The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00011

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
and MIOI AH OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
v'olume 1 Number 10
Hollywood. Florida Friday. March 19. 1971
Price 80a
March Is Magic Month For Women's Division
"March is the magic month for
the Women's Division," said Mrs.
Stanley Greenspun, campaign
chairman of the Women's Division
of Jewish Welfare Federation. "We
have planned all of our large scale
events for this month and are
topping off the month with a
"High Lighters" luncheon. The end
of this month will be the time
when all the pieces fall together
and we realize the results of all
our planning and hard work."
The "High Lighters" luncheon
will be held Thursday, March 25,
at The Hemispheres, 1950 S. Ocean
Dr., Hallandale. A minimum gift
of $25 will be the prerequisite for
Mrs Samuel Finkelstein, (left) decorations chairman of the
"High Lighters" luncheon, is shown with Mrs. Jack Levy
and Mrs. Robert Baer, luncheon cochairmen.
News Briefs
'Israel May Be Stalling9
WASHINGTON (WNS) A former high ranking State De-
partment official suggested at a background briefing for foreign
newsmen sponsored by the U.S. Information Agency that Israel's
strategy may be to stall the Jarring negotiations until 1972 because
they feel they can do better with Democrats in power in the United
States.
$42 Million Crash Program
JERUSALEM (WNS) Housing Minister Zeev Sharef said
that his Ministry will spend $42 million, 15% of its total budget.
in a crash program to build housing in East Jerusalem. He also
announced that a new residential quarter, containing 350 housing
units, will be constructed in the Tel Aviv suburb of Ramat Gan.
Chief Rabbi Receives Medal
PARIS (JTA) The 75-year-old Chief Rabbi of France. Dr.
Jacob Kaplan, was awarded the City of Paris medal this week for
"distinguished services to Paris, its civilization and culture." The
presentation was made at City Hall by Didier Delfour. president of
the Municipal Council; the audience included Baron Alain de Roths-
child, president of the French Central Consistory, and Israel's
Ambassador Asher Ben- Nathan.
Year-Round DST Opposed
NEW YORK (WNS) The Rabbinical Alliance of America
has expressed its opposition to a law which would put Daylight
Savings Time in effect the year round. Rabbi Abraham Gross, presi-
dent of the Alliance, said Orthodox Jews cannot begin their morn-
ing prayers and don their phylacteries, until about one hour before
sunrise. Should Daylight Savings Time be in effect during the
winter, the Rabbi warned, the vast majority of orthodox workers
would be placed in a position of not being able to perform these
facred commandments and fulfill their cherished religious obligations.
attendance at this function.
Guest speaker for the day will
be Dr. Arieh L Plotkin, former
Israel Defense Forces officer who
is a noted lecturer on Middle East-
ern affairs. When Dr. Plotkin
spoke recently before another
group of Federation workers, he
was greeted so enthusiastically
that the Women's Division officers
invited him to share his views at
their luncheon event. His back-
ground includes both M.A. and
Ph.D. degrees from Princeton Uni-
versity, where he has also served
on the faculty. He was the first
Israeli citizen to be admitted to
Princeton's Woodrow Wilson
School of International Affairs.
Mrs. Robert M. Baer and Mrs.
Jack I. Levy are cochairmen for
the High Lighters Division and
Mrs. Samuel Finkelstein is the
Decorations chairman. Captains in
charge of tables will include Mrs.
Norman Atkin, Mrs. Frances M.
Briefer, Mrs. Myron J. Brodie.
Mrs. Carolyn Davis. Mrs. Samuel
Finkelstein, Mrs. Milton Forman,
Mrs. Edward Gottlieb, Mrs. Selma
Harris, Mrs. Joseph Hopen, Mrs.
Herbert Katz, Mrs. Paul Koenig,
Mrs. James Fox Miller, Mrs. Al-
len Orlove, Mrs. Robert Pittell,
Mrs. Leonard Romanik, Mrs. Abra-
ham J. Salter. Mrs. Jack Shapiro,
Mrs. Steven A. Tobin and Mrs.
Sam Wcinstein.
The Women's Division campaign
started off with a training session
at the home of Mrs. Greenspun
with Dr. James Young, field direc-
tor of the Council of Jewish Fed-
eration and Welfare Funds, shar-
ing his gift solicitation experience
with the group.
The fund-raising event of the
Women's Division campaign fol-
lowed this meeting when some 35
women who had made a minimum
pledge of $365 were invited to the
home of Mrs. Myron Segal to hear
Mrs. Devorah Wigoder, a well-
known author and lecturer. Mrs.
Robert Gordon was chairman of
this tea; her cochairmen were
Mrs. Edward Gross and Mrs.
Frances Briefer.
A luncheon at the home of Mrs.
Andrew Groenman was the next
March event. Simcha Ronen. a
Sabra Captain in the Israeli Army,
was the speaker. Each of his listen-
ers had made a minimum pledge
of $100. Chairman for this Pace-
setters Division luncheon was Mrs.
Harry Permesly, former president
of the Women's Division. Her com-
mittee included Mrs. Norman At-
kin, Mrs. Jesse Fine, Mrs. Howard
Fuerst, Mrs. Asher Hollander, Mrs.
Bernard Milloff, Mrs. Joel Rott-
man, Mrs. Aaron Schecter and
Mrs. Stanley Silver.
This week the Special Gifts Di-
vision, under the chairmenship of
Mrs. Carolyn Davis, Mrs. Jerome
Leff and Mrs. Jesse Martin, was
to hold a luncheon at the home of
Mrs. Donald Berman for those
women making a minimum gift
of $50. Guest speaker, Jeanne
Daman Scaglione, heorine of the
Belgium Jewish underground, was
to be featured.
The Committee planning this
luncheon included Mrs. Loretta
Epstein, Mrs. AUan Fink, Mrs. Al-
fred Geronemus, Mrs. Fred Greene.
Mrs. Mitchell Guttenplan. Mrs.
Herbert Heiden, Mrs. Oroline
Honeyuan, Mrs. Michael Joelson
Mrs. Sally Koppel, Mrs. Sydney
Luria, Mrs. Marian Oldman. Mrs.
Jack Pollard. Mrs. Peter Pollock,
Mrs. Ethel Posnick, Mrs. Gussie
Off. ARIEH L nOTKIN f
Rosencranz, Mrs. Abe Salter. Mrs.
Manny Solomon and Mrs. Majry
Solomon.
The Advance Planning Commit-
tee for the High Lighters luncheon
includes Mrs. Morton Abram, Mrs.
Louis D. Bennett, Mrs. Donald
Berman, Mrs. Gerald Bernstein,
Mrs. David Goodman, Mrs. An-
drew Greenman, Mrs. Lucien
Hirschberg, Mrs. Louis Joblove,
Mrs. Howard Kellner, Mrs. Georire
Kline, Mrs. Frances Koerner. Mm.
Howard Liff. Mrs. Robert Malin-r.
Mrs. Harvey Peretz, Mrs. Aaron
Schecter, Mrs. Samuel Schwartx-
man and Mrs. Harold Yanofsky.
Mrs. Gerald Sieeel is president
of the Women's Division of Jew-
ish Welfare Federation; Mrs. Stan-
ley Greenspun is 1971 Combined
Campaign chairman.
'Russian Withdrawal
Helpful,' Rogers Says
By Special Report
JERUSALEM Israel re-
acted favorably last week to
U.S. Secretary of State William
P. Rogers' statement that "it
would be very helpful" for the
Soviet Union to reduce its mili-
tary force* in Egypt as part of
any Middle East peace agree-
ment.
Secretary Rogers' call for a
partial Soviet withdrawal from
the United Arab Republic was
coupled with a renewed pledge
that the United States would
provide manpower for any inter-
national police force needed in
tli.- Middle East.
Secretary Rogers, whose com-
ments were made during an in-
terview on educational TV in
Washington, declared: "If the
Soviet Union is interested in a
peacekeeping role, it won't need
those forces there." He was re-
ferring to the estimated 10,000-
man military contingent in the
UAR.
Stressing that Israel's previous
bad experience* with peacekeep-
ing forces had not occurred with
American troops participating,
the U.S. official declared that
UJS. participation was a "very
adequate guarantee for peace."
Mr. Rogers said he believes the
general situation in the Middle
East has become more danger-
ous since the expiration of the
ceasefire.
Foreign Minister Abba Eban
lauded the Rogers proposal, but
maintained Israel's position that
it would not categorically give
up all the territories occupied
during the Six-Day War of
June, 1967.
Reliable sources reported that
the improvement in U.S.-Israel
relations in the past few days
was the result of American of-
ficials' disillusionment regarding
the sincerity of Egypt's declar-
ation it is ready to make peace.
A Hurry of terrorist activity
against tiirael by Arab irregu-
lars operating from bases in
Syria, Jordan and Lebanon was
believed to be subsiding; along
the Sue* Canal, the ceasefire
was still holding, although the
formal truce extension expired
Sunday night.
Arab government sources.
j meanwhile, were quoted as say-
ing that face-to-face talks witli
Israel would be possible after
completion of the negotiating
phase of the indirect talks.
Israeli officials were watching
developments at the Kremlin
where some 100 Latvian ar.d
Russian Jews were staging a
mass hunger strike in their ef-
forts to obtain exit visas so they
can emigrate to Israel with,
considerable interest. Russian
government reaction, it was be-
lieved, would be a barometer by
which its future position could
be gauged.
M.I.T. Names Jewish
Scientist President
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (JTA)
A leading Jewish scientist,
Dr. Jerome B. Wiesner, who ha.?
been named 13th president of
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, is believed to be
the first Jewish president of the
famous 110-year-old university.
The appointment of the 55-
year-old former presidential ad-
visor, who is now Provost of the
institution, is effective July 1.


Page 2
fJewisti ThrkJian
Friday, March 19, 1971
federation Sabbattf %
Hollywood's Synagogues
Special "Federation Sabbath" l in
Israel since 199C. He has been a
services were held in Hollywood spokesman tor the Israel Foreign
temples laU Friday night to high- Service and has lectured exten-
sively throughout the United
States.
Arie Altman. a member of the
Israeli Knesset, spoke to the mem-
bers of Temple Beth El. He is a
member of Israel's Foreign Affairs
and Security Committees and
chairman Of the Social Committee.
ARIE ALTMAN
light the workings and goals of
Jewish Welfare Federation. Speak-
ers from Federation were fea-
tured.
Dr. Phillip Weinstein. Jr.. spoke
Bl Temple Heth El, Seymour Mann
I t Temple Sinai: Dr. Sheldon Wil-
lens was I he speaker at Temple
Beth Shalom and Harry Rosen
at Temple Israel of Mlramar.
To further Stress the importance
of the current Federation cam-,
palgn, each of the temples also
a nducted breakfast meetings for
their members at which experts on
the Middle Fast situation shared
their knowledge on conditions in i
Israel with temple members and j
guests.
Three of the temple breakfasts ,
were held last Sunday morning; j
Temple Israel of Miramar plans
their Sunday morning Federation
breakfast this weekend.
Milton K. Susnuuii editor of
the Pittsburgh. Pa., Jewish Criteri-
on, who has Jusl returned from
an extensive survey tour of Israel,
spoke to the members of Temple
Beth Shalom.
The Federation breakfast at
Temple Sinai featured Abbie Ben
Ari. the former director of the Is-
rael Government Tourist Office.
Mr. Ben Ari. a native of Johan-
nesburg, South Africa, has lived
At Temple Israel's breakfast, the
speaker will be Chaim Gordon,
who served as a Platoon Comman-
der during the Sinai Campaign.
Seymour Mann is serving as
chairman of the Temple Division
of Jewish Welfare Federation.
Working with him are Dr. Sheldon
Willens, Jack Kleiner and Jack
Herman representing Temple Beth
Shalom; Milton Forman, Mrs. Har-
old Firestone and Myer Kirsner.
-epi-escnting Temple Beth El; Joel
Rot'man, Sidney Holtzman and
Morton Kushner from Temple Si-
nai and Carl Carlie, Norman Praf-
in and Sam Lavinsky from Temple
Israel.
ABBIE BEN ARI
,i
<
me % FLORIDA'S
&ffiiW SHOWCASE
7] M/ RESTAURANT
-< Viking Sized Cocktails
Superb Cuisine Priced from $2.50
Music for dancing
by Eddie Chavez & his orchestra
Banquet facilities for groups of 2 to 400
Open from 5:00 P.M.
every day except Mon.
Reservations: 927-2566
(Dade) 945-5621
* VIKING
RESTAURANT LOUNGE
!' Mill with Of Ft. Laudenjile-Hillywoid
International Ah-pirt M U.S. 1, Dana
Hilie! P.T.A. Benefit
The P.T.A. of Hille! Community
Day School w is to sponsor a con-
tin"iital brunch and jewelry bou-
tique Thursday at 10 a.m. in the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Don Solo-
mon, 4(V_>0 Jefferson St., Holly-
wood. Mrs. Terry Drucker Is
P.T.A. president; Mrs. Elaine Bax-
ler is chairman of the arrange-
ments committee.
3
MM
. ":
5tev,
HOLLYWOOD BAKERY
107 South 20th Avenue
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
MOLI.IE ARBUZ
FORMERLY OF GOLD SEAL BAKERY OF CORAL WAY
Phone 922-5130
HOLLYWOOD DANK
anoTROST COMPANY
The Hollywood Bank with The Human Interest Added
1900 Tyler Street 923-8222
FOR CORRECT TIME
DIAL 922-7521
I
.


Frkkry.Moacfa 19. 1971
Page 3
ORGANIZATIONS IN SPOTLIGHT
Jewish Family Service Report:
Two cut of every three of the
515 families who came to Jewish
Family Service of Broward County
in 1970, were struggling with seem-
ingly insoluble problems: The
young couple who can only shout
at each other angry, frustrated,
upset, tsJowly drifting to divorce;
;i bright little boy who is failing
in school, too young to understand
what is happening in his family
and reacting in the only way he
knows with unexplained terror,
nightmares, and poor grades; the
bewilderni parents of a 17-year-
old caupht up in the drug culture.
Mrs. Perry To Be
Guest Of Honor
Mrs. Sam J. Perry, who is com-
pleting an unprecedented three
years OS president of the Temple
Sinai Sisterhood, will be the guest
of honor at a testimonial luncheon
at the Rr-f Restaurant Wednesday,
March 31.
Mrs Perry, who has been active
in variaui organizations since she
settled m Hollywood ten years
ago, is a past president of the
Ladies Auxiliary of Victor n.
Kivemar Post. Jewish War
Veteran.
Servrnt as ho^tesaes will he Mrs.
Elsie Fireman, Mrs. Lillian Freed-
man, Mr*. Mervin Hoinreich, Mrs.
Lillian .'..obson, Mrs. Bret Lus-
skin. Mr*. Philip Mautner, Mrs.
Joel Ruttman, Mrs. Nat Stone
and Mir Melvin Waldorf. Tickets
may be secured from Mrs. Lillian
Jacoham.
Soviet Dentist Detained,
Plane looves Wtth Luggage
LONDON (JTAI A Soviet
Jewish dentist and his family
who had booked a flight to Is-
rael via Vienna, were detained
by Kwvian officials at flight
time and the plane departed
without them. Their luggage, in-
cluding the baby's perambulator,
'iii with it.
Dr. Gregory Katz, a 30-year-
old Muscovite who speaks Yid-
dish as well as Russian, his wife
and 18-month-old son had no
intention of visiting London, but
after they were stranded with-
out their belongings due to So-
viet r*ii tape, friends took up a
collection and bought tickets for
the next flight, which was en-
route to Heathrow Airport.
RENT-A-CAR m
1*5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGF
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXK HWY.
H0UYW0O0
920-4141
ft^^A^^WMMW>WWW>
INDIAN HUM MHHT
TROPICAL milBS
CANDItS
fANcr ntun boxes
ORANGE BLOSSOM HONEY
GLAZED fKUIT
Bonded Gift Fruit
Shippers
Mail Ordar
1M0WUYSTMET
tOMlIt Irtaaiaga aarktafl Ut
*r*M4, Flo. MOM
PHONE 927-5447
Lonlincss and illness plus inade-
quate income describes more than
half of the 115 older persons who
sought our specialized services for
the aged. They and many others
were helped to feel that life could
still be worthwhile; that age did
not mean uselessness and rejec-
tion that someone cared.
And then, then are the young
Kays. They have everything --
everything, that is, but a child.
This was remedied in 1970 by the
Adoption Services provided by
Jewish Family Service of Broward
County.
The year 1970 has been one of
notable growth and achievement
The number of families requesting
help almost doubled, reflecting the
community's acceptance of the
agency as well as the ever grow-
ing expansion of Jewish population
in the area. Although half of our
clients live in Hollywood, families
coming to us from the northern
as well as the southern areas of
the county increased a hundred
fold
How did people get to Jewish
Family Service of Broward Coun-
ty' They were referred by friends,
neighbors, relatives who had ex-
perienced themselves the benefits
of our professional counselling pro-
gram. Others came on the referral
ot other helping professionals such
as the schools, social agencies,
rabbis, doctors and lawyers.
Our professional staff provided
these 515 troubled families with
1689 in-person and 3498 telephone
interviews. Frequently, total fam-
ilies were seen together.
Although the core of the agen-
cy's program lies in its individual
counselling to families and chil-
dren, it was also able to develop
an interpretative and educational
program in the community. One of
the major aims of Jewish Family
Service is the prevention of family-
breakdown the proffering ot
assistance with incipient problems
before they result in serious or per-
manent damage to family life.
Jewish Family Service Ls being
taxed with the escalating social
servie > needs of a continually ex-
panding Jewish population. The
Board of Directors of the Jewish
Family Service as well as its par-
ent organizations, the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of Greater Holly-
wood and the United Fund of
Broward County, are always seek-
ing wavs of dealing with unmet
needs. Pleased with their accom-
plishments in 1970. they look for-
ward to the challenge of 1971.
PEDIATRIC ASSOCIATES, P. A.
ANNOUNCE THE RELOCATION OF THEIR OFFICE
TO
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4500 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
FOR THE PRACTICE OF PfDIATRK AND ADOLESCENT MEDKMK
EDWARD J. SALTZNUN, M.D.
ARMOU) L TANK, M.D.
ROBERT S. PITTEtl, M.D.
PHILIP A. LEVIN, M.D. TELEPHONE:
JED J. JACOtSON, M.D. (M5) 966-8DO0
i
DiiwugSt Dancing Nightly Til 12 A.M.
it) Florida's Newest & Smartest Supper C/6
-ii
Joe DeCarlo Trio
O Sonny Bell g
$wWnefcach Daily from 11:30 a.m.

Harold & 4friif-antiaiafvd. Hollywood. *%*: 983-4008
Jack Borman Insurance Agency
Aatemebile Insvranct For Stnior Drivers
TENANTS FO*M MOMEOWNfM POLICY FO*
APARTMENT OR CONDOMINIUM OWNERS
J7J7 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
Hollywood. Florid* 33020
Phones Hollywood 923-2471 Miami: 947-5902
Reagan Anti-Semitic,
Black Leader Charges
OAKLAND, Calif.. (JTA)
Oov. Ronald Reagan's dismissal
of three Jewish chaplains, the
entire complement ministering
on a full time basis to patients
of that faith in California's 14
mental hospital's, is a "blatant
act of anti-Semitism.'' accord-
ing to Percy Moore, executive
director of Oakland's anti-pov-
erty program and the president
of the California Community Ac- |
tion Program Directors Associa-
tion, a state-wide organization
composed of anti-poverty leaders.
Moore, who is black, said that
the elimination of all three Jew-
ish chaplains, effective July 1.
while some 33 Catholic and Prot-
estant chaplains are retained is
"a blatant act of anti-Semitism
that is right in line with other
recent acts of the Governor that
discriminate against the poor
and the sick, and with special
impact of those of the minority
groups."
The other acts Moore referred
to were the Governor's veto last
week of funding for the Oak-
land anti-poverty program,
which last year benefitted some
41.000 of the city's poor, and his
veto in January of the Califor-
nia Rural Legal Assistance
program.
CLEANING
PRESSING
LAUNDRY
WYNONA
Cleaners
PHONE: 922-5561
500 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
We Pick Up and Deliver
W Clip the Dog
And Not ttu PaopM
JEAN'S *** UP
PETQ PARADISE
GROOMING ALL BREEDS
Bathing Clipping Dipping
Pick Up & Oalivary
Boarding
4440 HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD.
HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33023
Hours
9:00 -6:00
Thurt.-Frl. 9:00 9:00
Cloaad Sun. a Mon.
I
*O>H0ALE
l
HARDWARE & PAINT. INC
HOUSEWARES & GIFTS
HOME DECOR ASSESSORIES
100 E. Beach Boulevacd
Hallandale, Flotida 33009
927-0566
i^=
APP1IANCE CITY INC.
420 Hollywood Mall
Hollywood, Fla.
Miami Telephone 625-0840
Telephone 981-4300
RCA ADMIRAL
ZENITH FRIGIDAIRE "Dedicated to Good Service 4
HOOVER G.E. Quality at lowest Price"
Never Undersold-Guaranteed Lotcest Prices


Pcge 4
*Jewishnotktiar
Friday, March 19, 1971
^JewishFlcridian
... ..> <> ...I Al. HUIHM
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.E. 6th StrbIT Telephone 373-4605
HCLLYWOOD OFFICE Telephone 9450964
P.O. Box 2973, Miami, Florida 33101
F^ed K. Shochet Selma M. Thompson
Eiitor and Publisher AuiJtant to Publuher
MARION* NEVINS. News Coordinator
Tha J.wl.h Floridlan Does Not Quarantaa Tha Kaahroth
Of Tha Merchandiaa Advertiead In Its Columns.
Published BiWeckly by the Jewish Floridian
8ccnd-ClaB Pending Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
fewiSH Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Shopar Editorial
Advisory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Willens, Chairman; Ro? Beckerman, Ben
Salier, Marion Nevins. Dr. Norman Atlcin, Michael Ruvel.
Tha Jawlsh Floridlan has absorbed the Jewish Unity and tha Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate,
Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and tha Florida Press Association._________
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year $2.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 1
Friday, March 19, 1971
Number 10
22 ADAR 5731
There Must Be An Answer
Probably nothing describes the uncertainty of the
situation better than that favorite old newspaper phrase,
"as we go to press"; and as we go to press, all remains
quiet on the Middle East front. It is another way of saying
that there is no telling what will happen in the next few
hours, let alone the next days and weeks, since the end
of the formal cease-fire last Sunday.
The extended armistice and the tentative but definite
moves toward some kind of accommodation have told
us that Jordan, certainly, and probably Egypt as well as
Israel would rather meet their economic problems at home
than engage in more blood-letting, no matter how brave
the rhetoric. We don't believe in problems without solu-
tions; there must be an answer to the tragedy of the Middle
East. This is the hope we offer, "as we go to press."
Jews Hope For Action
The United Nations General Assembly has designated
1971 as the "international year for action against racialism
and Tacial discrimination." To carry out this task, the U.N.
Commission on Human Rights, which is now in conference
in Geneva, has given priority to a discussion of the right
of any individual to leave a country.
This right is, of course, particularly precious to Jews
in many parts of the world who hope that as a result of this
dialogue nations which do not at present subscribe to free
emigration as a basic human right will at last change
their laws.
Historical Catalogue Being Published
American Jewish history has been a neglected subject
for the most part, but this is not expected to be true in the
future. A Boston firm will soon publish a four-volume
catalogue of the American Jewish Archives, an estimated
85,000 cards detailing the more than 4,000,000 pages of
documents which have been accumulated by the Archives
on the Hebrew Union College campus in Cincinnati. Credit
must go to Rabbi Jacob R. Marcus who started the collec-
tion in 1947 with no idea that modern printing technology
would make it available to all scholars during his lifetime.
Opportunity Being Missed
The National Religious Broadcasters recently cele-
brated the 50th anniversary of the first reliaious broadcast
by beaming their closing program around the world in the
first reliaious international broadcast to be transmitted live
by satellite.
Although a Jewish technician was responsible for that
first broadcast and some excellent Jewish programming has
been a part of radio and television, the use of the air waves
for religious purposes has not been a it has been for the different Christian denominations. Some
idea of the dimensions to which this has grown is the fact
that 500,000 programs are scheduled each year to spread
the Christian gospel.
To many observers, broadcast religion today has be-
come more important than church-going. In the Greater
Miami area, only one synagogue has made any effort to
meet the challenge of this new concept through live broad-
cast of its services. For the most part, Jewish radio-TV
programming is at best sporadic and at worst amateurish.
There's an opportunity to stimulate interest in Judaism
that is being missed by our community.

I^fflfcli -r.......... .
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP
WASHINGTON The Rus-
sian troops manning the SAM-3
anti-aircraft missiles along the
Suez Canal have now been pull-
ed back, to be replaced with So-
viet advisers. Militarily, the de-
velopment is not overly signifi-
cant. Symbolically, however, it
is crucial.
It symbolizes a sharp shift in
the Soviet posture in the Middle
East, obviously resulting from a
re-assessment of the risks in
Moscow. Because of this shift in
Soviet policy, the nightmare of
the last 12 months seems less
and less likely to be turned into
horrible reality.
The nightmare was a Soviet-
supported attempt to crush Is-
rael by naked military might.
Month by month, ever since
last winter, the detailed Soviet
preparations for such an at-
tempt had been going forward
relentlessly. It had to be as-
sumed that the Soviets were
quite likely to do what they were
visibly preparing to do.
UNTIL AFTER the new year,
there was not a shred of hard
evidence to balance against this
evidence of active military prep-
aration. Now, however, the with-
drawal of the Russian missile-
battalions from the critical strip
along the Suez Canal is only one
item in the total of new evidence.
Another such is Egyptian Pres-
ident Anwar El Sadat's proposal
of a general troop pull-back, to
be followed by the reopening of
the canal. And yet another item
is the relatively down-to-earth
character of the last Egyptian
contribution to the negotiations
being conducted by U.N. Am-
bassador Gunnar Jarring.
BEHIND these developments,
moreover, it can now be stated
that '.hero was something even
more solid and important. There
was a definite turning point in
Soviet Middle Eastern ploicy, in
fact, which is now known to have
been signaled during the mid-
January visit to Egypt of the
Soviet President, Nikolai V.
Podgomy.
Podgorny brought along in his
party members of the Soviet
general staff, who had the task
of imparting the results of the
Soviet re-assessment to the
Egyptian high command. With
Soviet encouragement, the Egyp-
tians had just been conducting
rather public exercises with
their new, Soviet supplied canal-
crossing equipment. So what the
Egyptian high command now
heard must have been distinctly
unplatable. There were three
key points in the Soviet military
message.
FIRST, it was stated to be
Soviet policy to help the Egyp-
tians defend their existing terri-
tory from Israeli incursions; but
the Egyptian* were warned they
could no longer hope for Soviet
support in any attack on the
Israelis.
Second, this automatically
ruled out the large scale canal-
crossing, followed by a great
battle for Sinai, that had been
in Visible preparation for nearly
12 months. Without the most
active Soviet support, such an
enterprise was unthinkable.
THIRD, and finally, the Soviet
military even warned the Egyp-
tian military against any resump-
tion of the "war of attrition.
The Egyptians were bluntly told
that they were not even strong
enough to resume the war of
attrition without active Soviet
support. Ami there would be
no Soviet support for a resumed
war of attrition, despite the fjet
that the Soviets had undoubt-
edly supported it before the
cease-fire, in Gamal Abdel Nas-
ser's time.
In addition, it is known that
President Podgorny urged the
Egyptians to accept a six-
months' extension of the cease-
fire along the canal. Here he
was resisted, however, for only
a months extension was accepted
in Cairo. Officially, the extended
cease-fire in fact expires on
March 7.
IT CAN BE seen. then, why
there is little disquiet about the
danger of the cease-fire's non-
renewal, despite the brief time
left before it runs out. Yet, this
is only a minor aspect of the
really major and central devel-
opment. And this major and cen-
tral development Is simply the
rather abrupt Soviet retreat
from the very brink of a Middle
Continues on Pag* ?
J\S
Max Lerner
Sees It
NEW YORK In one sense Rabbi Meir Kahane has suc-
ceeded. He said it had been his purpose and that of the Jewish
Defense League to get the plight of the Soviet Jews off the back
pages and get it on page one, and with the help of the Russian
government he has done it. That help has come in several forms:
the Soviet stupidity in holding veiled anti-Jewish trials; the
Soviet blindnesss in fighting the Defense League's tactics by
public pressures, first on the U.S. government and then on the
Belgians; and the continued discriminations against Jews in the
Soviet life.
But once the story is on page one, what then? What lever-
age does the Defense League have or, for that matter, what
leverage does the high-powered meeting of world Jewish orga-
nizations at Brussels have to pressure the Russian-, into a
different policy? Mostly they have to fall back on world opinion.
The problem with bully-boy tactics like those of the Defense
League is that they become counter-productive. They run the
danger of alienating potential or marginal sympathies in every
country for the Soviet Jews. And the trouble with the quieter
and low-profile tactics of the Jewish Establishment leaders at
Brussels is that they may end with good resolutions and good
intentions.
HAD I BEEN AT THE Brussels meeting I should have added
my voice to the minority of delegates that strongly oppose Ka-
hane's tactics but was willing to have him appear and address the
conference. What danger did he represent that warranted ban-
ning him by the conference leaders, and that warranted detaining
him by the Belgian police? If the conference is on the track of
the right policies it could have tolerated a challenge.
As for Kahane himself, he represents the Jewish version of
the kind of ethnic nationalist tactics and philosophy that much
of the black nationalist movement in America has used and felt.
These things have a contagion about them. For some years
American Jews have been saying to the blacks "Use our method;
stay within the law and the system, and they will work for you
as they have worked for us." The more militant blacks rejected
the advice, however well meant. Now a fractional Jewish na-
tionalism follows the example of the black activist demonstrators.
"We don't have time for general concepts," said Rabbi Kahane
to the Brussels conference. "We need concrete action." And
again we must ask him, action for what, with what power lever-
age, what basic philosophy? What Henri Bergson once said still
holds true: "Act as men of thought, think as men of action."
ONE MUST ASSUME that the philosophy of the Brussels
conference leaders was somewhat as follows: That the Soviet
leaders and peoples are not of one mind on the treatment of the
three million Jews; that the ruling group is split on it, some of
them feeling (as Khruschchev did when he was in power) that
Stalin's rigid hatred of the Jews was wrong and that the Rus-
sians should not resume it; that the writers, scientists and in-
tellectuals are deeply ashamed of the policy; that the Soviet lead-
ership needs some face-saving gesture or formula in order to
change its policy quietly; that the Kahane tactics will destroy
that chance. In paying tribute to the role of the Red army in
the World War II struggle against the Nazis, the conference pre-
sumably was following the face-saving tactic.
Of the two tactics that of Kahane and that of the Brus-
sels conference leaders neither offers much hope of leverage
to shift Soviet policy, but one may do mischief and the other has
a chance of working, provided a stick of sorts can be found to
add to the carrot. Provided also that the self-made trap in which
the Soviet leaders are caught in their anti-Jewish policies hasn't
snapped too tight beyond being pried open.
A member of the Soviet staff nt the United Nations (I am
told> said the other day that he had formed a favorable opinion
of young American activists, but that the Defense League young-
sters had erased it. Which is to say that the Russians are de-
lighted with the New Left activism when it is directed against
the war or inward toward American internal conflict, but they
are angry at similar tactics that touch Russian policy
KAHANE HIMSELF. WHOM A New York jury recently
ruled against because of his message, was careful to say the trial
had been a fair one, and the prosecutor, too. even while he de-
plored the jury verdict. He was trying to draw a contrast be-
tween the position of the Jews in America and the Soviet Union.
Taking the three world centers of Jewish life today, the
Jews in Russia have neither freedom nor security; in Israel they
have freedom but are in constant external danger; in the United
States they have freedom and security together. That's why it
Is a moral necessity for American Jews to be deeply concerned
about the dangers in the other t vo areas: They havelhe political
luxury of doing it from a position of strength in their own country.


Friday, March 19. 1971
+Jewlsii fhrldUan
Page 5
YOUTH TODAY
'Israel Must Retain Some
Arab Land' U-M Prof Says
By BUDDY NEVINS
Univenity of Miami
Student and National Columnist for
City Daak Feature Service
Israel must retain some of the
land captured from the Arabs dur-
ing the 1967 Six-Day War to as-
sure its security, according to Uni-
versity of Miami's Middle East
expert.
"Certain territories must be re-
tained by Israel to assure protec-
tion of its borders," claimed Dr.
Andrew Handler, assistant profes-
sor of history. "Before 1967 the
Arabs could almost at will shell
any city in Israel. I think that
Israel will remember that.
"Some areas will undoubtedly
ho returned," said Dr. Handler,
who teaches Middle East politics
and history at the Coral Gables
. ducational institution, "but cer-
tain strategic areas lying very
dose to Israel will be retained."
Dr. Handler, who escaped from
Communist Hungary in 1957 and
studied the Middle East at Colum-
bia and the University of Cali-
iornia. is optimistic about the fu-
ture of the area. Believing that
the Arabs and Israel will soon ne-
gotiate on the ticklish problems
affecting them, the professor is
hopeful that a "mutually trusting
climate" is developing.
The mere fact that there is a
good chance for negotiations in
the near future," Dr. Handler said,
"is a hopeful sign. I think that both
Israel and Egypt, and perhaps Jor-
dan, will engage in constructive
negotiations leading to long-lasting
guarantees for some sort of a
pi aceful situation in the Middle
East,"
Such an agreement, Dr. Handler
believes, must be a complete un-
derstanding benefiting all parties
involved in the Middle East. In-
cluding the terrorist Palestine Lib-
eration Organization. Otherwise
thr- agreement won't work in guar-
anteeing peace.
"Many Arab nations and orrrani-
zations are directly or indirectly
involved in the situation." Dr.
Handler pointed out. "If we are
to work for lasting peace in the
Middle East, these Arab nations
will have to be part of a package
deal with some of the non-Middle
Eastern nations which have ex-
tensive interests in the area, such
as the United States and the Soviet
Union,
In Wometco Theatres
"Wuthering Heights" onens Fri-
iy in the Miami, Miracle, 163rd
Street, Carlyle, Palm Springs and
Hallandalo Theatres; the Rolling
Stones are featured in "Gimme
Shelter" at the Twin I, Patio and
Byron. Holdovers include "I Never
Sang for My Father" at the Carib,
The Music Lovers," Mayfair and
Sunset, and Promise at Dawn" at
the Normandy.
Through the effort* of Mrs.
Phillip Wrinstein, Jr., newly-fleet
I president of the Board, Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah will once again have
the use of the Girl Scout Camp for
their overnight*.
KOSHER CATERERS
UMvlatmdhHnUti
BAR MITZVAHS
WtOOlNOS PARTIES
SfKiAi/JiNG IN MOAtt CAKRING
NO MOW I WO*K
888-3469
If MO ANSWIt DIAL
S64-S278
OO SWAUOW N.. MIAMI SftlNSS
"Egypt atone can not ."peak for
the Arabs. Other Arab nations,
such as Syria. Jordan and Leb-
anon, must be involved in the ne-
gotiations. Also in view of the
fact that the Palestine Liberation
Organization is an accepted force
in the Middle East, no negotiations
will be successful and peace can-
not come to the Middle East
without including them in some
phase of the negotiations."
Dr. Handler looks for the United
States to play an increased role
in the Middle East. Noting that
there has been a "noticable im-
provement" of Uncle Sam's image
among the Arab nations, Dr. Han-
dler feels that this trend can only
help the cause of peace. "It is
again quite possible," he said,
"that we can play a major role in
the international and perhaps even
domestic phase of the activities of
the Arab states."
Hallandale Chapter
Of Hadassah Active
Ida Kimbrig, education chair-
man, planned the program for the
general membership meeting of
the Hallandale Chapter of Hadas-
sah this week at the Home Fed-
era] Bldg. in Hallandale.
Florence Rose, program chair-
man, moderated a panel discus-
sion by five Hadassah experts on
the "World of Hadassah." Mem-
bers and guests brought their own
questions to "stump the experts."
Entertainment was provided by
Belle Millman and Kate Hay-
flich.
The Chapter will hold its an-
nual Donor Luncheon at 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday, at the Diplomat Coun-
try Club with Mrs. Gerald Soltz, a
member of the Advisory Council
of the Florida Region Hadassah as
guest speaker. In addition, a Fash-
ion Show will be presented by
Haber's Dress Shops.
Committee chairmen for this
event are Florence Rose and Jean-
ette Alman; Mrs. Albert Aaron is
president of the Chapter.
Contest Entries. ,Tq Be .Exhibited
The 1971 Seven Lively Arts
Festival's Photography Competi-
tion and Exhibit will be held from
Wednesday, March 24, through
Sunday, April 4 with Mrs. David
Keating as chairman of the event,
Walter Gray, cochairman and Mrs.
Richard Carson assisting.
Entries will be exhibited at 2030
Polk St. during that time. Winners
will be displayed at First National
Bank of Hollywood the following
week. Awards will be made during
the Festival program at Young
Circle.
There will be four categories;
professional entries, news phoog-
raphers, adult amateurs and junior
amateurs under 16 years of age.
Awards will be presented to the
three top entries in each category
and ribbons will be given honor-
able mention winners.
In the "news" category, only
action shots will be accepted. Still
photos by newspaper photogra-
phers should be entered in the
professional category.
IF YOU THINK YOU'VE HAD GOOD
CHINESE FOOD BEFORE...TRY
CHRISTINE LEE'S GASLIGHT
WE ALSO SERVE THE FINEST STEAKS IN MIAMI
located in the Golden Strand Hotel
179th Street and Collins Avenue
Reservations Call 945-9075
Suggested 947-5651
L
Unsalted Mazola Margarine.
It lets you cook the book. Without burning it

How would you like a margarine that tastes as good as butter, but with none of .
butter's disadvantages?
That's what Unsalted Mazola Margarine is all about. It's parve. so you can use
it all the time. And because it has no milk solids, it doesn't burn or smoke in the
pan, like butter does. Even people with milk allergies can enjoy it.
Unsalted Mazola Margarine is low in saturated fats. too.
So instead of using butter for one thing, and margarine for something else, why
not use Unsalted Mazola Margarine for everything.
Look at it this way. You're not losing butter. You're gaining Mazola Margarine.
The first
few recipes
are on us.

104
STORE COUPON
Good toe 10* on Umaltod Mnoli M.rf.rlne.
^Mazola
Margarine
10^
To The Dealer for each coupon you accept
M Ov> uthcrutd agem! on im* purchase by
a CCIti"*' ol the specified product. <*t vailt
pay you 10< plus 3C candling charge* pro-
vided you and your customer have complied
with the term*' of this consumer otter Any
other arr'tcation by you constitutes fraud
Coupon may not re assigned o> transferred
oy you Vod when presented oy Outs<0>
*i" brewer or institutional user c
where prohibited land or otn*n<\ re-
stricted Your customer must pay any sales
tas invoices stowing your purchase ol suf-
ficient stock to cower coupons preaentefl ''
redemption m..t be aho*n on reguesi Lim on* to a 'amity Cash redemption value
"20 H Good ont. n US* Send lo
Besi Foodt Dmsion. CPC international, te
Bos 10? Clinton lc*j S?73? Otter sic ire*
September 30. t7t
STORE COUPON
10c


Page 6
*-Jenisi>ncridicir
Friday. March U. 1971
AA scene around
A ninny but cold Thursday saw the opening of Gulfstream
Rack Track and the thrones attending must be an indication
of a great season. Most of Hollywood mast have been there,
judging by the press of the mob. Crowds were lined up along the
fence, in the Ciub House Boxes and in all the seats and spaces
in between to watch tlie thoroughbreds make their turns around
the track.
Hone WWHH Alfred and Beverly Green both looked tanned
and terrific. They didn't have a horse running that day but they
were sure rootiiJg for the winners with enthusiasm! They had
their houseguests. the Marty Rosenthals, at the track with them.
Joe and Charlotte Rosenthnl were guests in Miriam Friedman's
box. The Rosenthals are Hollywood residents now, but their home
state is Kentucky and their home town is Louisville so they
really 'lualified as dyed-in-the-wool racing fans. Charlotte must
know something I don't know she re|>orted that she was
winning that day.
Kd Rosenthal and some friends occupied his box; they seemed
to be enjoying. Of course. Arnold Wintek was there to watch his
horses running. Kridie Gross was enjoying the day with a group
of his friends, and Milton Edclstcin had taken time off from the
tennis courts to watch the fillies. We all welcome the opening of
Gulfstream each year for it's fun to have racing so "close to
home."
On the same day we had the kick-off tea for the Women's
Division of Federation at Mickey Segal's home. The gals who
turned out ignored their diets, eating sandwiches and cake with
their tea and coffee. Jun- Gordon told me that she had made the
sandwiches. AH I can say is that she can cater for me any
day. Alice Mailman poured the coffee and acted as hostess
in the absence of her daughter, who of course, as we all know, is
now Dr. Marilyn Segal. Mickey had a full teaching schedule that
afternoon and couldn't be home to greet the ladies, June told us.
We caught a glimpse of three of the Segal children playing in the
background and they sure have grown up. Little Debbie, the
youngest, was .seen playing checkers with a friend.
Hattie Rosen told Walter Gray, who was taking pictures of
tome of the gals, that he had been taking pictures of her for
more years than she cared to remember. For the first time Caro-
lyn Davis and 1 were formally introduced. We've met and spoken
on many such occasions but it took Frances Briefer to OFFICI-
ALLY introduce us to each other. Cell Goldfarb told me
thai she has a feeling of closeness for her friends In Hollywood
although she and Sam have moved to Fort Lauderdale. Her
i lUghter and son-in-law, she said are moving here and nave
just bought a home on South Lake. Her son-ip law, an eminent
Ni w York physician, will now become a member of the Holly-
> iod medical profession. W< also saw Leila Shapiro, the rabbi's
wife, Ruth Meltzer, Mollie Bergman, Esther Smith and Belle
Schlaffer and many, many more.
When Louis Bomrich spoke on the Middle East crisis before
a large group of members of the Metrojxilitan Dinner Club, the
crowd was festive everyone was in their best bib and tucker
am! all were interested in Mr. Bomrich's views. Board members
Roz and Doc McLaury, two of my favorite people whom I don't
!;et to see often enough, were joined by Mary Jane and Bill Birl.
Also present were the Joel Rottmans, both Ted and Sam Sorin,
the Herman Goodmans, the Herman Corns, the Stan Kurashcs.
Mort and Gladys Abram, the Harry Wadlingtons and Dr. and
Mrs. Gordon Carver and many more.
At the Yacht Club dinner, a night when everyone ate, and
looked, plans for a Marina and Club House were being discussed.
As the membership and interest in boating grows, the need for
a meeting place and increased dock space becomes more impor-
tant each year. (You don't have to own a boat to be a member of
the Yacht Club but it helps because the talk is boats, boats and
more.boats). Among those attending were Ruth and Lou Sams,
Howard Handleman and Dr. Yale Citrin. (The Citrins now live on
South Lake next door to the Allen Gordons, who also recently
purchased a home there 1. Another South Lake family, the Don
Kovacs, were also at the Yacht Club Dinner, as were the Bob
Gordons, who have really become boating enthusiasts, and Alex
Morningslar. who has been a boating enthusiast from way back
when.
Grandparents get younger every day, it would seem! Judy
and Al Sweitzer recently celebrated the arrival of their first
grandchild. Drinking toasts with them were Ann and Al Yorra.
(Al was still hopefully waiting out the results of the "Guys and
Dills" tournament at Emerald Hills). Richie and Sidney Irvine,
who arrived fresh from the golf Jinks to herald the new arrival.
Dorothy and Ted Lifset, Grace Finkel and her daughter. Judy,
i Sid Finkel was home nursing a cold) Anna and Eddie Gross and
Miriam Friedman. Hilda Ginsburg dropped by to add her con-
gratulations and the Lou Porkers, who are new residents were
there also. Murray Levinson and Al Green had to go back North,
but their wives. Harriet Levinson and Beverly Green, joined in
the festivities. Alice and Bill Vogel were able to give tips on how
grandparents should behave they already have several.
On our usual noontime lunch hour, while caring a hamburger
at the Ranch House recently, we met Pete Weinstein. who intro-
duced us to his associate. Dr. Ira Feingold. Hope this wasn't "off
the record," but Pete told me that the beard is beginning to
itch so it is possible that we'll have a smooth-shaven Dr. Wein-
stein again! During another lunch hour at the Home Federal, we
potted Mike and Miette Burnstein eating tunafish sandwiches.
. We hear that Jesse Martin has accepted the post of Port
Representative on the Broward Area Planning Board, and that
.Mania Silver has shown still another side of her talents by
Izing a series of "Drug Awareness Days" for the South
Area Brow aid School Board district
Jn Z JU Shazar Meets Witli^
Gov't, Jewish Officials
I 1)1 l'OK, Th* Jewish Floridisiii
and Shofar of Greater
Hollywood
I have read the messages of
Greater Hollywood's Rabbis stress-
ing the importance of the present
Federation drive, in your issue of j
March 5th. with a great deal of j
interest. They pointed out the tre-
mendous needs of Israel and did
not overlook the needs of our
local and national institutions.
They also stressed the importance
of giving more, due principally to
the vast amount spent by Israel
lor security needs,
However, it seems to me they
overlooked a most important fact,
and that is that thousands of Jews
in this area alone did not respond
in previous years. In most of these
cases, the complacency of these
people is appalling. I have high
hopes that the planning is de-
signed to reach all of these pros-
pects and that Federation will get
the necessary workers and pledges.
Just a final word. I am of the
firm belief that Federation will
reach its goal of a million dollars
but it will be greater if the
number of people pledging will be
double that of last year.
SAM. .1. PERRY. President
Broward ZionM District
NEW YORK (JTA) After
a 33-minute unofficial courtesy
call at the White House, where
he was accompanied by Ambas-
sador Yitzhak Rabin, Israel's
l>iesident Zalman Shazar lea
Washington on a flight termint-
ing at Marine Terminal Airport.
Among those |ea*M to greet
him were. Rehaveam Amir, Con-
sul GeneraJ In New York. Yosef
Tekoah, Israel's Ambassador te
the Uuited Nations, and a dele-
gation headed ly Rabbi Israel
MlUer, president of the Ameri-
can Zionist Federation, and Ja-
cob Stein, president of United
Synagogue, both of whom are
vice chairmen of the Conference
of Presidents of Major Jewish
Organizations.
During his visit, the 81-year-
old president, who n ceived an
honorary Doctor of Human Let-
ters degree from Yeshiva Uni-
versity, met with prominent
scholars and received delegations
from major Jewish organizations
as well as New York City's
Mayor John Lindsay and Gov.
Nelson Rockefeller.
President Shazar was the
main speaker at a Tuesday
evening Israel Bonds dinner,
and received the two-volume
"Encyclopedia of Zionism and
Israel" fiom the encyclopedia's
editor, Dr. Raphael Patai, and
Dr. Emanuel Neumann, presi-
dent of the American Section-
Jewlsh Agenci-. and chairman of
I torsi Press in a Thursday cere-
mony.
ORT Luncheon And
Fashion Show Set
i
I The Hallandale Division of
I Women's American ORT will hold
: its annual fund-raising luncheon
at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday in the
Reef Restaurant. Fort Lauderdale,
it has been announced.
A fashion show with professional
models will be presented by Phyl-
lis Fashions of Fort Lauderdale.
Proceeds of the luncheon will go
; to the new School of Engineering
at the Hebrew University m Jeru-
salem.
Committee members who have
worked en setting up the luncheon
are Mrs. Fannie Nima, Mrs. Ann
Shafer. and Mrs. Ann Hyman with
Mrs. Nims acting as chairman.
Reservations may be made through
Mrs. Rita Goldman, president.
BXJRDINE'S
913
ArneV print culottes
Join the action
Fluid little summer coolers that slide on so fast you're
dressed in a wink. Arnel* triacetate culotte shifts with no
sleeves; but plenty of print. Flip skirts camouflage those
pants, just enough. Misses' 10-20, women's 14X-22K.
a
budget dreitei, trel floor Hollywood
com* in or call 9*4-2550


Friday. Match 19. 1971
*Jew 1st IhrMitr
Page V
Camp,Ka-Dee-Mah Board
Elects New President
The Board of Directors of Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah has announced the
election of Mrs. Phillip Weinstein.
MtS. PMIUP WtntSTUN, JR.
Jr., as its president. Mrs. Wein-
Btein has l>een a member of the
Board of Ka-Dee-Mah since its in-
( i on and an active worker for
it through the years.
Camp Ka-Dee-Mah was founded
four years ago after the original
Daj Camp Study Committee of
Ji'wish Welfare Federation rec-
ommended the establishment of a
trimmer Day Camp as a pilot
lirojcct for the summer of 1967.
Gerald Sieget was named to head
the committee which was appoint-
ed by Williairi D. Horvitz, who was
then president of Federation.
It was the aim of the original
committee to develop a day camp
which would provide all the basic
elements of camping and an op-
portunity for young people to form
friendships among their Jewish
peers in HciI1.vw.kk1. This was to
be accomplished with the social
and emotional growth of each in-
dividual child always kept in mind.
Richard Goldstein .vas affiliated
With the camp as its director from
the very In-ginning, Mr. Goldstein
had extensive camping experience
prior to his association with Ka-
Dee-Mnh and he has been instru-
mental in furthering the growth
and development of the camp pro-
gram during its four year opera-
tion here.
The ramp, which operates under
the guidance of the Jewish Welfare
Federation, has had the benefit of
the aid provided by the Federation
professionals, including Michael
Ru\e|, executive director, whose ex-
tensive camping experience has
been most helpful. It has operated
in the facilities of Temple Beth
El, with the Use of the Hallandale
pool for its swimming program.
For the first time, the camp of-
fered a few overnight trips for
some of its older groups last sum-
mer; the campers were taken to
various camp sites throughout
the area.
It had been expected that there
would be an enrollment of ap-
proximately 60 children in the age
groups covering first grade though
sixth grade in its first summer's
operation. Instead, right from the
very beginning the community's
need and desire for the camp was
demonstrated. The 1967 enrollment
was 102.
In contrast, this past summer
there was an enrollment of almost
300 campers; they ranged in age
from pre-school four-year-old's to
teenagers of 15. For the first time
graduates of Ka-Dee-Mah's own
"Counselor in Training" program
were available, and they proved
the worth of that part of the
camp program by their extreme
usefulness and efficiency. TWe
camp also had a staff of 46 per-
sons during 1970, and has become
a completely self-supporting, in-
tegral part of the community.
Since its earliest days, scholar-
ships have been awarded to wor-
thy youngsters who would other-
wise not be able to attend camp.
One of the ideals behind the orig-
inal camp concept was that no
child should lie denied the experi-
ence of camping because of the
lack of the necessary fees.
This year, with the fifth camp
summer coming up, plans have been
made for a bigger-than-ever camp
program. Discussions are also un-
derway regarding a permanent
camp site for the undertaking: the
Board believes that the time has
come for development in this
direction.
Members of the Board of Camp
Ka-Dee-Mah include, in addition
to Mrs. Weinstein, Mrs. Myron
Burnstein, Mrs. Martin Fleisher,
Sidney Friedman, Mrs. David Good-
man, Herbert Katz, Dr. Albert
Kellert, Sandy Kuttler, Morton
Levin, James Fox Miller, Mrs. Rob-
ert Pittell. Dr. Alfred Rosenthal,
Rabbi David Shapiro, Mr. and Mrs.
Gerald Siegel, and Dr. David A.
Stone.
Jewish Chapel To Be
Built At West Point
NEW YORK (WNS) Maj.
Gen. William A. Knowlton, Su-
I>erintendent of the U.S. Military
Academy at West Point, has an-
nounced that plans for the first
formal Jewish Chapel and Religious
Center in the Academy's 169 year
history, have been submitted to
Army Headquarters in Washington
for approval.
Tne general made the announce-
ment at Mount Neboh Congrega-
tion here, where he was presented
with the congregation's annual
Brotherhood Award. The Chapel
will serve the Jewish cadets, of-
ficers and enlisted men at the
Academy anrt the Jewish commun-
ity of Highland Falls, which is
adjacent to the Academy.
Israelis UiipejliirJbedJ5y
Cease-Fire's Expiration
JERUSALEM (JTA>Israelis
appeared unperturbed by the ex-
piration of the seven months-old
cease-fire agreement. The fact
that there has been no resump-
Gordon Federation
Breakfast Speaker
At Miramar Temple
Chaim Gordon, who served as a
Platoon Commander in the Sinai
Campaign of the Six-Day War and
presently is a candidate for his
Ph.D. degree in Philosophy at Duke
University, will be the guest speak-
er at a Temple Israel of Miramar
breakfast Sunday, March 21. The
event, which is being sponsored by
the Men's Club of the temple, will
feature a special program concern-
ing the goals and workings of
Jewish Welfare Federation.
Mr. Gordon, a member of the
Kibbutz Magal, performed the du-
ties of general secretary and serv-
ed on the Culture and Educational
Committee*. He has also taught at
Tel Aviv University and lectured
at the New School in New York
City.
This breakfast meeting is part
of the Temple Division program of
the Jewish Welfare Federation.
Carl Carlie, chairman of the Tem-
ple Division at Temple Israel, has j
been working with Norman Prafin
and Sam Lwinsky, coehairmen:
Edward Shankman is president
of the Men's Club.
tioi) of the shooting in the Suez
contributed to the air of equa-
nimity, of course, but they were
busy preparing for Purim festiv-
ities, and the only evidence of
their awareness of heightened
tension was the eagerness with
which they listened to hourly
news bulletins.
In view of the tact that tem-
porary arrangements frequently
become more and more perma-
nent with the passage of time,
the Israelis were not heaping
sandbags or blacking out street
lights. They reason that the
choice between peace and re-
newed warfare now rests with
the Egyptians and they wouldn't
deliberately provoke another
fight they would he sure to lose.
Troops manning the Bar-Lev
line along the Sui z Canal have
been on the alert for several
days, They have resumed wear-
ing helmets and flack Jackets,
but they appear supremely con-
fident that they could withstand
the Soviet artillery and missiles
massed on the Egyptian side- and
dc stray them should the war be
resumed.
JOSEPH ILSOP
Continued from Page 4
Eastern military adventure of
the gravest and most terrible
kind.
There can be no doubt at all
that such an adventure was be-
ing seriously considered in Mas-
cow although it cannot have
been finally decided upon for
many months on end. The prep-
arations going forward, almost
from the beginning of 1970, spoke
10 times louder than the menda-
cious denials of Soviet diplomats.
AS NOTED in a previous re-
port in this space, the Israeli
Intelligence Services give a gen-
erous share of the credit for the
shift in Soviet Middle Eastern
policy to the boldness and cour-
age President Nixon has shown
on the other side of the world,
in Vietnam, in fact. It remains
to be seen, however, whether
American diplomacy will make
a hash of the much changed,
far more hopeful Middle Eastern
situation.
Precautions are being taken
to avoid any accidental escala-
tion of hostilities. Overflights by
Egyptian reconnaissance planes
are recorded and reported to the
U.N. truce supervisors. Anti-
aircraft gunners track them, but
leave them unmolested, although
they are described as "sitting
ducks."
What seems to bother the Is-
raeli trooiw most are the Egyp-
tian propaganda broadcasts car-
ried across the canal by loud-
speaker, it was reported. The
bad Hebrew irritates them more
than the content, however.
Winograds Honored Guests
Rabbi anrt Mrs. Elliot Winograd
of Temple Israel of Miramar were
honored guests -,a the Miramar
Chapter of Pioneer Women's spe-
cial fund-raising luncheon in the
Diplomat Country Club recently.
Mis. Milton Gi ii. president of
the Greater Miami Council of Pio-
neer Women and Regional director
of the Southeastern District, who
was the guest speaker, outlined
Hi. remark ibie accomplishments of
" '.....'" "'"<-n and Moetzel Ha-
poalot in Israel.
&


ff
airfuv* &
\
REGULAR PRICE LIST
Shampoo & Set ,.....4.00
Hair Cut...........3.00
Manicure..........2.50
Color Rime ........ 1.00
Touch-up, Single.....8.00
Touch.up, Double ... 12.00
BY APPOINTMENT
927-1170
OPEN WEEKDAYS 9-5
FRIDAYS 9-9 SUNDAYS 9 1
SPECIAL
PERMANENT
WAVE
Regularly $25.00
?lj Complete
Including
Shampoo & Set
Mis here view our tine Art Exhibit by Contemporary Artists
(NEXT TO HOLIDAY INN)
1937 HARRISON STREET HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
2 hrs. Free Poritino on City Lot o^ Von Buren, between 19th & 20i'i A.es.
JOIN OUR
HOLIDAY WEEKEND
CRUISE GROUPS
IN 1971
3 and 4 DAY CRUIS
NASSAU and FREEPO
SPECIAL LOW RAT"
for Information Call:
981-2203 or Write:
A A C TRAVEL
120 N. 46th AVENUE. HOLLYWOOD HILLS, FLORIDA 33021
PLEASE SEND CRUISE DETAILS
NAME:
ADDRESS:.
PHONE: ,


Pcge 8
JewisHhrkfcn
Friday, March 19. 1971
5
it
OUR TOWN
by bobbe schlesinger
CMe/ Y'AII
Emerald Hills Country Club served up a
Night in Spain" as a sample of the Hollywood
3ood life to a full house of partying members.
Seen amidst the black bean soup and arroz con
potto were attorney-about-town Leonard Robblns
nd wife Sally with the Stuart Newmans; and
Vbe Kid Shirley Fmehler with that dancing two-
ome. Reubln anil Abby Klein. Making the scene
with some exciting plans tapped for a March 24th
date at the popular local club, was that glamour
jal-SOCial director, Telsa Balick. She'll be pro-
iucing "Comedy Tonight" starring Joel Rottman,
Fern Enias and Co. (the "and Co." means any-
>ne interested in helping out) and has enlisted
'he superbly skilled dramatic talents of Howard
Fuetxt. Stan Greenspan ind Al Geronemus for
the bound-to-be hilarious offering.
On hand to spread around some of that
Spirits charm were Audrey and Bernle with as
lively a group of dinner companions as one could
desire There was Joan and Ian Rosenberg (he's
The handbag manufacturing honcho) and Richard
i.olilin (Mr. Tile Service, Inc., himself* with his
pretty as a picture Mary. She's president of
Bollywood Hills chapter of ORT. A Luau lunch-
~on is in the offing March 31. to kick off this
worthy organization's campaign for new mem-
bers, and Mary's anticipating a big turnout.
Patti (ioliiin and her fiance, Joe Alvare*. Jr.,
made up the rest of the happy clan celebrating
the 68th birthday of Mary's handsome dad,
Manuel Martinez. After dinner the group adjourn-
d to the lounge, where they whooped it up with
ong and danct until the wee hours. And, if you've
never seen the Old Soft Shoe, the Mexican Hat
Dance or the Bunny Hop executed with style
;nd grace, stick around one night to watch this
:un crowd have a whack at it.
Tennis, Anyone?
A person engaging in conversation with Davfcl
Vi\el feels he's talking to a 21-year-old gentleman
.masquerading as a ten-year-old boy. David, the
bright, brown-eyed son of Maurice and Dot
Pixel is. in fact, only 10 years of age and a fifth
crade student at Pinecrest School. But, unlike the
ether tennis-playing boys his age, this pint-sized
promoter went one step further by organizing his
"ery own tennis tournament, the David Fixel
Open!
Eighteen youngsters ranging in age from 10
to 16 participated in the three-day tournament at
David Park. Van Winitaky won the singles event
with 10-year-old Bobby Berje* as runner-up. In
'he doubles matches Mike and John Saaaano
*ook first place honors while Jeff Krotenbere;
::nd Armand Molino were the runner's-up. All the
vinners received trophies and a pat on the back
rom the tournament's mighty organizer. Mean-
while. David's 15-year-old sister. Vert, doesn't
1ake a back seat to anyone. She's attending
Temple Sinai's weekly classes, usually offered
only to those students who have been confirmed.
After completing the two-year course of study,
Ten will be eligible to teach Sunday School
classes. With two such young go-getters in the
family, looks like Mr. and Mrs. F. can look for-
ward to an early retirement
People And Maces
It features complimentary cocktails, sliced
Entrecote de Boeuf Sauce Bordelaise. music by
Lester I-min and its all prettily wrapped up in
purple and white. What is it? The invitation to
the Florid* Derby Rail to be held March 19 at
the Diplomat Hotel. A goodly group of local resi-
dents are expected to be on hand for the mag-
nificent bash which will benefit Nova University.
Dr. and Mrs. Abraham Fiddlier, he's the presi-
dent of Nova U.l honorary chairmen of the ben-\
efit, are looking forward to the arrival of Dr.
Alexander Schiire, the Chancellor of Nova Uni-
versity who will be Hollywood bound from New
York to visit the Fischlers and attend the big
doings.
The lovely ladies of the South Broward Bar
Association Auxiliary have invited the equally
lovely ladies of the South Broward Branch of the
Medical Auxiliary to a. 9:30 a.m. brunch at Gulf-
stream Race Track March 23. The breakfast
brunch will be astounded and amazed by the
prestidigation of that mystical whiz and master
magician (and he's one terrific attorney, too>
VI Goodman. Members of the Phi Delta
Kpsilon medical fraternity brightened up the
Beach Club of the Hemispheres Hotel at their
Friday eve dinner-dance. A few of the many
making the scene were plastic surgeons Dr.
Harold Cohen and Dr. Marvin Shuater, with re-
spective spouses; the Peter Levera (he's a psy-
chiatrist I, Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert Berken, (so is
he: Dr. and Mrs. David Shifrin. (internal medi-
cine is his specialty); anesthesiologist, Sebna
Josel with her orthopedic-surgeon hubby, Bob;
and Dr. Bih Richman, who did such a grand job
of putting it all together.
Guess there's a great deal to be said for the
old adage "the grass is always greener, etc. ."
New York attorney Sy Berjjer and wife. Barb's
idea of getting away is to jet down to the warmth
and greenery of Florida (which they do at least
once a month) for a few rounds of golf and some
P.G.A. viewing While Hollywood residents.
Dr. Howard and Sandy Krltner'a idea is a 10-day
snow and ice wintry-type vacation in New York.
The Kellners recently took in the city sights and
managed enough time for some pretty fancy
skiing on the Concord Hotel's slopes. These two
couples should be introduced. Mayhaps an ex-
change of vacation abodes could be worked out.
Oratory on the Menu
The formally-attired members of the Metro-
politan Dinner Club of Greater Hollywood assem-
bled at Fort Lauderdale's Pier 66 for an evening
of dining and informative oratory. "Hopes for
Peace in the Middle East" was the subject of the
address delivered by Louis Bohmrich, internation-
al! economist, lecturer and trade consultant. Mr.
Bohmrich, who recently returned from a military,
economic, and political survey of eight countries
in the Middle East, came to the group well quali-
fied to speak on Middle Eastern affairs.
Among the interested listeners sharing a
table were Mr. and Mrs. Herman, the Joel Rott-
mana, Sam Sorin, Hilda and Herman Corn and
Naomi Kuraah. Ted Sorin, seated at the head
table with his delightful Lillian, ably handled his
two-fold assignment introducing the speaker
and delivering the closing benediction. Dr. Julian
and Harriet Bkte were on hand as were the
Anthony Kordaa, Lewis and Mitai Cohen, Mart
and Gladys Ahrant and the Sidney Kaaugaburga.
For those of you who enjoy the delicious blend
of elegant dining and stimulating oratory, the
Metropolitan Dinner Club of Hollywood will be
dishing up two more treats in the near future.
On tap for April 28, is Dr. Robert Finch of
England's address to the club members on
"Crime in the Modern World." J. Louis Powell
;vill be lecturing on "Our American Heritage"
and "Collapse of Time" come May 25.
PICTURE FRAMES
CUSTOM CREATED TO THE INDIVI DUALITY OF THE SUBJECT
IMPORTED & DOMESTIC #FINE ARTS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD
HUNDREDS OF DESIGNS FROM a FRAMES PICTURE RESTORING
WHICH TO SELECT o PORTRAITS IN OILS
DV
(fatten
STUDIOS AT
2032 HARRISON ST.
IN DOWNTOWN HOLLYWOOD
Phone 923-3267
Compoign Chairman
Apartment* Division
ef Jewish
Welfare federation
I
54
A meeting was held at The Hemispheres apartment of Dr.
Hubert Curson. chairman of the entire complex, for the local
campaign. Chairmen who were named for individual buildings
included Bill Weiss. Ocean North; Samuel Barack, Ocean South
Marvin Schochet. Bay North and Meyer Lipton and Harry A.
Cohen for Bay South.
The group is moving forward to surround themselves with
committees of dedicated volunteers to make the current cam-
paign a success. Representatives from Golden Beach were also
presenfat the meeting. They are planning their own campaign.
to -to "fr
Ira Hunter has been appointed chairman of the Emerald
Hills residents. Serving on his committee will be Mrs. Roger
Newman. Herbert Grossman, Dr. Joel Schneider and Dr. Jerry
Rosenbaum. Shepard Broad, well-known Miami attorney who is
a member of the UJA National Cabinet, addressed the group this
month.
to & -to
Seymour Cohen has been selected as campaign chairman for
Galahad West.
-to -to
Isaac Nassau has been appointed campaign chairman for the
Parker Dorado Apartments. Dr. Nassau, a graduate of Yale
Law School and former editor of the Yale Law Journal, was a
member of the Connecticut Bar for more than 40 years and was
also active in Jewish community affairs there.
^^onimunittf {-^alendi
ar
SATURDAY, MARCH 2*
I'aai Brit* Women Donor Dinner, Sheraton Hotel
SUNDAY, MAtCH 21
Temple hroel al Miromor Federation Breakfost 9:30 A.M.,
Temple hroel
Israeli Cultural Art Exhibit 1-5 P.M. 7-10 P.M. Haber Kara Hall.
TeeapleSeaai
Dedication Ceremony Mailman Center far Child Development,
Noon, latl N.W. 12th Ave.
TI/rSDAV, MAMCH 23
Miramor Chapter Pioneer Women Noon, Miromar Recreation Center
Hollywood Chapter Hadastah, Donor Luncheon, Noon, Amoricoan
HeteL
WIDNtSDAY, MARCH 24
Broward-North Dade Council B'noi B'rith, Matting 10 A.M.
Temple Beth Shalom, Torch Fund Luncheon. Mean, 1725 Monroe St.
Hollondale Chapter Hodossoh, Donor Luncheon, Noon, Diplomat
Country Club.
HaJlandole ORT, Luncheon, 11:30 A.M. Reef Restaurant.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
Woman's Division, Jewish Welfare Federation, Luncheon
TKIDAY, MAtCH 26
Easter Seal Clinic 7:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, MAtCH 2f
Minyon Club Breakfast 9 A.M. Temple Sinai.
MONDAY, MAtCH 29
Hotly wood Chapter Deborah Cetfee
TUESDAY, MARCH 30
Hollywood Chapter Hodossoh Board Meeting 10 A.M. Home
Federal Bldg.
Hollywood Chapter Hadastah leak Review 1 PJA Home Federal
Bldg. Harrison St.
WHMKSDAr, MARCH 31
Hollywood Hills ORT Luncheon Meeting 11 A.M. Home of Mrs.
Syhrio HoHmon
Temple Stop, Sisterhood, White Elephant Sale, P.M. Temple Sinai
Camp KmiaaaMh Board Mooting, RM.
FtlDAf. APtfl 2
* ** Creep Board Meeting H:30 A.M.
VISIT ISRAEL THIS YEAR
ALL TOURS DIRECT FROM MIAMI
22 DAYS ISRAEL ROME/LONDON $1045.00 por person
15 DAYS ISRAEL/LONDON $*M.OO por person
22 DAYS ISRAH./ATHENS/OREEK ISLAND CRUISE/LONDON
$1136. per person
INCLUDES: laRCho, Hotel, 2 Meals A Day
SIGHTSEEING TRANSFERS
927-1693
BUDGET TRAVEL
3808 South Ocean Drive
Hollywood, Florida 33020
(opp. Galahad Apr.)
947-1535 (Miami)


Friday. March 19, 1971
^JewlsttfhrUkun
Page 9
Mi MVMMIgMa |

"in |BJBJ Mean
100-Hour Vigil
For Soviet Jews
(Mil* Halberetam returned each day
for five day* to talk to thoaa who
maintained the vigil and to learn
first-hand the reaaona and objec-
tivaa of thoee who braved the chill-
ing winter winda to proclaim: "We
are Jewe and couldn't be prouder.")
By YITTA HALBERSTAM
The police barricades which
stood for five days at 67th Street
and Lexington Avenue have not
yet been removed, and they re-
mind passersby if those, now
gone, who stood behind the bar-
ricades. Tiie slogans they chant-
ed, the condemnations they
hurled, the accusations they
flung, and the songs they sang,
still ring in neighbors' ears. They
are gone, but their voices-
laughing, angry, gay, tense
violent, sadstill linger in the
air.
The voicesWhich defiantly
proclaimed to the world: "We
are Jews and couldn't be proud-
er," which forcefully warned of-
ficials in the nearby Soviet Mis-
sion: "Two Russians for every
Jew," which determinedly sang
"Am Yjsroel Chai"and the per-
sons to whom they belonged are
gone now. Only the barricades
and the torn bespattered pla-
cards fluttering on the ground,
abandoned by their bearers, are
left as witnesses.
But who were they, those peo-
ple who kept vigil, and why did
they come?
A MEMORY: It is 10 o'clock
in the morning, and the vigil is
in its third day. As I walk to-
ward the site of the vigil, num-
bed by harsh, biting winds
which sweep past me, I wonder:
Will anyone be there in this icy
weather? Could anyone possibly
have stayed the night, as pledg-
ed, in this nipping cold?
I reach the vigil's site and
look on in astonishment. Some
15 youngsters, faces reddened,
huddled in their parkas, are
marching in a bedraggled look-
ing circle, calling out to the few
who will stop to listen, "Please
save Soviet Jewry!"
Their voices are tired and
faint and very young. Amazed
to find the vigil not abandoned.
1 ask. "Have you been here all
night?" They nod in assent.
"But how could you, it's so
cold?"
"It is colder in Russia." one
very young boy declares.
"Hk>w old are you?" I ask.
"Eleven," is his answer.
ANOTHER MEMORY: Dusk
is beginning to wash the streets
with her gray colors; the sun
gives this corner of the earth
one last parting glance. Forty
people, voices strained, hoarsely
shout their slogans. Suddenly,
one boy yells out, "Okay folks,
it's time for 'Mincha'." (evening
devotional service.)
Someone makes a dash for
his car parked nearby and re-
turns, arms laden with "sid-
durim" (prayer-books) which he
distributes to the crowd. The
girls, women and men who are
not Orthodox, move respectful-
ly aside and talk In hushed tones
as the boys and men. led bv a
professional cantor who joined
the marchers several hours ago.
begin to pray.
Their chanting is soft and
solemn ;thev sway reverently,
totally oblivious to passersby
who stop in astonishment and
the policemen who shift uncom-
fortably in their places. The cops
are somewhat perolexed. Are
these the same kids who only
minutes before were yelling men-
acingly "Who do we want?
Kotygin! How do we want him?
Dead!"
The mood of the group has
changed so swiftly, so unexpect-
edly. At the conclusion of the
service, one young boy's high
pitched voice continues chant-
ing, while the others remain si-
lent. An orohan. he is reciting
the "Kaddish Yosum." (orphan's
prayer for the deceased.) He is
thirteen years old.
THERE WERE so many peo-
ple that I met and will never
forget and will never see again.
They were stooi>cd elderly men,
shriveled graying grandmothers,
hippies with unkempt hair flow-
ing on their shoulders and ye-
shiva boys with "peyot" tucked
neatly behind their ears. They
were people from all branches
of Judaism and people affiliated
with no branch of Judaism.
They were all concerned.
There was the young boy who
waved a placard that read "Stop
Russian Murderers": he wore a
bright green jacket with big
letters emblazoned on the back
that said "Holy Cross School."
There was 19-year old Yitzhak
Levy, a black Jew, who proudly
held the Israeli flag while march-
ing in the circle for hours. There
was the wizened and wrinkled
Russian Jew, Zavel Silber, a
famous sculptor, who marched
in the vigil every day.
There was the hippie who spor-
ted a "Weathermen" button;
he joined the marchers because
he felt that the "Jewish strug-
gle is one long liberation move-
ment." And there was the mid-
d'.e-aged sweetly dressed woman
executive, employed by a "Jew-
ish establishment" organization,
who took her vacation especially
at this time so that she could par-
ticipate in the vigil all week long.
BUT WHY did they come?
What drew them to the vigil
which was not sponsored or
sanctioned by the "Jewish es-
tablishment" organizations?
"My elderly parents urged
me to participate," explained the
woman executive. "They told
me not to sit silently like they
did during the Holocaust."
"I feel guilty about the sLx
million who died," said 13-yfar-
old Jonathan Omstein from New
Rochelle, who "conned" his par-
ents into letting him come to
the vigil.
"I am here," said 19-year-old
Toby Hauser from Brooklyn,
''because quiet diplomacy hasn't
worked until now and this is
the only way we can express
our solidarity with the Soviet
Jews."
Merle Voss. a librarian from
Huntington, Long Island, ex-
plained she had come to the
vigil "because the respectable
channels of protest are just not
working."
And 28-year-old Steve
Schwartz from Boston, said h"
had taken a week off from work
to participate in the vigil because
"It's about time the Jews de-
cided not to take it lying down."
There were varying emotions
and sentiments expressed by dif-
ferent persons during the vigil,
but the most often heard was
that of extreme disappointment
with the number of demonstra-
tors. (At its peak there were
an estimated 2.5C0 protestors,
but the number often plummeted
to 15)
"It is a terrible, terrible shame
that ot't of 2V. million Jews
living in New York City, only
5.000 (sic) at best, saw fit to
demonstrate their disapproval
of Soviet genocide." Josh, a mem-
ber of the Jewish Defense League
declared bitterly.
The woman executive also
voiced her an Citv Jews: 'They are quick to
wr'te checks, but not to gc out
and do!"
"Adults It'st can't come off
their apathy!" said Eli Schwartz.
a student at Brooklyn College.
"The turnout Is very, very
sad indeed." said Toby Hauser
sorrowfully.
Anger at the attitudes dis-
played by the policemen InvoUid
in the vigil was also voiced.
(There were a few minor scuffles
and one violent confrontation
between demonstrators and po-
lice during the vigil.) Charges
that members of the Tactical
Police Force were blatantly anti-
Semitic wet* made fey several
persons.
But while expressions of frus-
tration with the disappointing
turnout were voiced and com-
plaints of police brutality and
anti-Semitism aired, protestors
spoke glowingly of the many
acts of kindness displayed to-
wards them by strangers and
members of their own group.
Onp bov told the story of a
Greek steward who had passed
the vigil site during pre-dawn
hours and had given the 15 shiv-
ering youngsters s^ven dollars
with which to buy hot coffee.
Another told of the Chassidic
Rabbi who brought the march-
ers boxes of coffee and toast.
And another laughingly pointed
to a young girl holding a box
of Kleenex in her hands, gaily
offering them to marchers as
they passed. Still another spoke
of the 60-year-old widow who
had donated her four-room apart-
ment for the use of the protes-
tors during the vigil.
In the final day of the vigil,
news of the commutations were
announced, and protestors ex-
pressed their jubilation. Many
declared that they felt that it
was only the unexpected world
outcry and demonstrations that
had effected the clemency. They
were ecstatic that they had had
a part in sparing the lives of
the two Russian Jews.
"But although we are thrill-
ed," said Larry Fine, "tell your
readers that we will continue to
gather in protest and will not
rest until every single Russian
Jew is allowed to emigrate to
Israel."

Attending a meeting planning for the campaign of the Wom-
en's Division of Jewish Welfare Federation are Mrs. Donald
Berman, (left) Mrs. Carolyn Davis, Mrs. Jerry Leff and Mrs.
Jesse Martin.
Mrs. Stanley Greenspun, (left) Dr. James Young Mrs. Gerald
Siegel are talking over plans for the Women's Campaign of
Jewish Welfare Federation.
WHEN YOU
KOSHER SWEET
POUND OF
MARGARINE
YOU
D-FREE.
IT'SAMECHAYEH.
j When you buy your first pound of Kosher Sweet Chiffon
j we'll give you another pound, absolutely free. Now that's
: aMechayeh. It comes in a new blue package and two new
: fancy servers. It's a very sweet package. So look for us
: in the dairy case.
': If you think it's sweet butter, but it's not.
j Its Unsalted Sweet Chiffon.
: To get your store coupon good for a free pound of
: Unsalted Sweet Chiffon*, cut out this certificate and
: send italong with the ingredient statement from the
i front of an Unsalted Sweet Chiffon cartonto:
: ANDERSON CLAYTON FOODS
: P.O. Box 4785, CLINTON, IOWA 52732
Nam*.
Address.
City.
-State.
.zip.
1971. Limit: One tree pound per family. All requests must be accompanied by this
Anderson. certificate. Void where prohibited, taxed or restricted. This otter expires
Clayton* Co., ,: September 30. 1971. Pteeee How three weeks lor^attvery. s 7,
Ni*
I


Page 10
+Jewi$tncrkttan
Friday, March 19, 1971
Temple Jhwi Sets Israeli Cultural Art Exhibit March 21-25
An outstanding collection of
Isrnoli Art Objects will be on dis-
play Sunday, through Thursday
in the Karp Hall or Temple Sinai,
it has been announced.
The third annual Israeli Cul-
tural Art Exhibit will reflect the
different facets of Israel's histori-
cal heritage ancient and mod-
ern, Kaslorn and Western, ab-
stract and traditional. Paintings,
unique copper and brass art ob-
jects, modern gold and silver
Jewelry, hand blown glass, ceram-
ics, sculptings, and other craft ob-
jects revealing the complete spec-
trum of artistic movements in Is-
rael since Biblical times will be
featured.
Serving as general chairmen are
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Pittell. As-
sisting them are Dr. and Mrs.
Harold Cohen and Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Finder. Hosts and Host-
esses: Mr, and Mrs. Robert Rob-
erts, sales desk: Dr. and Mrs. Leo
Conn and Dr. and Mrs. Donald
Berman, publicity: Dr. and Mrs.
Joseph Hopen, champagne brunch;
Dr. and Mrs. David Sugerman. in-
vitations; Mr. and Mrs. Norman
Vaguda, Mr. and Mrs. Allen Gor-
Jon and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Roth-
farb. physical design and special
effects, and Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Koenig. inventory.
Tlie March 21-25 exhibit will be
open to the public from 1 to 5
p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. Admission Is
free.
10th Anniversary To Be Celebrated By Temple Israel
Sisterhood Donor Brunch Wednesday
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
: i ilot;i will hold its Torah Fund
Brunch ."'I 11:30 a.m. Wednesday
the temple. 1728 Monroe St.
I-ox and bagels will head the
list ol food at this affair, which
I] benefit the Torah Fund pro-
viding scholarships for rabbis,
1 ,ichors and cantors, and endow-
the Jewish Theological Semi-
nary, the "Eternal Light" TV
program, the Jewlrti Museum and
many other WO/thwhile Jewish
< auses
fcook Review Featured
The Henrietta Szold Group of
I- idaasah meeting at the Miramar
Recreation Center this week fea-
tured a book review presented by
Etta Scheinbaum, and a report on
ber recent trip to Israel by Flor-
fiice Xovick, president of the
I 'hapter.
MAR-PARV.
KOSHER & PARVE
MARGARINE
Brightens a bagel.
The congregation of Temple Is-
rael of Miramar will celebrate its
10th anniversary as a house of
worship in this city Sunday, March
28. at the temple. The festivities,
which will begin at 2 p.m., will
culminate in a gala dinner and
dance that evening.
Special guests of honor for the
occasion will be Gov. Reubin
O'Donovan Askew, the 37th Gov-
ernor of the State of Florida. The
spiritual leader of Temple Israel is
Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd, a long
lime friend of Governor Askew.
A reception for the Governor
will be followed by a program en-
titled: 'This is Your Life, Temple
Israel." a sentimental and joyous
review of the ten year history of
the temple.
Harry Hasan will be the emcee;
Mel Stewart Ls serving as chair-
man for the occasion. President of
the congregation is Seymour Goch.
Reservations are by invitation
only with preference given to tem-
ple members. Persons desiring fur-
ther information are advised to
contact the temple office.
On the progitun for the day will
be a representative of Elliot's
Bakery, a North Miami Beach
firm, demonstrating the art of!
decorating cakes and canapes as
well as card and mah jongg games.
Committee members include
Mrs. Edward Kaplan, chairman:
Mrs. Jerry Siegel, Mrs. Morton
Lesin, Mrs. Herman Niad. Mrs.
Leon Cutler. Mrs. Harvey Strauss,
Mrs. Alex Knob. Mrs. Robert Mil-
ler, Mrs. Morris Bond, Mrs. Nor-1
man Bass. Mrs. Gerald Bernstein.
Mrs, Morris Guss, Mrs. Harry
Zinuner. Reservations may be
made by calling Mrs. Kaplan or
Mrs Siegel.
Mrs. Harry Setnor is president
of the Sisterhood; Mrs. Henry Ja-
cobson Ls Ways and Means vice
president.
Gov. Reubin Askew, (center) who will be the
honored guest at the 10th anniversary dinner
of Temple Israel of Miramar Sunday, March
28, is shown with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rosen,
(left) and Rabbi and Mrs. Elliot Winograd
(right).
Diamonds Jewelry
Appraised
STATE LICENSED
APPRAISERS
MORNINGSTARS
119 N. 20th AVENUE
Hollywood
923-2372 923-2373
NEXT YEAR IN JERUSALEM
Salem's "Vacation in Israel" Sweepstakes

VIA
LOCAL WINNERS
Makes the going great! PICTORIAL EDITION
YOU'LL BE PRIZE GUESTS AT HOTEL INTER-CONTINENTAL F "JERUSALEM
JERUSALEM -A HISTORY"
ap&^ss

i
OFFICIAL RULES
1. On in official entry or on 3" i 5' plain
piece of paper, print your name, address and
lip code, ceitilymt that you are at least 21
years ol age. A'so include'the name of your
SALEM Dealer.
Friday, beginning April 2. 1971 and ending
May 28. 1971.
3. To be eligible for the prizes awarded every
other week, entries must be received by mid-
night Thursday in the week of each drawing.
Value.
. Ilfl a.i onoioi Tot.eco co n.iro* i.n a c
2. With each entry send 2 empty SALEM pack- '-.Entries are eligible tor all drawings held after
ages (King or Si.per Hirvfl or the Kurds "SALES),, date entry received. Only one weekly pnze to a
WITH NATURAL MENTHOL" prinied in block WR--4*; family. All enlries will be accumulated for the
ters on a 3" i 5" piece of paper. Enter .i. of tea. Grand Prize drawing. Crand Prize entries must
as you wish but mail each entry separately to: be received not later than midnight May 27
"SAIEM Vacation Sweepstakes." P.O Box 3909! 1971.
Dept. N, Crand Central Station, New York, New,.. $. Prizes are non transferable and non redeem
York 10017. able tor cash. Transportation to airport of de-
3. Winners wHI be determined in random draw- ^Searture must be furnished by winner. Grand
ings conducted by Pulse. Inc., an independent prize vacation must be taken within one year
fudging organization whose decisions are final. .alter notification,
here will be no substitutes for .prizes, n- 7. .Local, state and lederal taxes, if any, are
offered. Uhe responsibility of the winner.
ENTRY BLANK
SALEM SWEEPSTAKES
SEND ENTRY TO:
SALEM "VACATION SWEEPSTAKES",
P.O. BOX 3909, OEPT. N.
GRAND CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK, N.V. 10017
I certify that I am 21 years of age or older.
I
Ail CANDIDATES A6REE.
ZIP CODE SPEEPS
H0LIPAV MAIL
IOU4CCO (.0 .
' llfcmles, its
Ire, Entiants r
Void m Idaho,
4. The Grand Prize Is a 14-day vacation for two
to Jerusalem including round trip economy
class air transportation from winner's home
airport to destination, double room accommo-
dations at the Hotel Intercontinental, Jeru-
salem, taxes Imposed by hotels and service
companies and $500.00 toward cost of meals
and entertainment There will be five separate
drawiogs for 200 additional prizes Every other
week for 9 weeks five lucky persons, in each
of 8 different area"; fft>w York, Chicago. Wash-
Ington'Baltlmore. Philadelphia, Boston. Miami,
Los Angeles and all other areas) will win an
illustrated edition of Jerusatem-A History
These drawings will be held on every other
ENTER AS OFTEN AS YOU LIKE. NO PURCHASE REQUIRED.
SAIEM KING 19 mo "tar', 1.3 mg nicotine SAIEM SUPER KING 21 nig "Uf".
15 mg nicotine av pet cigirerte. fIC Repon NOV. 'JO.
Sweepstakes open to residents of the Con-
tinental United Stales and Hawaii only, except
employees and their families of R. J. Reynolds
- Totacco Co.. its subsidiaries and affiliated
- ts advertising agencies and Pulse,
. must be 21 years of age or older.
Idaho. Missouri and Washington, and
wherever else prohibited or restricted by law.
511 lederal. state and local laws, and reguia-
ons apply. Odds ol winning will be deter-
mined by number of entries received. All 201
prizes will be awarded. To obtain a list of win-
ners, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope
to: "Winners," P.O Box 3990. Grand Central
Station. New York, New York 10017,
I
Name-
Address.
-Phone No..
City.
State.
I
I
-Zip-
(REQUIRED)
PLEASE PRINT NAME AND ADDRESS OF YOUR SALEM 0EALER.
HE MAY WIN A PRIZE, T00I
Dealer's Name.
^ENTRANTS MUST BE 21 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER
Dealer's Aaare*.
Lt


Friday. March 19. 1971
>Jelstitk>rldttan
Page 11


7 Lively Arts Festival
Opening On Wednesday
The "Overture to the Festival"
which marks the beginning of the
Seven Lively Arts Festival, will
take place Wednesday evening, with
Dr. Marilyn Segal as hostess.
The "All Miami Youth Sym-
phony" will be featured in the
bandsholl Thursday evening, March
25, with Mrs. Robert De Weese as
hostess: a "tribute to Ballet" is
slated for Friday, March 2fi, with
Mrs. Frank Magee serving as
chairman and Mrs. Rose Rubin
assisting
The afternoon will be dedicated
to "Historical Reconstruction" on
Saturday, March 27, and a pro-
gram called' "Poets Speak" is set
for Sunday, March 28, with Dr.
William Stafford, poetry consul-
tant to the Library of Congress in
Washington, D.C. and Dr. Edmund
Skellingg as special guests. Mrs.
Wilson Atkinson will be hostess.
The Poetry Contest Awards pro-
gram will take place Monday,
March 29, at the Hollywood Rec-
reation Center under the direction
of June Justice. Cowboy, western
and folk music will Ik? featured at
Young Circle under the director-
ship of Ted Sorin on March 30 and
Junior Classics in Music will follow
on March 31 with Mrs. Sam Sorin
as hostess.
An "Evening of Opera" is sched-
uled for April 1, with a perform-
ance of "H.inscl and Gretel" by
Miami's Guild of Family Opera
Singer*. Mrs. Louil Graubard will
be in charge of this performance, i
Teen Talent will be featured on
April 2, with Mrs. Carl Hanna
as hostess and the "Afro American j
Tribute"" will have Mrs. Fred |
Pinkson as hostess.
The famous Sidewalk Art Show
will be held at Young Circle from
6 to 9 p.m. April 2. It will continue
through Sunday. April 4, from 9
a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday will alsoi
see the 11th anmial "Tea Party On j
the Green.*' under the chairman-
ship of Mrs. Jen Schaeffer. Local
women's clubs are invited to par-
ticipate with dozens of hospitality
corners for thousands of promen-
aders all adding to the color of the
final day of the Festival.
Miss Charlotte Infalls is chair-
man of the welcoming board work-
ing with Mrs. Olive Munch. Mrs.
Paul Houlihan is coordinator of
social events; Mrs. Roy Thomp-
son is the community relations
display space chairman: Mrs. Ed-
ward Wentworth. Jr.. crafts ex-
hibit chairman: Miss Ruth Koch,
tabloid editor; Mrs. Alta Orringer.
art show coordinator with Frank
V'alenchis heading the numerous
events involving art. Mrs. David
Keating is photography chairman,
working with Walter Gray and
Mrs. Richard Carson. Carl Ubell is
historian and Jack Grant is in
charge of the poetry, opera and
orchestra programs.
Hollywood Hadassah
Donor Luncheon Set
Jewish War Veterans Will Educate Public
Re: Japanese Firms Boycotting Of Israel
The Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A. has announced that it will
conduct an educational campaign
against Americans purchasing To-
yota and Dat-sun cars and patron-
izing Japan Airlines as long is
they cooperate with the Arab boy-
cott of Israeli goods and services.
In ,i memorandum to all Post
Commanders, signed by Depart-
ment commander Col. Maurice
Wi inman of Miami Beach, the or-
ganization pointed out that nego-
tiations and discussions with the
firms in question have produced
no results.
The memorandum reads as
follows:
"After several months of obscur-
ing the facts, during which Japan
Airlines insisted that it is sub-
ject to directives from the Japa-
nese Government while spokesmen
for the government maintained
that the decision was JAL's, the
matter is still stalled on dead cen-
ter with no change apparent in
regard to JAL cooperation with
the Arab boycott.
"Toyota Motor Company and
Nissan, producers of Datsun *?
hicles, continue to dodge, stall and
deny that they refuse to deal with
Israel while facts belie such as-
sertions. With a decline in sales to
the United States market and the
need to make costly adjustments
to meet American safety require-
ments, the Japanese auto pro-
ducers, Just as Japan Airlines, are
becoming more vulnerable to com-
petition from other manufactur-
ers and airlines.
"Cooperation with Arab eco-
nomic blackmail and the absence
of sound Japanese public policy to
counter so regressive a posture
leaves the J.W.V. with no alterna-
tive but to counteract forcefully,
consistent with the attitude ex-
pressed in American trade policy."
"The Japanese auto producers
are especially sensitive to change
In American demands for their
products," Commander Weinman
pointed out. "They must learn
that Americans do not want to
be a party to Arab economic
blackmail and will look to the com-
petition for products manufactured
In a more amenable atmosphere.
"We are determined." the State
Commander declared, "to teach
all those who surrender to Arab
blackmail that Americans want
no part of it and will by withhold-
ing their purchase power, make
this known to those who accede
to such blackmail."
The Jewish War Veterans, tin
oldest active veterans organiza-
tion in the nation, is celebrating
its 7f>th anniversary this year. The
Department of Florida will be
celebrating its 23th anniversary
during the JWV convention to be
held at the "Americana Hotel the
week of June 11.
Israeli Physicist
Claims Discovery
Of New Element
JERUSALEM (JTA) A 41-
year-old Israeli physicist, Dr.
Amnon Marinov, has reportedly
discovered a new super-heavy
element described by a Hebrew
University expert as "of su-
preme importance, because it
would open a new field in physi-
cal science."
The discovery, which has not
been fully confirmed, was an-
nounced by Prof. Shimon Ofer.
dean of the Hebrew University's
Faculty of Science. He said Dr.
Marinov, senior lecturer and re-
searcher in nuclear physics at
the university, was on a sab-
batical at the Rutherford lab-
oratories for high-energy re-
search in Oxford. England,
Professor Ofer said Dr. Mari-
nov had assumed the existence
of a new super-heavy element
on the basis of theoretical studies
and had suggested that the Ruth-
erford labs test them emphat-
ically. A large research staff was
placed at Dr. Marinov's disposal
and after a year or work the
team reported indications that
the new element exists. Prof.
Ofer cautioned, however, that
there was as yet no absolute
. proof.
If confirmed, the new element
would belong to the "trans-
Uranian" group in the periodic
table of chemical elements
those heavier than Uranium.
Dr. Hubert Curson was recently
appointed Jewish Welfare Fed-
eration campaign chairman for
The Hemispheres Apartments in
Hallandale.
El Al Is Preparing
For Its Boeing 747s
In Three (Countries
El Al Israel Airlines is to in-
vest $21 million over a period of
five to six years on an extensive
building program in connection
with absorption of its two Boeing
747s the first of which enters
service June 1, and the second next
Novcml>cr.
Of the total, some $14 million
will be expanded at Lod home base,
where already In advanced stage
of construct i..r. is the 747 hanger,
which with a roof area of over
two acres, is the largest building
of its type in the Middle East.
Within a 103 acre complex, con-
struction is now proceeding on
ne>v maintenance depots, new
workshops spare parts stores and
supply depots. Also under con-
struction is a Ug aircraft parking
lot.
At stations overseas. $7 million
will be spent on reconstruction
and enlargement of airport facili-
ties. The program includes the
building of a freight handling de-
pot and an additional new passen-
ger terminal at Kennedy Airport
as well as a frck-ht handling depot
at London's Heathrow Airport.
El Al is also expanding it*'ca-
tering facilities; following the sue
cess of its own catering un^t at
London Airport, a similar drtp is
to be established at Kennedy, in
partnership with a local caterer
At present, El Al serves some
200,000 main meals and 250,000
snacks monthly.
The Hollywood Chapter of Ha-.
dassah will hold its annual Re-
ward Donor Luncheon Tuesday
noon at the Americana Hotel, it
has been announced. This is this
Chapter's mast important fund-
raising event of the year and
serves to help support such proj-
ects as the Hebrew University's
Medical Complex in Jerusalem,
and Youth Aliyah in all its phases.
'Pie Israeli Foreign Ministry, in
conjunction with the World Health
Organization, carefully selects Af-
rican students from Ethiopia, Ken-
ya, Malawi, Nigeria and Ghana to
study at the Hebrew Medical
School where American standards
of healing and research are taught.
After these students finish their
studies, they return to their na-
tive lands to complete their in-
ternship. This enables them to re-
adjust to the land's economic dis-
ease patterns. It is hoped that
they will .join teaching institutes,
thus contributing to the establish-
ment of additional medical schools
in Africa.
The Youth Aliyah program in-
cludes schools such as the Alice
Seligsberg-Brandeis Vocational
High Schoool for girls in Jeru-
salem. The school off el's a full
time academic curriculum and in-
structions in homemaking. food
preparation, restaurant services,
industrial sewing, secretarial work,
weaving. crafts and fashion
designing.
At the Donor Luncheon, some of
the fashions created by these Is-
raeli students will be modeled hv
members of Hadassah. Mrs. SI -
ley S. Smith of Lory's, who is an
instructor or fashion coordination
at Bauder Career and Finishing
College in Miami, will be the n -
rator for the Israeli Fashion Show
which will be part of the day's en-
tertainment.
Mrs. Murray Taylor, the Chap-
ter's fund-raising vice president, is
the luncheon chairman. Mrs. A. A.
Pekelner, past president of the
Florida Region of Hadassah. will >e
the guest speaker; musical inter-
ludes will be presented l>y the
well-known Habimah players. The
original script for the occasion DBS
written by Mrs. Arthur Sch t
and Mrs. felsa Balick.
Seated on the dais will be execu-
tive Board Members of the Ches-
ter and executive members ">(
other groups including Mrs. J. J.
Briefer. Chapter president, Mrs.
living I-ondon, treasurer; Mrs.
George Robinson, financial secre-
tary; Mrs. Abraham Palant. re-
cording secretary; Mrs. Irving Po-
land, corresponding secretary.
Also Mrs. Archie Kamer, mem-
bership vice president; Mrs. L '.-
Han B. Harris, ticket chairman;
Mrs. Harry Bagtlan, president of
Beach Group; Mrs. Meyer A. N >-
viek. Henrietta .Szold: Mrs. M -
tin Steyer, Hillcrest; Mrs. Erl
Heichen, Mt. Scopus; Mrs. George
Sass Vizenthal Parker: and fin -
raising vice presidents Mrs. Harry
Bernstein, Beach group: Mrs. He-
man Shane, Henrietta Szold; Mrs.
Herman Goodman. Hillcrest. a t
Mrs. Zachery Boosin, Parker.
Send for your FREE copy today.
Manischewitz
MENU PLANNER AND RECIPE GUIDE
FOR THE 8 DAYS OF PASSOVER
Make this a Passover
to remember. How?
With the popular Manischewitz
menu planner and recipe guide.
And a complete shopping list of
everything you'll need for
Passover. 24 delicious, complete
meal suggestions for the 8 days
of Passover and easy to follow
recipes for all of the tasty dishes.
Manischewitz menu planner and
recipe guide. It's free.
Just write to: Manischewitz Menu Planner
Box 378, Newark, New Jersey 07101
Courtesy off the House
'joaaoaooooann


Paqe 12
vjewist ncridi&ri
Friday. Mardi 19. 1971
\
DEVORAH WIGODER SAYS
Dividing Jerusalem Again
Could Cause A Civil War
lorn of absorbing immigrants. They
also need heip to increase the
educational benefits for their chil-
dren as they would like to include
schooling so that it would include
two years of high school which
hasn't been possible up to now.
Mrs. Wigoder reported an inci-
dent related to the shortage of
foreign currency in Israel. When
she was readying heiself for this
trip to the United States, she said,
she requested $200 pocket money
which she felt was an absolute
minimum for her time out of
the country. And even though they
realized she was touring the United
States speaking to groups in order
to raise funds for Israel, they re-
plied, "Can't you get along with
$50."
The meeting, held at the home
of Mrs. Myron Segal, was attended
by approximately 35 women each
of whom had donated a minimum
of $363 for the Combined Campaign
of Jewish Welfare Federation. Mrs
Robert Gordon, past president of
the Women's Division who served
as clnirman. thanked her coelviir-
men. Mrs. Edward Grass and Mrs.
Frances Briefer, for their devoted
efforts before she introduced Mrs.
Gerald Segel, current president of
the Women's Division.
Mrs. Stanley Greenspun. cam-
paign chairman for the Division.
was then introduced. She invited
the group present to show their
continued interest in Federation
by attending the subsequent meet-
ings scheduled for successive weeks,
climaxing with a luncheon at The
Hemispheres on March 25.
Mrs. Frances Briefer, a former
campaign chairman who has been
a worker in Federation almost
from its inception in the commun-
ity, urged the ass,milled group to
really give of themselves this v. i
She reminded the women of the
origin of the division and of its
progress and growth in each suc-
ceeding year and asked that they
show their realization of the needs
in Israel by doubling their pledge
to $2 a day rather than the 81
thev had planned Approximately
$35,000 was raised towards the
total goal of S100.COO at this
gathering.

"Israelis are disciplined people
but there would be Civil War in
Israel were they made to give back
Jerusalem," declared Israeli au-
thor Devorah Wigoder speaking
before a spellbound group of Holly-
wood women at a meeting of the
Women's Division of Jewish Wel-
fare Federation last week. "The
people of Israel feel that it would
be sacrilegious to divide the city
of Jerusalem again," she said.
"Berlin is the only capital city
that has ever been divided," she
pointed out, "and even that has
had unhappy results."
Mrs. Wigoder, who was educated
in the United States, is an Ameri-
can Catholic by birth and an Is-
raeli Jew by choice. Her autobiog-
raphical story called "Hope is My
House'* is the talc of her journey
into Judaism. Her sister is a nun
in South Africa and she has a
brother who is a priest in this
country.
Speaking of her family's reac-
tion to her conversion and the re-
actions of her friends, she said that
she can recognize the increased
esteem in which Israel is now held
for today they seem proud to in-
treduce her as an Israeli, while in
the early years of her change-over
she sensed a feeling of disbelief
and reserve.
Speaking on behalf of Federa-
tion's needs in the current Com-
bined Campaign, Mrs. Wigoder
said that the Israeli people know
that their only real friends in the
world are their fellow Jews. The
Jewish closeness, she said, is a
trait of which other nationalities
seem jealous.
Israelis know that there is no
one country ujion which they can
n ly, but that Jewry everywhere
will support them. "Evers Israeli
's more Ih in paying their own
way," .she said, "but most of their
money goes for defense. They will
never lei anyone else pay for their
guns or man their guns. Their oth-
er problems, however, require
funds, and for these needs they
need help."
She pointed out that foremost
in their needs is aid for the prob-
Mrs. Harry Permesly poses with Devorah Wigoder, the
Israeli author who spoke at the Advanced Gifts meeting of
the Women's Division of Jewish Welfare Federation.
-
iWfl ^ a"fcV-

1 H fl Bawl J
Mrs. Frances Briefer, Mrs. Geoffrey Wigoder and Mrs.
Robert Gordon are pictured at the recent Advanced Gifts
meeting of the Women's Division of Jewish Welfare
Federation.
Mrs. A. L. Mailman, who acted
as hostess at the kickoff tea
held by the Women's Division
in the home of her daughter,
"Mickey" (Dr. Marilyn) Segal,
is shown pouring coffee for one
of the guests.
Drug Awareness
Program Series
Aimed At Parents
The first part of a three-day pro-
gram on Drug Awareness aimed at
parents of school children was en-
titled "Are You Aware of Drug
Abuse in Our Community?" and
encompassed three topics: (1) ex-
tent of the problem in Broward
County (2) the ages and the ranges
of background of involved children,
and (3) means and availability of
their drug supply.
The second session, which will
be held Tuesday, will cover the
subject "Facts About Drug Abuse."
Information on the identification
and history of common drugs and
the phychological reactions result-
ing from the use of various drugs
will be presented.
The third session which will take
place on Tuesday, March 30, will
l>e entitled "Drugs Are Just a
Symptom of the Problem." It will
cover ways of dealing with the
drug problem, school policies and
the role of security personnel, com-
munity services available for re-
habilitation and ways to deter
potential abusers," Some sugges-
tions as to how parents can deal
with the problem will also be
offered.
The entire series, entitled "Are
You Aware?" was arranged by
Mrs. Stanley Silver, for the resi-
dents of South Broward County.
JWV Celebrating
75th Anniversary
The Jewish War Vetreans of the
United States, which will celebrate
75 years of devoted service this
year, Is the oldest veterans or-
ganization in the United States.
The basic reason for organizing
the JWV, wnich was started in
1896 with 13 Jewish veterans of
the Union Army and has since
grown to hundreds of Posts
throughout the country, was to
dispel doubts raised by some as to
the patriotism of Jews during the
Civil War. Actually thousands of
new immigrant Jews had enlisted
in the service, and many had died
on the battlefields.
The programs of JWV cover a
wide spectrum of human rights
and dignity for veteran and non-
veteran whatever his race, creed
or color. Among these proiects are
veteran's services at V.A. Hos-
pitaLs, packages to GI's overseas,
scouting programs, support for
Israel and peace in the Middle
East, concern for Soviet Jewry, a
JWV memorial forest in Israel
campaign against extremists
groups in the U.S.. advancing
Americanism in the community
and other community projects.
Jewish War Veterans have also
emerged as a major force in the
Halls of Congress, where it peti-
tions on behalf of both Jewry and
the veteran. It is considered one
of the most important Jewish and
Veteran groups on the national
scene.
Interested persons are invited
to contact Arthur Sherry, Com-
mander. Victor B. Freedman Post
613, 520 NW 72nd St. Hollywood.
Lodge Elects New.SJiUe Qf Officers
The program of Herzl Lodge,
B'nai B'rith's recent meeting in
the Home Federal at Hallandale.
included the election of officers
for the coming year, and a dis-
cussion of B'nai B'rith's "Hot
Line" program by Irene Rosenthal.
This program, a project of Chai
Lodge B'nai B'rith, has helped
many young people who have
problems. Mrs. Rosenthal reported.
They can call the "Hot Line," and
without revealing their identity
speak to members of the I-odge or
their wives, who also remain anon-
ymous, and receive advice which
often aids in resolving the problem.
Some of the youths who have tel-
ephoned were desperate, she said,
and turned to the "Hot Line" as
a last resort.
The program was arranged by
Bob Hoffman, entertainment com-
mittee chairman. Jacob M. Mo-
gilowitz, Ixdgc president, presided.
Broward Z0A Celebrates
Sam J. Perry, president of the
organization, will preside when
the Broward Zionist District cel-
ebrates the 23rd anniversary Of
the establishment of the State of
Israel with a meeting at Temple
Sinai Sunday evening, April 4.
Rabbi David Shapiro, spiritual
leader of Temple Sinai and former
president of the Southeastern Re-
gion of the Z.O.A., will be one of
the honored guests. A representa-
tive from the Israeli delegation to
the U.N. will also be present.
GREATER HOLLYWOOD'S
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
WOMEN'S DIVISION
March 4 Advanced Gift* Luncheon-Home Mrs. Myron Segal
Morchl 1 Pace Setter* Meeting-Home Mr*. A*her Hollander
March II Special Gifts Meeting-Home Mr*. Donald Berma*
Malch 25 High Lighter* Luncheon-Hemisphere*
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
140 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOUYWOOO
A
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
"SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY"
"A Service Wifhin The Means Oi All"
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Jtwpte 3etk6
Wemotlal
Gardens
/j\
_9j^W5fo7write: '_ & Z'f* 1
TEMPLE BETH EL S:f.Kl.%'4^
Hie only all-jewish cemelery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beautifully land
scaped, perpetual care, reasonably priced.
For information call:
1351 S. 14th AVE.-HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME:__________________________________________^_
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
gjpj-gigjpjg^


Friday. March 19. 1971
vJewisti Thridinm
Page 13
fJU< KMiSfital. tjron. Parshah Of Parah
RABBI MAX A. LIPSCHITZ
Beth Torah Congregation
One of the four special Sabbaths
which we observe, preceding
Pesach. is the "Parshah of Parah"
whci a select
portion is read
from the Book
of Numbers.
This section,
to be read this
Sabbath, deals
with the Red
Heifer, free from
blemish, whose
remains are to
be burned and
its ashes dissolv-
ed in fresh
water.
These ashes, upon contact, puri-
fied the defiled and defiled the pure.
This Statute is so mysterious
that Rashi, our commentator,
states: "It is a decree from before
Me and you are not at liberty to
cavil at My decrees." However, the
Rabbis did make some attempts to
find some rationality to this para-
doxical decree.
In truth, there are many G-d
endowed gifts which man possesses,
but contain the potential of both
good and evil, as it were, purify-
ing the contaminated and defiling
Itahiii Lipschitz
the pure, to wit money, the
source of charity and potential for
saving human lives. .. The erec-
tion of schools and hospitals can,
at the same time, create miserly,
selfish, heartless individuals whose
lust for greater power and afflu-
ence far supersedes their ability
to help mankind.
Jealousy can, on the one hand, in-
spire man to noble desires to emu-
late other creative and productive
men; (rabbis call this character
trait "Kinat Soferim") and, on the
other hand, the self-same envy can
produce greed, hate, dishonesty,
and slander, against those who en-
joy greater fortune.
The truism of life is that we can
take almost every blessing and
employ it for the purpose of cre-
ativity, on the one hand, and de-
struction on the other.
The best example is man's abil-
ity to split the atom. Nuclear fis-
sion can. G-d forbid, blow the
world to smithereens and, at the
same time, possess the secret and
?* pnswer to man's incurable
diseases.
Therefore, the Red Heifer nar-
rative is not a simple story of a
sacred cow, but contains one of
the most mystical and Important
moral messages in the entire Bible.
HI : I 'i Ml: I::". MMWH MM
m
xz
mm \
nmwtl
MARCH 11-APRIL 9,1971
Purim to Ere* Pesach
is
MtllOVIL JEWISH MUSIC CHINCH
t|.>>< If IO M1IMH 1IWIU WHHM Mill ; *&?
.....
Heralding the March 11-April 9, 1971 observance of the
Jewish Music Festival under the auspices of the National
Jewish Welfare Board's Jewish Music Council, this color-
ful poster highlights the cultural event's theme. Jewish
Community Centers, synagogues, schools, fraternal socie-
ties and women's groups in hundreds of U.S. communities
are among the organizations that will celebrate the
Festival.
DON'T KILL TIME
SPEND IT WHERE IT'S NEEDED!!!
00 you LIKE TO TALK ON THE PHONE?
MAKE IT WORTHWHILE TALK.
Join the Phonothon group of Grcoter Hollywood's Federation
2-3 Hours In Tho Evening
00 foil LIKE OffKl ATMOSPHERE BUT SHtKK KCSPONSIBILTTrT
Yaa con dream while yea lick stomps, *oal envelopes and for
some privileged low, thero il ton the opportunity
to Itoff tho envelopes you seal. Nome tor Hours
00 YOU LIKl BEING PART Of THE SCENE?
I* your talent public relations?
Ywi cm uso it where Iff needed worVing tor Fodonrtlooj.
CALL 927-0536 ASK FOB SANM
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION Of GREATER HOUYWOOft
By RABBI SAMUEL. J. FOX
Why U it customary to offer a
prayer for the new month on the
Sabbath before the month
starts?
This emulates the age old tra-
dition whereby the Rabbinical
Court in Jerusalem, after receiv-
ing the testimony of witnesses
announced the arrival of the new
moon. The general purpose behind
the tradition was to make man
aware of the fact that the use of
time is up to his discretion, i.e.,
man is the master of his destiny.
Since we do not now have a
Rabbinical Court in Jerusalem of
the character of the Sanhedrin and,
since the practice of having the
Court announce the arrival of the
moon is not used, we announce
the coming of a new moon by hav-
ing the exact hour and minute an-
nounced in the synagogue on the
Sabbath before the new moon
arrives.
This announcement is couched
in prayers A prayer precedes the
announcement, another one fol-
lows it. Both appeal to the Al-
mighty for His blessing to make
the coming month a healthy, sat-
isfying, and rewarding one.
Why is the prayer for the new
moon recited while oomeone
hold* the Torah in the congre-
gation.
In the absence of the official
Rabbinical Court of Jerusalem, all
official acts done by the com-
munity, which would normally be
done by the Court and are appli-
cable in the synaeogue, are done
in the presence of the Torah Scroll.
It is the Torah Scroll which serves
as the basis of the authority for the
community to act.
This is also the reason whv the
Torah is held during the recitation
of Kol Nidre. The annulment of
vows for a community was some-
thing that belonged to the Rabbin-
ical Court on certain occasions.
Therefore, in the absence of the
f^ourt the Torah is held as a sym-
bol of the authority of the com-
munity which is acting in accord-
ance with the laws of the Torah.
Why it b) permissible to violate
the Sabbath in order to save a
life?
The Talmud is quite definite on
this matter indicating that one is
permitted to do whatever one can
do to sive a life on the SaMMh
(Yoma 84 B>. This permissivenew;
is based on several factors. One-*;
the verse in Exodus (3:14 wMcti
oroclaims that the Sabbath is
"Holy Unto You." The rabbis in-
dicate that the Sabbath was giv-
en for the sake of man and man
was not created for the sake of
Sabbath. Therefore, the life of man
is more important than the ob-
servance of the Sabbath.
Another verse in Exodus bids
the people of Israel to "observe
the Sabbath throughout their gen-
eration" (Exodus 31:16). The rab-
bis deduce from this that one mav
violate the Sabbath one time in
order to save a life who will ob-
serve the Sabbath for many year*
to come and then even have his
posterity observe it (Mekilta, Ed.
Friedmann. page 193-B.,)
There is a general rule regard-
ing the fact that one may violat"
a number of precept*-in order.to
preserve a life which is beinrr
threatened. This is based upon a
verse in Leviticus (J8:5> which
states regarding the .Oomnvmrl-
ments. "which if a man do he
shall live bv them." This means
according to the rabbis, that man
is supposed to li\'f. by obMrvlnfl
the Commandments '.and not to
die by them.
Of course, this permission does
not apply to the three cardinal
sins (i.e., adultry, Incest, and mur-
der). It also does not apply to
occasions when decrees have been
made by a hostile government in
order to destroy Jewish tradition.
In such cases one is obligated to
become a martyr in order to pre-
serve the time-oM way of Jewish
life.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Vayakhail Pekudai
"And Moses assembled all the congregation of the children
of Israel ." Exodus, Chapters 35-40
THE PEOPLE'S RESPONSE: Moses transmitted to the peo-
ple the details of God's commands relating to the sanctuary and
its contents, but first emphasized the holiness of the Sabbath
day on which no work was to be done. The Israelis responded
willingly and generously, and men and women alike made con-
tributions according to their ability. Women with the requisite
skill spun the linen material, and the princes gave precious stones
for the breastplate as well as spices and oil for the incense and
lamp. Some devout women even donated their mirrors of burn-
ished copper to be used for the making of the laver and its base.
Moses made special mention of the fact that God had singled
out Bezalel of the Tribe of Judah, a man of wisdom, understand-
ing and experience, to supervise the work. With him was asso-
ciated Oholiab, of the Tribe of Dan, who was a skilled engraver
and weaver. The gifts poured in to such an extent that the work-
men reported to Moses that they had more than they needed, so
the people were told to cease bringing their offerings.
Section by section, the Sanctuary and its contents began
to take shape. These are the accounts of the tabernacle. .
SUMMARY OF THE COSTS: The total cost incurred in the
construction of the Sanctuary was counted at Moses' command
under the direction of Ithamar, Aaron's youngest son. The weight
of the gold amounted to 29 talents and 730 shekels; (A talent
is equal to 100 pounds or 3,000 shekels); the weight of the silver
was 100 talents and 1,775 shekels, and of the brass 70 talents
and 2,400 shekels. The work, having been completed with the
making of the priestly garments, was inspected and approved by
Moses, who blessed the people for their magnificent achievement.
THE TABERNACLE IS ERECTED: On the first day of
the month (i.e. Nisan, almost a year after the departure from
Egypt) the Tabernacle was erected under Moses' personal super-
vision and the contents arranged in the prescribed order. A cloud
covered the Tabernacle which was filled with God's glory. When-
ever the cloud lifted, it gave the signal to the Israelites to con-
tinue their journey.
'"'i'"'1"'.........!- ; '"'" >''.......I '...... ':!" '
Cantorate Conference Set
The Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion School of
Sacred Music will hold a confer-
ence for young men and women in-
terested in the cantorate as a ca-
reer in New York City, Sunday.
March 28. The program of train-
ing leads to a professioral diploma
as Cantor and the Bachelor of
Sacred Music degree.
rvffar/c>M fc_5ervi
V
CC9
Esther Lowenthal. Director of
Casework for Jewish Family Serv-
ice, recently participated in a fam-
ily education forum sponsored by
the St. Petersburg Jewish Com-1
inanity Center and the Gulfeoast
Jewish Family Service on the sub-
ject of "Interfaith Dating and In-
termarriage." She also spoke to a
group of 100 OUT members at
Presidential Towers on the subject
of "Looking To The Years Ahead."
' Mrs. Joan Levi, Caseworker
for JFS. is scheduled to address
two Senior elassea at MeArthur
High School on the topic of how
family counseling problems such as "Hassling With
Your Parents" and "Unmarried
Parenthood."
SOI.El. (TEMPLE) 3300 N. 46 Avenuo
(Temporary office) Liberal.
HAUANDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER,
126 N. E. lit Ave. 44
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (TEMPLE) 1S51 14 Avo.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe 46
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sermon: "A People
I.mni: Alone." Saturday 11 A.M. Bar
Mitzvah: Jeffrey Alan Krotenberg-,
son of Dr. and Mrs. Jack Krotenberg.
BETH SHALOM (TEMPLIV. 172a
Monroe St. Conaervatlve Rabbi
Morton Malaveky. Cantor .rvino
Gold. 44
-----a-----
SINAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johneon St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Cantor Yehudah Heilbraun. 47
MKAMAR
ISRAEL (TEMPLE) 6920 3.W. S5th St
Comervative. Rabbi Elliot J. wino.
grad. Cantor Abraham Kostor. 41
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
N.W. >th St.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
22 ADAR 6:12
3?
NA^S/v/s**~SA<*^'vS**NA*VSA1
These lively Druze toddlers are attending a Pioneer
Women nursery school in their village of Daliyat-El-
Ha-Carmel, in tho hillo above Haifa, Israel. Pioneer
Women recently opened a day-care center for the
children of mothers working in a nearby pantyhose fac-
tory making two firsts for the village of Daliyat:
Druze women working, outside their homes and Druze
children being cared tor in a modern nursery school.
The Druze are an Arabic speaking, non-Moslem ethnic
group living in Israel.


Faqe 14
Friday. March IS. *9?i

Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
Some Of Those Unpredictable Israelis
X'"'' sion, and remind us that we are a unique and
ofti n unpredictable people. I dip into my bottomless
drawer and come up with the fol-
lowing:
Nature Can't Be Outdone. A
J group of artist! conceived the idea
'j of tailing the sound of a waterfall
tld of gently-running water, and
| then playing these tapes through
.1 mile and a half stretch of forest
near Jerusalem. Opening day was
a failure: torrential rains drowned
out the sounds of the tape
Maybe lie Haa a Hunch. A motorist whose car
was stolen advertised in the press seeking aid in
locating it. Tho ad was addressed in his letters to
"Young Detectives," and offered a prize of a bicycle
for help in recovering his machine.
liiim.-stii- Problem. From a letter to an "Ad-
vice" column in a Hebrew paper: "My husband Ls a
Sephardi; I am an Ashkenazi from Poland. Our son
will l>e Bar Mitzvah next year. My problem is:
should the ceremony be Sephardi or Ashkenazi?"
Chana Bavh's reply "The husband usually chooses.
This would Ik- a small concession by the wife, one of
those concessions on which peace is based."
Demand For Equal Right*. Noam Nader com-
plains in the press of discrimination against a clans
of citizens in Tel Aviv. The city gardeners do not
prune trees along the public sidewalks high enough,
so that tall persons make their way only with diffi-
culty. This Ls a \ iolation of their civic rights in favor
of shorter |x-rsons, he says.
Ingenuity. When Golda Mcir toured the wards
of the Josephthal Hospital in F.ilat she asked one
man in bed what his ailment was. "None." he said,
and popiK-d out from under the shivts. fully dressed.
It was Yona, the hospital gardener, who just wanted
to make sure that he met the Prime Minister.
(oiiiriixitii.ii Not Tax Deductible. Mordechai
Arbel. of the Israel Foreign Ministry, reports that
on his recent arrival in New York he was engaged
in conversation by his Jewish cab driver who was
happy to have an Israeli passenger. When Arbel
asked to be taken to the Dixieland Hotel the driver
demurr.nl and suggested that the Waldorf Astoria
would be much more proper. Arbel explained Israel's
budgetary problems, with the result that on arrival
at the Dixieland the driver refused to take the pre-
ferred fare. "Cill it my modest contribution toward
meeting Israel's deficit," he said.
Another railing- An Israeli youth emissary
visiting in a synagogue in the United States was
approached by the Gabbni who wanted to call him up
to the Torah. and asked- "How do I call you?" The
ignorant and flustered Israeli paused for a moment
- and then gave the man his telephone number!
Jewish Organizations:
By BIN G. FRANK
Capital Spotlight: By JOSEPH POtAKOFF
Zionist Membership Campaign Tree Universities'
M. M- *~~S / '.MI'I s l'lKll.i; \ MS I'OII I,....; oh I mill
THK AMERICAN ZIONIST FEDERATION is about to
embark on a massive membership campaign. The Fod-
iion, which now Include! in its mi mbership the exist-
ing 13 adult Ztonisl groups and 10 Zionist youth groups,
lor an overall membership of 700.000 persons who are
tomatlcally members Of the Federation, wants to in-
800K REVIEW
By Seymour B. Liebman
Some Recent Fiction
BOOKS AHOI'T JEW'S and/or Israel continue to
hold prominent places on publisher* lists; three
recent ones share tin- trait of being very readable.
The first is a collection of short
Stories, And Then Came Man. by
Joseph Shavinsky (Massef Israel
I Publishing House, IS). Sine- no
I credit is given to a translator, we
assume that the author, an Is-
;. is bi-lingual. We note this
with plensun for several publica-
tions from Israel within the past
year have been translated by Is-
raelis whose command of English has never been
polished by conversational usage,
Shavimky his a Vigorous and distinctive style.
HLs stories capture some of the exotic phases of life
and peoples <>t Israel. He portrays not only the
physical aspects of life of the Bedouin but also pro-
vides insights so some or their motivation forces.
Some of his accounts are legends and may have
been drawn from Aggada. Those and other stories all
add to the ambience of a book which asides the
warmth and affection or a story-teller who Breathes
life into his subjects.
The Twisted Wire bj I'.ich od Falkirk i Double-
day & Co., $3.951 is i short novel of intrigue which
takes place in Israel. Tim dramatis i>ersonne in-
cludes a British geologist, who has come to Jeru-
s.ili-m to deliver a ,>.i:>er at an international con-
vention of geologists and thro" secret agents, one
from the I'.S V. one from the Russian K.G.B.. and
an Israeli a femme r itale in the Israeli manner
and the protagonist of sex and romance. There is
suspense, action .mil subtle pro-lsnu-i propaganda.
The authors name is a pseudonym; we surmise
that his real name is Meyer Levin. Hi- knows the
country ami tin- people well enough to give excel-
lent descriptions, but there an- sunn- slight errors
that betray the author. Hi- should know that th
plural of kibbut/ Ls l.il.t.nt/im and that the Hat
Arab In cad i- pila without .in "c."
.lack Ansell has woven a readable story in the
Shermans ot Mannervtlle (Arbor House, 16.89). The
author was reared in Louisiana and in- evidences an
Understanding Ol tin- region where the story takes
place and tin rt i,: ,, whips among Jews, Christians,
and Blacks of the area The Shermans are Jewish
but. peripheral with respect to religion. Then- are
some glimpses of a kind of Reform Judaism in the
deep South. He includes reference to B'rai B'rtttl
and intoifaith "understandings." However the au-
thor appaan to be more conmad with tin- pees of
his story and with being in "the miMleni mode"
i.e.. use of four letter obscenities and descriptions or
copulation than in adding a dimension to the
reader's understanding of a changing situation. Tin-
same story could be told if the Shermans had been
a family from the North but then the book might
have appealed only to the prurient.
' '! ..... '- '..'-".:.' i ;!!,-". ..._:,..,,.;. : ,u .. .:: ....,... ,-
rre.ise its ranks from 730,000 to one million either by en-
rollhlg American Jews not now affiliated with the Zionist
movement directly into the Federation, or by encouraging
their affiliation through the existing national organiza-
tions.
Kabbi Israel Miller, president ol the Zionist Federa-
tion, said it afforded American Jews "an opportunity to
identify themselves with Zionism rather than simply de-
claring themselves as nominal friends ol Israel."
It is a tradition that every year organizations have
membership drives and go out and recruit members, but
this year, Zionist groups are doing it up big. Herman L.
Weisman. president of the Zionit Orginizntion of Amer-
ica, and Mrs. Faye Schenk, president of Hadassah, re-
lrt their organizations have undertaken major momlier-
shlp drives. "Put your name on the line for Israel." ssys
one organization. Another sends out brochuies to sympa-
thetic, ideological followers, still another lias assigned
quota.-, to each unit to double their membership. Bonus
gilts are offered in the form of free subscriptions. Poale
Zion even brought its own thefiach, David Breelau, asso-
ciate director of Hillcl Foundation it; Jerusalem, and sent
him on a speaking tour to start Poale Zion's campaign,
according to Leo Diosondruck. president of Poale Zion.
And m their campaign, the Religions Zionists of America
have launched a mas.s drive to unify. Torah Jewry under
the banner o: Ali/rarhi-Hitpoel Hami/rachi." according to
Rabbi Bernard a. Poupko, tin- group's president.
The youth, too, are involved. Youth Mobilization for
Israel, which consists of Jewish youth givu|>s. Ls running
a large registration drive aimed at the forthcoming Con-
gress elections. Jeff r< y Maas. the n itional coon Una tor, re-
ported tliat It; seminars are being held for the entire na-
tion; mailings are lieing sent out ami a ]>o.ster series of
Zionist folk heroes is befog planned.
The elect ions hold a grent deal of interest. Sevcnil
Zionist leaders favor democratic elections.. Jacques
Torczyner. chairman of the national board ot the Amei-
i- in Zionist Federation, ls one of them. "There must be
real democratic elections and not face-saving methods
which were not honest and which wen-not representative
of the tnu- strength of the groups." he said. Mr. Torczy-
ner. a past president of Hie Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica, and now chairman of its Administrative Board, added.
"The election should In- an opportunity to present each
political point ol view before the total Zionist membership,
even by using the mass media."
,'ist how the election will be held has not been work-
id out yet. Kut Rabbi Miller has appointed a special com-
mittee t,, come up with the practical plans. And it could
verj well in- that Zionists all over the nation could go to
the,r neighborhood Jewish enter or synagogue, and cast
their VOt* and place it in a ballot tX ;s one does in .,
local i lection. Or they could receive a mail ballot, for im-
mediate return to a central vote-counting headquarters,
Depending on th< commodity, the committee might de-
cide on a combination of-buth mail and "live" polling
place.
At stake in the is. election* to the World Zionist
Congress .ue 145 delegates out ot a total of S00, Sevei il
Zionist leaden envision public debates between represen-
tatives ol various organizations, Manj believe this would
be a healthy development for the Zionist movement; it
would show that "there is diversity wi'hm unity."
Others see tin- voting contests as an opportunit) to
expound their ideology U> Zionists of other persua-.ions.
As one Zionist loader opined: "Too often we talk to our-
selves, our own group. Now each can confront the other
in debate and discus* issues m up-to-date terras."
/*AMl'l'S Pit Ot; It A.MS FOR Jewish learning on
the style ol the "Free University" suddenly have
blossomed. Twelve years ago there was only one
at the University of Michigan which now, with
about 400 students taking 20 courses is regarded as
the largest and most formally structured.
Last year, those unique programs were active
at 13 universities; this spring, eight more universi-
liis will join the list.
r "Free universities" are de.se 1 ibod in a report to
the B'nui B'rith Hillel Foundations as a "new
approach to informal Jewish education.'' "Consider-
ing that this is an extra-curricular activity without
credit, the program is having a good start." says
Rabbi Samuel Z. Fishman, B'nai B'rith director of
Israel and Community Affairs.
A report in January to Hillel's Board by Dr.
All red Jospe. Hillel's Director of Programs and
Resources, discussing the philosophy and objectives
of the "frc universities," points out that most pro-
grams are based on Mures fundamental assumptions:
First, the Student is at the center of the decis-
ion-making process; the students themselves are ex-
pected to assume responsibility for their education
and to determine what to study and how, where,
how long and with whom.
Second, Free Universities generally offer
courses, outside those contained in the conventional
university curriculum.
Third, the Jewish faculty serves as a model.
"In this r.gaid," the reiwrt says, "a Jewish profes-
sor of chemistry, economics or political science who
volunteers to teach a course in Yiddish, Jewish
literature or Jewish thought can become an im-
pressive model by demonstrating that high intel-
lectual standards and Jewish literacy and commit-
ment are not mutually exclusive."
"Formats and content of the courses differ
enormously." Dr. Jospe says. "Some courses are set
up in the usual classroom manner with an instruc-
tor who teaches and students who listen and take
notes. Other courses rely less on books and lectures
and emphasize the use of films, tapes, video re-
sources, person-to-|xi-son encounters etc. Some re-
quire homework; others do not require any prepa-
ration.
"The course content too varies from situation
to situation," he says. "But in most cases courses
an- expected to have relevance to Jewish thought
and life."
Dr. Jospe found some universities offer a full
semester course; some concentrate on the summer
session; Still others compress their offerings into a
weekend institution. "Some courses actually consist
01 Hist one or two sessions and hardly deserve their
nile ever, though the discussions during these two
sessions can be fruitful;' be -ays.
In regard to finances, some universities are
completely "tree" in terms of tuition and Tees but
in many cases the students pay a nominal sum to
help cover administrative costs.
Ma iy class, s ,,v taught by regular university
faculty numbers while some are 1,-d by students
themselves. Where Hillel Foundations exist, the
local Hillel director unually functions as a key
instructor.
The Free University ty|v- approach to offering
J. wish education "is not really new at all," Dr.
Jospe points out. Programs of student-initiated
studies emerged as early as the beginning of this
century with the founding of the first Jewish stu-
dent societies, and especially the formation of the
Menordi Societies whose principal objectives were
the study of Jewish life, culture and problems."
.. s^se m m -
V*;
BBS


Friday. March 19. 1871
vjmisti fforidTtaf?
Pag 15
NORTON
SINCE 1324-
IR
SAFETY
SERVICE
MICHELIN

/t^sj.
? v
m
RADIAL
The steel-belted
radial tire!
FORDS,
CHEVYS,
PLYMOUTHS
all sizes, all makes
ajj models
PRICES START AS LOW AS:
^O 175-13
Plat F. E. Tai 1 Trade-in
Ask us about
budget terms
Famous Michelin X features include:
i conomy Michelin X gives you econ-
omy you never thought you'd get from
a tire! They roil easier, use less en-
ergy. Actually last at least twice as
long as conventional tires.
performance Michelin X tires offer
superior cornering, superior braking,
superior turnpike driving with no wan-
dering on straight-aways.
. Mfety You get highest degree of safety
against punctures-test-proven for
high-speed safety at 115 mph.
i construction Unique radial design with
super-strong steel cords make tires
grip harder-track surer-roll easier
with minimum distortion and scuffing.
NORTON
-SINCE 1924-
TIRE CO.
40,000 MILE GUARANTEE of actual tread wear!
"Michelin guarantee covers 40,000 mile tread life, defects in workmanship and materials and normal road hazards
(eicluding repairable punctures), is limited to free repair, or credit or refund equal to original purchase price multiplied
by percentage of guaranteed mileage not run (at Michelms option), and is conditioned upon use with "Airstop" tubes
(where applicable) and non-commercial use on passenger car or station wagon."
CLUB
f.
master charge
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-1556
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Ave. 681-8541
MIAMI SHORES
8801 Biscayne Blvd. 759-4446
N.MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 538-5331
SOUTH DADE
9001 S. Dixie Hwy. 667-7575
7:30 A.M. to 8:00 P.M., Mon.-Frl.
HOMESTEAD
30180 S. Federal Hwy. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD
6017 Hollywood Blvd.
at State Road No. 7 987-0450
FT. LAUDERDALE
1830 W. Broward Blvd. 525-3136
and
1740 E. Sunrise Blvd. 525-7588
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N. Federal Hwy. 943-4200
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Dixie 832-3044
HIALEAH/NORTHSIDE: MAJOR TIRE CO. 3130 N.W. 79th Street 691-6233


Pag 16-
+ lewl<*nr**1*yr
Friday, March 12. 1971
THE NEW JORDAN MARSH, 163RD STREET! SPACIOUS! GRACIOUS! ELEGANT!
FRIENDLY! YOU'LL SEE, YOU'LL FEEL, YOU'LL BE PART OF THE EXCITEMENT THAT'S
ALL AROUND. WE BRING YOU FOUR FABULOUS FLOORS PLUS A HUGE FREE
PARKING GARAGE ... SO DRIVE RIGHT IN. THEN STEP ACROSS OUR THRESHOLD
INTO A SHOPPERS PARADISE ... INTRODUCING THE MOST ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN
CONTEMPORARY DESIGN AND CONVENIENCE. STROLL ROOMY AISLES LINED WITH
COMPLETE SHOPPING VILLAGES AND BOUTIQUES IN OPULENT AND VIBRANT COLOR?
THAT MELD AND FLOW LIKE A RAINBOW INTO EVERY DEPARTMENT. MARVEL AT
THE FASHIONS FOR EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY. DISCOVER A VAST HOME FURNISHINGS
STORE ... A SERIES OF DESIGNER ROOMS ... AND MUCH, MUCH MORE I
WERE AT YOUR SERVICE, TOO, WITH A BEAUTY SALON. WEDDING GIFT REGISTRY,
INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO, GIFT WRAPPING, HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTER,
SHOP-AT-HOME CONVENIENCE, CHARGE-A-CAR, CUSTOMER SERVICE, PLUS
THREE IDEAL SPOTS FOR DINING AND REFRESHMENTS: THE GULFSTREAM RESTAURANT, f
ICE CREAM PARLOR, AND SNACK BAR.


^Jewish Fiaridliaiin
ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT OF
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
and Shofar Off Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19, 1971
Pries 20c
nfum
ome 350 persons at-
pecial Sunday morn-
>n breakfasts. Mr.
Imated that several
le attended the Fed-
; held at the area's
arch 12 and heard
*akers representing
Federation describe
iwrtbined Campaign
eds of local agencies
el.
'a Division, through
rhairman. Mrs. Stan-
, reported that all
unctions had proven
i in the number of
ing and the number
Iged. Following the
Luncheon March 25,
ie Women's Division
phone campaign to
women who had
attend.
's Division telephone
be in addition tj
i planned by Errol
in :.,r the Phonathon
Rosen reports that
i-; planning to i>>-
f the campaign dur-
of April. Members
tee will work each
he dquartera set up
tlon office in Holly-
*..

W


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ERDBEFGJE_S8P7MJ INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T23:57:56Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00011
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Pag* IB-
.JmldhntrkMnr
FVUay, Mardi 12. is

\ 4
41. Jf
KiW *M /*' ~. -A ft '.
V

A u-' ?


>***>./"
5-
- i?


now

>
at
Stopping Center
open

THE NEW JORDAN MARSH. 163RD STREET! SPACIOUS! GRACIOUS! ELEGANTI
FRIENDLY I YOU'LL SEE, YOU'LL FEEL, YOU'LL BE PART OF THE EXCITEMENT THAT'S
ALL AROUND. WE BRING YOU FOUR FABULOUS FLOORS PLUS A HUGE FREE
PARKING GARAGE ... SO DRIVE RIGHT IN. THEN STEP ACROSS OUR THRESHOLD
INTO A SHOPPERS PARADISE ... INTRODUCING THE MOST ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN
CONTEMPORARY DESIGN AND CONVENIENCE. STROLL ROOMY AISLES LINED WITH
COMPLETE SHOPPING VILLAGES AND BOUTIQUES IN OPULENT AND VIBRANT COLORS
THAT MELD AND FLOW LIKE A RAINBOW INTO EVERY DEPARTMENT. MARVEL AT
THE FASHIONS FOR EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY. DISCOVER A VAST HOME FURNISHINGS
STORE ... A SERIES OF DESIGNER ROOMS ... AND MUCH. MUCH MORE I

WERE AT YOUR SERVICE, TOO. WITH A BEAUTY SALON. WEDDING GIFT REGISTRY,
INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO, GIFT WRAPPING. HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTER,
SHOP-AT-HOME CONVENIENCE. CHARGE-A-CAR. CUSTOMER SERVICE, PLUS
THREE IDEAL SPOTS FOR DINING AND REFRESHMENTS: THE GULFSTREAM RESTAURANT, j
ICE CREAM PARLOR. AND SNACK BAR.
J