
But apparently it has not been
too productive. Gen. Herzog quoted
from a Cairo paper which told of
a conversation between the late
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
and Communist Party secretary
I Leonid I. Brezhnev. When Nasser
remarked that the Russians had
I shot 6Vwn four Israeli planes, the Soviet official
I replied, "Pardon, but our reports showed that we
I downed six planes." (Actually, Herzog says, they
pad only downed two Israeli planes, but even if it had
been six, that's not much for a five billion dollar
I investment!)
The New York Times reported recently that
every week two Russian planes arrive in Cairo with
military personnel and all the Russians seem to
immediately set off for the Egyptian bazaars, trying
to get bargains in rings, jewelry and Egyptian shoes.
"Although," says the Times correspondent, "each
Russian is given only $50 to spend, they are appar-
ently stocking up on shoes and jewelry; so even if
they -don't shoot down many Israeli planes, when
they return to Russia, their visit to Egypt will not
be a total loss."
thing of the dynamics and vitality of post-Holocaust
Jewish thought.
Wherein does this thought differ from that of pre-
World War II? Cohen's premise is that Jewish religion
"has become inescapably personalist in character" in
America. The present Jewish communities are "pcrson-
i.li.st and fideist and not generally halachic," he states,
and the normative Jewish community both secular and
religious is in Israel.
One is intrigued by. and in accord with, his statement
that the third generation comes to the synagogue in a
search for life meaning and the desire to learn and not
to pray. One feels that they will pray after they have
begun to learn. Except for those of the youth who seek
nihilism (and other extreme radicals including some
rabbis in the Jewish Peace Fellowship) meaning is indis-
pensable for life and the s;ense off meaninglcssness kills.
Cohen believes that his anthology will aid in the
search for meanings in Judaism, Jewish existence and the
Jewish people. His selections are divided into four parts;
The Foreground of Jewish Existence; The Renewal of
Theology; Challenges to Jewish Belief; and The Expecta-
tion and the Trust. Most of the essays have appeared in
"Commentary" or "Judaism." The list of authors contains
some of our prestigious thinkers. Although there is much
with which one may disagree, the large book has much
more which will stimulate one's thinking and with which
one may agree.
Each selection Is preceded by the anthologist's com-
ments and glosses. To those who arc concerned with the
relationships between Israel and its Jewish citizens, be-
tween Judaism and the State, two essays should be obli-
gatory; "Are We Israelis Still Jews? The Search for Juda-
ism in the New Society," by Ernst Simon, and "Religion
and State; The Cause for Interaction," by Aharon
Lichtenstein.
This is not a book for bedside reading nor can one dip
lightly into any of the selections. No author has pat
answers but for those who would have their mind's eyes
pointed in the direction of "Whither Judaism?" and even
"What is Judaism?" and are willing 4o'think for them-
selves, the book can serve as a Baedeker.
Befween Yea and Me: By BORIS SMOiAR
Music Festival Dates Back 27-Years
CONTRIBUTING greatly to
the spreading of knowledge
on Jewish music and to the ef-
forts of stimulating interest in
Jewish music is the Music Fes-
tival which is taking place this
month in many communities
throughout the United States.
The history of the Jewish Mu-
sic Festival goes back about 27
years, when The National Jew-
ish Music Council, sponsored by
the National Jewish Welfare
Hoard was formed, to bring mu-
sic into the Jewish home through
programs channeled primarily
through Jewish cultural institu-
tions.
A year after its formation, the
Council undertook to make Jew-
ish music popular by organizing
a "Jewish Music Week" each
year in the communities through-
out the country. The "Week'
was later expanded to a month-
long celebration. It has become
an annual national event enrich-
ing American Jewry with knowl-
edge and education.
Among its other activities, the
Council is engaged in encourag-
ing the commissioning of new

musical worka^t has also sought
to bridge Israel and America
through music, has honored a
number of outstanding Ameri-
can Jewish composers and pub-
lished a number of bibliogra-
phies on Jewish music. One of
them is the Bibliography of Jew-
ish Vocal Music; another is the
Bibliography of Publications and
Other Resources on Jewish Mu-
sic. The third is a Bibliography
of Instrumental Music of Jewish
Interest, and the fourth
Bibliography of Recordings of
Jewish. Jnterest.
T"E SECRETARY GENERAL ol the United Na-
tions, and Egypt too, are doing their best to make
Israel sound like a bellicose war-monger who won't
be reasonable. Israel is being por-
trayed as a stubborn, non concilia-
tory nation which is anxious to
| tak" on the whole Arab world, with
| Russia thrown in lor good meas-
1 ure.
The perceptive observer on the
scene here, though, can discern a
different Israel. There are unmis-
takable preparations for an "out-
break" of peace. It has not been blazoned in big
headlines, but the Israel Ministry of Finance has
already set up a high level planning committee to
study the effects which a real peace would have on
the nation's economy, and to make recommendations
to meet such a situation.What will happen, for ex-
ample, if tens of thousands of men are released from
military service and enter the labor market? What
will it mean to the economy if the so-called war
industries are called upon, overnight, to convert to
peace-time production? What will happen if the gov-
ernment halts its vast military spending program?
Ephraim Dovrat, Deputy Director General of the
Ministry of Finance, addressing a closed meeting
here in Haifa, analyzed th-? impact of peace on the
economy. He pointed out that the need for Israel to
be on a war footing creates three burdens: competi-
tion with normal industry for scarce labor, large ex-
penditure's at home, and gigantic import needs.
Peace would bring about relaxation in all three
areas.
Dovrat assured his audience that peace would
not cause a shock on the economy for several rea-
sons. For one thing, it would be many years before
we could be certain this is a real peace or just an-
other armistice to be broken at the Arabs' conven-
ience.
Furthermore, Israel's defense industries have
found markets abroad. Even today, Israel could sell
much more of its war production overseas were it
not for domestic requirements. With diminution of
such needs Israel's exports in this field could quickly
surpass even citrus as a source of income unless,
of course, a Utopia of world peace should suddenly
break out everywhere.
Labor Minister Yosef Almogi la optimistic on
other grounds. Peace here would quickly bring about,
an enormous increase in foreign investment, in im-
migration and in tourism. True peace presumably
would also gradually lead to normal trade relations
with our Arab neighbors.
The plans for development and extension of the
Port of Ashdod take into consideration that the port
must also be available for the commerce and ship-
ping needs of Jordan, and perhaps even Iraq. It is
encouraging to note that while Israel will not com-
promise on its security arrangements, and is reso-
lutely ready Xor any military eventuality it is also
preparing tqr peace.
8f
-
,
__
V,


Page 12
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