The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00013

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
^Jewisti Floridian
Volume 1 Number 12
ami SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 16, 1971
Price 20c
Hollywood Editor To
Visit Israel April 25
Through the efforts of the Jew-, editor in the Scripps-Howard news-
ish Welfare Federation of Greater
Hollywood, the community of
tWI AM N. Wf NT WORTH, Itt.
Hollywood will be one of the few
cities in Florida with a repre-
sentative on the newspaperman" <
tour of Israel sponsored by UJA
leaving April 25.
, The trip has been arranged as a
serious effort to give selected
newspapermen the op|x>rtunity to
see, hear and write on Israel as it
actually is.
Chosen to make the trip was
Edward H. Went worth, Jr.. 31.
editor of the Hollywood Sun Tat-
tler. Mr. Wentworth, the youngest
paper chain, is also one of the
youngest editors of a daily news-
paper in the nation. He is an
honor graduate of Georgia Military
College and received a degree in
Journalism and communications
from the University of Florida.
During his four years in the
Army he served as editor-in-chief
of the Pathfinder Division's week-
ly newspaper, the Arrow. That
publication was twice cited as the
most outstanding newspaper in
Europe during Mr. Wentworth's
editorship.
After Mr. Wentworth's release
from the service, he joined the
Sun Tattler as a reporter, and has
been promoted through the ranks,
serving as state editor, assistant
city editor, city editor and manag-
ing editor before being made edi-
tor. He is a member of the Florida
Newspaper Editors Association and
the American Society of News-
paper Editors.
The visit of the grout of news-
papermen to Israel will provine an
opportunity for them to see the
administered West Bank and the
Golan Heights, and possibly the
Sues Canal area and Sharm-el-
Sheik. It is expected that press
conferences will l>e held with top
Israeli government figures.
Newspapermen will also he able
to see for themselves the humani-
tarian work made possible by
American philanthropic dollars
raised by local Jewish Federations
and Welfare Funds and the United
Jewish Appeal, it was pointed out.
Communal Workers
Division Meeting
The Communal Workers Divi-
sion of Jewish Welfare Workers
wall hold a meeting on Thursday,
April 22 at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Joel Rottman. Mr. Rottman
is chairman of the Professional
Divisions for Federation.
Guest speaker at the meeting
will be Rabbi Robert Frazin, re-
cently appointed Rabbi for Temple
Solel, the newly-organized tempie
in the Emerald Hills area of Holly-
wood.
Serving as cochairmen of the
communal workers division are the
rabbis of Greater Hollywood
including Rabbi Samuel Jaffe of
Temple Beth El, Rabbi Morton
Malavsky of Temple Beth Shalom.
Rabbi David Shapiro of Temple
Sinai, Rabbi Elliot Winograd of
Temple Israel and Michael Ru-
vel, executive director of Jewish
Welfare Federation.
Phonathon Results
Called 'Outstanding'
JWV Post Again Offers
To Aid JWF Campaign
As it has in years past, Jewish
War Veterans Post No. 613 again
offered to aid in the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation campaign after a
recent meeting which was high-
lighted by a program dealing with
the present needs of Israel co-
ordinated by Michael Ruvel, JWF
executive director.
Jack Berman, past Commander
of the Post, will serve as choir-
man of the JWV effort to reach
veterans who have not been con-
tacted by representatives of the
other divisions. Arthur Sherry is
the Post's current Commander.
Browaid County attorney Errol
Rosen, chairman of the Phonathon
Division of JWF's current Com-
bined Campaign, has reported that
results have been outstanding in
the initial phases of the Phonathon
campaign.
"Things really went great last
week,'- said Mr. Rosen. "To the
best of my recollection, each day
has been better than any day last
year."
(A member of the Young Lead-
ers Council of Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration, a vice president of B'nai
B'rith's Chai Lodge and of Ki-
wanisl are working with Mr. Ro-
sen, James Jacobson, David Good-
man, Robert May and Sy Herman,
who will serve as captain of the
group manning the phones in the
local Federation offices two nights
a week from 7 to 9 p.m.
Each night four or five men
work with one of the captains in
telephone solicitation. Committee
workers including Mark Fried. Dr.
David Glassman, Harry Ixrnbeck.
Dr. Alex Kobb. Joseph Schwartz
fffROl RQSCN
and Reuben Schneider have already
devoted much time to the project:
many more men are expected 11
join them in the weeks to come,
as the Phonathon continues.
Orthodox Establishment Must
Yield Some Of Its Authority
Sadat's Terms
Flatly Rejected
tel AVIV (JTA) Deputy
Premier Yigal Allon warned Is-
rael's Orthodox religious estab-
lishment last week that then
will have to be some changes in
the exclusive authority it wields
over the Israelis' private affairs
in such matters as marriage and
divorce.
Addressing a Labor Party con-
vention session, Mr. Alion said,
"We are not a religious move-
ment, nor are we anti-religious.
However, one cannot accept the
situation when the fate of indi-
viduals in this country is in the
Insurance Division
Is Being Organized
For the first time the men of
tlie Greater Hollywood area who
are employed in the field of insur-
ance are being organized Into a
separate division in the Jewish
Welfare Federation campaign, 11
has been announced.
Stanley Greenspun and Harold
Rosenberg, who haw been select-
ed to serve as cochairmen of the
Insurance Division, are inviting all '
the Greater Hollywood insurance
men to attend a meeting at the j
Hollywood Beach Country Club on '
Friday, April 16.
hands of those whose way of
thinking and way of life is ob-
solete."
Mr. Alton's remarks reflected
the growing impatience both
inside uiid outside government
circles with the Orthodox
nihbinutc's conduct in matters
of conversion and in denying
marriage licenses to persons it
considers unfit to have them.
The rabbinate recently refused
to i 'cognize the Vienna conver-
sions of 54 rK>n-Jewish spouses
c migrating to Israel from the
Soviet Union. Another case that
aroused widespread indignation
was that of two young Israelis
whose mother thought her first
husband periahed in the Nazi
holocaust and subsequently re-
married. The children she and
her second hesband had were
rul 'i "illegitimate," and thus
unfit to marry "legitimate" per-
sons.
Mr. Allon said the problem Is
not the separation of religion
and government, but the crea-
tion of legal conditions by which
everyone in the country will be
able to live according to his own
belief. Labor Party leaders are
reportedly considering the intro-
duction of legislation providing
civil marriages for those desir-
ing them.
Hallandale Chapter Of
Hadassah Activities
Mrs. Caspar Alman served as
chairman of the donor luncheon
held recently by the Hallandale
Chapter of Hadassah at the Diplo-
mat Country Club. Mrs. Manny
Rose was donor chairman.
The program featured a per-
formance by the choral group,
which is under the supervision of
Florence Rose, who wrote their
words and conducted their re-
hearsals, giving the presentation a
professional air.
Hallandale Chapter held its
April board meeting in the home
(f Mrs. Paul Briiwr.sti in. Its gen-
eral membership meeting si sched-
uled Tuesday, April 30, h> Hallan-
dale's Home Federal Bl
The film "What's New at Ha-
dassah" was shown at the regular
April meeting of the Imperial
Towers Group of Hadassah last
weak. Complete information re-
garding chapter activities is pub-
lish, ,1 in the monthly bulletin.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Pre-
mier Golda Meir appeared be-
fore 3,000 delegates and foreign
visitors attending the opening
session of the Labor Party con-
vention here last week ana
flatly r. JeCted Egypt's lerr.-i for
an interim arrangement leading
to the reopening of the Suez
Canal.
The Premier was most em-
phatic in repeating her govern-
ment's opposition to Big Power
guarantees and peace-keeping
forces a-, lubstttates for the
kind al peace settlement Israel
wants.
The Egyptian terms were re-
ported by the official Middle
East News Agency in Cairo.
They called for a partial with-
drawal of Israeli forces from the
canal's least bank as a first
stage toward total withdrawal
from the Sinai peninsula, and
proposed that Egyptian forces
occupy the area evacuated by
Israel.
Mrs. Meir declared that Israel
favors reopening; of the water-
way and would willingly discuss
proposals aimed at normaliza-
tion of civilian life in the Suez.
r.one as well as de-escalation of
the military confrontation there.
"But." .lie said. "If recent state-
ments attributed t President
Sai'.at regarding the reopening of
the Suez (anal are authentic,
they caanot even be a basis for
agreement with Israel."
Mrs. Meir devoted much of
her address to a restatement of
Israei*i position on the territory
it believes must be retained in
order to assure its security, and
the nature of a peace settlement
with its Arab neighbors. But in
spite of her curt dismissal of the
Egyptian offer, reports persisted
that the government is awaiting
the opinion of defense exjierts
as to what conditions would be
required in order to permit, the
reopening of the waterway with-
out jeopardizing Israel's position
in the Sinai.
Informed sources said Cabinet
members differed on conditions
for >i:i interim arrangnient. De-
fense .Minister Moshe Dayan re-
l-ortedlv insisted on a formal
aimistiee or termination of
Egypt's belUgerency status as a
condition lor limited troop with-
drawals.
Several other Cabinet rr* n-
'>: s, oki n publicly on
possibility of an "interim solu-
tion" which has been propas
by the U.S. government. One
said Israel is prepared to discu=s
the opening of the canal sepa-
rably from other issues; anoth-
er told correspondents that Is-
rael might accept a temporary
arrangement if several condi-
tions were met, but an interim
arrangement must be recognized
hy both sides as a step toward
final settlement.
Chaplains 'Victims
Of State Cutback'
SAN FRANCISCO (JTAi
The millions, of dollars in health
am cutbacks ordered by
Gov. Ronald Reagan will rob the
o-.y) Jewish persons in its it
mental hospitals of the ministry
of three chaplains who trawl
throughout tin state by July I,
it was reported from the state
capital in Sacramento.
Especially trained for their
work. Jewish chaplains w
brief residencies in mental hos-
I itals and are generally acknowl-
edged to be a "special breed" i:i
the rabbinate.
1


Page 2
Jtwlsli fk>rKftor
Friday. April 16. 1971
.
Charlotte Teller Appointed
Broward JCRC Coordinator
Joseph Kieiman, president of the
Ji wish Community Rotations Coun-
cil of Broward County, has an-
nounted the ai>i>ointment of Mrs.
c"h.trlotte Tollor as coordinator of
the organization.
Mrs. Tollor, whoso recent in-
wlvomont as coordinator of the
Community Survey for the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Greater
Hollywood pave her the Opportun-
ity of contact with all the Jewish
organizations in the Greater Holly-
wood community, has a varied
ivickpround including ser%-ice in
the United Cerebral Palsy Asso-
ciation, of NiLsji.-m County as ad-
ministrative assistant, community
relations, and as director of
- hi.d1 and community relations
i or North Shore Schools, Glen
Head. N.Y.
During World War II she was a
film editor on training films and
documentaries for the Signal
Corps. She later attended the Now
School for Sooi;d Research and
the RabinovitZ School of Photo-
tugiaphy in New York City.
Mrs. Teller, who resides in Holly-
wood with her husband William.
their son Ir.i a student at Flor-
kla Atlantic University and
_. daughter Madelyn, a senior in high
si hool, is a member of the Mt.
Scopus Grouu of Hadassah.
The JCRC is an organization
whoso purposes and activities are
I .st expressed in the Preamble of
it.s By-Laws which states: "WE,
AS CITIZENS OK THE UNITED
STATES, OK THE STATE OF
:-"ix>niD.\ and Tin: various
COMMUNITIES OF BROWARP
COUNTY, determined to reaffirm
ur faith in fundamental human
ignis, and in the equal rights of
all citizens, and
"To help establish and maintain
inditions under which justice and
spec! for the obligations and
(thts nt" citizenship can best be
erpetuated and
To promote social progress and
' etter standard of life, and
Diamonds '<'' Jewelry
Appraised
STATE LICENSED
APPRAISERS
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Hollywood
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'To promote, practice and en-
gender mutual appreciation and
understanding among all peoples
to live together in peace with one
another as good neighbors, and
"To cooperate with other agen-
cies for the purpose of fostering
mutual understanding in a spirit
of fellowship among all citizens,
irrespective of race, color, or creed,
and
"To protect and preserve the
civil, political, economic and re-
ligious rights of the Jewish and all
peoples in the United States, when-
ever such rights are challenged or
threatened, and
"To cooperate with all organiza-
tions engaged in combatting all
sources of racial, religious and mi-
nority discrimination."
Should any community emerg-
ency occur, JCRC now has a "HOT-
LINE" (920-6940) which can be
catted at any time. As the central
community organization, JCRC
would bo able to take immediate
action.
Government Has
Majority Support
NEW YORK (JTA) Accord-
ing to a Louis Harris |>oll com-
missioned by Time magazine and
conducted jointly with Public
('pinion Research, an Israeli
an overwhelming majority of Is-
raelis support their government
in negotiations with the Arabs
and believe it is doing all it can
to negotiate a peace treaty.
The |)11 on foreign |x>licy re-
vealed that Israeli Jews give
their complete support to the of-
ficial position that the occupied
territories of East Jerusalem,
the Golan Heights and Sharm
el-Sheikh should bo retained by
Israel in any settlement, Time
reported. Only l<:;. of those who
were questioned felt the govern-
ment should be more flexible in
negotiating with the Arabs.
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Yearbook Editor To
Speak Before Dade,
Broward Meetings
Milton Himmelfarb, director of j
the American Jewish Committee
liiformatien .and Research Serv-
ices and editor of the American j
Jewish Yearbook, will address a
joint meeting of the Broward
County Jewish Community Rela- |
tions Council and the Broward
County Chapter of the American
Jewish Committee in the home of
Dr. and Mrs. Myron Segal, 700
Washington St., Hollywood, Sun-
day, April 25, at 7:30 p.m.
Mr. Himmelfarb, one of "Com-
mentary's contributing editors, is
also scheduled to address an 8 p.m.
Monday, April 26, meeting of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
AJCommittee in the River Room
of the Dupont Plaza Hotel.
A qualified observer of the Jew-
ish condition in America, Mr. Him-
melfarb, who received his educa-
tion in the City College of New
York, the Jewish Theological Sem-
inary's College of Jewish Studies,
the University of Paris and Co-
lumbia University, has been a vis-
iting professor at the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary and a visiting
lecturer at Yale.
Young Leaders Council
Meeting Is Scheduled
A meeting of the Young Leaders
Council will bo held Wednesday.
April 21, at 8 p.m. in the home of
Dr. Alex Kobb, a member of its
Program Committee who also
serves as chairman of the Dentists
Division of Jewish Welfare Feder-
ation.
Arthur Teitelbaum, executive di-
rector of the Southeast Florida
Region of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, the guest
speaker for the evening, will dis-
cuss "Prejudice and Anti-Semit-
ism." Mr. Teitelbaum's daily in-
volvement with the problems in
Broward and Dado Counties make
him well qualified to give a clear
picture of the \*-n] situation.
When Temple Israel of Miramar celebrated its 10th anni-
versary recently, Seymour Goch, (left) president of the con-
gregation, its spiritual leader. Rabbi Elliot Winograd, Flor-
ida's Gov. Reubin Askew and Harry Rosen, a vice presi-
dent of the temple who served as master af ceremonies
posed together for the cameraman.
Gov. Askew Guest Of Honor
At Anniversary Celebration
Gov. Reubin O"Donovan Askew,
who was the guest of honor at the
10th anniversary celebration of
Temple Israel of Miramar recent-
ly, Is a long time personal friend
of Temple Israel's spiritual leader,
Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd.
In an address before the congre-
gation Gov. Askew said that he
has for many years been close to
the Jewish people. "In fact," ho
pointed out, "before I became Gov-
ernor, I had five Jewish attorneys
as law partners."
Temple Isra'd was begun 10
years ago on land surrounded by
cow pastures and wilderness. To-
day, it is the center of a thriving,
bustling and rapidly-expanding
Jewish community, and offers a
full program of temple services
including a Temple Sisterhood.
Men's Club, Golden Age Club,
JVVV Chapter, a Singles Club and
many other social activities.
Religious services are held at
the temple seven days a week.
morning and evening, and the con-
grcgatlons educational facility in-
cludes a pre-nuraery and kinder-
garten, six year Hebrew school,
i Sunday school division and a full
| Adult Education program. Duo to
'he temple's tremendous growth, a
fully air conditioned administra-
tion building, sanctuary and so-
cial hull has been built this year.
Among the prominent persons
attending the temple's anniver-
sary celebration were Mayor Cal-
houn of Miramar, Mayor Boyd of
Pembroke Pines, City Councilmen
Alvin Portner and Joseph Forzano.
Councilman Harry M. Rosen, a
vice president of the congregation,
served as master of ceremonies
for the inniversary celebration.
The day's activities included a
; ion and cocktail hour for
'he distinguished pwtlu. followed
by dinner. On the evening's pro-
pram was a skit entitled "This Is
Yon- Life T-mpie Israel." written
and directed by Jo Ann Lee and
ackie Rosen. Another s|)ecial event
was the distribution of award cer-
tificates to prominent individuals
uh had played a vital role in the
history of the temple. Those docu-
ments were signed by Rabbi Wino-
i grad, Temple Israel's president
| Seymour Goch, ;ind Gov. Askew.
Cantor Abraham Koster, accom-
I by Jo Ann lyoo, presented
the musical entertainment. Ways
leans vice president was the
chairman for the entire affair, in
eluding the planning and develop-
1 ment.
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Friday. April 16. 1971
vJeHisli tlcr*cfiann
\
ORGANIZATION IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Bureau Of Jewish Education
Page 3
for the past nine yrars, in co-
o|>eration with the Jewish Welfare
Federation, the Bureau of Jewish
Kduoation whicli has its offices in
Miami Bt-aeh, hits made its total
program ..of educational services
B\anaTSi<> to HSllyvvoixi.
Founded some 28 years ago. the
Bureau was the first central agen-
cy to promote Jewish education in
this area. It provides both the
Hebrew ami the one-day-a-week
schools with regular consultation
services and includes direction in
administration, curriculum, teach-
er observance and staff confer-
ences. The Bureau also supplies
appropriate bulletins for Jewish
festivals, visual aid materials and
pedagogic bulletins.
The Bureau assisted in the for-
mation of the Hollywood Commis-
sion on Jewish Kducation, which
recently selected Morton Perlin to
succeed Abraham J. Salter as its
chairman. Mr. Salter, who has
sci-vcd as chairman since its incep-
tion, is a vice president of the
Jewish Welfare Federation.
Mr. Perlin, the former Temple
Sinai Religious Education Com-
mittee representative on the Com-
mission who now takes over its
direction, has been a Hollywood
resident since 1949. A graduate of
the University of Florida Law
School, he was a founding mem-
ber of the Broward Chapter of the
AJC and is a former board mem-
ber of the Broward O.E.C.G.
The Jewish Education Commit-
tee includes Rabbis Samuel Jaffe,
Morton Malavsky, David Shapiro
and Elliot Winograd; Solomon Be-
norroch. Dr. Frederick Blumen-
thal. Abraham Ftachler. Dr. How-
ard Fuerst, Dr.. Charles Friedman,
Dr. Martin Feuerman, Mrs. Albert
J. Kelkrt. Dr. Rubin Klein, Mrs.
Robert Pittell. Abraham Salter.
Dr. Louis Schwartzman, Mrs. Ger-
ald Siegel. Dr. Edward Weiner and
Jack Yeslow. .
The Bureau, chartered to "do
and perform all acts and things
necessary or proper for the ad-
vancement of Jewish education ...
and work for the extension, in-
ti nsification and improvement of
facilities for Jewish education in
the community ." has, throuph
the Hollywood Commission, made
an effort to alleviate the shortage
of religious school teachers by
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-stablishing a 20-session training
course. The 1,'i students presently
enrolled will receive a weekend
teacher's license upon completion, i
The Commission was also instu-1
mental MrfJRj creation of the He- '
blew High School, now in its!
fourth year of operation with a
current Ll-ttudeol registration.!
Jewish Library facilities are avail-
able to the students at the Bu-
reau's Lincoln Road headquarters.
Dr. Louis Schwartzman, execu-
tive director of the Bureau for the
past 21 years, emphasized the need
for qualified applicants in the
teacher training program and
urged that all interested persons
contact him for a personal inter-
view.
This student at the Beth Zei-
roth Mizrachi, Tel Aviv, a
project of the Mizrachi Wom-
en's Organization of America
is beginning a career as a
fashion designer. The school
prepares youngsters for roles
in Israel's increasingly so-
phisticated fashion industries.
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NCJW Art Discussion iu'i The Hollywood Section of the "f ""J f"r *WC1 <>< "Art
National Council of Jewish Women ~ A Pdrt of Ur **** bv *"
will meet Monday, April 19, at Esther Zwelbaeb, an artist and
12:30 p.m. in the Home Federal teacher.
5jj
Stan.
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Page 4
+ JmM> Meridian
Friday. April 16, 1971
iMJewisli Meridian
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.E. 6th Street Telephone 373-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 945-0694
P.O. Box 2973, Miami, Florida 33101
Fred K. Shochet Selma M. Thompson
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MARION KEVINS, News Coordinator
Ths Jewish Floridisn Does Not Guarantee The Kaehruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns.
Published Bi-Weeijlv by the Jewish Flondian
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Jewish Welfare Federation op Creater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Willcns, Chairman; Ross Beckerman, Ben
Saltcr. Marion Ncvins, Dr. Norman Atkin, Michael Rtivel.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Association
cf English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.__________
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Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 1
Friday, April 16, 1971
Number 12
21 NISAN 5731
Ties Being Strengthened
The recent Israel convention of the Conservative Rab-
binical Assembly is described by observers as having had
little or no impact on the religious scene which, for political
reasons, is dominated by Orthodox Judaism. There is little
Conservative activity in Israel, but this may be more than
a question of emphasis on the part of the movement here
than anything else.
In contrast. Reform has developed programs which
reveal a desire for closer ties with the Israeli experience
than one would expect from its past history. Every Reform
rabbinical student, for instance, is now required to spend
his first year of study at the Hebrew Union College school
in Jerusalem. The national director of the Reform youth
movement in America has moved to Israel where he will
establish programs for American youth there as well as
develop a Reform youth program for Israelis. Seven Re-
form congregations are now actively served by rabbis
in contrast to only three of the Conservative wing. Many
believe that this movement will strengthen the ties be-
tween American and Israeli Jews through common religious
concerns rather than emphasis on fund-raising alone.
New Concern For American Jews
A new concern for American Jews has been revealed
in an article which discloses that there are 10,000 Jews
living among the 30,000 American draft fugitives in Can-
ada. This is an astounding figure, particularly since most
of them are between the ages of 17-24 and thus represent
a substantial potential loss to American Jewry.
In view of the recent surprising poll which showed
that 12% of Americans would like to leave the country, it
is of interest that many of the expatriates are not in Can-
ada to avoid the draft but because they wanted to take
their families from what the article called the "hostile and
violent society which is tday's U.S.A." Trie article is basic-
ally a plea to "help our sons who are searching for their
identity in Canada" and it is one which should not be
ignored.
Teachers May Be A Problem
Because many Jews believe and the record tends
to confirm their beliefs that the typical college campus
has an alienating effect on young Jewish students, a pri-
vate group of wealthy Jews is sponsoring a new liberal
arts college in New York. While Touro College is not under
religious sponsorship, it will have a Jewish orientation in
that the three core programs will be in the humanities,
sciences and the Jewish heritage.
If it accomplishes nothing else, the new college will
at least be an addition to the ever-growing opportunities to
take Jewish studies being offered in many of our major
educational institutions today. The difficulties in getting
good teachers may be a great problem, for there is an
acute shortage of Jewish scholars qualified to teach on a
university level. And, while we wish Touro all the success
it deserves, it is flying in the face of a hundred years of
modern Jewish history to believe that isolating students
from the mainstream of American college life will keep
them from turning left at this stage of their lives.
Most Nations Are Grateful
Although sometimes their votes in the United Nations
would indicate otherwise, most of the African nations are
grateful to Israel for the assistance the Jewish state has
given them in the past decade. More than 17,000 Africans
and Asians have been trained by Israeli experts in the
fields of agriculture, medicine and coopero'ives.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON Since the
time of Franklin D. Roosevelt,
the shock troops of the Demo-
cratic Party have been organized
labor, the American Jewish com-
munity and the black voters. It
is a strange sight, therefore, to
see the leading Democratic can-
didates doing their level best to
alienate two of these three
groups.
The group being flouted, even
scorned, are the shock troops
with organization, namely labor,
and in lesser degree the shork
troops with cash, namely the
Jewish community. With regard
to organized labor, the process
came to a head, in a preliminary
way. in the Senate vote on the
supersonic transport.
THE SOLE imaginable Demo-
eratic candidate who voted for
the SST, Sen. Henry M. Jackson
of Washington, gave his party's
assembled state chairmen a lec-
ture on Friday, after the vote,
about their party's need for labor
support and the danger of losing
it. And no wonder.
From tough old George Meany
on down, what may be called
the pork chops wing of the labor
movement which means the
richest and most numerous wing
strongly backed the SST,
strictly for pork chops reasons.
Canceling the project cost thou-
sands of existing jobs and pre-
vented tens of thousands of jobs
from being created in the future.
SINCE Sens. Edmund Muskie,
George McGovern and others
were already regarded as beyond
redemption, Son. Hubert Hum-
phrey of Minnesota was the
chief target of the labor drive.
The union most actively involved
was, rather naturally, the ma-
chinists, led by Floyd E. "Red"
Smith.
Some weeks ago, Sen. Hum-
phrey met with the machinists'
political action branch and de-
clared that he was leaning toward
a pro-SST vote. Later and more
importantly, Sen. Humphrey
gave George Meany himself what
Meany thought was a hard-and-
fast commitment to vote for the
SST.
Humphrey reportedly says
that he was misunderstood. In
any case, Humphrey and every
other imaginable Democratic
candidate, except Jackson, then
voted against the SST. The lan-
guage now being used about
Humphrey in labor circles, where
he used to be the favorite among
all Democrats, therefore has to
be heard to be believed.
BUT THAT is by no means
the end of the story. Sen. Hum-
phrey, obviously pulled two ways,
equally obviously voted as he did
because he feared the most vo-
cal Democrats. These are the
people, sourly described by la-
bor's veteran representative on
Capitol Hill, Andrew Biemiller,
as "he silk stocking liberals."'
If Humphrey had voted the other
way, the silk stocking liberals
would surely have been down on
him like a ton of bricks.
The archetype of these silk
stocking liberals. Prof. J Ken-
neth Gailbraith, has lately is-
sued a public pronunciamento,
rather in the manner of an En-
glish court circular, that he grac-
iously intends to spend some
time with George Meany. Pre-
sumably the idea is to close the
widening breach, but it is a 10
to 1 bet that Meany will either
refuse to see Galbraith. or will
tell him to go to hell in so many-
words.
BY THE SAME token, at the
AFL-CIO convention in Miami
some weetta iuo, all the Demo-
eratle Candida! v set I
Jackson quite clearly laid an
when they appeared. The trou-
blesome issues on this occasion
were national defense and for-
eign policy. Jackson alone was
Invited to address both the exec-
utive council and the leaders of
the political arm, COPE, and
Jackson evoked great enthu-
siasm.
AS TO THE American Jew-
ish community, a recent cxperi-
ence'of this reporter's spoke vol-
umes. The argument was made,
to an Israeli leader of the ut-
most eminence, that in view of
.lie Soviet presence in the Mid-
dle East "defensible frontiers"
were much less important to Is-
rael than an ironclad American
guarantee, which would give pro-
tection against the Soviets. The
Continued on Pag* 5-1
. 18
Max Lerner
Sees It
Now that it is past Congress, the new amendment to give
the 18-year-olds the right to vote in state and local elections
will go through the state legislators like greased lightning. This
confiims the wisdom of Justice Hugo Black's strategy in the
historic decision in which he got a majority of five to assert the
right of 18-year-olds to vote in federal elections but left the
other question to the amendment process.
Justice Black, at 85. serves as a bridge between the Warren
Court and the new one. He comes closer than any other to ex-
pressing how this commentator feels on the crucial constitutional
issues. Refusing to line up with Justices Douglas and Brennan
on one side or Burger and Blackmun on the other, he leads a
critical, independent middle group which belies the easy assump-
tion that there is a sharp split on the new court between con-
servatives and radicals.
IN MY. OWN READING of the new court, it falls into three
voting groups. One is the hard-core remnant of the Warren Court,
composed of Douglas (an F.D.R. appointee) and Brennan (Eisen-
hower), with Thurgood Marshall (L.B.J.) joining them on civil
rights and freedoms The second consists of the two Nixon ap-
pointees Burger and Blackmun who stick together and are
bound to prove an historic tandem, along with Stewart (Eisen-
hower) who joins them frequently but is capable of surprises.
This leaves a third very loose trio Black (F.D.R.) Harlan
(Eisenhower) and Byron White (J.F.K.). They don't vote to-
gether: Black is a Southern radical on free speech issues, Harlan
a Republican liberal whose dominant passion is to protect the
sovereignty of the states and their courts; White, a former Ken-
nedy attorney general, has little ideology in him. One could call
them a swing trio only in the sense that whichever way two of
them swing will provide a majority of five and recently at
least two have swung more often than not in the Burger-Black-
mun direction.
THERE YOU HAVE the new court not a 180 degree turn
to the right, but enough of a turn to make Burger rather than
Warren majorities on most issues. The commanding personalities
on the court are easily those of Burger. Black and Douglas, each
an individualist, but with different roles. Were he other than he
is, Douglas could try to consolidate a majority on liberal com-
promises, but his thinking approaches the New Left, and often he
ends as the lone dissenter.
Burger is a natural for a chief justice in a time of dismantl-
ing what was vulnerable in the Warren Court and consolidating
the rest. But he and Blackmun, as the appointees of a President
who was pledged to reverse the Warren decisions, especially in
criminal constitutional cases, have promises to keep if not
literally, then symbolically. This keeps him from being quite the
kind of unifying chief justice that Hughes and Warren were.
By default of the others, Black by temperament a fighter
rather than a compromiser and unifier will have to assume
more of the unifying role. That is why, aside from friendship I
trust he will stay on the court at least until the current crisis of
transition is over. There is no one to replace him.
THE WARREN COURT lasted for a generation, 1953-1969,
extending through Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson's terms.
Warren has cited as its commanding cases in three areas the
Baker v. Carr (on one-man one-vote apportionment). Brown (on
school desegregation) and Gideon (on the absolute right to coun-
sel). To Gideon we must add Miranda, on confessions given with-
out police warnings of a man's rights.
Of Warren's three areas, the victory has been won beyond
redress in the apportionment area. On desegregation there will
still be battles ahead, not only because of.a clash of ideologies on
the court but because both black and..white leaders outside the
court don't know where they want to ge, or why. On the rights
of accused men. the recent Harris decision cut back on Miranda,
although I can't be as intense as Brennan's dissent was about the
seriousness of the cutback.
Other courtrooms, other voices. Other times, other moods
and strategies. Burger could not get his majorities together in
the Harrif case, in the Jami s case on welfare visits, in the recent
conscientious r.hjector if .1,0 ciim lfp of opinion outs;.|r
the court had not changed. The com!.- decisions on women's
and capital punishment will be largely governed by this
climate Despite Mr. Dooley. the Supreme Court doesn't only fol-
low the .lection returns; it follows the trend of the opinion
weeklii i and the media and especial!) p undercurrents of
rig among alienate !
it i) 7 'raw


M Friday, April 16. 1971
v^ui fUrlli r
Page
a
i[
v^v',^Al^^*^|^l^<^^
scene around
fcfiWiMii -
A At a meeting of the Hollywood Commission on Jewish Edu-
cation at Abo Sailer's home, a new chairman was chosen Mort
Perlin. Although a graduate lawyer, Mort has given up the prac-
tice of law and la Instead running a family business. He has rep-
resented Temple Sinai on the Commission and now takes ever
from Abe Setter as chaiiman of the commission. Abe, as we all
know, has been a guiding light for this body since its inception
nine yeais ago.
& When Temple Israel of Miramar celebrated its 10th
anniversary recently, Gov. Reubin Askew, a long-time friend of
Rabbi Klliot Winograd, was there. Henry Perry, from whom the
temple members purchased the land on which they built the
temple, also attended the dinner as did many locals including
Mayor Calnoun oi Miramar and Mayor Boyd ot Pembroke Fines.
The celebration lasted most of the day, ending with a fabulous
dinner.
Seen lunching at a Hollywood Boulevard restaurant were
Mike Ruvel, executive director of Jewish Weltaie Federation.
Mitchell (uittenplan, his assistant, and a group of men includ-
ing Pete Weinstein, Sam Meline and Dave Gaadman. Wonder
what they were mapping out? Whatever it was, it didn't inter-
fere with their appetites. They all seemed to be stowing the
food away pretty well.
ft ft ft
Bits and Pieces: Rosalyn Rotttnan has just been elected
president of the Temple Sinai Sisterho.Ki. Hubby Joel is rightly
proud. Al and Marion Cohen's son, Bob, is getting married in
June, I hear. He's now living and working in Washington. Mom
and Pop just returned from a six month stay in Mexico. Spent
their time in Ajajic which is about 35 miles from Guadalajara.
They loved it there and can't wait to go back. The A. L.
Mailmans entertained the Joe Gahels, the Joe Shures and the Ed
Grosses at Westview on a recent evening. Daughter June, is re-
cuperating from pneumonia. June's hubby, Bob Gordon, president
of JWF, is busy shuttling between his home, his position at the
bank and the hospital. Their daughter, Jill, who was home on
vacation, is now back at School.
ft ft ft
One weekend at the Mariposa the Al Yorras had a party,
the Al Greens had a party and the Bill Vogels had a party. The
Yorras had as their guests Ann Yorra's brother and sister-in-law
all the way from California. Joining them were the Sidney Le-
vines, the Stan Kurashes, the Wick Greenes, Pearl Wcitzner.
The day of the Al Green's party, one of their horses had
made the run at Gulfstream. Alfred said it should have won but
instead it came in fourth. The large group helping them drown
their sorrows included the Joe Rosenthals, Hilda Ginsburg and
her sister, Rhea. Miriam Friedman, and Eli Davidoffs.
The Bill Vogels entertained their friends at Skylake Coun-
try Club. Many of their golfing friends from throughout the area
joined them.
ft ft ft
George Bursak tells me that a joint dinner with the Miami
Chapter of AJC to be held May 8 at the Sonesta Beach Hotel
on Key Biscayne is in the talking stage,
ft ft ft
Just got word that United Fund will have their day at Gulf-
stream Race Track on Thursday, April 22. It's a good oppor-
tunity to meet your friends, watch the fillies and support United
Fund at one and the same time. By the way, this will be the
season's closing day for racing at Gulfstream, so join the
throng. .
ft ft ft
Martha Schecter, who is Chairman of the nominating Com-
mittee for the Women's Division of Federation reported that
they are already making plans for next year and holding meet-
ings to select women to head up the campaign. She and Aaron
are busy making plans to visit Spain and Portugal with Stan
and Namoi Kurash. If they have as much fun over there as
they have had planning the trip and shopping for it, they should
all have a ball. Candy Kurash (Stan and Naomi's Dalmatian) co-
operated by having her litter of pups early so as not to interfere
with the departure. .
ft ft ft
Jan Levy, Betty and Harold's daughter, came down from
New York to see her folks, grab a bit of sun and celebrate
Passover. Bobby and Wick Greene's daughter, Lynn, also
came down with husband, Carl, and baby Tracy.
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JOSEPH ALSQP
Continutd from Page 4
ariswer was al! (Mit^snofted":
"What if your Democratic
Party nominates X or Y? What
if he gets elected? What use will
an American guarantee be
then?"
THK RKADER ran fill in the
names of the leading Democrat-
ic candidates, who are now
strong converts to the polliey
of national weakness so long ad-
vocated by the silk stocking lib-
erals. It was startling to hear,
considering that the Israelis have
so long regarded the Democratic
Party as a kind of suburb of Tel
Aviv.
But the fact is that Israel
now lives and enjoys her free-
dom, like every other free coun-
try, by virtue of the American
strength and resolution. That
fact is increasingly perceived in
our Jewish community, except
among the radically chic. So
what happens to the Democratic
army without its shock troops?
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Kaplan were among 105 American
Jewish community leaders who visited border settlements,
development towns and other projects in Israel through the
UJA during the recent 10-day UJA Young Leadership Mis-
sion of the 1971 United Jewish Appeal campaign. Mr. Kap-
lan serves as president of the local Jewish Family Service
and is chairman of the Lawyers Division for Jewish Weliare
Federation.
cotton shifts
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17
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<
BURDIN



Page 6
vJenisti flcridlian
Friday, April 16. 1971 _
Hollywood's New Temple Solel
Names Spiritual Leader
RBMMH^B
Temple Solol. Hoil>wood's near*
iro appointment of Rabbi Robert
RABBI BOBfffT fRAZ.'N
V. Frazin as its spiritual leader.
Rabbi Frazin, who will assume his
full-time duties with tin- temple
nexl January, officiated at its
Seck-i in the Emerald Hills Coun-
try Club last week, and spoke bc-
fore a recent meeting of the newly
organized Temple Sold Sisterhood,
discussing "Basic Judaism."
Rabbi Fraa in, who will be work-
ing with Hi" temple leadership in
an advisor; capacity until he as-
INDIAN RIVER FRUIT
fROPICAl JEIUIS
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ORANGE BLOSSOM HONtY
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1809 WHEY STREET
Opposite Breedings Parking Lot
Hollywood, Flo. 33020
PHONE 927-5447
Mnma his full responsibilities in
1972, is presently serving 56 con-
gregations in the five southern
states and another in Freeport,
Grand Bahamas, as director of the
Southeast Council ami South Flor-
ida Federation of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
II- also acts as liaison between
local congregational and national
piogramming. and is charged with
the n-sponsihility of establishing
new Reform and Liberal congre-
gations.
A native of Chicago, Rabbi
Frazin received his B.S. degree
ln>m Northwestern University and
was ordained at Hebrew Union
College Jewish Institute of Re-
ligion. Cincinnati. Ohio. He also
holds Bachelor of Hebrew Letters
and Master of Arts in Hebrew Let-
ters decrees from HUC-JIR. where
he was a soloist with the college
choir.
Before accepting his present po-
sition, Rabbi Frazin served as an
assistant rabbi in Indiana|H>lis,
where he was a frequent guest on
iiMerfaith television panels, hosted
a weekly radio program and co-
hosted a weekly TV program on
Judaism Its Symbols and Cere-
monies. He also served as cochair-
man of the Indianajwlis Jewish
Community Relations Council's
Civil Liberties Committee and was
a member of the Council's Execu-
tive Board.
Rabbi Frazin serves as the rab-
binic director of the Ray and
Philip N. Coleman camp located in
Georgia, and is the Southeast Fed-
eration of Temple Youth anil the
Greater Miami Federation of
Temple Youth's rabbinic advisor.
He also serves on the advisory
committee for the Youth Council
of Greater Miami, and initiated
and advises the Miami Mitzvah
Corps, a group of Miami teenagers
who voluntarily work with the
underprivileged,
A member of the Rabbinical As-
sociation of Greater Miami Rabbi
Frazin, whose untiring efforts in
the community's behalf, with spe-
cial emphasis on youth involve-
ment, and up-to-date thinking re-
cently earned him the complimen-
tary title "Jet-Age Rabbi" sits on
the executive board of the Miami
Chapter of the Leukemia Society
of America and participates in the
weekly "Adventures In Judaism"
radio program. He and his wife,
the former Susan Banks of Can-
ton. Ohio, are the parents of two
sons and a daughter.
Joshua Brian Jaffe, an honor
student at the Hebrew Acad-
emy of Greater Miami, has been
awarded first prize for his Sci-
ence Fair project on "The Cell
the Chain of Life." Joshua,
the only boy in the ninth grade
who has maintained honor roll
status all year in both the He-
brew and English departments,
is the son of Rabbi and Mrs.
Samuel Jaffe of Hollywood.
If YOU THINK YOU'VE HAD GOOD
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Suggested 947-5661
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V* Milt SMtk of Ft. Liodcrdile Hollywood
lntirutisMl Airport on U.S. 1, Dsoia
M.M.
says...
Maurii Meyers
Campaign Chairman
Apartments Division
of Jewish
Welfare Federation
;
The group at Hemispheres Bay North launched their cam-
paign for Federation at a recent meeting. Among those present
were Mr. and Mrs. Morris Fritz. Dr. and Mrs. Arthur GoJdboff.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Rothschild. Mr. and Mrs. Burt Kaplan. Mi-
ami Mrs. Benjamin Margolis. Miss Dorrls Madden. Sam Schnei-
der, Morris Olschwang, Dr. Hubert Curson. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin
Shochet, Louis Paul Nestle and Michell Guttenplan, assistant
director of J.W F. Mr. and Mrs. Shochet were the hosts for the
evening.
Busy people always find time for important causes. Jessie
Berk, Paul Lobl and Nathan Maxman took time out of their
B'nai B'rith Committee meeting to meet with Murray Smithline.
Apartment Division vice chairman, to discuss the campaign in
the Plaza Towers where both Mr. Lobl and Mr. Maxman arc
residents. They agreed to help coordinate the campaign for Fed-
eration later this month.
After meeting with Murray Smithline, Betty and Simon Ein-
stein, long-time residents of Hollywood, agreed to again coordi-
nate the campaign for the Beverly Complex.
The Hallandale Beach Chapter of Women's American
ORT invited a speaker to discuss the needs of the Campaign and
the way they could participate as a group at their April 17
meeting.
Energetic Michael Joelson, vice chairman of the Campaign
Apartments Division, accompanied me when I met with Julius
Bernstein, chairman of La Mer to discuss ways to inject enthusi-
asm for the campaign in this lovely new condominium.
Vivacious Carolyn Davis, the only distaff member of the top
team of vice chairmen in this division is still plugging away at
her building, the Presidential. She and her helper, Louis Rosen,
hope to increase the percentages there.

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Friday, April 16, 1971
ilmisti rtcrtdtiain
Page 7
i\
\
A
For Some Soviet Jews It Is

Slavery In Freedom"
By MVRRAY Zl'CKOFF
ITA New. Bditor
"Newspapers arc filled with stor-
ies these dnys about those Soviet
Jews who are emigrating to Israel
or to other countries of their
choice and those Jews who are im-
prisoned either in the mire of bur-
eaucratic red tape or in the jails
and labor camps for daring to de-
mand "Freedom Now." TTieir re-
fusal to renonce their Jewishness
and their courage in the face of
enmity arid juridical savagery of
their oppressors is one of epochal
heroism.
But what of those Russian Jews
who defehd the Soviet Union, re-
vile Zionism, repudiate Judaism
and besmirch Israel? What manner
of persons are these Jews for whom
oppression is freedom and freedom
appears as oppression? What are
they like?
Part of the answer is provided
in a ppjuphlet, "Soviet Jews Re-
ject Zionist 'Protection,' issued
by the Novosti Press Agency in
Moscow and released last month
in the United States. The 30-pago
pamphlet is a transcript of a EQUIid-
tahlc conference of Soviet Jews
"arranged;" as the introduction to
English-language translation puts
it. by Novosti, the Writers' Union
of the U.S.S.R., and the editorial
board ol the Yiddish-language pub-
lication Sovietish Heimland.
The introduction states, "The
gathering w chaired by Hero of
the Soviet Union Henrich Hofman,
who is also a member of the Wri-
ters' Union of the U.S.S.R." The
discussion took place Feb. 5, some
three weeks prior to the world
conference on Soviet Jewry in
Brussels.
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The pamphlet is worth, reading,
even studying, not for *at the
participants say the robotized,
monotonous diatribes are repeated
time and again but for what
they do not say. And what they
tail to say, in the context of this
conference, Incomes a key to the
bizarre thought process of these
socially schizophrenic Soviet Jews.
Hofman, who assailed "uncurbed
Zionist displays of violent antl-So-
vict feeling engineered both in
Israel and in the U.S.A.." intro-
duced the poet Aron Vergclis, who
is editor-in-chief of Sovietish Heim-
land, saying: "He has just come
back from a trip to Western Eur-
ope where he saw for himself the
outrages perpetrated by the Zion-
ists and their accomplices."
Vergells, repeating the trigger
phrase supplied by Hofman, said
he witnessed "the Zionist out-
rages which were perpetrated un-
der the pretext of 'protecting' So-
viet Jews." What were these "out-
ragoa?" Vergells provides not a
single clue.
Isaak Mints described by Hofman
as "commissar Of the Red Cossack
cavalry corps" during the Civil
War (19181, reminded his rapt au-
dience that the October Revolution
was fought for the freedom of "all
the Soviet people. Besides," he said,
"We saved the nations of the
world from fascist bondage." The
75-year-old "academician" also ex-
pressed a teeling of "deepest dis-
gust at the ingratitude of Belgium
one of the nations saved by the
Soviet Union, he said for allow-
ing the forthcoming world confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry to convene
there.
Dmitri Novakovsky, who asks
to "say a few words" is intro-
ducefl a? "an assistant director Of
a research institute in lighting
equipment who maa naanume J/Sn
first to enter Auschwitz with the
liberation forces." "I am sure that
if the organizers and sponsors of
the Brussels assembly were to be
brought face to face with the lib-
erated inmates of Auschwitz, the
survivors of the Nazi inferno
would treat them in much the
same way as they would treat the
fascists," says Novakovsky.
Mikhail Goldstein, described by
Hotaan as "a driver from Muka-
chevo who, fairing for Zionist
propaganda, emigrated to Lsrael,
but returned after being disap-
pointed in the charms of the Zion-
ist paradise." Goldstein described
how he worked "like a galley
slave" in the blazing heat (near
the Jordanian border) for 16-18
hours a day. After piling one hor-
ror story on top of another in re-
counting his alleged sojourn in
Israel, he said he was allowed to
return "thanks to the Soviet peo-
ple. "In Israel, which is led by out-
right Zionists and chauvinists. I
experienced nothing but bitter dis-
appointment, tears of despair, and
n feeling of inferiority," he re-
called.
Alexei Fishkin. another alleged
returnee from Israel, also de-
scribed his work experience there.
"We had many overseers watch-
ing us on the job," he said. "Just
as in the Nazi ghetto," said Hof-
man. "It was worse than in the
ghetto," he replied. Expanding on
his woes, this "Lithuanian con-
sumer co-op employe," as he was
described, added: "I have been
in one of those ghettos and I es-
caped from it 17 days later. But it
took me eight years to get out of
Israel.
The "arranged" conference par-
ticipants droned on and on. One
FUva Vishchinikina, "from the Jew-
ish autonomous region chair-
man of the Valdgeim village So-
viet," said: "We have socialism
and there (in Israel) they have
the jungle law of capitalism. Then,
they have Zionist fascism."
Col. Gen. David Dragunsky
stated that when he was in Uru-
guay last December he told a
meeting of workers: "God grant
the Jews all over the world a life
as good as they have in the Soviet
Union. I think all Soviet Jews
share this view." All?
There is no real need to answer
these statements, these mental gy-
rations and verbid gymnastics.
They fall of their own violution.
But what is most striking about
all the statements is the crash of
silence about their own joy as
Jews in the Soviet Union. What
emerges from this conference is
the stark, bleak picture of men
and women who are not merely
opponents of Israel and Zienism
but who express anguish at bcint;
Jews.
The statements are filled with
Continued en Page 1J
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Page 8
Mewfsft fk>rklton
Friday, April 16. 1971
Beth Sholom Hosts
Nearly 100 Teenagers
Nearly 100 Southeast Region of
United Synagogue Youth gathered
at Temple Both Shal tn early this
month fur a comptafti w Kend of
i on ili' i!v mi "R sian
and What To Do Vbou i-
The group gathered first for
Kabbalal Shabbat services and a
i tonal Sabbath dinner was
s ved, and a play depicting the
theme -an original script written
by Mioholo Roberts. Marc Finkcl-
Btl in and Walter Zolli-r was pre-
s( nted. A lively Ruach session fol-
lowed the OncK Shabbat.
A luncheon was served to the
group by the Senior Friendship
Club following Saturday morning
services under the direction of the
club's president, Mrs. Sam Blon-
der and an efficient committee. A
sonir and dance session was led by
Josi i Yanich, Regional director of
the American Jewish Congress. He
also i ined Rabbi Morion Malav-
sky in leading the seminar dis-
CUS! ] i is.
After a Saturday night visit to
the "Polar Palace," the teens re-
I to the temple for a letter-
writing session. Their pleas in be-
half of the Jews in Soviet Russia
were addressed to U.S. govern-
ment leaders, including President
Richard M. Nixon and various
s. naturs and congressmen. The
teens bade each other farewell at
1 p.m. Sunday, following a visit to
Birch State Park.
Marshall Baltuch. Regional di-
rector of USY, was a guest for the
entire weekend, which was under
the chairmanship of Donna Levy.
Howard Kaufman is senior presi-
dent and Debbie Margolis junior
president of the host group. Youth
coordinator is Mrs. Shirley Gold-
I man; Lynda Segall and Aaron
i Solomon are advisors.
Testimonial Dinner For 'Tevye'
Cast Hosted By Seniors
The Senior Friendship Club of
Temple Beth Shalom sponsored a
testimonial dinner for the cast of
"Tevye Hie Dairyman" which pre-
bi nted three performances of the
play last month for the benefit of
the building fund which will fi-
nance construction of the new
sanctuary at 46) Arthur St.
cast members Esther Agen, who
played the part of Tevye, and
Shirley Feinstein who portrayed
Gitel, choral coach Sylvia Leiber-
man and Harry Fine, make-up
intist. received awards from Mrs.
Samu'l Blonder, president, and
Mi -. William Weiser, viee presi-
dent of the Senior Friendship Club.
Mrs. William Kowitt. producer-
director of the show, received a
standing ovation from the dinner
guests in addition to her award.
Mrs. Kowitt announced plans to
present the play again in the near
future.
' ""Xiiimig"'flRSsF'tWt&eifl' fotf "The"
rcasion were Rabbi and Mrs.
Morton Malavsky, Cantor and Mrs.
' Irving Gold, Mr. and Mrs. Morton
Agen, Mr. and Mrs. L. Alpert, Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Asnin, Mr. and
Mrs. Morris Axin. Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Blonder, Mrs. Toby Bran-
deis, Mrs. I.cna Cooper. Mr. and
! Mrs. Jack Cheyet, Mr. and Mrs.
Eob F.tkin. Mr. and Mrs. Hany
; Fine. Mrs. Minnie Frank, Mrs.
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Mr. and Mrs. Irving Feinstein and
j Mrs. Helen Kalish.
The guest list also included Mr.
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and Mrs. William Kow'tt. Mrs.
j Sylvia Leiberman. Mrs. Fannie
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| Mrs. Mac Wyden and Mr. and Mrs.
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Jewish Welfare Federation executive director Michael Ruvel, former JWF executive
Frances Briefer, and former Women's Division president Mrs. Harry Permesly.
41
Guest speaker Dr. Arieh Plotkin was seated with Mrs. Robert Baer, (left) who
served as cochairman of the luncheon, and Mrs. Gerald Siegel, current presi-
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Friday. April 16. 1971
+Jty*ist Fk>t knar
Page 9
JWF Women's Division Holds Gala Luncheon
A
r
Women's Division campaign chairman Mrs. Stanley Greenspun (center)
was seated with luncheon cochairman Mrs. Jack Levy (left) and Mrs.
David Shapiro.
Jesse J. Martin, general chairman of the JWF campaign, was seated with
former Women's Division president Mrs. Robert Gordon at the head table.
From left to right are (seated) Mrs. Leon Gruber, Mrs. David Rauff and Mrs. Dora Levy.
From left to right are Mrs. Leo Beer, Mrs. Herman Bookman, Mrs. Caroline ^ Florence Novick and m^. Rose Kranser are standing.
Honeyman and Mrs. Fay Rose.
From left to right are Mrs. Arthur Lean, Mrs. Muriel Fuerst, Mrs. Sol Heller, Mrs,
Morris Gold and Mrs. Frances Joseph.
Mrs. Stanley Greenspun, Women's Division campaign chairman, is pictured
here with (from left, seated) Mrs. Steven Tobin, Mrs. Col Linde and Mrs. James
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Page 10
* *W*/>#*rvrrt/#3#7
Friday. April 16. 1971
I have never been persecuted.
I have never lived in a ghetto.
Ihave never felt likeTsraelwasmy home
Butlam Jewish.
>&
"I am Jewish. But noone has ever persecuted me or
my family. Noone has ever forced us to live in poverty,
cramped in with other Jews. Or forced us to leave
one ghetto for another one.
"I am Jewish but I've never felt
that I must live in Israel to fulfill the Jewishness I feel.
And yet I understand those who do.
A child of mine has never been in a school bus that
saboteurs have destroyed, but I can understand the pain
of the people whose children have been murdered.
Just as I can understand the anguish of children
who can't go to school, older people who can't receive
proper care, immigrants who can't speak their new language,
&id a job and provide the basic needs of life for their families.
"I can understand the people of Israel
because their lives bum with the same pride and hope
that I in my own way share.
"I want to help assimilate immigrants, train teachers,
build schools, rehabilitate the sick and handicapped.
"I look forward to the day when they will have
peace and freedom insjtead of the fear that they
will be terrorized by bordering enemies.
'Because I am Jewish, I feel at one with the people
of Israel and with Jews everywhere who suffer. This is
our heritage, this is our common bond. And as a Jew,
I must not let my brother's call for help go unanswered."
*
I want to help.
Name.
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
1909 HARRISON STREET HOLLYWOOD, FtORIDA 33020
Phone (305) 927-0536
!


lay. April 16. 1971
+Jewisti War Mian
Page 11
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlesinger
7te Highlighter
The Women's Division of the Jewish Welfare
limaxed a year's planning and hard work with
leir Highlighters Luncheon at the Hemis-
Jherea Beach Club. A goodly group was on hand
lo combine a little fun with their fund-raising
pid to hear a stirring address delivered by Dr.
Irieh L. Plotkin, a former Israel Defence Forces
Officer who is an author, research worker and
lecturer. Along with Dr. Plotkin. Michael Rtivt-l,
the director of the Jewish Welfare Federation.
Uld J-hsc Martin, campaign chairman, some very
special ladies held forth at the head table: Mrs.
Harry Permesly, former president of the Wom-
an's Division: Mrs. Frances Briefer; Per'e Sieirel,
lout of the Women's Division; Gloria Green-
hpun. Women's Division campaign chairman;
Mr-. David Shapiro, June Gordon and the lunch-
on chairman who delivered up the successful
lftemoon, M.vrna Levy and Aviva Baer.
Special kudos go to Betty Flnkelstetn and
it committee members, Brenda (ireenman,
l)oris Schwa rtzman and Sandy Kellner (Sandy.
Incidentally, really "with it" in a blue and white
jwh iinni numl)cr accessorized with white and
lowboy hat i for the imaginative centerpieces
[hat stood high on each of the tables. The round
ipheves covered with money and candy were tied
lith golden velvet ribbons most aptly proclaim-
nu Its Sweet to Give."
Among the marvelous-looqing lunch bunch en-
bying it all were Sandi Katler, Barbara Miller,
|V ancy Ail k in, Natalie Job love and Rochelle Koe-
bg. Those attractive gals, Ina Linda and Mar-
pta Tobin, were on hand as were Father Gordon
in .. snappy blue denim suit),Lee Herman, who
popp* jnd Dr. Bob Sabra's personality-a-plenty partner.
limi. All in attendance are to be congratulated
In a job well done and a pat on the back is in
k Velf ire Federation for doing themselves proud
|r: .igain.
Vennis, Anyone?
It was a WOW week of tennis, tennis, ten-
lis! The A venture Country Club was the spot
there all the action took place. A dazzling array
If pro tennis celebrities slammed into town for
|he Aeek-long $50,000 Tennis Classic. Rod Lower,
Irthnr Ahe, Roy Emerson, Torn Oklcer, Nlkki
Pllic Marty Riemen, Tony Roche, Cttff Drysdnle
Lnd Ken Rosewall to name just a few. Pretty
[heavy" names to be sure!
The kickoff cocktail party for it all found
n;iny of the Hollywood tennis buffs out in force
mix-it-up socially with some of the world's
knest tennis pros. Dr. and Mrs. Herb Bluestone
lith daughter Joanne rVnersnan, Mr. and Mrs.
perntan Goodman and Mr. and Mrs. Herman
urn were there as were Dr. WUllam Glantx and
^r. Dave and Maryanne Lehman with Bonnie
Pni rhoffer and Jules andAdrlan Aron. The
nie Seiunons were present, too, as well as
[on and Sheila SheffeL And, of course. Dr. Mel
one and wife Shirley made the scene. When the
furnament was held at David Park in Holly-
i, it was they who hosted all those fun cock
pa 11 parties for the tennis pros and fans.
During the week a goodly number of localities
|rned out for the matches. Dr. and Mrs. Ed
.Hunan, Dr. and Mrs. Milt Caster, Dr. and Mrs.
Meister, Dr. and Mrs. Pete Weinstein, Mau-
and Dot Flxel, Betty and Sonny Flnkel-
kln, Dr. Mike Siegel, Dr. and Mrs. Lou Job-
te, Dr. and Mrs. Lee EKijnaU, Jatnea Miller,
\. Norman Atkln, and Dr. Mitt Myers with
i, g son Jonathan were a few of the very many
ving the gusty winds during tournament
ek.
The ll71 Dinah Shore Invitational Classic
Le Club International for the pro-celebrily
matches took place the same week and we were
there! Seated with us ("us" being Jordana Wes-
ter, Iris Crane and yours truly) was Silva Mla-
ciino, a young lady from Yugoslavia houseguesting
with the Westers. When she was introduced to
Yugoslavian tennis pro, Nikkl Pillc, he joined us
for what turned out to be a once-in-a-lifetime
afternoon. Comedian Alan Klnjr, who was later
to play in the doubles match with Pilic, came over
to join him. The famous comedian was accom-
panied by his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Duehin,
George Plimpton, Ethel Kennedy and Burt
Baeharach!!! After all the introduction we s|>cnt
the afternoon "together," lunching and viewing
the matches. Our little group definitely deserved
Oscars for (what appeared to be I our cool headed
"performance" of unimpressed ladies accustomed
to lunching with celebs. Other people of note
taking part in the tournament were Dlna Mer-
rill. Dinah Shore, Chris and Dorothy McGulre
and Jim O'Brien. But, we certainly couldn't tell
you who won or lost. You'll have to check the
sports section for those incidentals as we had
all we could do in simply appearing casual about
breathing properly.
So, if your interests run to socializing with
the famous instead of just observing them, here's
a sure-fire way of accomplishing it. Invite a
Yugoslavian young lady as your houseguest!
People And Places
Many of the young set brightened up the
Parker Playhouse for the opening nHfht perform-
ance of "Bob and Ray, The Two and Only." Jeff
Atkin, son of Dr. and Mrs. Norman Atkin and
Michael Wolflnffer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mau-
rice WoUinjrer, on hand for the two-man show,
were looking forward to their weekend of scuba
diving in the Florida Keys. The two ties charm-
ing young gents will be accompanied by Dr.
Atkin, his brother, Gene, and his younger son.
Mike.
When Alyse Sillier isn't in the stands root-
ing up a storm for younger son, Gary, and his
little league team, she joins her husband, Andy,
in a whirlwind of preparatioas for the upcoming
wedding celebration of son. Ronald, to Joanne
Rosenkauf. That wedding knot will be tied May
23rd at the Seville Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Newman the's prexy of j
the Emerald Hills Homeowners Association) two
of the many interested listeners on hand for the J
most recent meeting of the Hollywood Hills
Homeowners Association. Chief Naylan of the
Hollywood Police Department was joined by
detectives and police officers in giving some
helpful info to the group on home-burglary
prevention.
Dr. Sain MellBrM fair lady, Audrey, opened
her home to the members of the Greater Holly-
wood Dental Auxiliary for their election of of-
ficers meeting and brunch. A few of the many
on hand were Mrs. Martin Reeber, Mrs. Richard
Pyne. Mrs. Jerry Rosenbauni, Mrs. Jerry I. Fish-
man, and Mrs. Alex Kobb.
A brand new temple and a brand new Sis-
terhood! That's Temple Solel and its new presi-
dent is Mrs. Howard Berman. She was among
the many enthusiastic ladies present at the
membership coffee hosted by Mrs. Laarence flut-
ter, membership vice president. Getting ac-
quainted were Mrs. Jack Packar, Mrs. Abe Slater,
Mrs. Harry Ebunan. Mrs. Stanley Berk, Mrs.
Laurence Weber, Mrs. Jack Duoksteln, Mrs.
Stanley SeJlgman, Mrs. Sam Schacter, Mrs. Hy-
man Berman and Mrs. Jerome Oxe*ibejj)rl
Gerry and Sue Gnnxburger are JfMl of fon-
due and so arc their many frlends^TWey played
host to a group of "big-dippers" r*^htly and it
was a huge success. Some of the dMne dunkers
making the scene were Dr. Paul and Dotty Win-
k-k. Dr. Joel and Meryl Schneider, Dr. Conrad
and Carol J:icobs and Howie and Marilyn Harri-
son.
K^ommunitxi ^ MONDAY, APRIL 19
Notl. Ceancil Jewish Women Discussion Gross 1 2*30 p.m.
Hallondale Home Federal
Beborah-Hwd. Chapter Card Party
USY Dramatic Club Temple Beth Shalom
TUESDAY, Ann 20
Hadassah-Hallandale Noon Meeting at Hallandale Home Federal
Hodassah-Mt. Scopus Chapter Meeting
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21
Jewish Welfare Federation-Young leaders Meeting 8 p.m.
Home ef Dr. Alex Kobb
Hadassah-Beach Group Meeting i p.m. Galahad South
Temple Sinai Sisterhood Beard luncheon Neon at Temple Sinai
THURSDAY, APRIL 22
Women's American OUT Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hallandale Home
Federal Bldg.
Jewish Welfare Federation-Communal Workers Meeting at Home of
Jeel Rortman
Pioneer Women Miramar Chapter Meeting at Miramar Recreation
Center.
SATURDAY, APRIL 24
Easter Seal Dinner Dance 7 p.m. at Hillcrest Country Club
MONDAY, APRIL 26
Jewish National Fund Dinner
TUESDAY, AMU 27
Temple Sinai Sisterbeed Beard Meeting
Hadassah-Hwd. Chapter Book Review 1 p.m. Home Federal Bldg.,
1720 Harrison St.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21
B'nai B'rith-Bwd.-N. Dade Council Meeting at 10:00 a.m.
Temple Sinai Men's Club luncheon .._.......
THURSDAY, APRIL 29
B'nai B'rith Wemen-Bwd.-N. Dade Council Installation 8 p.m. Hill-
crest C. C.
'-=
AT, Arm 30
Ns*i Women's Cemm. Brandeis Univ. Dessert Luncheon 12:30
We ma ef Mrs. Reuben Klein
WADLINGTOH
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
140 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOUYWOOO
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"A Service Within The Means Of All"
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
7empCe Beth 1
Wlentotial
Cjazdens
The only aH-jewish cemetery in Broward
CountyiPeaceTuIsurroundings,beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
923 825S_or write: _
""TEMPLEBETH EL_ rftWSS"
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME: _____________________.-----------------------------
ADDRESS:
___PHONE: ------


Page Vl
+jf*vi*t> nurikM**
Friday. April 16. 1971
Jewish Education's Role
Theme Of RCA Convention
The cnwlal role of Jewish edit-
ion in countering tM corrosive
. fjuences alienating Jewish'youth
be discussed at the forthcom-
ing convention ol the Rabbinical
Council of America scheduled May
3-9 at the Sea ti.ill Hotel in Miami
i ich, accordin to an announ -
. i made by the president ol the
Rabbinical Ci labbl Bernard
i.. Berzon. More than liOO delegates
: all parts of the United States
and Canada arc expected to attend.
An educational symposium will
ire outstanding educators from
the United States and Canada on
the theme "Jewish Education as
I Foundation of Jewish Survival
in the 1970's." Chairman of the
session will bo Dr. Bernard Berg-
man, who serves as chairman of
the National Council for Torah
Education.
Dr. Alvin Schiff. executive vice
president of The New York Board
of Jewish Education, will deliver
paper on the subject "Ideological
C intent In the Hebrew High School
Curriculum." A second
"Non-eiir'-ie ;iar Guidance In Jew-
ish Education," will be delivered
bj Ral si Joseph Deitcher, Educa-
tional Coordinator of the Hebrev
Acad< my of Montreal.
Another sneaker will Ih- Rabbi
Fabian Schonfeld of New York,
who will draw from his vast ex-
perience with Yeshlva education
in New York in his address, "How
in reach the heart, as well as the
mind, is the challenge of the next
decade," he said. "The former in-
volves the area of personal gui-
dance, the personal warmth and
contact between the teacher and
his students, while the latter re-
quires an invigorated curriculum,
utilizing an awareness of contem-
porary currents of thought," it
was explained.
President Zalman Shazar and the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem M.
Schneerson, are pictured in the Rebbe's siudy at Lubavitch world head-
quarters, in New York. After hearing the Megillah at the Lubavitcher synaqoque
in the presence of more than 3,000 congregants, Mr. Shazar met privately with
Rebbe for more than six hours. President Shazar, a devout Lubavitcher follower,
is named Schneur Zalman after Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi (1745-1813),
founder of the Chabad Lubavitch movement.
When most people think of EL AL,
they think of Israel. That's pretty
logical, since Israel is where we
come from.
But please don't forget about the'
other places we fly to.
If you're traveling to Europe, you
can take an EL AL flight to London,
Rome; Athens, or Geneva. And if
none of these cities is your destina-
tion, take EL AL to one of them any-
way. We'll make arrangements for
a connecting flight on another air-
line from there to wherever you
might be going.
What's important is that your trip
to Europe on an EL AL flight will be
supporting the Israel economy. And
EL AL is part of the economy.
For information on our European
schedules, contact EL AL or your
local travel agent.
The folks back home would ap-
preciate it..

The Airline of Israel


ly, April 16, 1971
vJewistittcricHani
Page 13
Rabbi Prinz Misquoted'
By Look Magazine
MUikii ft riBkNI MMMMHIi.i ..! HI
ii:i*i.i..uw>Mni.uii.uiudii
NEW YORK (JTA) An
liclc on "The Agonized Amcr-
\n Jews" in the new issue of
jk magazine has been scored
"terribly distorted" by Dr.
>chim Prinz, 69, past presi-
it of the American Jewish
rigress, who is extensively
kted in it.
JThcy misquote me terribly,"
f. Prinz told the Jewish Telc-
V]i\\c Agency, adding that on
b;isis of previous experience
|th lx>ok he assumed he would
the text of the article he-
publication. The three-page
Ice, by senior editor Gerald
|tor, appears in the maga-
s April 20 issue.
Dr. Prinz said that the printed
prsion of his remarks about
le Jewish Defense League waa
hiilder than I meant." Look
luotes him as saying: 'The Jevv-
|h Defense League is something
Yeud would have described as
Isychopathology. It is sick, lu-
picroiisly ineffective, trying to
r.itate a philosophy of violence
lat is not only inimical to Jews
lut utterly alien. It grew out of
a sick reaction-to the black rev-
olution. The slogan of the "JOCT
'Never Again,' is based on the
assumption that if the Jews had
done something about Hitler,
six million wouldn't have died!
The assumption is entirely false.
What Jews did learn from Aus-
chwitz la that the home of Bee-
thoven and Bach could kill with
impunity."
Uabbi Prinz endorsed the sec-
tion of the article quoting his
condemnation of American Jew-
ry, however, taken from the text
of a speech in which he said: "In
terms of Jewish culture, Amer-
ican Jewry is a disasti r area.
It has not attracted anybody of
intellectual stature. The mosl
mediocre people lead. The most
illiterate Jewry in the world is
in the U.S.A. Our kids know
about Martin Luther King's let-
ter from a Birmingham jail hut
not about Jeremiah's letter from
jail in Jerusalem. I'm quite des-
perate about American Jewry."
Astor reported that Rabbi
Prinz warned that American
Jews must not be forced to place
their stamp of approval on ev-
ery action by Israel and told him
that American Jewry "must ac-
knowledge the independence and
integrity of American Jewry."
Rabbi Prinz was quoted as say-
ing: "Because we are close to
Israel, we must not be forced
to accept every move as pru-
dent or acceptable. Israel must
not become the manager of
American Jewry, but only of
its own affairs." Dr. Prinz. who
is recupeiating from an opera-
tion, told the JTA he would lend
a formal letter of complaint to
Look.
*Jm fxabbi S5pealis J-rem Jlie f^ulpit
.Hi* I'll w *w 11111: wmmummtm
'Leaven In Our Hearts9
$
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
21 NISAN 6:25
Sr^*s**r*SrtrMV>VMVMjP4*4*/
Rabbi Raab
For Some Soviet Jews It Is
..
Slavery In Freedom"
Continued from Pag* 7-
pnom and hatred. But against
^hat? In the last analysis, against
heir own Jcwishness. There is not
ven a hint that these partici-
unts are Jewish except for theii
kames and Hofman's identifica-
|on of them. These same diatribes
Mild just as well have been is-
jed by non-Jewish Russians.
What emerges, therefore, is a
rotesque vilification of Jcwish-
ness vis-a-vis an attack on Zionism
find Israel, and the pathos of per-
sns whose Jewishness is self-de-
Mcd. They are one step from be-
ng "mishumadim."
It is easy to write off those who
laid they were "duped" by Zion-
fm as suffering from guilt feel-
igs for having "betrayed" theii
fatherland" by going if, indeed,
ley did to Israel and now ex-
piating their guilt feelings by "con-
rssing." It is equally easy to dis-
>'iss the others as willing tools in
the hands of the Kremlin in return
for relative, albeit elusive, free-
dom. But that's too easy.
Perhaps part of the answer is
that despite their efforts to affirm
that Russia doesn't have any "Jew-
ish question," there is a glimmering
of awareness that tens of thou-
sands of their brothers and sisters
prove daily that it does. Perhaps
part of the answer, too, is that de-
spite their efforts to blend into
the status-quo of Soviet society,
they are always trotted out as
showcase Jews. And part of the
answer may also be that these
Jews are fearful that once their
labors in the vineyards of others
arc no longer required, they will
be tossed on the scrapheap by the
very forces they now defend.
In the final analysis, these are
the tragic Jews serving out a life-
long sentence Of imprisonment in
their own minds where they are
both the jailed and the jailer.
These arc the Jews who are so
oppressed that they no longer
recognize their oppression. Theirs
is the oppression of ultimate as-
similation: toal identification with
the oppressor and a burning hatred
of those who dare defy and chal-
lenge oppression.
It is the tragedy of the margi-
nal Jew who has become a lackey
in the hope of averting total ostrac-
ism. It is the ostracized Jew ho-
ping to remain, at least marginal:
needed if not necessary. These are
the Jews who rationalize what Ac-
had Ha'am termed "slavery in
freedom," a condition he defined as
"spiritual slavery under the veil of
outward freedom.'
The tragedy is that these Jews
arc shackled by what Erich Fromm
'ias called, in another connection,
"chains of illusion." And the
greatest trageoy is that the chains
ire forped by these Jews them-
selves. *
By RABBI DAVID RAAB
Temple Beth Raphael
Each year the Festival of Pass-
over with its message of freedom
einforces the importance of being
free. However,
before the Fes-
tival is observed,
we are told that
it is necessary
to remove all
leaven or "cho-
metz" from our
midst.
Why Ls leaven
forbidden? It is
explained in the
reading of the
Torab that when
the children of
Is rail were in a hurry to leave
Egypt, they did not have time to
permit the dough to ferment.
Therefore, they baked "mataohs"
or unleavened bread.
I believe, however, that we are
commanded to remove all leaven
because the Hebrew word for
leaven is "chometz" which means
"sour" or "sourness.''
Removing the leaven or crumbs
if bread from our homes is not
enough. It is only symbolic. In
order to have true freedom, we
mutt remove the "sourness" which
is within us.
The difficulty of this task is
augmented by the fact that what-
ever the "sourness" touches, that
too. becomes sour. Place a sweet
individual next to a sour one. and
i he sweet becomes sour never
the other way around.
Indeed, we have in our society
people who live on "sourness."
The longer they are in power the
moat fermented and sour they be-
come. These people criticize know-
ing not what! They find fault with
everyone but with themselves.
In every era there is somewhat
of a generation gap, but even more
precise, it is, I believe a communi-
cation gap. This gap is present be-
cause of the "sourness," bitterness
and rebelliousness in the heart of
he young people, their desire to
break away from the past It is
also present in the hearts and
ninds of the older ceneration or
"establishment" which tries to
hold on to the past.
Over 2.000 years ago, Socrates
remarked: "The children now have
luxury; they have .'ho manners:
they have contempt for authority:
they show disrespect.for their cld-
e-s ,'. '. and they contradict their
parents and tyrannize over
their teachers."
If this generation is to be dif-
ferent from all other generations.
ve must remove the sourness and
bitterness from our hearts. A
society is made up of individuals.
If the individual has bitterness
within him. the society and the
community will be infected. This
in turn will affect the nations and
the world. H there is peace in the
heart of man, there will be peace
in the world.
The last days of the Passover
Festival re-emphasize the impor-
tance of freedom, and the need u>
regard ourselves as though we
have been freed. This repetition is
made because we do not yet pos-
sess complete freedom.
In our day and age we find
th't the Jews of Russia are not
free. Although economically and
oolitic-i'Iv fne, yet spiritually they
ire enslaved. Russian Jews are
not free when they cannot think
M they wish, speak as they feel
or write as their hearts and minds
direct, and finally, worship as their
cons tience dictates.
Rut even they, fired by the Pass-
over tradition and message of free-
dom, are showing signs of spiritual
release and deliverance. They are
no longer Jews of silence and no
longer afraid. They have removed
the "sourness" from their midst.
"Lei My People Go" was the
slogan of th" great Exodus from
Egypt It is the slogan of the Pass-
over and it must be the slogan of
Russian Jcwrv.
fKeliqic'iis Oerrii
'9
ices
SOLEL (TEMPLE) 3306 N. 46 Avenue
(Temporary office) Liberal.
H/.UANDAIE
HALLANOALE JEWISH CENTEM
126 N. E. 1st Ave. 44
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (TEMPLE) 1SS1 8. 14 AM
Reform. Rabbi Samual Jaffa. 4*
1'rMay |fl:30 a.m. Vlzkor Memorial
s. -rvii -... :15 p.m. Topic: "l-ove
Story": r There A Return To Ho.
mantle Love**1
BETH SHALOM (TEMPLtfV 172t
Monroe St. Conservative Rabbi
Morton Malavsfcy. Cantor Irving
Gold 4S
Thursday 7:.1l> p.m. Friday 9 a.m.
7:30 i).m. Saturday 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m.
Vlzkor. i
----
SINAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johneon St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro1.
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. 4?
Thursday 6 p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m ,
3:11 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m.. 10 a.m.
Yizkor Service.
MWAMAI
ISRAEL (TEMPLE) MM S.W. SSth St.
Conservative. Rabbi Elliot J. Wine-
grad. Cantor Abraham Kostar. 4S
Thursday rt:30 p.m. Friday 9 a.m.. 8:30
p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.. 10 a.m. Tlskor
Services. .4
MAtMTI
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. I1S1
N.W. 9th at.
There Are No Unknown Soldiers In Israel
> CHABL.ES JOSHUA LEVIN
There are no "unknown sol-
|ers" in Israel.
The nation is like a closcly-
^it family. When one of its sons
ills in battle, the loss is mourn-
by all. Photos of those killed
|re displayed in the newspapers,
funeral notices reflect a
pighborly sharing of grief. The
alien are not faceless strangers,
ley arc everybody's children.
Here Is one taken at random
rom a recent issue of The
Jerusalem Post, Israel's English
anguage daily. It reads like an
lem from the "Locals and Per-
bnals" of small-town American
jewspa|>crs. There is an identi-
|able intimacy and warmth, a
Bme-town flavor that spreads
cover a country:
"Seem i 1st Lt.) Drori QHboa,
who, was kil'ed on the Suez
inal on Sunday, was laid to
yesterday at Kibbutz Yad
( : a;, h I home, with fUH
plitary honors. Drori hail sign-
on for an additional three
Miths attar finishing his com-
pulsory military service. He was
eulogized by Kibbutz Secretary
Ashcr Weinman."
In the widest and most authen-
tic sense, the Israel Defense farc-
es is a people's army, its young
members respected and idolized
as probably in no other land.
The young male Israeli enters
the service at 18 for a three-year
hitch. He is then shifted to ih;-
rese-ves where he will remain
until 55. recently extended from
49. Girls serve for shorter peri-
ods in both categories. There .ir-
relatively few deferments and
4-Ps are utilized. Draft dodrs
and deserters are aunost un-
known.
Kven before is. youngsters of
secondary school age serve in
CJadnaa contraction of Gedu-
del Near, youth troops a vol-
untary para-military organizatl m
directed an! supervised by the
Miri-try of Education. Love .,;
count: v Is Instilled early
a teenager turns to a strang-
er in an inter-city B el
month." But three years out of
his life, that's quite a stceicii'.'
He shrugged and smiled. "One
must. It's my country."
The Israeli soldier is a proud
one. An incident in T|fji Aviv's
Sheraton Hotel coffee shop is
illustrative. A younjttrst iiou-
tenant had finished hjSjBical and
moved toward the cashier. He
was stopped by a *cU-mcBiting
American tourist who wanted
to take the check. The officer
declined with thanc4?8lding trm'
the Defense Forces takes care
of all his needs. "*
L'fe in Israel strrprtflwhcn rtt*S
and announces, as if he had to
tell everybody he met: "I will be
beginning my army service next
lir. An ol.l
or eighties
loudspeak-
l's seat i:i :
bus. When tn
the de i .
jldjersriji a-V, i!
1-giiSi to cr
ft of t'.e fal!"i.
fected him as :f
bull''tins go on
man in his sev
gazed intently
or above the d;
Jerusalem-bouni
announcer
ol three Israeli
lee action, le
had never Jh^a
yet the nev a
they \v ere"riS
A veti i i f:vm a south-
*
ern kibbutz, who was in Tel Aviv
for a day, tried at lunchtime lo
interpret the extraordinarily
deep affection of the country for
its young defenders.
"To be sure." he begarr, a* ne
buttered his lachmaniut (soft
white rol!s) which with leberf
(yogurt) and tea made up his
quick meal, "all countries jihI
all peoples are proud of their
armed forces and react as mi.jiit
be expected to casualties.
"Here in Israel we have a very
special feeling and it is due to
. many reasons.' It Is part'y >
cause the nation and Its Defense
Forces became of aee just I usl
year, when b">th were 21. It i-
alo because our enemies hav-n't
given us much time to tak."
either for granted, and some of
our friends would prek < that
neither existed We could -,ot
continue to live a more or foss
normal existence if our young
men were not on watch on the
borders. They ;irc so few lhal
each Is doubly precious to us.
: ther rea-
*H ted h'

the table for emphasis. "I re-
member as a child in Poland
when we had to bar the doors
and windows of our home and
cower in corners as drunken
mobs of Polish hooligans swept
through the streets, thirsting for
Jewish blood and. ironically,
enough, shouting, 'Zhid, na Pal-
estina!" Jew, go to Palestine.
Thousands of old-timers in Israet
remember similar scenes in Rus-
sia or Lithuania. The survivors
of Hitler's blood bath lived for
the day when they could be
among their own and on their
own soil. All of us are now in
Israel, defended by our young
men. No more cowering. Is it.
an\ wonia r that we worship
these youngsti rst When >>ne
falls the er.tire country mourns
th" loss."
In this sense. Israelis say
are no "unknown sokhert. '
Those who give their lives aie
known by name, and are re-
d and remembered in the.
nation-family called Israel.


Page 14
fJenitf) fkxIdHfiiri
Friday, April 16. 1971
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah Now
Accepting Applications
Applications are now bciriK ac-
cepted for Hip fifth summer sea-
son of ("amp Ka-Dee-Mah, the
only camp in Greater Hollywood
sponsored by the Jewish commun-
ity, which provides children with a
unique opportunity for recreational
activity on a broad scale in asso-
ciation with other Jewish young
people.
Children at Camp Ka-Dee-Mah
receive contact with their Jewish
heritage as well ai their American
heritage through music, drama,
story time, holiday celebrations
and special events, rather than
through formal classes or religious
services.
The camp is oriented to social
group, with small groups of chil-
dren led by mature counselors
who are trained to concern them-
selves with the social and emo-
tional growth of children to maxi-
mum capacity. It offers an oppor-
tunity for group living designed
to give youngsters some basic
learning experiences, such as mak-
ing friends, sharing, developing
new skills, adjusting to new situa-
tions, and understanding and ap-
reciating the world around them.
Four age-graded programs are
offered for hoys and girls from
the ;iges of four through 15. Ap-
plications are being accepted from
all residents of the community re-
gardless of their ability to pay the
full cost of the tuition. Campers
are divided into Juniors. Seniors,
Teen Travelers and C.I.T.'s.
The Junior group will consist of
all boys and girls who will l>e four
by July 1 but have not yet at-
tended first grade. Their program
will be similar to the program of
the oMor children but will be pre-
sented at a more leisurely pace.
Tri|>f and cook-outs will be shorter
and activities suited to the younger
ages will be featured. Junior Camp
is housed in a separate wing of
Temple Beth-El and travels in its
own bus during the camp day.
The Senior gMUp is made up of
your.;-:, rs utering second through
fifth !i in September. Th >
""ill nee a completi range
of d Ctlvities including
nature and ft, si *rti and
games arts and crafts, music, di t-
matics, trips, celebrations. On >g
Shalb.it programs, overnights and
Special cents. A program of swim
instruction and recreational swim-
ming is supervised by the lied
Cross-trained professional staff at
the Hallandaie City Pool. The
Camp program stresses relaxed
but friendly approach to organized
fun.
The next age group us the Teen
Travelers, which is designed to
meet the needs of campers who
will be entering grades six through
nine. Teen Travelers are given the
opportunity to ''do their own
thing" by actively participating in
the preliminary planning of their
own program.
This year's Teen Travelers in-
novation is two separate teen units
- one for the f^th and 7th graders,
and one for 8th and 9th graders.
The two units will go their sep-
arate ways, with activities geared
to their respective interests and
needs; occasionally the two units
will plan joint activities.
A unique program, Teen Trav-
elers introduces the more mature
camper to a variety of campsites
and a flexible daily schedule. The
teens travel the highways and by-
ways of Dadc and Broward Coun-
ties. Each new day brings a new
experience, new site, new adven-
ture. The daily sites are chosen so
thai the program is well rounded.
Including athletic, social, cultural,
educational and community serv-
ice activities.
The basic time schedule is 9:36
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., but they will b?
free to rearrange their hours to
suit specific activities, such as
night ball games, campfires or
beach parties. Schedules of coming
activities will be distributed in ad-
vance, and will generally include
at least one evening activity each
Week. Teen Travelers will carry
their own lunches and may bring
beverages or buy them at camp.
The fourth program will be the
CounsHors-in-Training group, a
carefully selected small group of
tenth graders who are interested
in an intensive, well rounded train-
ing program designed to develop
an understanding of child behavior,
group leadership techniques and
program skills. This group will be
attached to Junior and Senior
Camps. Their time will be devoted
to instruction, observation, dis-
cussion, practice, supervised prac-
tical assignments and just plain
fun!
All applicants for the C.I.T. pro-
gram will be interviewed in i>crson
in order to determine their readi-
ness and interest. Only six week
"egistrations can be accented: the
i < for the in is $90. Those
who complete the program satis-
factorily will be issued a certifi-
cate and will be eligible for hiring
next summer as second year (rath-
r than In'ginning Junior Coun-
selors.
Camp Ka-Dco-Mah is under the
supervision of Michael Ruvel.
ACSVV, executive director of the
Jewish Welfare Federation of
(beater Hollywood. Director of the
Camp is Richard K. Goldstein, who
has had 22 years of camp leader-
ship experienop 13 of them as
i ("amp Directs)! for Jewish com-
munity centers in New Jersey and
Virginia and has directed Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah since its inception
four years ago.
Each group of 10 to 12 children
will be led by a senior counselor
at least 19 years old, or with one
or more years of college. All will
have special skills which they will
share with other groups. Each
group will also have a Junior
Counselor 16 or 17 years old. In
order to strengthen the program,
an extensive orientation and a
five day training program will
precede the camp.
Temple Beth-El's air conditioned
classrooms and auditorium, as well
as its outdoor playground and ath-
j letic facilities have been rented
for the camp season to serve as
I the home base for both Junior and
Senior divisions. Recreational and
instructional swimming will take
p'ace at the Hallandaie City Pool,
where eight Hed Cross Water Safe-
ty Instructors will lead the pro-
gram. Liberal use will be made of
nearby Recreation Department
facilities, playgrounds and beaches
at well as Greynolds Park. Chil-
dren will bring their own lunch:
the camp will provide lunchtime
beverage and a snack daily.
Campers will be picked up daily
in the vicinity of their homes and
will not be expected to cross major
intersections without an escort. In
some cases, however, it may be
necessary for parents to provide
escorts for very small children to
and from the bus stop. The Camp
will try to provide bus service any-
where within the area served by
the Jewish Welfare Federation of
Greater Hollywood, unless such
service will unduly extend the
travel time for other riders.
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah is a non-
profit camp, thereby providing for
reasonable fees as follows: 6 weeks
(Mondav, June 21 to Friday, July
301 $175; 3 weeks 'Monday June
21 to Friday, July 9t $90; 3 weeks
(Monday, July 12 to Friday, July
301 $9D.
Completed applications may be
broueht or mailed to Camp Ka-
Dee-Mah, c/o Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration. Suite 109, 1909 Harrison
St., Hollywood. Fla. 33020. A de-
posit "f at least $25 must accom-
pany each application (This deposit
will not he refunded unless th"
camp is unable to accept the child i
>nd the balance of the fee is due
by June 10.
Registration is limited so that
adequate supervision and facilities
can be guaranteed to all campers.
Applications will be accepted in
order of their receipt, and regis-
tration for each age group will
close as soon as the limit for that
group has been reached. Parents
are urged to register early to avoid
disiopnntment. Reduced fees are
available for those who can not
afford full tuition.
Question
Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why do people refrain from
using a knife to cut or trhn the
fringe* of the Tails (Tzitzlth)
but use their teeth Instead?
This is traced to the statements
of the rabbis in the Mishnah (Mi-
doth 3:41 where it is stated that
a stone which has been touched by
metal is unfit tor use for the altar.
The reason given by the rabbis
prohibiting the use of metal for
the altar stone is that metal is of-
ten used to shorten life by being
material for armaments while the
altar is used to prolong life. The
Tzitzlth likewise are used as a
means of helping one to remem-
ber the commandments of God in
order to prolong life and thus are
not touched bv metal, which is
i sometimes used for the reverse
| purpose.
Why do some congregations
raise up the scroll before the
reading while others do so after
the leading'.
It is generally the Oriental Jew-
ish congregations (Sephardic) who
raise the Torah before the reading
while the Occidental (Asbkenazic)
co^T'nities raise u after the
reading.
It seems that originally the
practice was to raise the Torah
before the reading so as to set the
proper tone and atmosphere for
the reading as well as to set the
purpose. Some explain that the
reason the Ashkenazic communi-
ties do this after the readme is
because the congregations were
evidently under the impression
that it was most important to see
the script and therefore they some-
times left after seeing the script
before the reading took place.
In order to keep them in their
places the raising of the Torah was
deferred until after the reading
took place so that the people in
the congregation would wait there
until after the reading in order to
see the script in the scroll when it
was raised up for them.
BBW Chapters Attend
Leadership Workshop
Some 33 chapters of B'nai H'rith
Women in the South Florida area
participated in the second annual
Leadership Workshop held recenl
lv at the Carillon Hotel in Miami
Beach. The Workshop includ"d
training for presidents, desk of-
fices (treasurers, financial, re-
cording ard corresponding .:<
taries) :eadersr.ip, fund-raising.
membership and programming.
Mrs. Arthur Horowitz, second
v'c" president of District No. 5,
BBW, was Workshop coordinator,
'xx-al chairman for the Broward -
North Dade area was Mrs. Sidney
Flitter.
CUSTOM DRESSMAKING FOR
WOMEN AN0 CHILDREN
Pattern and material of your
own choosing. Special attention
given in your own home.
COURTEOUS SERVICE
FAIR PRICE RANGE
Estimate* Cheerfully Given
Phone 929-5852
THE CHINA SHOP
1212 S. Federal Hwy., Oania ,
Hand Painted China
Monograming
Containers For Flowers
Prints for Deeounage
INSTRUCTION SUPPLIES
Phone S25-0202

MAID SERVICE
Uniformed, neat with police I.D.
Card S2.75 hour 9-5 nr. minimum
Experienced courteous service.
Mon. thru Friday. 925-0433. Miss
Perry. .
i
sna shot
PIZZA SHOP
327 E. BEACH BLVD.
Delivery to 2 A.M.
PIZZA, BAKED LASAONA
w Garlic Bread. Sausage and
Meatball Subs.
EAT-IN-TAKE-OUT
Phone 920-3555
Open 12 Noon Closed Monday
CUDDY'S UlCTKIC, INC
COMPLETE ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
SERVING BROWARD
15 YEARS
FREE ESTIMATES
125 N. Dixie Highway Hldl.
Phone 923-307*
A. MM
BUILDER & GEN. CONTRACTOR
WILL BUILD ON YOUR LAND
OR OURS
35 YEARS EXPERIENCE
New and Remodeling
RESIDENTIAL A COMMERCIAL
Florida Room Carport
Enclosures
Licensed-Insured
Phone 983-S079
METRO BUILDERS
Additions and remodeling. Specia-
list in home and office Interiors.
Carports enclosed at fair prices.
15 years experience. Licensed and
insured. 966-3064.
CARPET INSTALLATION
WARNING!
Don't have your carpets installed
by amateurs. Call an expert. 25
*'"'' J*P*r<'nce-iorK guaranteed
REASONABLE.DEPENDABLE
Free Estimates Cheerfully Given
Evenings and Weekends If Requir-
ed. Savings on Padding. 989-9872
DO NOT USE FOR MORE THAN ONE CHILD. USE PLAIN PAPE.l TO REGISTER ADDITIONAL CHILDREN.
Registration -1971 Season
Last Name
First Name
Address
TTt7
Dateof Birth
Age on 7/1/71
Tip"
Mother's Name
Street Corner
Nearest Our Home
Father's Name
Home Phone
Brothers or Sisters in Camp This Season
Business Phone
and
3 Weeks June 21 July 9 ($90.00
Did Applicant Attend
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah previously?
Please
Check
One:
Grade in Sept. '71
Which years?
3 Weeks July 12 July 30 ($90.00)
6 Weeks June 21 July 30 ($175.00)
Enclosed is a deposit of $ -,

Please
Check
One:
Junior Age 4 by July 1, T971 to F irst Grade
Senior Second through Fifth Grades
Teen Traveler 6th through 9th Grades
C.l.T's 10th Grade (6 weeks only) ($90.00 for 6 weeks)
. -.............,. -3. ~
camp activities and to travel in all vehicles used for camp transportation.
($25.00 minimum). I agree to permit the child registered above to participate in all
CARPET CLEANING
IMMDIAU SOtVICt
Brighten up your home. Call now
h-r...F.R,EE EST|MATE. Carpets
beautifully cleaned. Dry foam
bcqJ5.0!1 "tardative dded fr*
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Phone 961-5741
Wl
3
THE LITTLE WILDER
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GENERAL CONTRACTOR
staSuhS! ,nd '""d- Gansral
E .-J ;'ii,.unl,mited- Rmodel-
ffiLrri A*M2J5 Florida rooms,
screened enclosures. Doors hunn
Paneling. 981-2193; 922-6684 8
Professional-Expert Service
DOROTHY L. PARK
PUBLIC STENONOTARY
More than 15 years experience.
Legal-Marine-General. Office. 1104
So. Federal, Hollywood. Call any-
time 822-3370.

Signature of Parent
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING
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HOLLYWOOD


April 16. 1971
-Jenistncridiar)
Page 15
BOOK MVIIW By Seymour B. tiebmon
Books On Communist Attitudes
18 FPU-l XO think that Western democratic
| nations can exist in the world separate and apart
i communist states. It is, however, greater folly
to believe that our nation, or any
nation, can co-exist with Russia
and its satellites as friends and
equals. The height of folly is to
give credence to Russian promises
or statements of good intentions.
He who would take the viper to
his bosom would soon find the poi-
sonous fangs sunk ieop into his
breast.
Robert Conquest in his book, The Nation KlUra
Macmillan Co., $6.95), presents a documented
nt of the destruction of the nations which lay
within Russia's southern borders. The story of what
Stalin did to the Volga Germans, the Kalmyks, and
the Islamic nations of the Crimea and Caucasus
has been a dark sestet The liquidation of these
"nations" (just as the Jews are a "nation" within
Russia) was a warning by the U.S.S.R. to all other
non-Russian peoples. The Muslim Turki, the Bud-
dhist Mongols, the Crimean Tartars and Kalmyks
were destroyed or deported. Over a half-million
people died during the deportution; those yet alive
cannot return to their former abodes.
The aim of socialism is to abolish the present
division of mankind into small states and to merge
them. Stalin amplified Lenin's rule by adding: "It
should be borne in mind that in addition to the
rights of nations to self-determination, there is also
Befween You and Me: By BORIS SMOLAR
Inside The New York Times
IW DOES ONE RISE in The New York Times from
^n editor on Jewish affairs to executive editor, be-
ig the man who runs the world's most powerful news-
Read "My Life and The Times" by
Turner Catledge, just published by
Harper & Row and you will find the
answer. You will also get a glimpse of the
attempts of the late publisher of The
New York Times, Arthur Hays Sulzbcr-
ger, to keep the newspaper out of the
crossfire between Zionist and non-Zion-
ists and various other Jewish factions.
Mr. Catledge, who held the position of
litive editor until his retirement, relates how he
led on the editorial staff of the Times in 1929 on a
ty of $80 a week. Only a few days after he was hired,
(vas assigned to write a. story on the Wailing Wall
)n the morgues' of the newspa|>er. The story was
lied to supplement news of the outbreak of Arab riots
erusalem during which a group of Jewish worshipers
killed at the Wailing Wall.
/ith a Baptist father and a Presbyterian mother the
|issippi-born Catledge had a good Sunday School edu-
n. and when Ik' began to read the clips from the
^gue, all the Biblical places he had studied in Sunday
tool began coming to life. He did not know whether the
|or wanted from 200 or 2,000 words on the Wailing
but he was so fascinated that he wrote a long de-
d article which attracted the attention of Adolph
K the publisher.
Israel Newsletter
The next thine, he knew he was what he calls "the
unofficial Jewish editor" of the New York Times. Any
news involving Jews was automatically referred to him.
He was later taken off the Jewish beat and assigned to
cover political events and was later transferred to the
Washington staff of the newspaper, covering the House
of Representatives.
Mr. Catledge reveals that Sulzbcrgcr was not a re-
ligious man, and although Jewish by birth he did not
want |>eople to think the Times was a "Jewish news-
paper." When Mr. Catledge became assistant managing
editor, the bullpen of the Times was largely Catholic, and
there had been criticism that the news coverage had been
affected by that fact. When he l>egan to put new men in
the bullpen, it happened thnt his first apimintces were
Jewish. He was told by Sul/.berger: "Don't go from a
Catholic bullpen to a Jewish bullpen."
Another time Sulzberger commented on the high pro-
portion of Jewish by-lines. However, for the most part no
thought was given to the matter, and never was religion
a factor in personnel decisions. In employing staff on the
editorial department, an applicant was judged by his
professional ability and not by his religion or lack of it
Mr. Catledge assures.
In his "My Life and The Times," Catledge takes the
reader behind the scenes of the New York Times on many
"inside" editorial decisions of great importance. Reading
the book will make one understand what makes the New
York Times the excellent newspaper il is.
By CARL ALPERT
Young Arab's Soliloquy
tOM RECENT STUDIES, articles and interviews with
Israeli Arabs, I consolidate the observations of a young
|ae!i Arab intellectual as he musingly surveys the pres-
scene. .
"The confrontation between Israel and
| Egypt has become tense, but most peo-
ple don't seem to realize that the most
I exposed and the most frustrated victims
I of all are the Arabs of Israel.
"The Israeli Jews know exactly where
I they stand. They have no conflict of loy-
alties. On the other side, the leaders of
I the Fatah have made no secret of their
goal. It is only wo who must be silent,
can not, dare not, express a loyalty which will bring
vn on us the wrath of either side. And so we must be
re neutral than the neutrals.
"Of course we want peace. We want security and
conditions as will permit us to lead quiet, fruitful
s. The Israelis tell us such conditions are assured un-
them; our brethren across the lines tell us that ful-
nent of our lives as Arabs can come only under an
lb government. Is it any wonder that some of us yield
(the patriotic appeal of the Fatah?
"Indeed, the wonder is that so few have yielded. Don't
et there are almost 400,000 Arabs in Israel not to
of the million more in the occupied territories. But
do Israelis insist on remembering the few who be-
terrorists? You can't generalize at one extreme any
re than you can generalize on the basis of an Arab who
|inteers his services to lecture for the UJA in America.
Isn't it natural for us to feel a close sense of kinship
the millions of Arabs In the neighboring states
speak the same language as we, have the same folk
customs, follow the same religion, and are indeed blood
brothers of the same families?
"Yet with very few exceptions we have not made
common cause with our brethren. Out of fear of the con-
sequences? From conviction that Israel would win any-
how? Whatever the reasons you may be sure that our
situation is not an enviable one. It is not easy to be a
minority. Jews should know that.
. .
"You tell us that we have greateftjreedom in Until
than is permitted in most Arab states. We have the vote.
We have civil freedom. We have the right to express con-
trary political views and the right to organize politically.
We have representation in the Knesset, democratically
elected by Arab voters. But are you aware of the deep
sense of futility and frustration from which we suffer?
"When a bomb goes off somewhere Jews look at us
with suspicion, and you know there are Jewish ruffians
who arc not above "taking it out" on the first Arab they
meet. Many of us are getting a university education, yes,
but not all jobs are open to us. They tell us there are
'critical' or 'delicate' posts in whjeh Arabs can not be
trusted. Perhaps this is justified by the state of war, but
how do you think it makes us fe^J^, Can we be blamed for
thinking, sometimes, that under an Arab government all
this would be different?
"Mind you. we resent the established Arab leadership
in Israel, as well. They lepresent a generation which has
gone, but they still cling to'power, The Jews deal with
these heads of clans and these political bosses,' with the
result that the young Arab, .intellectuals, seeking self-
expression, are being drii^'-into the arms of the
extremists.
the right of the working class to consolidate its
power, and the right of self-determination is sub-
ordinate to the latter power."
Although Conquest's book has no mention of
Russia's Jews, Anti-Semitism Without Jews, by
Paul Lendvai (Doubleday & Co., $7.95t deals ex-
clusively with Jews behind the Iron Curtain. Lend-
vai's book is most timely because of the world-wide
agitation by Jewry to secure permission for Soviet
Jews to emigrate from the hell-hole of religious in-
tolerance and dictatorship. The two books under re-
view complement each other.
"Anti-Semitism Without Jews" traces the devel-
opment of Slavic antipathy, an almost endemic hos- '
tility approaching genetic heredity, to Jews which
the communist nations (except the Czechs) have al-
ways demonstrated. The development is now at the
stage which Lendvai calls the attack on the "corpor-
ate Zionist." He contends that Poland's transition
from covert unofficial prejudice to institutionalized
political anti-Semitism is a product of certain his-
torical, national and political experiences placed
against a specifically Polish background.
"Political anti-Semitism, transparently dis-
guised as 'anti-Zionism' has acquired a fresh and
disturbing dimension in other eastern countries as
well." he says. Venomous attacks on Jewish his-
tory, Jewish religion and the Jewish people are
shifted and changed by the Kremlin as political ex-
pediency dictates.
A KrCmlinologist defines political anti-Semi-
tism as "the attempt to establish the corporate Jew
as a general and public menace, the implication be-
ing that some official public remedy is called for."
The Jewish question under Communism has never
existed in a void. Anti-Semitism Without Jews
should be read and studied by Jew and Christian.
Instead of harangues for justice to the Jews and
their right to emigrate from behind the Iron Curtain
based on emotional grounds, we can acquire an in-
tellectual basis which will be recognized as valid by
peoples of all faiths.
As We Were Saying: By ROBERT E. SEGAI
Forward from Brussels
i ORE AT STATESMAN and an institution that
blew its cool succeeded in unifying the historic
Brussels Conference on Soviet Jewry. The institu-
tion was the Kremlin's slaphappy
propaganda machine. The states-
man was David Ben-Gurion, 84.
Preparations for the Conference,
bringing together determined Jews
from 38 nations on rather short
notice, threw the Russian masters
of propaganda into such a tizzy
that they put the Conference on
the news map. And when Ben-
Gurion. who had been battling respiratory illness,
rose from his sickbed to come marching in to the
Palais des Congres, appeared to give benediction to
the three days of intensive soul searching, the world
Jewish community experienced a healing moment
of reunion.
Pravda's attack on the Conference and the wire
pulling hy Moscow's publicity chess players were
almost comic. First, Russia accused the Jews of
profaning Red Army Day (Feb. 23) by planning
opposition rally on.a day the Red Army regards its
exclusive property. Actually, the conferees did not
have their axe out against the Russian system of
doing business and conducting life. Rather people
had come together to gain for Russian Jews the
simple right to pack up and move to Israel. Nobody
was interested in saying anything nasty about the
Red Army.
Rebuffed at that turn, the Russians then jumped
on the Belgium authorities for allowing "the Zion-
ists of the world" to assemble on Belgium soil. The
fact that Brussels symbolized NATO added to what
the Soviets regarded as an affront. One version of
the-Belgium rejoinder to this kind of complaint was:
"Belgium has always offered refuge to those who
feel they are members of an oppressed minority.
After all Brussels has given haven to Karl Marx
and Friedrich Engels; so why should Moscow com-
plain about-hospitality extended to the world's
Jews?" But' the frightened Russians refused to de-
sist especially when the Conference, in closing,
dispatched a delegation to Geneva, where the United
Nations Human Rights Commission was in session.


Page 16
? ~-# n*rir*li>n
Friday. April 16, 1971
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