The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00012

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
TOl
'*Jemsti Florid tin
mber 11
and SHOFAII OF CHEATER HOLLYWOOD
^^^^ Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 2, 1971
Price 20:
JWF Combined Campaign Gains Momentum
ttmbined Campaign of
TOOd'a Jewish Wel-
sn is gathering force
.continue to organize
Chairmen from all
that their individual
ns are going forward
lusiasm and coopera-
on all fronts.
^r, who is in charge of
iii. Industrial and
|sions, has announced
ent of Dr. Bert L.
lirman of the Medi-
cal Division and Dr. Marvin Shus-
ter as eochairman. Dr. Alex Kobb
has accepted the chairmanship of
the Dental Division.
Dr. Lusskin, who was discharged
from the Navy as a Lieutenant
Commander has practiced medi-
cine in Hollywood since 1964. He is
the Chief of Orthopedics at Golden
Isles Hospital and is also on the
staffs of Memorial Hospital and
Doctor's Hospital. A graduate of
the New York State College of
-
8 W&"
Bt Lusskin, (left) chairman ol the Medical Division,
lover plans for the current Combined Campaign with
trman Dr. Marvin "Sinister (right) and Robert Baer,
Jon chairman, who is in charge of the Professional,
rial and Medical Divisions.
an, Bush Optimistic
n Mideast Situation
YORK (JTA) Both
rs Foreign Minister Abba
|and the new U.S. envoy to
r.itt <1 Nations. Ambassador
I Hush, appeared un week*
rV programs and both ex-
pi optimism over develop-
in the Middle East.
Ian interview on the CBS
ram "Face the Nation." Mr.
said U.S.-Israel relations
been "strengthened" and
ed President Nixon for his
rmous conti ibution" to the
fiance of war. Mr. F.ban said
Si's policy is "based on very
pnatic security ideas," and
Cted American emphasis on
international peacekeeping
instead of geographical se-
|ty, however, recalling the
fire of such forces in the
It.
Ir. Bush, who appeared on
C"t "Meet The Press," de-
'I that a peacekeeping force
ll have "a very useful role"
denied |nit tihi; pressure on
pel. He also explained that
kind of force envisioned by
I niti-il States would not be
p* the I.N. force withdrawn
Secretary-General I' Thant
Wn the region in May, 1967.
Medicine, he served his residency
in Orthopedics at Bellevue Hos-
pital in New York City.
In his report on the progress of
his Division in the Combined Cam-
paign, Dr. Lusskin said that his
group has met frequently on an
informal basis, and that Dr. Shus-
ter will be contacting the medical
doctors while he covers the mem-
bers of the allied professions, in-
cluding optometrists, podiatrists,
pharmacists, chiropractors, and
Temple University Dental School
and has been practicing dentistry
in Hollywood since 1966. He and
his wife have two children. His
local affiliations include member-
ship in the American Dental As-
sociation, Florida Dental Associa-
tion and the Greater Hollywood
Dental Association.
The Apartment House Division,
which has taken on more and
more importance with the develop-
nursing home personnel. Dr.' Kobb knie"t.1f "* high rise communities
will cover the dental proression.
Dr. Lusskin's group also plans to
contact the retired doctors in the
area by means of a telephone cam-
paign in addition to holding eve-
ning meetings.
Dr. Shuster, who will be work-
ing with Dr. Lusskin, graduated
from Georgetown University and
Georgetown Medical School and
interned at Mt. Sinai Hospital in
New York City. He served a resi-
dency there, and also served as
resident in Plastic Surgery at Mon-
tefiore Hospital in New York bo-
fore coming to Hollywood two
years ago with his wife and three
children. He has been a consultant
for Chai Lodge's "Teen Age Hot-
line since its inception.
Dr. Kobb. who is heading the
Dental Division, is a graduate of
is still organizing new buildings.
Maurie Meyers, chairman of this
Division, reports that 20 buildings
have been organized in the past
two weeks. This phase of the cam-
paign as well as campaign activi-
ties in the buildings already or-
ganized is continuing, he said.
More than 60 buildings have al-
ready held meetings for the ten-
ants which featured speakers or
films regarding Federation's cam-
paign. Many of these buildings
have already shown large increases
in the totals raised over last year.
Seymour Mann, reporting for
the Temple Division said that more
than 100 new gifts had result ?d
from temple activities this year.
Breakfast meeetings at the vari-
ous temples wound up with the
March 21 event at Tpmplo Israel
of Miramar. Some 350 persons at-
tended these special Sunday morn-
ing Federation breakfasts. Mr.
Mann also estimated that several
thousand people attended the Fed-
eration Nights held at the area's
temples on March 12 and heard
the various speakers representing
Jewish Welfare Federation describe
the current Combined Campaign
to meet the needs of local agencies
as well as Israel.
The Women's Division, through
its Campaign chairman, Mrs. Stan-
ley Greenspun, reported that all
of its March functions had proven
successful both in the number of
women attending and the number
of dollars pledged. Following the
High Lighters Luncheon March 25,
members of the Women's Division
planned a telephone campaign to
reach all those women who had
been unable to attend.
This Women's Division telephone
campaign will be in addition t)
the Phonathon planned by Errol
Rosen, chairman of the Phonathon
Division. Mr. Rosen reports that
h;s Committee is planning to be-
gin their part of the campaign dur-
ing the mon'h of April. Members
of fie committee will work each
evening from headquarters set up
at the Federation office in :'
wood.
PASSOVER 1971
HtST SBKR Ar-RH
Mr. Bush said the proposed
new force would not be suscep-
tible to "unilateral withdrawal
without America's having some-
thing to say about it through its
veto in the Security Council."
After a meeting with Secre-
tary of State William P. Rogers
Mr! Eban had told newsmen, "If
there are differences of opinion
on Israel's security, respect
should be given to Israel's re-
sponsibilities and Israel's views.
What is at stake is Israel's se-
curity and Israel's survival," he
said. At another point he re-
marked that some elements of
national security were so vital
that Israel will, if necessary, de-
fend them alone.
Feigin Receives
Palmach Badge
JERUSALEM (WNS> Depu-
ty Premier Yigal Allon has pre-
sentid the Badge of the Pa'mach
the famous Jewish fighting
force of World War II and the
1956 War of Independence to
Maj. Giische Feigin, the former
Red Army hero who returned
his medals in protest against
Soviet anti-Semitism.
..."




Page 2
* lewis* Hcrtdlan
Friday, April 2, 1971
Dr. Plotkin Speaker At
High Lighters Luncheon
Mori' than 125 women guest! at
lie Worn- ii'- !' s High Light-
< rs Luncheon i The Hemispheres
verc stirred by ords of Dr.
Arteh PloiKi: Ii authority
on the Middle !' | situation, who
wai the gu si s; ker. "A strong
and dynamic Is; \ c n do mira-
cles on the Mid i East scene," he
t'.ld them.
Dr. Plotkin. th first Israeli ad-
rnltti d to the Woodnnv Wilson
Schcol of Interni lional Affairs at
Princeton is nov engaged in do-
Ing research h i In the United
States. Dr. Piotl a, who declared
that Israel feels the beat way to
ain the ns: : ol Ihe world is
ii deserve v.. added: "I believe
v. e do."
He urged his listeners, "Raise
your sights. Hit i your wagon to
Star. If you c-ime in prepared to
-i\e X amount of dollars, double
it."
Mm, Jack Lev; one of the co-
lairmen, introduced the i>eople
n the dais inclu ling Mrs. Robert
' K>rdon. pasl isident of the
Women's Division, Mrs. Harry
Pertnesly, Campaign chairman,
CSSe Martin. Ml David Shapiro.
High Lighters Division cochairman
Mrs. Robert Baer. Mrs, Gerald Sie-
pel, president of the Women's Di-
i, Mrs. Stanley Greenspun,
Women's Division Campaign chair-
man, Dr. Plotkin Mrs. Francis M.
Briefer and Michael Ruvel, execu-
' ve director of Jewish Welfare
Federation.
Mrs. Gerald Sie jeL In her role as
i resident, summed up the many
worthwhile activities of the Divi-
sion which had taken place during
ihe year, and urged the group to
pen up their hearts to Jews
.nroughout the world.
Mrs. Greenspun told the group
lat one of the wonderful extra
1 muses had r suite i from the
impaign was the discovery of
. lany new young I ders. She de-
lared that it was her belief thai
them young women would be
lore than capab! i I I iking over
where the current l< aders left off.
Irs. Greenspun also pointed out
that the job was not yel done
telethon and persona] solicitation
rive was still ahead of them.
it was the plea of Mrs. Robert
'lordon, who spoke on behalf of
her husband, as well as for her-
'elf, that her listeners give from
'he heart and not from the head.
^RENT-A-CAR
*5 a day!
FREE MILEAGE
CAR-BELL
Jesse Martin thanked the women
for having invited him to spend a
lunch hoar with them and said
that he was sure that if each of
them spoke to their husbands they
could easily gel an extra Sl.000,000
by Sundaj
The fourth in a series of lunch-
eons arranged by the Women's Di-
vision was under the chairmanship
of Mrs. Baer and Mrs. Levy; Mrs.
Samuel Finkelstein, and a com-
mittee including Mrs. Howard Kell-
r.er. Mrs. Samuel Schwartzman
and Mrs. Andrew Greonman, took
charge of the table decorations.
Hostesses for the day were Mrs.
Norman Atkin, Mrs. Francis Brief-
er, Mrs. Myron Brodie, Mrs. Caro-
lyn Davis, Mrs. Samuel Finkel-
stein, Mi's. Milton Forman, Mrs.
Edward Gottlieb, Mrs. Selma Har-
ris, Mrs. Joseph Hopen, Mrs. Her-
bert D. Katz, Mrs. Paul Koenlg,
Mrs. James Fox Miller, Mrs. Allan
Orlove, Mrs. Robert Pittell, Mrs.
Leonard Romanlk, Mrs. Abraham
J. Salter, Mrs. jack Shapiro, Mrs.
Steven A. Tobin and Mrs. Sam
Woinsteln.
Singh'* Meet Tuesdays
The Temple Israel Singles Club
will meet thl first and third Tues-
day of each month at Temple Is-J
rael in Mi amar, Jack Went !'.
president ol the group, has an-1
noimeed. Th'- meetings are open
to young singles between the ages
of 2] and 4o. Varied social as well
as club activities are planned for'
each meeting.
Sisterhood Plans
Musical Program
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El will present soloist Patrick W.
Matthews, In an outstanding musi-
cal program at their next monthly
meeting Tuesday. Apr4] i:, at '11:30
a.m. in the temple's Tobin Audi-
torium.
Mr. Mitthews will be accom-
panied by Mrs. Jack Smith. Tem-
ple Beth Ell organist for the past
seven years., who is Dean of Mi-
ami's American Guild or Organ-
ists.
Bom in Winston-Salem. N.C.,
Mr. Matthews had his first train-
ing in the Bel Conto Boy's Choir
of Winston-Salem. He received his
B.S. degree in Music from Appa-
lachian State University and a
Master's degree in Voice from the
University of Miami, and has been
the Choral Director of both Miami
Kdison Junior High School and
Miami Senior High School, and
has directed choirs at Plymouth
Congregational Church for eight
years.
Mr. Matthews has appealed in
musicals in the Miami Music The-
ater, Coconut Grove Playhouse,
and Theater under the Stars in
Atlanta, Ga. He has had principal
roles in Opera Guild of Greater
Miami productions and has been
featured as soloist with the
Miami Beach Symphony Orchestra,
the Greater Miami Philharmonic
and the Summer Pops.
Hollondale Hadassah Group Elects New Slate Of Officers
The Chal Group of the Hallan-,
dale Chapter of Hadassah has
elected a slate of officers. Until
they are officially installed, how-
ever, members of this group will
attend general meetings of the
Hallandale Chapter of Hadassah
at the Home Federal Building in
Hallandale.
President of the group will be
Jeannette Alman; vice presidents
include Norma Gofberg, fund-rais-
ing; Ida Kimbrig, education and
Zionist affairs, and Ann Schuman,
membership; Ray Brownstein,
treasurer; Sally Shulmah, finan-
cial secretary; Mildred Sudnow,
corresponding secretary; Ida Karl,
in, recording secretary; and Flor-
ence Rose, program chairman.
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Hollywood, Flo.
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Telephone 981-4300
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100 E. Beach Boulevard
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UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
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Phone 922-5130
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500 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY
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We Pick Up and Mivor


Friday. April 2, 1970
9-JewistithrMKOm
Page 3-A
AN ENGINEER VIEWS
The Israel Of Today
By KDWARD piN'CIX riling evX, ywhorr. The educational
(Mr, Dlncln, an engineer juKt re- cut.n, : '._ ,, ,...
turned Iron an tTJA Mlnl-.MlHi.lon to ?*>> superb With fine build-
larML He prevlouHuy worked three
yean in fHrnel for the Itritinh trovern-
in.nt under the Mandate).
Now that I have returned from
Israel. I re,ili/e that it is almost
impossible for me to describe the
prrienced by going; there. I would
rot have missed this opportunity
for the world.
[g] u 1 in 1071 is a beautiful, busy,
noisy, warlike, peaceful little roun-
iry of 2'i million Jews and one
million Arabs who live harmonious-
ly together. It is growing fast and
if more money would come into
this country, the results would be
fantastic.
The government of Israel Is
democratic in every way, from the
President down to any level of
service. I visited the Knesset anil
saw that each department's furni-
ture was the same and Chagall
tapi stries hang everywhere regard-
less of the official's position in the
government.
The Arabs who remained and
those who came bark arc into-
rated nd happy. They have full
-hip and are equal on all
KOepI In military service. It
, i pleasure to see democracy
Ion. Ths Jews contribut. i Mi.
Ten Commandments to eiviUza-
i.in and so far no better philoso-
phy for the conduct of men has
bet n found. Israel Is a complex
society, composed of people used
i many wflys of life but they oil
together in peace.
From an engineer's point of
>' buildings and roads in
: rael are well planned. Electrl \
ultural ,nd civil engineers are
ful now, hut as immh; at: m
continues ai the rate of 50.000 a
more w ill be needed.
A : Icultural miracles have been
I and st iny and bare hill -
i en c -t:v rted htl > a para-
T ; kinds of fruit-;
; h ve been planted
a n1 it you were to go to the Scan-
lii ivian countries in the winter
j"'! w I fresh straw
mas from Israel.
HOSpn '1 Piedic-il schools
in Israel are considered among
Ihi best In the world. Business is
wishing and new industries are
ins, distributed in localities ac-
cording to need. The teachers we
met seem Imbued with a feeling of
responsibility for the children
as though they were their own.
My impression was that the
true feelings and emotions I ex- Israelis feel their greatest threat
Is Russia's ambition lo dominate
the Middle East and destroy Is-
rael. It is felt that Egyptian sol-
diers ore not yet ready to utilize
the modem tools of war supplied
by the Russians without Russia's
help, but Russian aviators, tech-
nicians md soldiers are there in
full force and the possibility of
war always exists.
In some Israeli communities
there are patrols night and day
and not one single adult is un-
armed. They eat, sleep and work
in readiness to defend their com-
munity. Their whole life is dedi-
cated to survival. Defense costs
71' I of the budget of the country
and Israeli citizens are taxed to
the hilt. This year SSOO.COO.OOO
must be raised by UJA for medi-
care, welfare and educational pur-
poses It is not just a charity, but
rather help for survival.
My advice to Jew and Christian
alike is: "Go to Israel and see
what the Jews have accomplished
in 22 years." For those who have
never Iwen there, it is a most
thrilling experience. And for those
who have been there before, as I
was, what has been accomplish'd
throuch the efforts and good will
of men, women and children too,
will seem a miracle.
I think the best treat Jewish
parents end grandparents could
offer young people would be a trip
to Israel because only in Is-
rael can they fully identify with
Judaism and feel the kinship with
Jews cverywhei
Hoffman Elected
1971-72 President
Of Herzl Lodge 2764
At its monthly business meeting
in the Home Federal Savings &
Loan Building in Hallandale, Herzl
Lodge, B'nai B'rith, elected Rob-
ert HoffnVih as its president, and
a full slate of officers to serve for
the 1971-72 year.
Irene Rosenthal addressed the
members on the subject of the
"Hot Line," a B'nai B'rith project,
which has helped many young-
sters with problems, some of them
so serious they were contemplating
suicide before they made the call.
Several of those present volun-
teered to join the "Hot Line"
workers.
Herzl Lodge Is composed of men
residing in the high rises of Holly-
wood, Hallandale and North Dade
County. Its principal social event
of the year, the annual dinner-
dunce, was held Sunday at Tem-
ple Sinai, Hollywood.
Mrs. Ila Lavin Speaker
Mrs. Ida Lavin, program chair-
Ce On "Moral Conscience
A Global I >'ii' ry" at the i
Holly-Da].' ol American
Jewish G ng in the
Recreation Room of Galahad South.
Chai Lodge Officers
Will Be Installed
Chal Lodge No. 2574 of B'nai'
B'rith will hold its annual Installa-
tion-dinner-dance at the Orangt
Brook Country Club Saturday eve-'
ning, April 24. The evening's fes-
tivities will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Officers for the new year to be
install."l Include Dr. Phil Levin,
president; Herb Hoffman. Stan
M ti oils, Errol Rosen, Sid Abram-
son and Bernie Lynn, vice presi-
dt nl <; Al Koch, corresponding sec-
retary: Mike Hannan, recording
secretary; EM Lack, financial sec-
retary; Sid Lipkin, warden; and
Gil Arem. parliamentarian. Trus-
tees for the cominq year are Jock
Kleiner. Milton Hopfenberg and
Z h BlaL
The Lodge's successful "Teen
Age Hot Line" project lias re-
from youngsl TS since its incep-
tion and has pro\ Id
many of that number, it was
announced.
A i lenic vill be bi 11 M ly 2 at
lerdale
for its nicr.i'n rs and their t
A golf tournament lias been sched-
uli (I i: >!ling Hills ( luntry Club
,.1 Mai 2 1.
KOSHER CATERERS
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BAR MITZVAHS
Wf DOINGS -PARTIES
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PETS PARADISE
GROOMING ALL BREEDS
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Boarding
4440 HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD.
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Pets I and Pet Supplies
966-5556
Hours
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Thurs.-Frl. 900 9;0O
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Viking Sized Cocktails
Superb Cuisine Priced front $2 50
Mosfc ter dancing
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Banquet facilities for groups of 2 to 400
Open from 5:00 P.M.
every day except Mon.
Reservations: 927-2566
(Dade) 945-5621
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1849 Hollywood Blvd. 3101 S. Ocean Drive
2501 S. Ocean Drive
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MASTER FOTO LABS
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Color Prints
Borderless for Larger Image and Textured Silk Finish Paper
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JUMBO SIZE PRINTS ... 17c
Plus Processing of Film
GIANT SIZE 5x5 24c
Special Discount Prices on All Other Types of Film Processing
2015 Harrison Street, Hollywood 929-4751
c
ttu ^-^ale n day
ovnntuni
FHIDAY, APRIL 2
Beach Group Hndossah Board Meeting 10:30 A.M.
USY Weekend at Temple Beth Shalom
SUHDAY, APRIL 4
Broword Zionists Meeting 8 p.m. at Temple Sinai
MONDAY, APRIL 5
Natl. Council Jewish Women-Luncheon-Fashion Show, Noon at Sky
Lake Country Club
Hollywood Chapter Deborah Board Meeting
B'nai B'rith Women Hollywood Chapter Donor Dinner, 6 p.m.
Sheraton Hotel, Fort Lauderdaie
T Lit SO AY, APRIL 6
Sisterhood Temple Sinai Passover Seminar 8 p.m. at Temple Sinai
Meadowbrook Chapter ORT Meeting at Hallandale Home Federal
THURSDAY, APRIL 8
Hallandale Chapter ORT Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hallandale Home
Federal Bldg.
TUESDAY, APRIL 13
Hadassah Ml. Scopus Branch Board Meeting
THURSDAY, APRIL 15
American Israeli Lighthouse Meeting at Hallandale Home
Federal Bldg.

Temple Beth Shalom
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
COMMUNITY PASSOVER SEDER
at the
DIPLOMAT HOTEL
Holly wood-by-the-Sea
FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 1971, 6:30 P.M.
CONDUCTED BY
DR. MORTON MALAYSKY, RABBI
ASSISTED BY CANTOR IRVING GOLD
Strictly kosher, gourmet seder meal, with all holiday
trimmings Prime rib or chicken entree.
CALL IMMEDIATELY FOR RESERVATIONS.
TEMPLE OFFICE, 981-6111 -949-0501
If YOU THINK YOU'VE HAD GOOD
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located in the Golden Strand Hotel
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Reservations Call 945-9075
Suggested 947-5661
Dining & Dancing Nightly Till 2 A.M.
in Florida's Newest & Smartest Supper Ctub
Joe DeCarlo Trio
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Page 4
-Jewish fttrkfiar
Friday. April 2, 1971
<*Jewishfloridlain
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.E. 6th Street Telephone 375-4605
HOLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 945-0964
P.O. Box 2975, Miami. Florida 53101
Fred K. Shochet SelmaM. Thompson
Editor and Publisher Aifirtant to Publisher
MARION MB VIMS, N*w Coordinator
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Of Tho Mrchand1M Advert.aad Ifi lt Colgmno.
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Volume 1
Friday, April 2
Number 11 <
7 NISAN 5731
Israeli Position Not Popular
"Guarantees" of the major powers to protect the in-
terests of smaller nations has an attractive ring to it at a
rime when Israel's obstinacy in regard to much of the terri-
tory it took from the Arabs in 1967 appears to threaten the
possibility of a peaceful settlement in the Middle East.
There is no doubt that, at this point, when even Senaior
William Fulbright is in agreement with Secretary of State
Rogers, the Israeli position is not a popular one.
But those who look with favor on guarantees as a
solution ignore a record which is there for all to read
but which only that state, fighting for its life, seems to pay
any attention: the recent "guarantee" of a standstill at
Suez, broken by the Egyptians and the Russians when
they moved the SAM missiles into the area, raising only
mild protests from the United States; the "guarantee" of
free access through the canal which brought the with-
drawal of Israel's troops from Suez in 1956, (and what hap-
pened when Egypt refused to honor it?); and the inability
of tht United States to get even one other nation to
join it in testing the blockade of the Gulf of Akaba pas-
sage through which had been "guaranteed" by the United
Nations in 19*7.
Munich. Teheran, Yalta. Czechoslovakia. Poland and
Middle Europe are all monuments to Big Power guar-
antees. Those who believed that large states had any
interests but their own in mind, soon learned those guar-
antees were nothing but scraps of paper when those
interests clashed.
Israel won the right to stand firm for reasonably se-
cure borders with its blood. It won it when the Arab states
refused to accept the decisions of the United Nations in
1948 and again in 1956 and 1967 when the Arab states
threatened the existence of the Jewish state and lost.
It is not as conguerors that Israel demands their right to
be a self-guarantor of peace in the Middle East but as
people whose 4,000 years of history have taught them to
depend upon no guarantees but their own determination
to survive in a hostile world.
Similar B9I Proposed Here
Tennessee is not one of the areas in which Jews are
found in any significant number. By tradition, it is con-
sidered one of the "Bible-belt" states. It is significant,
therefore, that Protestant and Catholic clergy expressed
their strong opposition to a bill which would change the
state's election day to Saturday.
"The change," it was stated, "would be offensive to
our Jewish brethren and our Christian brothers, the Sev-
enth-Day Adventists," who observe Saturday as the Sab-
bath. Such a bill has also been proposed for Florida, where
far more Jews would be affected.
Jews Would Benefit Most
Ever sensitive to the cause of humanity. Congressman
Dante Fascell has introduced a resolution in the House of
Representatives calling upon the President to prevail on
the Soviet Union to keep its commitment, made in 1966, to
permit the emigration of Russian citizens in order to be re-
united with relatives outside the Soviet borders. Jews
would benefit most if this promise by Premier Kosygin were
kept but the scope of the commitment goes beyond Jewish
interests and affects thousands of other separated families.
Greatest Need Of Red Cross
Traditionally, March is National Red Cross Month. But
now that most financial support has been supplied through
active participation there is a tendency to forget that the
greatest need of Red Cross is for volunteers, people to do
the work of helping neighbors, people in trouble. Here is
one way you car. do your share.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON It is hard
to exaggerate the sharpness of
the knife-edge on which U.S. pol-
icy in the Middle East is now
dangerously balanced. In the last
fortnight, to begin with. Presi-
dent Nixon has had to inter-
vene personally to prevent the
State Department's Ar.i
from all but declaring war on
The ArabUts were champing
at the bit to take two potential-
ly decisive steps.
First, they wanted the U.S.
government to issue a rin
public denunciation o: Israeli
intransigence.
Second, they wanted "to pat
on the screws" their favorite
expedient by halting Ameri-
can arms deliveries to the
Israelis.
THF. ARABISTS argued that
this was the right way to bring
what they no doubt called 'quot-
ing the late Neville Chamber-
lain i "peace in our time" in the
Middle East. In fact, however, a
more lunatic course of action
would be difficult to discover.
The reasons it is so lunatic are
basically very simple.
For nearly a year, until less
than two months ago, the So-
viet General Staff was actively,
methodically and very complete-
ly preparing for a campaign in-
tended to have strong Soviet
combat-support, that was aimed
to crush Israel by brute force.
In January, however, the first
signs began to appear that the
Soviets had reassessed the risks
of this campaign they had been
preparing for.
THIS SOVIET reassessment
of risks in the Middle East is
the unique source of the more
hopeful outlook in that part of
the world today. Beyond doubt,
moreover, the central factor in
the Soviet reassessment of risks
* i a new assessment of what
the United States might do if
brute force were resorted to.
In these circumstances, then,
the State Department Arabists
wished to line this country up,
fully and finally, with the So-
viets and against Israel. That
would have subtracted the equa-
tion, of course, precisely the
American factor that caused the
risks to be reassessed in Moscow.
THE SOVIETS would then
have been able to count out the
United States, indeed, telling
our government in effect: "If
you won't take direct action to
see justice done, as you your-
selves have defined justice, then
we are quite prepared to do so."
What was stopped by the Pres-
ident, in sum, was nothing more
nor less than a plan for sliding
straight back into the night-
marish status quo ante. That is
not the end of the nonsense,
either, as is indicated by the
case of the State Department
Arahists-represontative in Cairo.
Donald Bergus.
SINCE THE prospects bo can
to hriehten. the Bergus cables
from Cairo are known to have
exuded optimism and greatly
'tressed his own closeness to the
Egyptian Bovarnment One nor-
mally sensible high official re-
cently commented that Bergus
now seemed to have "more in-
fluence" in Egypt than the So-
viets. If that is the impression
Bereus is convoying, someone
ought to ask him whether con-
struction has been halted on
the new Soviet naval base at
Mersa Mat run.
To this it must be ad the unwisdom of the Israelis,
although more understandable.
h is also ben striking, at least
thus f.ir. Here. th< problem is
really one of priorities The first
Israeli priority, at the moment
i< to have "defnsibie frontiers."
This me.-ins. in effect, pormn-
nentlv hanging onto a ct-:n of
t'ip Sinai Des*>rt and the Sharm
El-Sheik position.
BIT IN reality, no frontier
Of Israel can ever be truly defen-
sible with tho Soviets active in
the Middle East and with So-
viet troops in a combat role in
Egypt. With the Soviets in the
act. in truth, Israel's frontiers,
whatever they may be, can only
Continued on Pag* 10
f\.S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK They are hanging garlands of marigolds
around the neck of Indira Gandhi. Her election victory has dis-
heartened the opposition, dismayed her enemies, stunned the
: outdistanced the fondest c ilculations of her lieutenants
and even troubled her allied parties on whom she will no longer
depend.
In my first interview with Mrs. Gandhi, at Delhi in I960,
when she was still only Nehru's daughter, I felt she was headed
for a high political career, but I did not forsee its dimensions.
When she came to the opening of the U.N. session last fall, she
asked a group of American writers to meet with her and talk
about our country and hers. But alas, the Americans proved
narcissists, and most of the talk turned on the massive and wit-
less problems of the United States and little of it on the more
massive and more witless dilemmas of India. So we got very few
benefits of her insights into her own task and didn't discover
whether she believes that the power of her office now become
more powerful can make much of a dent in its problems.
SHE STRIKES MANY OBSERVERS notably Bernard
Nossiter. in his brilliant, scathing book "Soft State" (Harper)
as distant and unsympathetic. I have found her at once innately
shy and hardened by her exposures, but also sensitive to her
country and people and to the winds of doctrine and circum-
stance that buffet every people today.
Her strength as a politician, as in her father's case, goes
along with a still untapped potential as a leader and states-
woman. She has proved unbelievably adroit and tough In her
political maneuvers, forcing a split in the Congress Party in
order to rebuild it, putting its old-line leaders to rout, staking
everything on the mood and timing of an early election and
winning her gamble. Her victory was not a victory for her
party or her vague "socialist" goal, but an intensely personal
victory, which tells little about what she can do in a substantive
way.
The election was not fought on issues but on symbols. The
Indian poor, in the villages and cities, have become more con-
scious of their poverty, and when they voted for Indira Gandhi
as a symbol they voted for their claims against the rich. Her
two crucial symbolic moves were to nationalize the banks and
cut off the purses of the princes, and when the supreme court
held against her she had it made. The rest was a matter of get-
ting to the people, to nail down their awareness.
BUT WHERE WILL HER brilliant victory get India? Look
at a few facts about India yesterday and today. Yesterday there
was the constant onslaught of famine. Today there is a "green
revolution," with the New Mexican wheat seeds, which have
doubled the acre yield, but they are still in limited and not wide-
spread use. When I lived in India a decade ago there were less
than 450 million people. Today there are 550 million an in-
crease of over 100 million in a decade. In the next decade it will
be 725 million.
The food supply could grow at 4% a year, but it is now
only at 2%, while the population is growing at 2H%. It is a
disheartening race. There are 200 million people living on $35 a
year income, or less than a dime a day. In India's 24 years of
independentce a Nehru has been prims minister for the whole
time, except for three years, and I find few signs that Mrs.
Gandhi has any deeper knowledge of what to do with India than
her father had before her. He liked to concentrate on foreign
policy, with a country that had only a slender power base, and
internally he focused on developing heavy industry. Mrs. Gandhi
has wisely shifted her emphasis to food production and is quieter
on foreign policy. But she has not acted with any energy or
command on population control, nor on the constant Naxalite
political killings in Calcutta and throughout West Bengal that
are threatening to split the society.
THE CORE OF THE PROBLEM is familiar enough. There
are millions of young people coming out of the schools, looking
for jobs that don't exist 17 million of the "educated unem-
ployed" right now. They could be turned into a managerial and
technical elite, which could break the inertia and corruption of
the bureaucracy, and could turn India from being a "soft state"
(Gunnar Myrdal's phrase for one with neither command nor
obedience, neither decision nor carry-through) into an effective
state. But I doubt whether anything Mrs. Gandhi has in her
planning dossiers is calculated to do that.
The issue la not "socialism" against "capitalism." Even in a
semi-socialist frame (aa Israel has shown I one can release the
energies of new enterprises in a mixed economy, and employ the
young coming on the job market, and force the educational sys-
tem to serve their needs, and change the moral climate in which
the educated jobless don't want to soil their hands and perhaps
even get at the sources of the political mi.rderou-.ness in Bengal.
it can be done. But can Mrs Gandhi break awav from her
own intellectual past enough to tak- a more important gamble
than the electoral gamble she his Just won?


n
Friday. April 2. 1970
+Jewisti ncrHktr
Page 5
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlesinger
Bravo Bjoerling
It was glorious music and Rolf Bjonrllng in
concert at Temple Beth Ei recently. The lead
ter.or of the Royal Swedish Opera and his piano
accompanist, William Lind, director of the
Swedish radio orchestra, wore presented by the
Seven Li\e4y Arts Festival, Inc., Dr. and Mrs.
Mrs. M>ron Segal and Dr. and Mrs. Abraham
Fi^-hler held forth on the receiving line wel-
coming the audience of most distinguished art-
ists and notables, who later stood to cheer the
performance of th? Swedish guest artist. He re-
turned lor several encores as a result.
Of course Barbara and Frieda Rasvl of the
Broward County Civic Ballet were there as well
as Mrs. Charles Friedman. Mrs. Norman Lee and
-Mr. and .Mrs. Herman Friedman. They never miss
a concert. Mr. and Mrs. Maurire Fivel and Dr.
and Mrs. Harry Orringer I Alta looked lovely in
a white brocaded gown> were on the scene as
were Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Kessel, the Juan Wes-
ters, the Ernest Sayfles and Dr. and Mrs. Irving
Fixel.
Following the performance Mr. Bjoerling (his
late father, Jussi, was considered one of Europe's
finest tenors > was honored at a reception along
with Beirnhard Soaneratedt, manager of the
Royal Swedish Opera Company. The after-the-
concert party which filled the night with more
Klorious singing and lasted until the wee hoars,
was hosted by Axel Lind, the artist considered
one of the leading painters of the open sea, and
Dr. and Mrs. Fmanuel Nielsen (he is the noted
Danish author poetl. On hand for the music-filled
festivities were the Norwegian and Swedish Con-
sul; The Honorable and Mrs. Oistein Bergh and
the Honorable and Mrs. Gustuv Larse-n; Count
Erie de I^ewenhaupt ."nd daughter, Alexandra
and PeJle Starkman, Scandinavian news repre-
sentative.
Representing our local press was everybody's
favorite lady. Alice Foster (of the Miami Her-
ald i with hubby. Bill, as well as Frank Nagler
with wife June Justice. Rnv Recchla and the ever-
charming Jack Grant of the Hollywood Herald.
A very pleasant touch to the evening arrived
in the person of Louis Bu//.!I. Way back in 19^8
the gentleman had traveled from his Atlanta. Ga.
home to the Academy of Music in Philadelphia
for the concert of Jiml Bjoerling i Rolfs father I.
Mr. Buzzell. now living in Pompano, had treas-
ured the 1938 program souvenir all these many-
years and graciously presented it to Rolf Bjoer-
iin^ backstage following his equally memorable
performance.
Potcder And Paint
That famous Hollywood, California makeup
artist and hairdresser of the stars breezed in to
Fort Laudei dale's Saks Fifth Avenue salon to
bfcllyhoo his upcoming book and offer up his
magnifies talents to all comers. It was The
George .Masters, of the feminine overhaul. The
gorgeous blond gent, who was once billed by
Life Magazine as one of the best in the world, is
probably most famous for his glamorous altera-
tion of Lynda Bird Johnson.
"I Can Make Her But Can You Keep Her? or
Feel Me .Am I Dry Yet?" is the name of the
book telling "all" about the women Masters has
beautified. Such famous femmes as Marilyn Mon-
roe, Liz TayUw, Rltn Hiiyworth, Arlene Dahl and
Jennifer Jones are included in the book that Mr.
M describes as "juicy, pure garbage and teriffic."
No doubt 'twill be a best seller! It has all the
ingredients. Many of our local gals (they prefer
to remain nameless) went under the rollers,
paintbrush and sponge of the Master for some
spectacular results. So, if you happen to see a
gorgeous somebody resembling Marilyn Monroe
or Li? Taylor crossing Hollywood Bouvelard,
look again. Might just be your next door
neighbor.
Exceptional Young Men
The enormous smiles lighting up the faces of
proud parents, Al and Terry Geronemus these
days are no doubt due to the latest award gar-
nered by son, Roy. The Morehead Award to
study at the University of North Carolina in
Chapel Hill was presented to the young man on
the basis of outstanding merit as reflected in his
academic ability, character and leadership. Roy,
who is a student at '.awrenccville School, N.J.,
distinguished himself as president of the varsity
swimming and water polo teams.
Zaehary Teioh, a junior at Nova High School
and member of the National Honor Society, ac-
quitted himself well as member of the Nova High
School debating team in Palm Beach recently.
Zaehary won a trophy for extemporaneous de-
bate and the team returned home with a grand
total of three trophies for their outstanding
efforts. The group is interested in organizing de-
bates on a country-wide basis. For those of you
who are interested, please contact Rhoda Radow
at Nova High School for further details.
The Shore Club set the scene for the birth-
day party of Samuel Matkoff who celebrated the
fact that he was 95 years young. Surrounded by
relatives and friends, the fantastically agile and
quick-witted gentleman delighted the audience
when he copped the hotel's dancing trophy for
his spirited performance of a wicked Cha-Cha.
People And Places
Norma, (Mrs. Jerry) Slegel. one of the vice
presidents of the Hollywood Chapter of Hope
School for Mentally Retarded, will be heading up
the school's donor luncheon come April 24th at
the Hemispheres Hotel. Taking in the ex-
citing vibes of Spanish guitars and the tempting
taste treats of their favorite spot, El Baturro,
were Dr. George and Eleanor Marholen with Dr.
and Mrs. Ed Jaffe, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Jaffe and
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Tlnsky.
Marvelous paintings, antiques and objects
d'art up for auction at Emerald Hills Country
Club Friday for those of you attending the first
half of the daily double benefit for the American
Cancer Society. Along with cocktails, dancing and
buffet supper, there'll be opportunity a-plenty to
bid on English sterling serving dishes, porcelain,
jewelry, 19th century French and English silver
crowns and Chinese and Japanese Imasis. The
second part of the daily double is a day of lunch-
eon and racing at Gullstream Park April 14.
Mrs. Milton Myers and Mrs. Juan Wester are
heading it all up with a great big assist from 40
other hard working femmes of the community.
Fight fans jumped, shouted and screamed
their way through 15 rounds of the multi-million-
dollar "Battle of Champions" on closed circuit
TV at the Miami Beach Convention Hall. The
fight, the classic test of the boxer. Muhammad
All, against the slugger Joe Fraxler, ended with
ole "Mighty Mouth Ali" silenced by a unanimous
decision in favor of Frazier. Along with show
biz celebrities. Jackie Gleason and Joe E. Lewis,
our own local celebrities helped pack the Con-
vention Hall for "the fight of the century" they
won't soon forget. Steve Tobin made the scene
with Ma\ Chlra, Louis Mornlngstar, Dan and Bob
Rcitcr, Chuck Rowars and Bob Wright.
A stirring and emotion packed speech was
delivered to a goodly group of ladies of the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation by Jeanne Duman. The
Catholic heroine of the Belgian Jewish under-
ground who rescued 10.000 children from the
Nazi? and helped rehabilitate children going to
Israel, touched the hearts of all in attendance
with her eloquence. Mrs. Donald Herman's lovely
home set the stage for the petite luncheon and
powerful oration. Some of the many attending
were Roz Reiter, Selma Hopen, Miriam Ottlman,
Charlotte Gordon, Evelyn Sternbergr, Ann Pollard.
Myrna Levy, Gloria Greenspun, Pearl Siegel,
Carolyn Davis, Cynde Martin, Sylvia Salter and
Marion Nevtns.
Take a beautiful island like St. Maarten, mix
it with four delightful and compatible couples
from Hollywood, and the result is one terrific
weekend. Marilee and Bob Berirer, Elsie and
Dave Spechler. Vlnee and Dbwme DUelln and
Sheila and Don Sheffel were the funsters who
sailed, swam and thoroughly enjoyed themselves.
A definite highlight of the trip was the ride on a
Volkswagen bus through the mountainous roads
with Dr. Dave Spechler at the wheel, ably as-
sisted by Dr. Bob Berger as "tour director."
Passover Seder For Jewish
Patients At State Hospital
A Passover Seder will be con-1
ducted for the Jewish patients at,
the South Florida State Hespital'
at 7 p.m. Monday, April 5, in the !
chapel. This special event is spon-
sored each year by the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of Greater Holly-
wood and the Broward-North Dade
Council of B'nai B'rith Women.
Rabbi Arthur Abrams. spiritual
.eader of Temple Emanuel in Fort
Lauderdale and representing t\e
Broward Board of Rabbis, will o.
ffclatc at the Seder In ke,ing
Befh Shalom USY'ers
Host S. Florida Toons
T.mple Beth Shalom USY'ers j
will play host to other South Flor-1
ida USY'ers Friday through Sun-1
day when the teenagers gather for j
an entire weekend of planned
activities.
Howard Kaufman is president
of Senior Chapter; Debbie Mar-
golis is president of Junior Chap- I
ter. Mrs. Shirley Goldman is Youth |
Coordinator, Linda Segall is ad-!
visor of Junior USY and Aaron I
Solomon is advisor of Senior USY.
Beginning the weekend's activi-
ties on the theme "Soviet Jewry
and What Can Be Done to Help,"
will be a traditional Sabbath din-
ner, followed by an original play
depicting the Jews' life in Russia.
The play was written by Michele
Roberts, Marc Finkelstein and
Walter Zoller.
Saturday afternoon's seminar
leaders will be Dr. Morton Malav-
sky and Joseph Yanich. Regional
director of American Jewish Con-
gress.
with the holiday, an array of tea*
ditional foods, including gefilte
fish, matzoh,'and- an assortment of
other delicacies will be served.
The Broward-North Dade Coun-
cil sponsors Jewish festival parties
commemorating the various holi-
days throughout the year at the
hospital, under the chairmanship
of Mrs. Lillian Kaplan of the Holly-
wood Chapter: Mrs. Kitty Bau-
mohl of the Sunshine Chapter is
cochairman. Also participating in
these parties this year are Aviva,
Fort Lauderdale. Hollywood, Moor-
ings, North Dade, Points East, Sky
Lake and Sunshine chapters. A
group of dedicated women from
each of the various chapters will
also be on hand to lend their
assistance
Provision has been made at the
hospital to deliver sufficient mat-
zoh for the duration of Passover to
the various dining areas where
they will be distributed to any
Jewish patient requesting them.
imperial Towers Group
Of Hadassah Meeting
The next meeting of the Imperial
Towers Group of Hadassah will be
held on Tuesday, April 6, in the,
Card Room of the Imperial Tow-
ers West Bldg., Mrs. Sol (Ann)
Cooper president pro-tern, has1
announced.
In addition to the regular 12:30
p.m. business meeting, entertain-
ment has been planned for mem-
bers and guests. Mrs. Jean Edwab,
who Is celebrating her birthday
that day, will sponsor the refresh-
ments.
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
140 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"A Service Within The Means Of All"
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
7mpU 3etk6
tttemoziat
gardens
For information can: 'V'^'>
923-8266orwrHK_ ^/y/;jM
TEMPLE BETH EL &&$&&
The only all-jew ish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land-
scaped, perpetual tare, reasonably priced.
For information call:
,
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME:_________________________
ADDRESS: ______________________
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
'i


Foqe 6
+Je*lstfk>rkitor>
rriday, April 2. 1971
wVVVWVVVVW*~W*%W*M^W*^*'WW*^
scene aWnd
by Marjon NeviBs
March is always a pay month in this area with all the or-
ganizations holding luncheons and dinners during the month.
Koremost on my calendar were the Thursday luncheons of the
Women's Division of Federation. There was the beautiful lunch-
eon at the beautiful home of Brenda Greenman. Brendn is in the
uocess ot redecoriting and the place is already simply falmlows.
The living room has been done in bright shades of yellow with
touches of green, which makes it simny and cheerful. The guests
"orgot calories and diets and filled themselves with aU kinds of
goodies. Bremia's motiier-in-law. Helen, was there, of course, and
*> were many of the outstanding women in the community, in-
cluding Hazel Sharenow. Madelyn Silver, Minnie Robinson.
Martha Schooler, Rosalyn Rottman, Ksther Lowenthal, Ann
Pollard. Mrs. J. Smolian and Mrs. Leon Sternberger. Along with
.nany other hard workers for Federation they all listened atten-
tively to the attractive young speaker Simca Robin. It was cer-
tainly a treat to spend a lew pleasant hours in Brenda's lovely
home.
We met Lee and Donald Bcrman having lunch at Kmerald
Hills and I kiddl her about why she wasn't home preparing for
the Thursday lunch to be held at her home for Federation. Al-
though it was still a week olf when I met them. Lee said she was
{lad I reminded her. tor she had better cancel her Tuesday golf
game for that week. Well, now that the luncheon is over. I'm not
sure whether Lee canceled her coif game or not, but I can say
>vith certainty that she was well prepared for the large group of
vonion who joined her for lunch. The champagne punch was
,ummy. the sandwiches, salads and desserts were super. The
nomo itself is gorgeous and done in a most unusual style for this
nart of Florida although the backyard pool and the golf course
ackground an- Florida for sure. ... At Lee's house we saw
Carolyn Davis, who MM chairman, for the day. Ginger Leff and
Cinde Martin, of course, and Selma Hopen, who was telling us
iout the project of the Brovwud County's Medical Auxiliary (to
secure a non-partisan school board*. Selma was eating and hud-
Jung with Bobtoe Schlessmger, Terry Geronemus. Jill Hunter,
ludie Newman, Roz Reiter, Sylvia Salter, Naomi Kui-ish, Pearl
SiegeL Gloria Grecnspun. Adrian Aron. Charlotte Gordon, and
Frances Briefer, without whom no Federation affair would be
omplete.
Heading the group of people who were at the Derby Ball for
the benefit of Nova University were, of course. Shirley and Abe
Fishier. There was dining and danciii" and beautiful clothes and
nil for a good cause: our own Nova University. From this area
there were Fran and Herb Tobin. June and Bob Gordon. Sally
tnd Jim Sholstall, Annette and Bernie Milloff. Marcia and Stan
Silver jnd Annette and Bert Parks. Incidentally, the Bert
Parks had Temple Folding ot travel fame as their guest recently.
One Wednesday night a Young Leaders meeting was held
-it the home of Dave and Rikki Goodman. Wives were invited,
ind most of the men brought their fraus. The very young and
attractive Robert Frazin s(oke to the group. Pete and Dodie
Wcinstein were there; Pete's president of the group. Marcha
iik! Steve Tobin were there, as were Marcy and Jim Jacobson,
fill and Larry Hunter. Drazia and Howard Herman, Mike and
Mark Fried and many more of the younger group.
Grace Durbin opened her house for a meeting of the Holly-
wood Scholarship Foundation. The house is another of the beau-
tiful homes around town but this one is geared especially for a
eouple like Abe and Grace, who like to entartain. The living
room is 50 feet long with different sized groupings arranged for
cvcrsatUin. The Scholarship group included a dozen women
making plans to interview graduating seniors applying to them
)'o:- scholarships. The group included Gladys Abram, Grace Finkel,
Madeline Sternlight, and others interested in this particular proj-
ect. The Durbin's two year old grandson was at the house visiting
and everyone agreed that a better behaved two year old would
i*e hard to find. Shirley Fishier was rushing from the meeting
to get into formal clothes for a picture-taking session in connec-
tion with the Nova University benefit. .
Milton Form.'in celebrated his birthday party at Emerald
Hills. He and Iuise were with Pearl and Gerry Siegel and a
Large gioup all helping him make merry. Others in the dining
room to take j>art in what was called a "Las Vegas Night" were
Sylcia and Milton Graditor. the Reuben Schneiders, Shirley and
Julie Litwin and Betty and Sunny Finkelstein and enough others
to make quite a mob. .
"Winding up the March luncheons of the Women's Division
of Federation but as Gloria Greenspun put it "certainly not
winding up the campaign." was the elegant High Lighters Lunch-
eon at the Hemispheres. The room was simply beautiful, thanks
to Betty Finkelstein and her committee of Sandi Kellner, Doris
Schwartzman and Brendn Greenman. Each table had a center-
piece made of make believe money and wrapped candies .
with streamers stating "It's Sweot To Give." They carried the
same theme out throughout the room, and would that the money
had been real! The Women's Division would have had a bonanza!
Couldn't begin to enumerate all the old friends I saw there,
Init just for starters there was Leah Weinstein, looking just
gnat even though she told me she had had an eye Infection, Fay
Rose. Caroline Honey man, Jan Grossman, Gladys Rosenfield. Was
also dehghted to meet Howard Fuerst's mother, who was there
with a group which included Mrs. Arthur Lezar, Mrs. Francis
Joseph. Mrs. Morris Gold and Mrs. Sol Heljer. Also met Martha
Schecter's mother. Mrs. Sylvia S|*>ctor and Mrs. Mildred Ber-
Jow, the decorator, who is Sheldon Berlow's mother. It was a
day for mothers and a day for daughters and a great day for the
gals, Aviva Baer and Myrna Levy who worked so hard to make
the day a success!
CBS Renews Controversial
TV Program For 1971-1972
NEW YORK (JTA) "All in
the Family," the comedy series
about an Americai* bixwt. which
has been under fire by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. wa< renewed for the
1971-72 season by CBS-TV last
week because the network found
that it was being received fav-
orably by most station critics
and viewers.
' John Cowden. CBS-TV vice
president for information serv-
ices, told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that 183 of the chain's
195 station affiliates were carry-
ing the series an overwhelm-
ing total that represents one of
the highest levels of acceptance
among CBS-TV sliows. In addi-
tituvha noted, a majority of crit-
ics and viewers indicated ap-
proval of the program.
"All in the Family," which
premiered in January, centers
on Archie Bunker, (played by
Carroll O' Connor ( a blue-col-
lar worker who spews racial and
religious prejudices, complete
with ethnic epithets, and gets
his comeuppance at the end of
each episode. In one episode.
Archie excoriated a Jewish wom-
an for allegedly ramming his
car ("They're all the same, them
people!"!, then sought a Jewish
lawyer to represent him becauaa
"they're smarter and shrewder."
Norman I-ear, co-producer and
story consultant for "All in the
Family,'' said recently on the
"David Frost Show," that the
program seeks first to enter-
tain and second to cause Mew-
era to reconsider their own prej-
udices. The show's supporters
i have included erttfee of the
New York Times aad TV Guide.
and it is a personal favorite of
CBS-TV president Robert D.
Wood.
George Friedman, Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency staff reporter
who recently reviewed this pro-
gram, wrote: "Some impression-
able youngsters may learn the
wrong lessons"irom the program
- but this observers viewpoint
is that the series (at leaat so
far> is an always funny; often
brilliant one that both makes
its anti-bias points and enter-
tains: tlu- ideal combination."
Dl,
COCKTAILS
by
I (executive
oLounae
925-9323
BUSINESSMEN'S LUNCH
SERVING LUNCH FROM 11:30 TO 4
SOUP. ITALIAN $150
SUBMARINE, COFFEE or TEA I
FOR TAKE OUT FOOD CAU. 120-3 HO
715 SOUTH 21st AVE.

For over thirty-five years, families
have been relying on Planters Oil
for all their Kosher cooking.
On Passover and all year through.
They like itbecause it's pure, light and
polyunsaturated. So the true taste
of the food comes through. Try
this traditional Passover recipe
and see what we mean. Cook it with
Kosher and Parve Planters Oil.
And Happy Passover.
Chopped Chicken Livers
Vz cup Planters Oil
Vi cup diced onion
1 lb. chicken livers, broiled
1 hard-cooked egg
1 teaspoon salt
Vt teaspoon pepper
Heat Planters Oil in a heavy skillet;
add diced onion and saute until
transparent, for about 5 minutes.
Allow to cool in skillet. Grind or chop
together chicken livers, egg
and the entire contents of the skillet.
Stir in salt and pepper. Chill until
ready to serve. Makes about
1 Vz cups. Serve as hors d'oeuvres,
on lettuce or toast points.
APassover
Recipe
from the
Passover Oil
< \


Friday. April 2, 1970
* fewest) Hr irSdfUnun
\
Page V

Some of the women seen at recent Jewish Welfare Federation's Women's
Division Luncheons are shown here. Mrs. Charles Greenman, Mrs. Andrew
Qreenman, who hosted a luncheon, and Mrs. Harry Permesly. past president
of the Women's Division of Jewish Welfare Federation are in photo at left.
Smiling from behind a table loaded with temptations (center) are Mrs. Mollie
Bergman. Mrs. Leon Gruher, Mis. Hattie Rosen and Mrs. Max Levinson. Mrs.
Joseph Gabel, Mrs. Hy Schlafer and Mrs. Gustave Klinkenstein are in photo
at right.
Max Jakobson Is Finland's
Nominee For Top ILN. Post
INiTFD NATIONS (WUP)
A few days after U Thant declar-
11 that he will not accept another
1' iin as Secretary-General, the
Finnish government in Helinski
announced that it was submitting
the name of its Permanent Repre-
sentative to the U.N. Max Jakob-
son, son of a Jewishly-dedicated
family but a universalist in spirit,
is a candidate for the high post.
The news of Jakobson's nomi-
nation did not come as a surprise
to correspondents or diplomats
here. The popular and well-liked
Ambassador has long been among
the few spoken of as Thant's pos-
sible successors. Dr. Gunnar Jarr-
ing is another name on that list.
The tail, handsome and- athleti-
tally-buUt Finn has, all through
his tenure as the U.N. spokes-
man for neutral Finland, shown an
unusual brilliancy and initiative
which have brought him great re-
spect and admiration from all .ele-
ments within the world organiza-
tion. He has especially distinguish-
ed himself as a member of the
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Security Council.
Ambassador Jakobson. who just
returned from a two-week visit to
his homeland, graciously consent-
ed to grant me an exclusive inter-
view on condition that the top-
ics be confined to questions re-
lating to the political develop-
ments within the U.N. The inter-
view took place at the Finnish
Mission nearby a few days after
his government announced his
candidacy. Among the basic is-
sues discussed were the Middle
Fast, the Secretary-General's of-
fice, the role of Finland in world
affairs, and the hope of the U.N.
for world peace.
But before we turn to his reac-
tions to my questions, I would like
to give my own impression of the
man. I found Max Jakobson, who
is 47 years of age, a genuinely
sincere figure of the highest rank
possessing the true qualities of the
impartial jurist, the true states-
man who will never compromise
on any issue involving justice. In
this sense he appeared to me the
genuine universalist whose main
hope and aspiration in life is to
see peace and understanding at-
tained among the nations of the
world despite their political and
ideological differences. This I
found, was his "religion," deeply
imbedded in him by the influences
of his "interfaith" home hjs
mother is of Christian origin
and by his uniquely neutral nation.
His Jewish father is 85 years of
age.
It is generally held hero that
both Moscow and Washington
view Jakobson with favor and, be-
cause of his broad and equitable
approach to the Middle East prob-
lem he was chairman of the
Special Political Committee han-
dling UNRWA during the 21st
session even the Arab delegates
have found him fully acceptable.
During the pleasant interview
I asked Ambassador Jakobson
whether he felt that the leakages
of the UAR Aide Memoire and
the Israeli 14 points would in any
way impede Dr. Gunnar Jarring's
efforts towards a solution of the
problem and whether he believed
that the Security Council Resolu-
tion 242 contained the seeds to a
possible final settlement of the
Arab-Israeli conflict.
"I am sure Dr. Jarring is not
happy about the leakages," he
said. "When one side leaks its
document, the other side is almost
compelled to do the same. And,
as for the Security Council Reso-
lution 242, I think it is a most
remarkable fact that such a reso-
lution could be adapted unanimous-
ly. It is also a remarkable thing,"
he stressed, "that for the first
time in well over 20 years of Pal-
estine conflict, all of the main
powers were able to agree on
what is really a most comprehen-
sive plan for a solution."
"If you can imagine that such a
solution, such a proposal, had been
put forward in the Security Coun-
cil, let's say. in May, 1967 if
anyone would have put that t'or-
ward then, he would haw been
called completely crazy. It was
completely impossible to imagine
that anything like that could have
been attempted," he declared.
"In fact, throughout the 20
years of conflict attempts to solve
the problem between Israel and
her Arab neighbors have always
failed. Now this is the first time
that this has been achieved. Of
course, it is true that it has not
yet been carried out. But I still
believe it will, be the basis for a
peaceful solution of the Middle
East crisis. It is an ingenious
resolution, it covers everything
that has to be covered for a per-
manent solution, for the estab-
lishment of a just and lasting
peace," he said.
"What about the conflicting in-
terpretations which have been
given to tins resolution?" I asked.
"It is true," he replied, "that
there are different interpretations,
but these will be overcome
through negotiations. This is where
Dr. Jarring's mission comes in. I
am not underestimating the dif-
ficulty. I still think one cannot
dismiss this resolution because it
has become the point of view of
the entire international commun-
ity on the Middle East. It is a sort
of guideline for all of us in our
approach to the Middle East, so
that in a sense it has already
achieved something quite impor-
tant. Indeed, there has never been
such a unified attitude, such a
unified view of the problem
adopted by virtually the whole in-
ternational community."
I turned to his candidacy and
Continued, on f 7-
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THE FLORISTic.
HOLLYWOOD (Diplomat Hotel) 920-4155
(Opening Soon at 401 N. Federal Highway)
FORT LAUDERDALE 525-2871
PLANTATION 584-8770
Mrs. Howard Fuerst (seated) poured tea ai the Pace Set-
ters Luncheon in Mrs. Andrew Greenman's home. Joining
her at the Buffet Table are. from left to right, Mrs. Gerald
Siegel, president of Women's Division of JWF, Mrs. Rottman
Mrs. Stanley Greenspun. campaign chairman and guest
speaker. Simca Rodin.
TO ALL HAPPY HOLIDAYS
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KOSHER ZION SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO
1455 S. AberfcN St. WriMJJ, HL WW Hm: (312) 73t-22tt
-i


Page 8
*Je*lst> ncrfcfian
Friday, April 2, 1971
Dr. Norman Lcndman. (left) Dr. Alex Kobb
and Arthur Frimet are shown in photo at
left, and Mr. and Mrs. Mark Fried, Dr. Alex
Buchwald and Joseph L. Schwartz in the one
at right at a recent meeting of the Young
Leader's Council.
Demonstrators Arrested
Near Russian Embassy
WASHINGTON District of
Columbia polii an ited some
ST.") Jews who staged a massive
Bit-in in the street near the So-
\:, t Embassy la.-t week. Rabbi
Meir Kahanc. natio.ia; chairman
<: (he Jewish Defense League,
was among the lirst to bo ar-
rested. Most were charged with
viclating District of Columbia
traffic regulations after they ig-
nored police warnings to clear
the area.
The demonstration began with
a rally on the Ellipse, a park
behind the White House, before
Rabbi Kahane led the noisy hut
>lin , rsons past the White 1'
thn : -i Lafay tti S |U ir ai d
, L6th Sti t to where a
1 SI
i
500
it ion a
by Federal law.
The den 51 tion cli ted a
i .! cai .hI o : I
nse League againsl So1 I
diplomats. R&bbi Kahane told
the crowd that .,' WS well final-
ly being given ik units to l^ave
Russia because of the efforts
now being made by Ami rican
Ji v. s in their behalf.
A State Department spokes-
man said there was "no way to
oquat' tiu peaceful public dem-
onstration for Soviet Jewry" in
Washington with the "official
violation of the U.S. Kmbassy in
Moscow" which took place last
week. Charles Bray said that
| the United States takes a very
grave view of the violation of
Embassy property by Soviet po-
j lice trying to remove a Soviet
citizen.
Replying to newsmen's ques-
! tions. Mr. Bray said the Soviets
i hadn't protested Sunday's dem-
' onstration. and that he thought
the police had handled the mat-
ti r very well. Only 124 of those
ited ie taken to police
Iquai P'i -. it u.:- re] oi ted,
Temple Eelh El's Annual
Congregational Meeting
T .; B 'ii El's coi
eh will hi- h, '.! In
Auditorium of the tem-
Sut A; 11 -1. will
iner at 6:33 p.m.
i lusii of tlie evening will he
epoi I >; the aomin it ing com-
' i.;: i >!:!. of candidates,
followed by the election of of-
and trustees. This dinner
meeting is confined to members
: the temple because i>f the lim-
ited facilities; dinner tickets may
secured from the temple office.
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Importers
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Complete line of WALL DECOR '"door
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and all were released after pay-
ing a S10 bond. Police processed
689 on the spot and released
them immediately; processing
included identity checks and
photographs.
Florida Chapter Of
Israeli Lighthouse
The first Florida chapter of the
American Israeli Lighthouse, the
Minnie Goldstein Chapter formed
by seven former residents of New
York City, already boasts a mem-
bership of 70.
The Lighthouse has one sole
function to rehabilitate the
blind and return them to a sighted
world with ;i trade and employ-
it Chapter meet'^gs are held
on the third Thursday of each
month.
tJrloliJau Cyreetincjs Jo f
rom
HOLLYWOOD FEDERAL
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION
HOLLYWOOD
1909 Tyler St.
W. HOLLYWOOD
5950 Washington St.
DANIA
140 S. Federal H'way
DAVIE
3896 S.W. 64th Ave (Davie Rd.)
'Partners in Community Progress Since 1931"
THE
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*>


Friday. April 2. 1970
+Jeni$l> fhriat^r
Page 9
Hollywood Area Temples Schedule Traditional Seders
Temples in 'he Hollywood area
w: | be holding traditional Seders
f.] members and friends on the
j. -i night of Passover, April 9.
Temple Sinai will hold its Seder
Louis Zinn Chapel. Services,
will begin at 6 p.m., will be
conducted by Rabbi David Sha-|the Emerald Hills Country Club,
piro and Cantor Yehudah L. Heil- The service, to be conducted by
brun, who will be assisted in his
portion of the service by members
of the Temple Sinai choir
Temple Beth El's 15th annual
Passover Seder will take place at
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual
loader, will begin at 6:15 n.m.
Table arrangements and reserv i-
tions may be made at the temple
office.
Temple Beth Shalom will hold a
community Passover Seder in the
Eenux Arts Ballroom of the Dip-
lomat Hotel. Rabbi Morton Malav-
iky will conduct the services, as-
sisted by Cantor Irving Gold. Res-
ervations may be made for both
members and non-members by
calling Mrs. Bill Gordon at the
I temple office.
Middle East experts were featured as guest speakers at
Hollywood area breakfast meetings arranged by the Temple
Division of Jewish Welfare Federation in cooperation with
the temples. Rabbi David Shapiro of Temple Sinai, Holly-
wood confers with speaker Abbie Ben Ari, former director of
the Israel Government Tourist Office; Chaim Gordon, an
Israeli platoon commander during the Sinai campaign, is
shown with Rabbi Elliot Winograd of Temple Israel of Mira-
mar; with Rabbi Morton Malavsky, spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom, is Milton Sussman, editor of the Pittsburgh,
Pa., Jewish Criterion, and Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe of Temple
Beth El, is pictured with Arie Airman, a member of the Israeli
Knesset.
Sharm el Sheikh
Compromise Seen
As A Possibility
JERUSALEM (JTAi Israel
may be willing to settle for
something less than parmanei i
sovereignty over the Sham
Sheikh strongpoint In Southern
Sinai as long as it is assured
of firm control over the posil
and ow r a land bridge linking
it to Israeli t< rritory, infor
sources said.
Observers saiil th" stand Im-
plies that Israel may be willing
now to consider an American
proposal that a long-term I -
ix> negotiated for the b n
which dominates the Straits of
Tiran, through which most < f
the nation's oil imports must
pass.
The United States, with
its technological superiority, it
was recalled, insisted on retain-
ing its leased naval base at
Guantanamo, Cuba, proving that
it is possible to have the use of
a territory without acquiring i\
For the first time it was offi-
cially disclosed that most oil im-
ports pass through the Straits
of Tiran enroute to Eilat, the
southern terminus of Israel's oil
to keep control of the new 150-
mile road from Eilate to Sharm
pipeline to the Mediterranean
coast.

.


4L,


faqe 10
lewisti Htrldlan
Friday. April 2. 1971
Early Registration At
Hiliel Through April
chool I
Earlj i "'' S|;'
y( ,] I to i mher 1
wm | V;-, i, I j
i iiy Day
S St., Holly-
Dr. L-ee I chairman of
the r [istration committee, and
Rabbi Simon MurciatlO, the school's
principal, met recently to set up
the registration program and to
outline the requirement for ad-
mission.
The Hiliel School, which opened
lasi September, is a co-educational
Jewish day school combining He-
brale-veltgious and general studios
and now includes nursery, kinder-
n and grades I through 7.
Those entering the nursery must
be four years old by December.
The children to be dergarten musl have attained their
Rabbi Frazin
Guest Speaker
P. ibbi Robert Frazin, the guest
peakar at a recent meeting of the
Young Leaden Council at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. David Goodman,
snoko to the Young Leaders and
their wives on the subject of 'Juda-
ism As Differentiated From
Jewish ness."
Dr. Philip Wiiristein, president
of the Council, presided at the
meeting, where plans were final-
ized for the social evening which
will be the final event on this
year's extensive Young Leaders
program a pool party to take
place at Emerald Hills Country
Club.
Amonc those present at the
meeting were Mr. and Mrs. James
Jacobson, Dr. and Mrs. Alex Kobb,
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Schneider. Mr.
and Mrs. Larry Hunter, Mr. and
Mrs. i'rrol Rosen, Mr. and Mrs.
Mark Fried, Dr. nd Mrs. Howard
Berman, Dr. and Mrs. David Glass-
man, Mr. and Mrs. Steven Tobin,
Dr. Norman Landmanj Arthur
prii i-;;h Schwarz, Dr. and
Mrs. rd Krinzman, Mr. and
Mr- [Go i !;nnn and Dr. and
Mrs. Philip \v"' in itein, Jr
Happy Passover From .
IIKEl.MITS
ARCO
3451 Sheridan Street
Hollywood
Phone 983-9849
fifth bit thday on or before January
L. i'Jlejnie': Hie I'l-' Kdl'
i -'"h* .'six'years' old by this
tintsdmin are limited to a maxi-
mum enrollment of 18 students
per class,
The general studies program is
fully accredited by the state of
Florida and meets the highest
standards of the local Board of
Education. In addition to the li-
censed and highly qualified class-
room teachers, the faculty also
includes art, music and physical
education instructors.
The courses in the Hebraic De-
partment include modern conver-
sational Hebrew, Bible, Jewish his-
tory, holidays, and synagogue
skills. The school's bi-cultural pro-
gram aims for the full integration
of the JtWietl child into the Amer-
ican environment. "With our pres-
ent school curriculum being geared
to a highly individualized program
of studies, it is necessary that we
limit registration for each grade.
Applications will therefore be con-
sidered on a first-come, first- serv-
ed basis only." Rabbi Murciano
said.
For registration information or
an appointment with the principal.
oarents may call the school office.
JMattf of \f<"^ h*
JOSEPH ALSQP
Continued from Page 4
he defensible if the United
Stiles-stand9 ready to prevent
Soviet resort to brute force.
This is the real lesson of
the long, long months when the
Soviets were obviously consider-
ing a resort to brute force. With
their courage and their skill, the
Israelites have remarkably
strong right arms. But even the
strength of their right arms
squarely depends on the con-
tinuous availability of advanced
American weaponry.
HENCE Israel's highest pri-
ority ought to be to get an iron-
clad American guarantee, such
as Israel has never had before,
including affirmative congres-
sional action. Israel ought to ac-
cept something not far from
the western frontier envisioned
in Secretary of State William
Rogers" plan of October, 1969,
always providi.ig that this high-
est priority of an ironclad U.S.
guarantee has first been fulfilled.
This kind of peace should not
be unattainable, either. But it
can only be attained, on present
prospects, by negotiations on the
level of Richard M. Nixon and
Golda Meir.
Happy Passover. From...
TEXACO
UOULYWOOB
910 S. Dixie Highway
Phone 923-9396
Auto Service
Courterous Service
BO rnlfcrtO, Prop.
Happy Passover From .. .
JOE'S
AMERiCAN
202 N. Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Phono 922-3640
American Oil Motor Club
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .
JONAS AMERICAN SERVICE STATION
7000 HOLLYWOOD BLVD., HOLLYWOOD
Phone 983-3834
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM ..
ART'S AUTOMOTIVE
1703 N. FEDERAL HWY., HOLLYWOOD
Phone 929-9195
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ...
Lil Peanuts Day Nursery And Kindergarten
6025 MAYO STREET, W. HOLLYWOOD
Phone 961-8011
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ..
R. V. DRESSMAKING! AND ALTERATIONS
5000 PEMBROKE ROAD, HOLLYWOOD
Phone 983-7997
gLff
HOLIDAY GREETlNG&f ROM ..
CHARLES PASTRY SHOP INC.
CAKES FOR ALL OCCASIONS
1811 Wiley Street
2652 Hollywood Blvd. 923-7113
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM .
MICHELLE'S ORIGINALS. SHELLCRAFT
1295 E. BEACH BLVD., H ALLAN DALE
Decorative Creative Designs Bags, Jewelry, Boxes
Special Novelties
Phone 922-2568
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ...
WALTER'S OUTDOOR FURNITURE
422 S. Dixie Highway, Hollywood 927-8555
SPECIALIZING IN RE-WFBBING
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ...
TED'S CITGO SERVICE STATION
6450 Hollywood Blvd., Pembroke Pines
Complete One Stop Service
Tune-ups Brake Service
_. HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL ...
NUDELMANS THE MAGICIAN
a; BIG FOUR TEXACO SERVICE STATION
10^
901 N. Dixie Highway, Hallandale 927-8222
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .
FEDERAL HWY. PHILLIPS 66 SERVICE STATION
1503 N FEDERAL HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD
Phone 923-9472
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .
M A M' SHAMROCK SERVICE STATION
7051 TAFT STREET, HOLLYWOOD 983-9758
Complete Auto Service
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM...
ROSE'S SUNOCO SERVICE
6390 SHERIDAN STREET, HOLLYWOOD
Phone 983-4999
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM ..
VISCO UNION 76 SERVICE
2922 JOHNSON STREET, HOLLYWOOD
Phone 923-3408
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM ..
JOHNNY'S SHELL SERVICE
3000 JOHNSON STREET, HOLLYWOOD
Phon. 9218 Complete Auto Service
HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL------
HALLANDALE BEACH CITGO SERVICE
4112 S. Ocean Drive, Hallandale
Phone 927-8350 922-9663
HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL
LOIS'S ALTERATION SHOP
4528 TYLER STREET, HOLLYWOOD 33021
Designing and Restyling
Phono 983-9757
HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL ..
BIKINI BEAUTY SALON
(no appointment necessary) *
2524 Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale
Phono 927-5467 927-9157
GALAHAD HALL SOUTH BEAUTY SALON
3801 S. Ocean Drive, Hollywood Phone 929-1840
Wishes All Our Friends and Customers A Happy Passover
Open Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 4:00
TEMIS HAIR FASHIONS
714 Atlantic Shores Blvd., Hallandale
Phone 923-6482 and 923-7833
Best Wishes To All For A Happy Passover
HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL ..
HARLEYS PAINT and BODY SHOP
801 N. Dixie Highway, Hallandale
Phone 922-8400 24 Hour Towing
HARLEY ARZT
Happy Passover To All
JIM RICHMANS PAINT and BODY SHOP
301 N. Dixie Highway, HaUandelo
Phono 923-3669
DAM A PAINT and BODY SHOP
121 S.E. 1st A venue-920-4495
Complete Auto Painting Collision Sperieliets
ERNIE LAUER, Prop.
*A
Happy Passover To All
DAMIOO PAINT and BODY SHOP
701 S. Federal Highway, Dania 927-2257
Quality Work Fast Service
Happy Passover To All
FASHION GALLERY
LATEST FASHIONS
6 N. Federal Highway, Dania
MARTAY KRAUS Mgr. 925-0575


r, April 2, 1970
#Je*i*t) fhr/dttan
Page 11

ax Jakobson Is Finland's
ominee For Top U.N. Post
Continued from P9 7-
whether he would be amen-
to the post of Secretary-Gen-
PausiiiK a moment as if to
kkier carefully what to say, he
jnded with a "Well, of course,
that the Finnish jjovernment
started a process of consulta-
with other governments on
question and has put forward
name in these consultations,
rally it implies that it makes
lavailable ."
then referred to Secretary-
tieral Thant's recent statement
the effect that the choice of
next U.N. chief should not be
kved at on the basis of any
kcific geographical or regional
presentations but rather on the
ilities of the man. "Do you con-
in this view?" I asked.
|lt is an important principle,"
kobson replied, "well and very
llcly supported in the U.N. that
office of the Secretary-Gen-
III should not be subject to ro-
lion among regional groups. In
lat sense," he added, "it is not
|mparable to, let's say, the pres-
ency of the Assembly and many
hrr offices of that kind which
ive now become the subject to
Lionel rotation and are in fact
Ui-d by a method through which
regional groups really agree
nong themselves on a candidate
ho is then ultimately accepted
all the others.
|"It would change the character
1 the Secretary General," he con-
[iued, "if such regional consider-
|ons would applj co his selec-
& The quality of the individual
[supposed to be taken into ac-
|unt in all the different elections
the U.N. combined with the
(inciple of rotation, but, in the
ase of the Secretary-General, the
tinc;ple of rotation does not ap-
| In his reply to my question on
dw his country has managed to
intain a state of neutrality in
face of so many European con-
lets, and how it is different from
her neutrals, he not.-d that ev-
country which las passed
[rough neutrality mint find its
vn policy to suit the conditions
lich prevail in trat particular
krt of the world and relating to
the interests and situation of the
country-conrernvd.*"! don't' think
that you will find the many coun-
tries which call themselves neu-
tral to be alike. There are no
identical twins. Kach one has a
different character," he said.
Discussing a proposed Confer-
ence on Kuropean Security, Am-
bassador Jakobson pointed to the
vital role which Finland could play
in this regard. "I think that our
unique contribution to such a con-
ference is based on the fact that
we do have good relations with ev-
ery country concerned, including
the two Germanys. In that sense."
he declared, "Finland can, for in-
stance, servo as a host in a man-
ner that wili make it possible for
all participants, whatever their
differences, to feel that they will
be treated in an equal manner and
with strict objectivity."
Before joining the Foreign Serv-
ice in 1953, Max Jakobson was a
journalist. His first post was that
of press attache to the Kmbassy
of Finland in Washington, D.C.
Returning to Helinski in 1958, he
was appointed chief of the press
department at the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs. In 1962 he was
appointed Director of Political Af-
fairs at the Ministry until 1965
when he was designated the Am-
bassador of Finland to the U.N.
He has authored several books; in-
cluding "Finnish Neutrality"
(Pracger 19691)''and "The Diplo-
macy of the Winter War" (Harv-
ard University Press, 1960).
Kugels A Traditional
Feature Of Passover
Kugels arc versatile menu items, I
appearing on Passover tables as
main dishes, accompaniments or.
desserts. Potato Kugc-1. one of the]
most popular, is essentially a souf-|
fie made with grated potatoes and
flavored with onion and parsley.
Peanut Oil. the lightest of the com-
mon cooking oils, keeps this egg-
ricii kugel cloud-light and airy,
without imparting any flavor of|
its own. The favorite cooking oil |
the year round. Planters Peanut,
Oil is also Kosher for Passover. I
HAPPY PASSOVER FROM ...
EDWARD LICHTMAN and JACK BRADLEY
PALMVIEW REALTY. INC.
2310 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood
Telephone 920-1414
- *
Additional recipes for Passover,
as well as the rest of tbl year, are,
featured in the colorful 32-page
booklet, "Five Great Cuisines with1
Planters Peanut Oil." The booklet,
includes background facts on cook-
ing with peanut oil and a section |
of recipes for Jewish mem;-., plus \
recipes from French, Ttaliai Chi-
nese and American C lisine: For,
your free copy, write to: Planters
Peanut Oil. P.O. Box 2695, Grand |
Central Station. New York. N.Y.
10017.
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .
PLAZA STANDARD SERVICE CENTER
460 S. STATE ROAD 7, W. HOLLYWOOD 989-9264
Complete Auto Service 35 Years Experience
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .
JOt RANDAZZtVS GUlf SERVICE STATION
1700 N. UNIVERSITY DR., W. Hollywood
Complete Auto Service 961-3790
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .. .
REACH-O-RAMA
YOUR ONE STOP POOL and PATIO SHOP
1716 N. DIXIE HWY 922-2289
Pool Equipment Patio Furnituro
922-9281
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM ..
DANIA TEXACO SERVICE
550 S. FEDERAL HIGHWAY, DIANA
General Aeto Service
Happy Passover From .. .
CITY HALL SHELL
2635 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
Phone 927-1045
Complete Auto Service
Happy Holiday To
Everyone from
JIM
AMERICAN MOTORS
SERVICE STATION
Thank You
Phone 983-0288
HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL
MILES STANDARD SERVICE
900 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD 922-9636
Spec. Servicing Air Cond. Electric Windows
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM
FLOYD'S CUSTOM CABINETS
Custom Built Cabinet* Kitchens and Vanities
SPECIALIZING IN CLINICS
5622 S.W. 21 Street, Hollywood Phone 966-3750
Happy Holidays To All My
Customers and Friends From
C&C AUTO
SERVICE
1631 N. State Road 7
Hollywood 966-4141
Complete Auto Serviae
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM .
ROSE ANN'S TAILORING
AND DRY CLEANING
7159 Pembroke Road, Pembroke Pines 983-4173
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM ..
ARGO UNIFORM CO.
1000 S. Dixie Highway, Ha II and ale
Phone 922-6597
. i
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ... AD
HOLLYWOOD PRINT SHOP
117 S. 21st Avenue, Hollywood 922-1967
Specializing In Wedding and BarMirxvah Invitations
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .
MODERN UPHOLSTERY
4135 Hallandale Beach Blvd., West Hollywood
Phone 983-9674
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM...
ACE UPHOLSTERY
610 $. Dixie Highway, Hallandale 9226622
A SATISFIED CUSTOMER IS OUR ASSET
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ..
DEBRA-LYNN BANQUET CATERERS
SPECIALIZING IN LOX AND BAGELS BREAKFAST
1030 S.W. 56th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD
Phone 966-0523
HAPPY PASSOVER TO ALL FROM
MR. and MRS. ALLAN L. DAVIS of
HOLLYWOOD HEARING AID SERVICE
2124 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 923-8338
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM ... I '
VILLAGE INTERIORS *.-
CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING FREE ESTIMATES
Phone 922-9991
2152 TYLER STREET, Hollywood
i I.
HAPPY HOLIDAY FROM .
GETTO UPHOLSTERY
6242 PEMBROKE ROAD, MIRAMAR
Phone 989-8005
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ...
SHARLYNE'S CIRCLE DRESS SHOPS
1847 Hollywood Blvd. 1913 A- Hollywood Blvd, Hollywood
922-1937 929-3345
MICHAEL HAIMM, Prop.
T
MARION'S ^CERAMICS STUDIO
125 N. 46 Ave., Hollywood -9ft 1-0832 Air Conditioned
Complete Line of Ceramic Supplies and Gifts
Day and Evening Classes, Also Children's Instruction' by
Marian Farnham Happy Passover To All
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ...
RUT AUTOMATIC CAR WASH
FREE WASH WITH HU-UP
5811 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
Phone 961-4645
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ...
JIMMJE'S HOME STYLE CANDIES
FAMOUS FOR "HEAVENLY HASH"
20 N. Federal Highway, Dania
Tel. 923-9385
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM ..
HARVEST VILLAGE NATURAL FOODS INC.
1928 Harrison Street, Hollywood
Phone 927-1335 927-0621


Paqe 12
^Jfwlsfj ihrktiar)
Friday, April 2. 1971
I
Freedom Through Identification
By RABBI DAVI1> SHAPIRO
I'ii tMenl
Friday Bight, April 0, Jews all
over the world will sil down al th'1
festive table of the Sodcr and
lead from our centuries-old book
called "the Haggadah, the story of
l8rael' In the Haggadah there is a line
considered to be the most impor-
tant in the whole Passover cele-
bration. It reads as follows: "In
every generation it is the duty of
every Jew to look upon himself as
if he. person illy, went forth out of
Egypt."
This line announces a principle
which is bi sic and fundamental to
Judaism: r amely. that there are
causes in h imin life which are of
such great importance that life
without them would hardly be
worthwhile; that our attitude to
such causes, therefore, cannot be
merely one of mere sympathy, but
must be one of empathy. What is
required in such cases is complete
identification with the cause! And
freedom is such a cause; therefoie,
the command of the Passovnr serv-
ice is to completely identify our-
selves with the Hebrew slave in
Enypt as though we. too, were lib-
erated from Egyptian slavery.
What our religious heritage ex- i
l> cst of us, then on Passover eve
is not merely to retell an ancient :
tale, but our complete identifica-
tiim with the whole historic drama
of Israel's liberation from Egypt!
The Haggada i challenges us to,
saj "We werf ilaves in Egypt, WE j
suffered the 1 umiliation and thej
defeat; WE won the freedom to;
build our lives in our own home-
land according to our religious
Ideals." This is the .I-- Ish princi-
ple of identification. It leans that
those who are not ln'"ired should
Iv as indignant ns th e who are1
that those who do ni iitffcr sin"
feel the pain, the a* y. the an-
guish of those who do! Only thus
does one fulfill the commandment
of identification.
I say this to you. not only to
define the deeper meaning of the
Festival of Freedom, but also in
relation to one of the ereatcst
challenges we Jews musl face to-
day. I refer to one of the largest
si gments of our people who are
still in spiritual slavery, and are
not yet liberated from suffering
and defeat: the large Jewish com-
munity living within the boundaries
of the Soviet Union.
One has to understand their po-
sition in the light of the tragedy
which our people cxncricncerl In
this generation. We were a peo-
|.!e numbering some 18 million
when Hitler came to power. The
Nazis murdered over a third of
our number. We are. today, a small
people of only 1.1 million souls. Of
'his. some five to six million live
here on the American continent
and 2'/ million live in the state of
Israel. This means that the second
largest Jewish community on earth
estimated at two to three mil-
lion is still living behind the
Iron Curtain, in a hostile atmos-
chere. without an organized Jew-
ish community life, without Jewish
schools, without Jewish newspa-
pers without Jen ish books, and
without Jewish literature in
short, a community unable to lead
a Jewish life and unable to fulfill
themselves at Jews either cultur-
ally or spiritually.
The Jews in Russia are officially
considered a national minority, yet
they do not reap the benefit of
this status as do all other minori-
ties of the country. They are be-
ing discriminated against in many
fields of endeavor: they are al-
lowed neither full integration as
Russian citizens, nor emigration
in order to be reunited with their
"aniihes in the free world.
We feel that we must continue
to alert the free world to what is
happening to our people in the So-
viet Union. We cannot be silent
when the cultural and religious
life of the second largest Jewish
community in the world is threat-
ned with extinction. After the
"nited Nations passed a universal
declaration against racial and re-
'igious intolerance, is it too much
to demand that a Jewish citizen of
the Soviet Union -should be allowed
> live a fu'l Te-vish life according
to the principles of his religion?
It 's with our U'.:--j'n breathren
ot the h iusi hrl! of Israel that we
kler'lfj ourrolvea at the Passover
season, so that when we recite the
sggadah and we read the an-
;cnt words, we know that WE [
re THEY: we look uoon ourselves
I if we are behind the Iron Cur-
1 tain: we suffer with them, we feel
I their pain.
We American Jews are happllj
in the West, but on Passover our
I hearts are sadly in fie East. This
rear, we pray to the U>rd_ of
'IWjTfiSnrt the rerteerffcr'W man-
kind t sustain our brethren in
?his difficult hour, and to calls'*
civilized mankind to exert a strong
Influence upon the leaders of the
Fast, to let those of its Jewish
Citizens who want to, lead a Jevv-
sh life: and to permit the others
who want to go, the freedom to
emigrate in order to be united
with members of their own fami-
lies.
We p-ayerfu'ly hope that our
generation, which has witnessed
the liberation of millions of peo-
ple in many parts of the world,
will live to see the day in which
freedom will dawn upon our peo-
ple in Russia, and that through
our identification with the Jews in
Russia, they will be permitted to
behold the light of liberty, so that
together, we and they and the
whole human race, may be priv
;leged to celebrate Passover a
the universal feast of freedom.
ORGANIZATION IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Federation's Chaplaincy Service
One of the many local programs
j provided by the Jewish Welfa*e
' Federation of Gieater Hollywood
I is a program that provides Jewish
| services for the Jewish patients of
; South Florida St tie Hospital. The
services are implemented by mem-
be] of the Broward Hoard of
Rabbis with each of the seven
rabbis assuming responsibility for
a month at a time on a rotating
basis.
The attending rabbi's services
I are available to patients on a 24-
I hour-a-ilay basis. Thev administer
to the needs of the dying, assist in
j arrangements for the departed and
I often serve as liaison between the
I patient and the patient's family
For those patients who request
| them, rabbis will provide private
counseling sessions and spiritual
help. Religious services are c in-
ducted in the hospital chapel each
Monday.
Special holiday services are a. i
held during the year with specia1
parlies foi specific holidays. Th
meaning and symbolism of the hoi:-
-lay 4s*tressed in this way! At th:?
season of the year, plans and prep,
arattions are under wav for i
special Seder service which will be
conducted at the hospital.
Through this program provid-j
by Federation, it is hoped that i
number of nati'-nts can be reh). l
bilitated and returned to normal,!]
everyday life.
Serve Yoban Coffee It's
General Foods' Premium
Don't settle for "second best"
on this holiday because that
old adage about coffee "crowning"
a great meal is still true. And your
nests deserve the best Yuban.
the premium coffee made by Gen-
eral Foods.
When vou smell Yuban's deep,
rich coffee aroma, you know you're
serving the best money can buy.
CANOLEUGHTING TIME
7NISAN 6:10
VWWWWW*^MM^
Happy Passover From .
loxai
JEWELLERS
201 9-A Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
Going out of Business
Thanks to all our Customers
Happy Passover From .
CUSTOM MADE DINETTE SETS
by
E.M.R.
501 S. 21st Ave., Hollywood
922-9868
Placemats Mugs Giftware
Happy Passover From .
nil. kmi
STUDIO
2481 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
Phone 927-3549
Custom Dressmaking and
Alterations...
SHALOM
from
BEST WISHES INC.
4533 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
Phone 981-7500
Happy Passover From .
SALLY'S
ALTERATIONS
1818'. N. 20th AVENUE
Hollywood
Phone 922-6900
Men and Women's Alterations
ALBET
BEAUTY
SA10N
2132 Harrison Street
Hollywood
Formerly Batel Beauty Salon
of Manhattan, N.Y.
Wishes You A Happy Passover
Tel: 922-3349
Al Jakubec, Prop.
Happy Passover From .
BOULEVARD
FASHIONS
2029 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
Phone 922-5212
ANN SEVINE
Happy Passover From .
BREINER BROS.
SERVICE CENTER
400 N. Dixie Highway
Hollywood
Phone 922-2324
..-.in
v..
Happy Passover From .
LUMAVS
3806 S. Ocean Drive
Hollywood
Specializing In Swim Suits
922-2250
Mr. L. Berman, Prop.
Happy Passover From.. .
AQUA GOLF
DRIVING RANGE
Professional Golf Instruction
Golf Equipment and Repairs
Open 9 A.M. to 10 P.M.
7 Days
2250 S. Park Rd
Pembroke Park
Phone 989-9254
PASSOVER GREETINGS .
FRANK MOORE REALTY* MNC.
Main Office: 2455 Hollywood Blvd. 929-1902
Branch Office: 2515 Hollywood Blvd. 927-1616
FRANKLIN D. MOORE, President
NORMAN PLATT, General Manager
Dandruff Treatment Razor Cut
PAL JOEY'S BARBER SHOP
PHONE 922-9300
(Formerly Al and Gene's Barber Shop)
:-: MANICURE :-:
1906 HARRISON STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Wish You A Happy Passover
PASSOVER GREETINGS FROM SHAPIRO'S and GARMIZO of
IIARI.V-JA.MlvS HARDWARE
950 So. Dixie Highway, Hollywood 922-2633
Happy Passover From .. .
JACK'S
FURNITURE STORE
2031 Harrison Street
Hollywood
Phone 923-3528
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM .
TIM RAKER PHOTOGRAPHY
2020 TYLER STREET, HOLLYWOOD 927-5003
PORTRAITS WEDDINGS COMMERCIAL
PHOTOGRAPHY A-Z
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM .
HOLLYWOOD CATERING
6076 PEMBROKE ROAD, MIRAMAR
GEORGE MANKOWSKI
Phone 961-5587
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM .
HALM. AN DALE. GARDENS
Nursery Stock Hector ft Ortho Fertilizers Insecticides Tor
Mowers Garden Supplies Pet Supplies Decorative Urns and
Fountains Open Sundays 9 A^. to 4 PJK. 923-2070
_______________806 S. Dixie Hwy., Hallandala


n
iday. April 2, 1970
+JmM tier Minn
Page 13
Rabbi-Teacher Writes Book After Retiring
a'.; i
cia!
IV
I
fhia
ep.
r i
I be
What does a master teacher and
jicated spiritual leader do af-
|er retirement? The answer is
bvious. He writes a book.
No exception to this rule is the
own faith while stoutly defending
the rights of otners and
aging them to oe
fast.
An ordained Methodist minister,
encour-
equally stead-
case of Rabbi David L. Ziojonka, I Dri Wils J. Dunn, followed Rabbi
Iwho returned to the University
[of Tampa recently to witness
'commencement exercises for the
first time in 40 years as an on-
looker.
Zielonka as chairman of the uni-
versity's Sociology Department.
Of his long time friend and as-
sociate, Dr. Dunn says, "Early in
our association I learned he never
had any intention of compromising
Six months earlier, his dual re-! Ml values. Nor did he expect any
thcr person to compromise his."
/
t n ment climaxed a combined to-
tal of almost SO years of service
a founding faculty member of
University and as leader of
Tampa's Congregation Scbaarai
Z'dek iGates of Righteousness).
)n campus his was the happy
lf< te of building bridges to sur-
:r nit wills of prejudice and mis-
- landing. He exerted a
adying influence in helping to
|pjide the private, liberal arts col-
[ege through the vicissitudes of
[depression and demonstrations;
I war and w>nt; challenges and
[ change.
During his tenure on the faculty,
which began in 1931, he headed
th Department of Sociology for
18 years, established the Depart-
ing nt of Philosophy and directed
it for four years, and founded the
Din.itmcnt o' Religion which he
jhain d until his retirement.
P multaneouslv, he was earninc
Hstinction as the full-time rabbi
|fo Schaarai Zedck Synagogue and
Iving hundreds of hours each
v- ar to humanitarian and welfare
work in the community.
Asked to name the academic ex-
rience which gives him the
rreatest joy, the response is
irompt: "All of my students who
etum to report their achieve-
ments." His dark eyes glow as he
jnks of all who have done so.
Marie Isobel Swingley, ch.ss of
' >8, is one who recalls taking ev-
i ry course Zielonka taught.
"I was impressed by his great
Knowledge, not only of Judaism,
II' it also of a'A religion. He has the
mack of conversing with his stu-
nts rather than lecturing. He is
ltellectual without being lofty." I
IA paraplegic, Marie Is now office j
panager for the Easter Seal So-
ty of Hillsborough County.
Very much th same sentiment
is expressed by Aurobindo J. Jani,
native of Valem, C.ujarat State,
India, and assist int professor of
Ps} ihology at the University of
Tampa.
A practicing Hindu marching to
'et another drumbeat. Dr. Jan:
refers to Rabbi Zielonka as "a
'iving man of faith." He explains
further. "In the final analysis,
Faith is the Man."
A comparative newcomer to the
University of Tampa campus.
Father Leo Van den Oetelaar.
S.J., chaplain of the Newman
Center, has high praise for his
confrere.
"I can appreciate the many fine
lualitics of this gentle man. This
iocs not mean that he never pro-
vokes contradietion. He is strong,
but his respect for others prevents
."lashes and makes them feel wise
and good. To be at one time a rock
in the surging tide of change, and
'it the same time a kind and un-
derstanding guide of youth, is a
tribute to the eternal values of
the religious tradition."
In Tampa, his great humanitar-
ian efforts have not gone unno-
ticed. In 1965 he was elected
president of the Family Services
Association; in 1969, he received
the fourth Hannah G. Solomon
award from the Tampa section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women. In 1953, his synagogue
sponsored a trip to Israel for him
and Mrs. Zielonka, where he at-
tended the opening of Hebrew
Union College Biblical and Arche-
ological School in Jerusalem. He
>s an alumnus of Hebrew Union
Colleg?, class or '29.
In 194". when he addressed the
iiaduating c'pss at the University
Son of a rabbi |onka> and father of a rabbi (David | of Tampa, he received the honorary
Tl. Zielonka), the leader of Tarn-1 L.H.D. degree. The class of 1949
M'l Reform temnle is true to his dedicated their issue of "The Mo-
M.M.
says...
Htmmru Meyert
Campaign Chairman
Aparlmenls Division
at Jewish
Welfare ftitralitm
The Hemispheres complex is moving into high gear in its
first Federation campaign.
Sam Barack of Ocean South hosted a cocktail party for
workers in his building on Sunday, March 21. Those present in-
cluded Mrs. Bert Lcvine. Mrs. Estclle Langs, Mrs. Rose Burnof-
sky, Pauline Buchner. Nathan Noveck, Nathan Goldberg, Mrs.
Simmy Davids, Sanford Bearman. Joe Guttman, Joseph Perl-
mutter, Joe Berger and Herman Green.
On Monday. Bill Weiss of Ocean North held a similar event
in his home, playing host to Mrs. Gould, Donald Land, Mrs.
Young and Dr. Hubert Curson. Also working with the committee
i-= Alex Morningstar.
Meyer Lipton. chairman of Bay South, had as his special
guests, Mr. and Mrs. Meisel who were celebrating their 52nd
Wedding Anniversary. In addition. Mr. and Mrs. Joe Horowitz.
Mrs. Beatrice Rothenberg, Benjamin Baskin. Irving Nadler,
Marjorie Belfield, and Mrs. Bert Lcvine were also there.
A fourth meeting in Bay North is scheduled to take place
shortly. David Rabins chairman of the Presidents' Council at
Hillcrest, has announced that the camuiign is meeting with a
reception in the entire complex.
made the most outstanding
tribution to the University.
con-
RABBI DAVID ZIUONKA
late and to love." In 1965, he re-
ceived the George Truman Huntei
him as "a man to admire, to emu-
roccan." the college yearbook, to
award as the faculty member whe
At the 19SS Homecoming, he re-
ceived the University Alumni As-
sociation award as the outstand-
' ihg facility member with more
than five years of service. At the
Honors Convocation in May, 1970,
just prior to his retirement, a
plaque was presented to him by
University president David M.
Delo "in recognition of 39 years of
Unselfish, dedicated instruction and
many other contributions and serv-
ices cheerfully rendered to the
institution."
But his greatest claim to fame
ties in the hearts of students, past
and present, who remember him
v ith such great admiration. One
of those knows him both as an un-
dergraduate and as a fellow fac-
ulty member.
In June, 1935. Miller K. Adams
led the first U-T commencement
procession. Now chairman of the
Department of Health. Physical
Education and Recreation, Dr. Ad
n&ti
fc_5c"V."
laions
HAIUNDALE
MALLANDALE JEWISH
126 N. E. lit Ave.
cc#
CENTEr
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (TEMPLE) 1S51 8. 14 Av
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. 41
Friday 8:11 p.m. Topic: "Passover
1U71 Are W.' seeing A New Birth of
Frw'diira?" Saturday 11 am Bar
Mltzvah: Kevin Kras, son of Air. and
Mrs. Stanley I.. Knias.
BETH SHALOM (TEMPLfV. 172S
Monroe St. conservative Rabb
Morton Malavaky. Cantot .rvinc
Gold. 41
SINAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. 41
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (TEMPLE) 20 S.W. S5th St
Conaervative. Rabbi Elliot J. Wine
grad. Cantor Abraham Koetar. 4*
MARGATE
JEWISH CENTER.
St.
10i
MARGATE
N.W. th
SOLEL (TEMPLE) 3300 N. 44 Avenue
(Temporary office) Liberal.
Question
Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Why do |lions .!>. cover their
head with Tails during prayer?
Some commentaries explain that
?his is done so as to make a man
feel humble before God (Bat--Jo-
seph 8:1 Others claim that this is
done to fill a person with foar and
reverence before the Almighty.
Still others claim that this is done
to help a person concentrate.Qn his
prayers without being dfiftractcd
from outside influences, ^9^o
3 tie
Furthermore, the effect of cov-
ering the head with 'ttur-* Talis
means that on?'s entire body is
wrapped with the preseece of the
Almighty and that the<, person is
entirely engulfed with the spirit of
his Creator. The fringap of the
Talis are representative of the
Commandments of the Almighty.
At every phase of life, the Jew
is involved with some of Ihe Com-
mandments so thai his entire life
is committed to the awareness of
God to whom man must relate at
all times and under Wronditinns.
It should lie borne in mind thai
originally a Jew wxfcle'a Talis all
through the day and not only at
prayer as is our prrwrnt custom;
th:- ill the hours of the day are
ipenl being swage |fche presence
it the Divine.
ams confesses that he feels for his
mentei the veneration older cul-
tures reserved for teachers.
"Rabbi Zielonka has that talent
for enthusiasm that sets him
apart as a master." Then Dr. Ad-
ams adds the supreme tribute. "In
my opinion, he is everything a boy
would want in a father."
Rabbi Zielonka, a native of El
Paso. Tex., and his wife, the for-
mer Carol Ciencr, a classmate of
his undergraduate days at the
University of Cincinnati, are the
parents of two sons David, the
rabbi, and Dr. Carl Zielonka, a
practicing dentist in Tampa.
Asked about the book he is
writing, Rabbi Zielonka confesses
that one tends to procrastinate
when a demanding schedule is
ease]. Pressed for details, he ex-
plains thai the tentative title,
"Rabbi On Horseback," refers to
the almost incredible experiences
his father. Martin, faced as a cir-
cuit-riding rabbi for a wide seg-
ment of Texas.
aw i aMaiiHMiiiuui.1!.....n:'ni BMaaaaaai a
J-rof
0?,e JKJLrn
11.SJtHuUBBagfflMIWgniMPI
Fire Is Not A Free Agent
By RABBI 8AD1 XAIIMIAS
Sephardic -Jewish Congregation
From the infancy of the human
-ace, fire has been the symbol of
"ivilization. The myth of Prome-
'heus stealing fire from heaven
ind his punishment is the agonizing
Jream of civilization.
In the Torah, fire is a symbol o!
Holiness marking the spiritual as-
cot of a man.
Fire by itself, is neutral it
nan be a devouring fire burning
cities and leaving homeless farm
I'es. or it can be a purifier of the
Iross from gold. The inventions of
civilization are productive or de-
structive, depending on its usei
ind manipulator. Civilization is
neutral, man Is not: fire burns, but
.nan determines its direction ant1
mrpose.
Despite the .glaring shortcom-
;ngs o! civilization and the exorbi-
tant toll it exacts for progress, *c
re unanimous in affirming that d
fire must perpetually burn upor
'he Altar. The light of our civiliza-
tion must not be permitted to g<.
we have to bring sac
out. even if
iZfaaanatwaMniii*
rifices for its preservation.
Darkness is the nemeis of man
striving to go forward to kindle
he torch of learning or the candle
>f fellowship. Light is also the
symbol of religion, happiness, and
knowledge; the eternal triangle
of the mature person.
Rut there is yet a third type of
fire, as recorded in Chronicles, de-
scribing the dedication of the Tem-
ple by King Solomon: "The fire
came down from reaven, and con-
sumed the liurnt offering and the
sacrifices: and the glory of the
Lord filled the house."
Some elite generations become
worthy of the fire from heaven.
This fire also consumes like others,
but only th'- offered sacrifices.
This lire aim K not contained, but
:t is not bent on destruction: on
'he contrarp. it spreads the glory
if God
Let US therefore ever seek the
right fire that brings glory in its
waks. I>et us remember that fire is
not a free agent: .nan can deter-
mine whether it be a dire fire of
destruction or a higher fire of
elorv.
MKMIMene <"1 >.' >' 11 it- -' -i > i :: n !'
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Tzav
"i
"And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, command Aaron
and his sons, saying, this is the law of the bumt-offering ."
(Chapters 6-8).
SACRIFICIAL DUTIES OF THE. PRIESTS: The priests were
charged with the duty of bringing a burnt-offering on behalf of
the community every morning and evening and the fire on the
altar was to be kept burning continuously. Supplementary laws
prescribed their sacrificial duties and the portions of the offer-
ings they were to receive as their dues. Their share of the meal,
sin and trespass offerings could be eaten only within the court
of the sanctuary'by a priest who was ceremoniously clean. Aaron,
from the time he was ordained, was to bring a meal-offering each
morning .ind evening on his own behalf, and on behalf of the
priesthood. c
The peace offering was the only sacrifice of which the of-
ferer, too, was permitted to partake, provided he was ceremon-
ially clean.
CONSECRATION OF AARON AND HIS SONS: In an im-
pressive ceremony held in the court of the sanctuary, Aaron and
his sons were coiis.-crated and installed by Moses in the presence
of the congregation. After the priests hid bathed, Moses dressed
Aaron in his distinctive garments and anointed the tabernacle
and its contents the ark, table of show-bread, candlestick and
altar of ilicense as well as the altar of burnt-offering with its
accessories, and th.' laver and it.s base, all of which stood in the
court of the sanctuary. He then poured anointing oil upon Aaron's
head to sanctify him. Finally, the ordinary priests were invested
with their garments, and a tin-offering, burnt-offering and a
special conBecrati6n were offered up by Moses. These rites were
repeated daily for seven days with Aaron and his sons remaining
in the court throughout the period.


Page 14-
fjewlst tlcrldliair
Friday. April 2. 1971
DATUM JERUSALEM By Elmhu Solpeter
Plant Combines Business Skill Zionism
A ^^ is happy to mix nusiness with
pleasure accurately describes Os-
cai Van Leer.
':;,;gtWSV. t'OB
Van Leer,
-ueans packae-
lng. He is head
of the Royal
Packaging In-
dustry Van
Leer N.V. of
A m s t e lveen.
Holland, which
owns 65 plants in 30 countries
on five continents, making con-
tainers for everything from pe-
troleuih to frozen food, from
bulk chemicals to precious medi-
cine. The firm handles packag-
ing as a system: it is interested
in the total conditioning of the
contents to assure its protection
and preservation in best possi-
ble condition.
Pleasure for Van Leer means
science-based industries and Zi-
onism. He founded Holland's
first modern optical instruments
before World War H; several
years ago, he combined his two
interests with the establishment
of the Rehovot Klectro-Optical
Company, a joint venture with
the applied research branch of
the Wizmann Institute of Sci-
ence. And now he is combinine
packaging, science-based indus-
tries and Zionism.
In partnership with the Israel
Atomic Energy Commission, he
has established SORVAN, an In-
dustrial irradiation plant which
J>sg^Btfwtioa|n|IWt fWWI'- 4*9*
clear type of processes to steril-
ize and/or disinfect industrial
or agricultural products when-
more conventional methods, like
boiling or chemical action would
ruin or damage the product.
The SORVAN plant at Nahal
Soieq will initially concentrate on
the sterilization of disposable
medical instruments, primarily
syringes and needles. In the sec-
ond stage, the plant will stPrilize
fodder for laboratory animals
which must live in germ-free
environment. Later, the plant
will branch out Into the use of
radiation in manufacturing proc-
esses.
U*l) titfUlsi'^''""" '"^"'"t
tories have been conducting stud-
ies in the preservation of agri-
cultural products ngainst spoil-
age and ugainst pests by irradia-
tion. Considerable progress has
be.n made in developing meth-
ods to retard spoilage and
sprouting and a new method to
protect the sugar content of
freshly harvested sugar beets
has been patented. (Unless beets
arc rushed immediately for proc-
essing they can lose about a
fifth of their worth in one dayi
Irradiation right after harvest-
ing prevents such deterioration
for several days. Needless to say,
these processes do not leave any
traces of radioactivity In the
projJuflljfcjHEoqjJscd. They only
destroy any germs or seeds of
gemination.
The SORVAN facilities near
Nahal Soreq. which Is also the
site of the first of Israel's nu-
clear reactors, will use Cobalt-
W and an electron accelerator
as sources of radiation. The ac-
celerator will come from the
United States, the rest of the
equipment from Canada. The
investment in the plant will be
about $572,000 put up in equal
parts by the two partners.
Israel Newsletter
Bv CAM ALPERT
The Medical School Of Tomorrow
students who graduate from medical
*, ;hool In the next five to ten years will be
practicing in the 21sl century! Thai simple truth
may well ha> me of the stimuli to the launch-
ing .,i a bold and i xciting venture in medical educa-
tion now underw iy In Haifa
yi dical is becoming more and more
, I with fields of science which would
Mem to be ti from study of anatomy or
path ill gy. Hi rl pace-m iker, artificial kidneys elec-
tronic ii ntal >i tod iy play a role In the
medical world which necessitate the closest possible
reiatl i the i hysici in on the one hand.
on the other. Hence
it is thai Israel's third medical school opened here
iasi j o iting with the Tech-
nion. Israi I Ii ol T< chnology.
It is an experimont which will be watched w th
the do* si interest In many parts of the world. For
their flrsl three years the students will receive the
lucation provided byTechnion, with emph
on y and the sciences. Some may there-
aftei s| oialize in bio-medical engineering and re-
ctive their bachelor's degree in that field. Others
will pro ecd with the clinical studies, specialized
m dical subjects and hospital work. The end prod-
uct uvill en with a good training In medi-
cal subjects, and ;>h>sirians who will not be strang-
ers to eli rtronies, hydraulics and mechanical engi-
neering.
The Technlon-Haifa Medical School already has
an enrollment of 90 students, h ivlng Ix'ijun with
upper class Israelis wh i were brought back
i studies abroad Next fall it will begin with a
Todov's Thought: By DR. SAMUEL SILVER
The Taste Of Yiddish
IP \r>! <:;'. i.l> II1INK
,... mid be Leo I i's book, "1
Joj f Ylddls i.'
Now we have been sei I the m lin
c mrs .
it g ,. n I new book called "The
Taste 'if Yiddish,:' by Lillian Mermin
Feinsilver.
The new book towers over everything
ever written in English on. the Yidd^h
1 inguage.
This delicious btx)k lists hundreds of
' Yiddish expressions and explains-^thetr
meaning. It has a chapter on the impact Yiddish has made
on English, and another on the way English has affected
Yiddish.
The section on religion is a small college* education
on Judaism.
Mrs. Feinsilver knows what she is writing about For
23 ;. has ba Ming notes and has been
. this book, which is a masterpiece.
i would be the first to admit thai he Is an
m Yiddish, not an expert. He is a "feinshmeker,"
not a Iver.
Mrs. Feinsilver la an authority on the subject. Also,
d> 11 style and she writes in a breezy fashion and
ntless anecdotes. Looking over her shoulder
B the book was her gifted husband, Rabbi
K""jeinsilver, of Easton, Pa.
If youjtiint to laugh, weep, get smart, or just enjoy
a movable literary feast, rush to your nearest bookstore
and- buy llsw Aook. Young people and brides and confir-
iiTands aniCiam'-Jews as well will lick their fingers over
it. It's published by Thomas Yoseloff.
J -
id
As the
Gezunterhalt,"
health.
er says in her delightful foreword, "Ess
enjoy this delicious book in good

*
#
Overseas Newsletter
By Samuel Goldsmith
c59l
Money In The Pipeline
1IBYA is not entl atooutttM planned
Egyptlai lil pip ine along1 the west banfrol 81 "
Sue/, in fact, Libya has refused to make any c
tribution to project, and to join the west-
ern consortium of financial bickers, though Egypt
wanted Libya to do so for psychological reasons,
and also in order to at the *0 million pounds .sterl-
ing needed to finance the plan more quickly.
Britain has not finally decided yet whether t*
contribute 18 million sterling, or 20% of the cost,
to this project by way of an export credit gu.irant
(which means the government underwrites the
value of exported equipment to individual firms).
But it is certain that Britain will give Egypt
the money. Once again, the Foreign Office has over-
ii,lid the TraasnOt ibrushing aside the ar ument
ihit* Egypt is tit)Mftrid'a worst repayer of loans
The For Ign Office argued thai Britain must go in
because Ffahoe;fflRy and Spain had tgreed to.
I i in the Israeli point of view it may perhaps
. be more ir\terestinaata note that the military argu-
i t Britisnparticipation, (namely that the
jumping -stations along the pipeline and the oil
ti rquhal on the Madtterranean would be at the
mercy of the Israelis) was countered with the argu-
ment that American oil companies had undertaken
to use the pipeline for- the first five years after its
completion, and so the Israelis would leave it alone,
for they do not interfere with "Morgan," (an off-
shore drilling rig in Egyptian waters) because
American firms are connected with it.

S00K RtVltW
first-year class of 54 at the Technion campus. In the
meantime the school Is preparing clinical facilities in
the old 40-room stone building which once housed
the St. Joseph de Carmel Mission School, it is lo-
cati d directly alongside the Rambam Hospital which.
when its new wing is com;,:, ted, will have 1.000
beds. The staff, drawn from local hospitals and
other cities, already numbers 120. Dean of the new
Medical School is Professor David Erlik, Chief of
Surg .-'. i t he Rambam Hospital, whose persistence
ind rhted vision have brought it Into existence.
The Technion is also expanding facilities on Its
campus, especially in biology and physiology. The
life iciei es ire important to the national welfare.
oqulre the services of engineers and technolo-
gists no less than aeronautics, argiculture engineer-
ing <> hj h Dlegy.
Haifa scientists are boldly challenging the tra-
that a medical school must be located on the
a liberal arts university, and that a de-
gree In the humanities must necessarily make for
a better doctor. The interdisciplinary relations be-
tween medicine and engineering on the Technion
campus, i! Is b I ivill train the k nd of gradu-
ate who will be better equipped to service his
i ts and hu n tj In th > de diatery
id.
By Seymour B. Liebmon
'QB VII', By Uris
Y^lllI.K QB VII, by Leon Uris (Doubleday & Co.,
17.85) is a work of fiction by a noted story-
teller, it is not another -Exodus" but it is better
than some of his other books.
While it is fiction, it approaches
fact, since so much of the story is
predicated upon events of the re-
cent past.
The title stands for "Queens
3ench, Courtroom Number 7" in
London. In spite of verbose ex-
planations of the rise of an English
barrister, the operations of a pub-
lishing concern and other bits of esoteric informa-
tion, the story finally takes hold about the middle
of the book. From then on, the tension builds as the
trial unfolds.
In the halcyon pie-World War I days, authors
were paid by the word. Uris is not that old, but his
verbosity is reminiscent of those days. He appears
to be under the compulsion to exhibit that he is not
only a world traveller but that his knowledge Is
more than superficial about the places he visited
and the people he met.
The crux of the story is the libel suit by
a former doctor in a concentration camp against the
Jewish luthor or the book. The doctor has been
Charged With performing castrations and other
heinous operations needlessly and without anesthet-
ic; upon Jewish prisoners male and female. He
had been acquitted and was subscqiu ntly knighted,
but one of the reasons for his acquittal was the
failure to produce necessary witnesses. The Jewish
author, who innocently repeated the charges, had
done great research but had overlooked facts per-
taining to the doctor.
To carp about the absence of high literary
quality, an absence almost endemic in Uris' books.
will be considered picayunish by many. In this age,
most bestsellers are devoid of this ingredient. At
least Uris has narrated a tale without over-indulging
In obscenities and appealing to the prurient.


riday. April 2, 1970
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HIALEAH/NORTHSIDE: MAJOR TIRE CO. 3130 N.W. 79th Street 691-6233


Page 16-
.~ <> nnri&ttr
Friday. April 3. 1971
I have never been persecuted.
Ihave never lived in a ghetto.
Ihave neverfelt like Israel was my home.
Butlam Jewish.
fcI am Jewish. But no-one has ever persecuted me or
my family. No-one has ever forced us to live in poverty,
cramped in with other Jews. Or forced us to leave
one ghetto for another one.
"I am Jewish but Fve never felt
that 1 must live in Israel to fulfill the Jewishness I feel.
And yet I understand those who do.
"A child of mine has never been in a school bus that
saboteurs have destroyed, but I can understand the pain
of the people whose children have been murdered.
Just as I can understand the anguish of children
who can't go to school, older people who can t receive
proper care, immigrants who can t speak their new language,
find a job and provide the basic needs of life for their families.
"I can understand the people of Israel
because their lives burn with the same pride and hope
that I in my own way share.
"I want to help assimilate immigrants, train teachers,
build schools, rehabilitate the sick and handicapped.
"I look forward to the day when they will have
peace and freedom instead of the fear that they
will be terrorized by bordering enemies.
"Because I am Jewish. I feel at one with the people
of Israel and with Jews everywhere who suffer. This is
our heritage, this is our common bond. And as a Jew,
I must not let my brother s call for help go unanswered."
I want to help.
Name______
Address
City-
State
Zip
Mail to: (Insert \ our local'Federation or Campaign names
and address.)
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
1909 HARRISON STREET HOLLYWOOD FLORIDA 33020
Phone (305) 927-0536


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