The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00009

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
and MUM All OF GUI A 11 II HOIXYWOOB
Volume 1 Number 8
Hollywood, Florida Friday, February 19, 1971
Price 21 ~
Special Gifts Dinner Total Nearly $500,000
snmp 141 pifts. totaling KAAA i*\,.,;-i c- i_______ _
Some 141 gifts, totaling $444,-
409.29 wore the final result of the
.-uccessful A. L. Mailman-Joseph
Gabel Special Gifts Dinner which
was held recently at the Diplomat
Country Club. The festive occasion
vu thr lirst large-scale event in
1971 Combined Campaign of
Greater Hollywood's Jewish Wel-
fare Federation, Community lead-
from all walks of life gathered
to discuss the needs of the cam-
paign and ways to achieve its
1/"i< .0 000 goal a sum vi-
ally iin-ssa'y in view of Israel's
leeds today,
A benediction by Rabbi David
of Temple Israel. Holly-
o id, in which he cited the fellow-
ship of Jcwa throughout the world
their fe'ow Jews in Israel and
Ihi ir obligation to each other be-
. n the evening's program.
David Schoenbrun, noted tele-
vision and radio personality who
was the guest speaker for the eve-
ning, spoke of his experiences as a
broadcast, r and foreign news ana-
lyst and told of the early days of
radio when he was the only ac-
knowledged "Jewish-broadcaster"
although many networks were
owned by Jews. He has now been
joined in the media by several
other broadcasters of Jewish back-
ground, he. went on. Mr. Schoen-
brun described his friendship with
David Bcn-G irion and Golda Meir
ard told of the occasion when
President Charles DeGaulle of
of France asked Ben-Gurion how
it was that Golda Meir. a woman,
had attained a position of such
Important* in Israel. His descrip-
tion of Ben-Gurion's surprised look
when he answered "Golda, a wom-
an?" drew spontaneous laughter
from the audience.
In a more serious vein, Mr. Scho-
enbrun stressed the problems Is-
rael faces because of her present
military needs, and the fact that
those needs force her to rely on
American Jewry's aid for her social
welfare needs. "We are being asked
for money not blood, though,"
he said, "and money is a small
thing to give."
Following Mr. Schoonbrun's ad-
dress, Mr. Mailman, one of the co-
sponsors of the dinner, played a
tape which Abba F.ban had made
soon after the Six-Day War for
the attentive group of men. (Mr.
Eban had spoke at length of the
hopes for peace in Israel.) A stir-
ring plea fcr substantial help for
the Israeli people so that Mr.
Eban's goals may be realized was
made my Mr. Mailman who de-
clared, "This is the time when we|
Jews in the United States are be- ]
ing counted on to meet Israel's
need*."
Robert Gordon, current presi- :
dent of Hollywood's Jewish Wei- j
fare Federation, who took over the \
duties of Mast"i of Ceremonies
from Jesse Martin, the 1971 Cam- I
paign chairman, introduced both '
Eban Says End To Time Periods
Is Necessary To Reduce Tension
By Special Report
JERUSALEM Foreign Min-
Jlst< r ..iii a El an told a preai
I conference nere last week that
I "an end to time periods of the
I extensions announced
II y 1 ;yp1 is necessary to reduce
Middle East tension a;id pave
It he way for progress in peace
talks."
Mr. El;an also told correspon-
kli-iitv t;:i!liered In t!u- Israel cup-
rt;il thai his nation has formally
Ir.iisiiitte'l the content of Pre-
mier (. ICa Weir's address to
^he Knesset to Cnlted Nations
ppeelal mediator Dr. Oultnar V.
Jarring;.
He said there was complete
pupi-o. i oy me government tor
Irs. Meir's approval of separate
kalks on the opening of the Suez
Canal, coup'ed with a rejection
pf a unilateral withdrawal by
Israeli troops from the canal as
p-manded by the United Arab
Republic.
Mr. Klian also stressed Israel's
right to free passage through
I he Suez Canal, a point not
mentioned hv Kgypfs president
In his proposal to reoften the
waterway.
Despite the negative-sounding
rhetoric from both sides, U.S.
officials said they were "inter-
ested and encouraged" by the
Sndat offer and Meir counter-
offer, if only because it went
Deyond the repetition of previ-
ously stated positions. American
Middle Fast specialists did not
interpret Mrs. Meir's remarks
as a firm rejection of the Sadat
proposal, but refrained from of-
ficial comment lest they preju-
dice the position of either side.
Washington is eager to have
more specific details from both
sides, they said. The precise
terms of the proposals are still
too uncertain for the State De-
partment to comment publicly.
Dr. Chloe Tal, of the Department of Oncology, Hadas-
sah Hebrew University Medical Center in Ein Kamer,
Jerusalem has developed a new, simple test to make
the early diagnosis of cancer possible. Because of a
reduction in government and foundation medical re-
search grants, Hadassah has pledged to raise a mil-
lion dollars this year to be used exclusively for re-
search at the Medical Center. The Hadassah Medical
Organization hopes to crttain this goal by June 8, in
time for the 10th Anniversary of the opening of the
Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Ein
Karem.
Relative calm continued on
Israel's borders, meanwhile,
with ti:e Palestinian terrorists
facing increasing public pres-
sure from the Lebanese govern-
ment. Strong Israeli counter-
measures against Lebanon have
followed almost every Palestin-
ian attack launched from the
southern part of that country,
and thousands of Lebanese ci-
vilians have demanded a crack-
down on the terrorists.
Premier May
Retire Prior
To Term's End
JERUSALEM (JTAI Ac-
cording to persistent rumors
here, Israel's Prime Minister
Golda Meir is considering re-
tirement before her term of of-
fice is up in 1973 and Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan has pri-
vately agreed to continue serv-
ing in a government headed by
the current Finance Minister,
Pinhas Sapir.
The reports apparently stem
from indications that the 73-
year-old Premier is increasingly
fatigued by the burdens of of-
fice, although her health is still
said to be good. Her decision re-
portedly will be determined by
the progress of the Jarring talks
if there is apparent danger of
a new war, she will serve out
her term, but she would prefer
to pass her mantle on to Sapir
so that he can gain experience
as Premier before the next na-
tional elections.
Should Mr. Sapir, 64, a native
of Poland who settled in Pales-
tine in 1929, succeed Mrs. Meir,
the reins of power will continue
to be held by the old generation
of Labor Zionists from Eastern
Europe. He is said to have
achieved an unassailable posi-
tion of influence and power with
the Labor Party leadership, but
many doubt that he could lead
the Party to an electoral victory
without prior experience as a
Premier.
the guest speaker and Mr. M*il-
man. Dr. Harry Permesly and Ben
Salter, honorary presidents of
Federation, Dr. Norman Atkin and
Herbert Katz, cochairmen of the
Campaign, also addressed the me iU
ine. A. J. Salter tabulated the re-
sults and reported the final fig-
ures on the sum raised during t.ie
event launching the drive.
A. L. Mailman, (left) and Joseph Gabel congratulating each
other on the success cf the Special Gifts Dinner which wa:.
held recently at the Diplomat Country Club and included
men who play prominent parts in the Combined Campaign
of Greater Hollywood's Jewish Welfare Federation.
News Briefs
dews Wreck Party Headquarters
MELBOURNE, Australia (WNS) Approximately 600 person
many of them bearing concentration camp numbers on their fore-
arms and some wearing striped garments similar to those once worn
bv camp inmates wrecked the headquarters of Australia's neo-
Nazi organization Sunday. About 2,000 demonstrators had massed
to protest to the police over a parade and meeting scheduled by the
neo-Nazis in a nearby park. The police persuaded the neo-Nazis t >
postpone their program, and all but 503 of the demonstrators dis-
persed before the melee began.
Clergy Protests Election Bill
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WNSI A group of Memphis Protestant
and Catholic clergymen have voiced opposition to a bill introduce!
in the Tennessee Legislature which would change the state's elec-
tion day from Thursday to Saturday. "The change would be offen-
sive to our Jewish brethren and our Christian brothers, the Seventh-
day Adventists, who also observe Saturday as their Sabbath"
they declared. The clergymen represented the Catholic Diocese of
Memphis, the Unitarian Church, the Westminister Presbyterian
House, a Metnodist church and two Baptist churches.
Mobil Yields To Boycott
NEW YORK (WNS) A spokesman for Mobil Oil Co., one of
the nation's largest oil firms with major Middle East interests,
conceded that the company has yielded to the Arab boycott of
Israeli-made products in its Mideast operations. The spokesman sail
the company had been forced to take action because all tanker*
entering Libyan ports are searched and discovery of any product-
made or grown in Israel brings stiff fines to the owner of the ship
or its seizure by Libyan authorities. The spokesman said that tha
policy applied only to Mobil operatiens in the Middle East ani
added that it was a case of complying with Libyan demands or go-
ing out of business in that phase of its operations.
Wiesenthal Has Nazi's Number
TEL AVIV (WNS) Simon Wiesenthal, the Nazi hunter, toli
newsmen that he knows the exact whereabouts of notorious Ausch-
witz "selection doctor" Joseph Mcngele and even has the number of
the Panamanian passport Mengele is holding. He said his center wa?
now concentrating on Nazi Commander Ludwig Hahn, the man re-
sponsible for the murder of many Polish Jews in the Warsaw
Ghetto. Hahn. Wiesenthal reported, is living in Hamburg and main-
tains two villas. Wiesenthal's center has forwarded the pertinent
information to West German authorities, but no steps towards
Kahn's arrest have yet been taken by official*.
I

i


Page 2
vJenisHJcridTian
Friday, February 19, 1971
...... .. t LJ J IKleiman Named
William Horvitz To Head JCRC presidet
7 Lively Arts Festival'
William D. Horvitz, a past pres-
ident of Greater Hollywood's Jew-
ish Welfare Fed-ration who has
dance, poetry, painting, sculpture
The newly-formed Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council named i
Joseph Kleiman. nn active worker
In many causes who has been its |
and photography in a great array acting picsident. to serve as its
president at a meeting held Sun
day evening, Jan. 31.
Other officer) elected were Mor-
ton Abram, Jerome Friedman and
Jacob M. Mogilowitz. vice presi-
dents; Joanne Hlller, secretary;
WILLIAM 1). IIOKVITZ
been active in many community
events, was recently chosen to
serve as president of Hollywood's
llth annual "7 Lively Arts Festi-
val," which will begin March 24
and continue through April 4.
Mrs. Thomas A. Thomas will be
the Festival's program vice presi-
dent and Jerry Yellin will coordi-
nate the programs.
The "7 Lively Arts Festival" is
held in cooperation with the City
o( Hollywood's Recreation Depart-
ment and pays tribute to music,
Smorgasbord Luncheon
The Hollywood Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women held its 9lh annual
Smorgasbord Luncheon and Game-;
Party this week at Temple Beth
K! in Hollywood under the chair-
manship of Eve Zeccola and Marion
Franklin.
Pizza
can
be
"ffflllflD
of mediums.
The Department is represented
by Miss Phyllis Dewey, acting di-
rector, Patrick J. Heneghan. com-
munity sen ices director, and Mrs.
Jane Hose, performing arts super-
visor. Dr. Ernest Sayfie is vice and Richard L. Levy, treasurer.
president in charge of business ad- j ^^ t) lvpn>spnt th,.ir orga.
ministration. Llzatiors .... the Board of the Ooun-
At the first meeting or the ar-1 were Jack Herman and Arthur
nmgements committee, held In the Shay, Jewish War Veterans; Fran-
home of Mrs. Thomas, the 1971 ce* M. Briefer, Hollywood Hndas-
theme "Si,;n of the Times" was sail: George Bursak, American
finalized. Jewish Committee of Bewward
County; So] Cooper, Herzl Lodge,
B'nai B'rith; Milton Forman and
Seymour Mann, Jewish Welfare
Federation; Mrs. Arthur Friend.
Mt. Scopus Hadassah; Mrs, Alan
Jacobs and Mrs. Milton Fornrin
National Council Jewish women,
Sam J. Perry, Zionist Organization;
Rita Duskin, author of "The Fru- Mrs. Sam J. Perry, Sisterhood of
ral Chariot," was the guest speak- Teem!- Sinai, and Mrs. Edward
er at a general membership meet- Schackman, Sisterhood of Temple
mg of the Hallandale Hadassah for* I.

Rita Duskin Is
Guest Speaker
Serving on the Board as Mom-
hers-At-Large will be Seymour
Samet, Louis Shenk and Helen
which also featured songs by Bel-
!e Milbnan In the Home Federal
Building on Hallandale Beach
Boulevard this week. Mrs. Flor- y^0'
ence Rose was program chairman.1 '____^__________
Mrs. Duskin whose first book of
poems was just published, spoke pne| DisCUSSlon Set
of her endeavor to create a sus-
tained atmosphere throughout the
,'book, as though is were one con-
tinuous poem or song. Her titl<\
she said, was taken from Emily
Dickinson's line "How frugal is
the
'
H&.IY
&PQD]
The Henrietta Szold Group of
Hadassah was to meet Thursday,
at the Mirmar Recreation Center
for a panel discussion on "Myths
md Facts About Arab and Israel
chariot that bears a human Relations," led by the educational
soul." i chairman. Mrs. Etta Scheinbaum
The Hallandale Hadassah will with Mrs. Iillian Corbat. Mrs. Na-
hold its Donor Luncheon at th- j omi Needier, Mrs. LilMan Gold-
Diplomat Country Club on Wednes- berg and Mrs. Esther Goldberg as
day, March 24. panelists.
HOLLYWOOD DANK
"oTDOST COMPANY
The Hollywood Bank with The Human Interest Added
1900 Tyler Street 923-8222
FOR CORRECT TIME
DIAL 922-7521
Give the kids a surprising
treat. Make your pizza
dough. Then cut into bagel
shapes, using a donut or
cookie cutter that has a hole
in the middle. Now bake
and lavish with the tasty
pizza sauce and cheese.The
makings are all therein
enBoyardee
CHEEZE PIZZA MIX
V
WSM


Friday. February 19. 1971
+Jmlsi> ikridteijn
Page 3
Day Care Center
Donated By Wohls
Tin* dedication ceremony for the
j](.\\ Carver Ranches Day Care
Center will be held on Sunday,
MB. THOMAS WOHL
fc"eb. 21, at 3 p.m. The new build-
Inn, which was donated to the
immunity by Mr. and Mrs. Thom-
Wohl is located at 4033 SW
l2m SI in Hollywood.
I The Day Care Center was start-
ed four years ago. Classes were
originally conducted in the com-
munity's recreation building.
Through the efforts of the Eco-
nomic Opportunity Croup who sup-
plied the teachers, the National
Council of Jewish Women of Hol-
lywood who provided volunteei
teachers and special equipment for
the Children, and the assistance of
the Carver Handles' Parents'
Group, the Center now has 00
Headstart and Day Care children
enrolled and attenlng each day.
Through the generosity of Mr.
and Mrs. Wohl, the Center's kit-
chen is now equipped to provide 50
Day Care children with hot lunch-
es and snacks daily.
The facilities will also be used
for evening classes and meetings
held by the adult community of
Carver Ranches. Mrs. Elouile Sim-
mons is serving as the director.
Sunday's dedication ceremonies
are open to the general public.
iilult Education Begins
Lt Temple Beth Shalom
Adult Kducation classes, which
pegan this week at Temple Beth
Shalom, will continue for an eight
k\cek peiod in its Jack and Rachel
Shapiro Religious School, 4501 Ar-
thur St., Hollywood. The Tuesday
evening courses are open to all
knembers Of the temple and their
friends.
The schedule Includes Haftorah
bhanting, Torah chanting and can-
tillation, liturgy, prayers and pray-
jv 'Hi-Be, with Cantor Irving Gold
Is instructor. Rabbi Morton Malav-
kky instructs classes in Yiddish
I ind Basic Yiddish Lan-
i and a discussion of the
ffhy i an I Wherefores of Jewish
lidaj ist.iivs and Ceremonies.
lasics o H brew, parallel with
'brew School, is taught by
I)! i lys Diamond. Registration fee
lor thes< courses covers books and
|upplles,
Additional information may be
Kitained by calling Mrs. Bill Gor-
>>n at the Temple Both Shalom
Iffice.
11
RENT-A-CAR =
*5 A DAY
FREE MILEAGE
CAR-BELL
MOTORS
520 S. DIXIE HWY.
HOUtWOOD
920-4141
(NDIAN KIVER FRUIT
f B0PIC 41 JELLIES
CANDIES
EAHCY fltUIT BOXES
MANGE BLOSSOM HONEY
GLAZED FRUIT
Bonded Gift Fruit
Shippers
Mail Order
uoe wruT street
OsystHslissdssgs ParMai *
tWIyw^e, Fta. 33020
PHONE 927-5447
Airports Increase
Security Measures
LONDON (JTA) Security
precautions have been increased
at British and West German air-
ports in the wake of Arab ter-
rorist threats to attack German
aircraft and reports that new
hijacking attempts were being
planned.
Western airline companies in
Bonn have received leaflets
from the Popular Front for the
Lileration of Palestine, which
engineered four hijackings last
September, warning that the
next time, the guerrillas will bo
carrying whiskey bottles full of
gas with which to foil attempts
to subdue them.
West German police, it was
learned, are aware of the pres-
ence in their country of four
Arab guerrillas. Their passport
numbers have been forwsfrded
to London. The PFLP. howevc i .
has issued a denial that anyone
has been sent to Europe on hi-
jacking or sabotage missions.
Auxiliary Fetes
Mrs. Goldman
At Luncheon
The Board of the Hollywood
Auxiliary of the Jewish Home for
the Aged I Douglas Gardens I hon-
ored Mrs. Jerry Goldman at a re-
cent luncheon held In the Ruby
Auditorium of the Home.
Mrs. Goldman, who is now 83
years old, was honored for the un-
selfish love and devotion she has
given to the Home and its resi-
dents for more than 19 years. Un-
til last year. Mrs. Goldman took
as many as of the residents as her
car would hold for a day's trip
each Sunday morning. These out-
ings had to be discontinued when
Mrs. Goldman was no longer
physically able to drive her car.
The residents of the Home who
attended the luncheon presented
her with a pin and earrings that
had been made in the Arts and
Crafts Department of the Home.
Also present at the luncheon were
Rabbi David Shapiro of Temple
Sinai, H illywood, and his wife,
Maurice Pearlstein, former execu-
tive director of the Jewish Home
for the Aged, Mrs. Goldman's son
Lloyd of Bal Harbour and her
daughter Mrs. Sid Pearlman. Mrs.
Goldman, the mother of seven
children, has 17 grandchildren and
14 great-grandchildren.
Lilyan Beckerman, honorary
president of the Hollywood Auxili-
ary ol the Home, declared: "Jerry
Goldman's kindnesses, her generos-
ity, her understanding are limit-
less. She is truly a Queen That
opinion was obviously shared by
all the residents of the Home who
honored her on this occasion.
Teitelbaum Addresses
Herzl Lodge Members
Featured on the program of B'na.
B'rith's Her/1 Lodge meeting at
Temple Sinai this week was an
address by Arthur Teitelbaum. Re-
gional director of the Anti-Defa-
mation League. He spoke on the
subject of "Jewish Security in the
United States The Myths, the
Challenges."
The Lodge will hold its annua.
fund-raising dinner-dance Sunday
March 2S, nt Temple Sinai, it has
been announced. Serving as chair-
man for the event is w lliam
ler.
A multi-media module, designed and produced for the
United Jewish Appeal, is currently on view at the Holly-
wood Mall. The room-size walk-through exhibit features
two slide and sound presentations, "The UJA Story," and
"Deganit," a child's eye view of life on an Israeli border
kibbutz, plus a still photograph panorama display of UJA
sponsored programs in Israel and around the world. The
module will be displayed at the Hollywood Mall until Feb.
22, and is being staffed by women volunteer members of
the Women's Division of Jewish Welfare Federation.
Celebrities To Lea Alderman Benjamin Briscoe,.
who was guest of honor for the |
1988 Fair, will be among the ce-1
lelirities leading the 20th annual I
Irish Youth Fair Parade down
Hollywood Boulevard March 13.
The name Briscoe is well-known;
to Jews and Catholics throughout
the world. Beniamin's father, the
late Robert Briscoe, was Ix>rd
Mayor of Dublin, Ireland during
the late 1950s and toured the
L'nited States many times pro-
claiming the wonders of Ireland
and also selling Israel Bonds. Al-
though this event is called the
Irish Fair, ail nationalities are in-
vited to participate.
HOLLYWOOD BAKERY
107 South 20th Avenue
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
MOLLIE ARBUZ
FORMERLY OF GOLD SEAL BAKERY 0F CORAL WAY
Phone 922-5130
CLEANING
WYNONA
Cleaners
PHONE: 922-5561
500 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
We Pick Up ana Deliver
APPLIANCE CITY INC.
420 Hollywood Moll Hollywood, Flo.
Telephone 981-4300 Miami Telephone 625-0840
RCA ADMIRAL
ZENITH FRIGIDAIRE "Dedicated to Good Service t
HOOVER G.E. Quality at Lowest Price"
Never Undersold-Guaranteed Lowest Prices


Pcce 4
* Iwtisti Fk>ridllain
Friday, February 19, 1971
tKJewisti Floridiar
u.d SNHI \H HI I.HMIIN IIUIIlWIHHt
OFFICE and PLANT120 N.E. 6th Street Telephone J7V4605
LYWOOD OFFICE TSLBPHONB 9450964
P.O. Box 2973. Miami. Florida 33101
Fred K. Shochet SelmvM. Thompson
Jitor and Publisher As.vi5W.it to Publisher
MARION nkvins. News Coordinator
The Jewith Floridian Doet Not Guarantee The Kaihruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns.
Published Bi-Wecidv b) the Jewish Floridian
Kf nnd-Clnss Pending Postnge Puld at Muni, I'la.
-ii Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood Siiofar Editorial
jory CommitteeDr. Sheldon Willcns, Chairman; Ross Beckerman, Ben
-. Marion Ncvins, Dr. Norman Atkin, Michael Rtrvel.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate.
Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Association
of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association. _______
SUBSCRIPTION
RATES: (Local Area) One Year $5.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Three Years $12.00
Y-_.ume 1
F.iday. February 19, 1971
Number 8
24 SHEVAT 5731
Broad Authority Given, But Unused
Although Ihe Israeli government is grateful for the
opportunity to make much-needed military purchases under
the Toreign Military Sales Act, the amount of credit sup-
port requested in the Administration's new budget is viewed
by many as inadequate and the credit terms stringent.
While this represents an improvement over previous
U.S. policy on arms for Israel, it should be remembered that
the last Congress, under which S500 million in military
credits was authorized, provided the authority for better
treatment in Section 501 of the Defense Procurement Act.
The measure, which carried a strong and decisive pol-
icy statement aimed at Moscow was approved by 87 Sena-
tors. This statement declared: "Any such sale, credit sale,
or guaranty shall be made on terms and conditions not
less favorable than those extended to other countries which
receive the same or similar types of aircraft and equip-
ment." Washington observers believe that the Adminis-
tration should have used the broad authority under De-
fense Procurement rather than the routine and more expen-
sive Foreign Military Sales Act.
Histadrut Program Is Vital
Attainment of S20 million in contributions by the Israel
Histadrut Foundation will be realized next week during the
organization's sixth annual international Mid-Winter Con-
ference in Miami Beach.
The participation of its first chairman. Ambassador
Arthur J. Goldberg, and other dignitaries will help give the
Foundation the recognition it has earned in Israel as well
as in the United States and Canada.
Histadrut's program of health, education and cultural
projects achieved worldwide attention. The Kupat Holim
medical network serves more than three-fourths of Israel's
population. The Histadrut Amal technical high schools,
youth centers, Afro-Asian Institute and other facilities are
also vital factors in the growth of Israel.
As Histadrut concludes its Golden Jubilee celebration,
Israel looks to American and Canadian Jews for new di-
mensions of support through deferred giving to the Hista-
drut Foundation.
Departure From Precedent
The increasing demand by English-speaking youth
for study in Israel has been met by the decision of the He-
brew University to provide an academic curriculum in Eng-
lish (and Spanish, as well) for foreign students in their first
two years of study. With the American College in Jeru-
salem geared solely to the needs of such students proving
a success in its three years of existence, there are now
ample opportunities for serious young people to get their
education in Israel.
For the Hebrew University, center of the Hebrew lan-
guage for the past 50 years, the decision was a major de-
parture from precedent. It was made in the face of recom-
mendations that a separate foreign language university be
created to meet the increasing demand. Hebrew Univer-
sity officials wisely opposed this idea for it would have
cut off American, British. Canadian and South African
youth in particular from contact with Israelis. One thing is
made clear: there will be no relaxation of the high stand-
ards that have been set for faculty and students at Hebrew
University.
Issue Deserves Top Priority
The right of any person to leave any country, includ-
ing his own, deserves top priority at the forthcoming meet-
ing of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. It
has been on the Commission's agenda since 1963 but has
been entangled in international red tape so that while its
substance has been approved by many nations including
the Soviet Union the requisite number of official ratifica-
tions to bring it into force is still lacking. Although we are
particularly concerned with the plight of Jews in Russia,
Iraq and other Arab states which deny their basic rights,
this is an issue which affects the future of all humanity.
MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSO?
WASHINGTON -Asa po-
litical strategist, Richard M.
Nixon is still being underrated
by the majority of Democrats.
Thry show few signs, for In-
stance, of perceiving how the
1972 election can be affected by
the astonishing governmental
Innovations the President has
now begun to propose.
The trouble is thai few Demo-
crat as : i appreciate the Pres-
's wet ii me long headedro ss.
ii 'iv c nsider the real origin,
which can now be disclosed on
undoubted authority, of the
mu< h-debati d Nixon stral ">'
tor the 1970 election. It ori ji-
nated when the President
bought his program for getting.
Inflation under control from the
chairman of his C luncil of Eco-
nomic Advisdrs, Paul McCrack-
en.
THAT WAS very early in
19B9. Mr. Nixon asked MeCrack-
en, pointedly, whether inflation
could be under control by 1972,
without bad times and high un-
employment in 1970. McCrack-
in re,.lied truthfully that these
results in 1970 would he hard to
avoid, although he hoped they
could be avoided.
To the President, of course,
McCracken'S reply meant the
likely prospect, for 1970, of
some Republican losses in the
Senate and substantial losses
between 20 and 30 seats in the
House of Representatives. So he
began to prepare, almost at once,
to put the Democrats on the de-
fensive with the so-called "So-
cial Issue" Instead of leaving
the other side to take the of-
fensive issues of bad times and
joblessness.
UK UUED a meat-ax. plus
Vice President Agnew. to exe-
cute this strategy. But the fact
remains that the Republicans
actually gained two seats in the
Senate, and held their !l
1 ttses to a rock-bottom mini-
mum. Realistically considered,
this was a s ilid achievement.
All this is now worth men-
tioning, simply because it is
again undoubted that we are
now witnessing the same sort
of long-headed preparation for
1972. it ;-. now fashionable to
say the Nixon plan for radical
restructuring of the whole gov-
ernment may be a good plan;
but it does not matter very
much because Congress will not
accept it.
Bi'T As anyone should
the President is far too sophis-
ticated to expect the Congress
to approve radical government
restructuring this year. Fqually
certainly he does not expect
the Congress to approve the
even more radical tax revision
that he means to offer next
y- ar. His requests for these vast
innovations, in fact, are meant
to become the main planks of
his 1972 platform.
If you think about it a little,
moreover, they are likely to
prove extremely solid planks. As
just re|)orted in this space, the
centerpiece of next year's root-
and-branch tax revision will l>e
the so-called value-added tax. In
Itself, th..- will be controversial,
even unpalatable,
BIT A value-added tax at the
European level of 154 will bring
in around $60 billion a year in
this country, even if medicines
anil foodstuffs are excluded.
Some of this huge sum will have
to be invested in meeting ur-
gent national needs for a
stronger defense, money for the
environment, more money for
better schools. Some more will
also go to fatten the President's
proposed revenue sharing.
Kven so. that will leave an
enormous sum that can be used
for the other purposes previous-
ly reported to reduce person-
al income taxes; to cut corpor-
ate taxes; and to help out home
owners now sorely overburdened
by property taxi s. The home
owners, it should be noted, are
In l>c prime recipients of Nlx-
onian benevolence. And anyone
ought to be able to figure out
the politics of that.
IF VOl think about it. the
governmental Im ivations al-
i ady prop ised !-t ro atly into
the same pattern. The Pi
dent is not going to be run
against "Big Government" in
the old way. This old way w
Bay that we must not try to
this, that or the other great -
Continued on Page 7
/\s
Max Lerner
Sees It
Th
vanqul
..( \ uMnamese war. I suspect, will have neither victors
shed. When and if it ends, it will end as a standu...
W to tr v" W1" "" n0t Wi" >ut hom 0" trial but
now to prevent a recurrence.
sue rf^iJt 1!I"SIs"cms to mo karate from the broadest Is-
wu the *iIT" i b? ,hC Grman a,,d J"P" cas" i{
rvl i T ,he nd f ,hc in lament on
;n1hnri|,l?|,(l did ni" Judgment on them-
u u.:''...' *hl'.v,c T For. W-twy. whether we like it or not,
NEW YORK So the level has escalated, and what started
as a set of trials (Lt. William Calley and others) tor the My Lai
m i-s icre has become a debate about the war guilt of the top
American generals, Cabinet officers, even Presidents
From wh< re Calley sat, on trial at Ft. Benning. Ga.. this
was a dream break for it got a lot of the heat off him and
cemented his basic defense on the ground of "superior orders."
But from where the i> st of US sit, I wonder how useful the whole
exercise will prove, except as a moral purgative.
With the Calley trial still going on, it would be wrong to
comment on his guilt or innocence. Calley has given part of his
story in Esquire and to several correspondents, emphasizing the
I'm-an-ordinary-guv aspects of it, but he has yet to complete it
in the military courtroom.
As for My Lai itself, aside from Calley, millions of words
have been written some of my own among them in rev vi-
sion from what happened there. Whatever the judicial outcome.
My Lai will remain a shattering historical episode, an ugly scar
across the American conscience. It will take a long time before
some tissue grows over it. and it will never be wholly expunged.
AT NUREMBERG, where the high Nazi officials were tried
by an Allied court, they pleaded that they were only carrying
out what Hitl.i had commanded them to do.
Albert Specr, who is today enjoying a curious and profitable
glorification for his memoirs, took a different tack. The sub-
ordinates m th>' field, he said, did have to carry out their orders,
but the top leaders had to accept "co-responsibility" wtih Hitler.
it is ironic to see the doctrine of superior orders cropping up
again, in the current phase of the My Lai public debate, after
the Allied Judges had rejected it at Nuremberg.
In his book on Nuremberg and Vietnam, and In an inter-
view on tin' Dick Cavett show, Telford Taylor formerly Amer-
ican pro :utor i Nuremberg, now law professor at Columbia
and Vale has said tint by the legal logic ol Nuremberg, and
of the Japanese tri ils, the American commanding general at the
time of Mv Lai could be tried tor war crimes. A group of "Con-
cerned Offlo is." basing themselves in part on Taylor, has asked
for an Inquiry into war guilt on the top levels.
The Army secretary's answer, I suspect, will be that a com-
mission headed b; Gen, Peers has already investigated the
of orders and responsibilities, up and down. The trouble with the
Peers Commission report, as anyone trying to comment on it
found 'rut. is that so much of the evidence and findings were
enssified as it had to be. while the Calley trial and others
were still pending. At some point the Peers Commission and the
Army secretary will owe the nation a full accounting, with no
one spared.
AT THIS POINT you have to dig deeper into the nature of
war itself and the problem of historic responsibility.
When Walter I.ippmann wrote a few weeks ago that the
Vietnamese war had been a blunder and that President Nixon
would do well to repair the blunder by rapid withdrawal, some of
his critics objected that this view ignored the immorolity of the
war from the start. They .saw it, in brief, not as a blunder but as
a crime.
By that logic, everything since the start of America's inter-
vention has been a crime, and those involved have been crimin ils.
This wouid certainly resolve the issue of Calley and others, high
and low. for where everyone la guilty it follows that no one is
guiltier than the rest.
My own view is that the deep involvement was in fact a
blunder but that the moral or immoral aspects of the war can't
be assessed sweepingly. All war is immoral. In the Vietnam
Case, a Super Power like the Unit, d States, with the Super
Powers military technology, cannot fight a war against guer-
rillas, where civilians and combatants are-intermingled, with
clean hands.
No Western power French. Dutch. British has done it
without incurring guilt, and the United States is no exception.
Once we admit tins larger evil, we can insist 6n a policy of care-
a. disciphne Inside the Army so that the inevitable crazy-hot
JS ",.":"' ,locsn turn '",0 col<'' atrocities.
nor
standoff.
is always Written by the surviv-
ors.
-' **a



Friday, February 19. 1971
* ***#> Atafeffen
Page 5
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19


si,



1 : r
now
ft ^
r-
at
Shopping Center
Now open


u
THE NEW JORDAN MARSH, 163RD STREETI SPACIOUS! GRACIOUS! ELEGANT!
FRIENDLY I YOU'LL SEE, YOU'LL FEEL. YOU'LL BE PART OF THE EXCITEMENT THAT'S
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PARKING GARAGE ... SO DRIVE RIGHT IN. THEN STEP ACROSS OUR THRESHOLD
INTO A SHOPPER'S PARADISE ... INTRODUCING THE MOST ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN
CONTEMPORARY DESIGN AND CONVENIENCE. STROLL ROOMY AISLES LINED WITH
COMPLETE SHOPPING VILLAGES AND BOUTIQUES IN OPULENT AND VIBRANT COLORS
THAT MELD AND FLOW LIKE A RAINBOW INTO EVERY DEPARTMENT. MARVEL AT
THE FASHIONS FOR EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY. DISCOVER A VAST HOME FURNISHINGS
STORE... A SERIES OF DESIGNER ROOMS... AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!
WE'RE AT YOUR SERVICE, TOO, WITH A BEAUTY SALON, WEDDING GIFT REGISTRY,
INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO, GIFT WRAPPING, HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTER,
SHOP-AT-HOME CONVENIENCE, CHARGE-A-CAR, CUSTOMER SERVICE, PLUS
THREE IDEAL SPOTS FOR DINING AND REFRESHMENTS: THE GULFSTREAM RESTAURANT,
ICE CREAM PARLOR, AND SNACK BAR.
.
i


Page 6
+Je*lsHTcridiar
Friday, February 19. 1971
Mrs. Geoffrey Wigoder
Is Luncheon Speaker
Mrs, Geoffrey Wifjoder will be
the guest speaker at the Advanced
Gifts Luncheon of Greater Holly-
Gerald SMegel Is president of the
Division and Mrs. Francis Briefer
campaign chairman advisor for
life. Mrs. Robert Gordon and Mrs
Edward Gross are Initial Gifts
chairmen.
The Advanced C.ifts Luncheon
will he followed by a Pace Setters
meeting hosted by Mrs. Asher
Hollander March 11 at her lovely
home on Diplomat Parkway. Mrs
Donald Herman will host the Spe-
cial Gifts meeting on March IS
in her new home in the Emerald
[sies section of Hollywood. The
Women's Division of Federation
will top off the campaign with a
March '-'.} Highlighter Luncheon
at The Hemispheres in Hallandale.
>1RS. GEOFFREY WIGODER I
wood's Women's Division of Jew-1
ish Welfare Federation. The lunch-
eon will he held March 4 at the
home of Mrs. Myron Segal in Hol-
lywood. I
l
Mrs. Wigoder, a graduate of the
American Academy of Dramatic
Arts, the New School for Social
Research and the Jewish Thcologi-1
cal Seminary ol Adult studies, is
assistant to the director of the
Public Relations, Information and;
Special Events section of the New'
School for Social Research.
The author of "Hope Is My
House." an autobiographical story |
of her iourney into Judaism. Mrs.
Wigoder has spoken in the United
States and ('m.ida in behalf of
Canadian Hadassah WIZO. Is-
rael Bonds U.J.A. and Hadassah
U.S.A. and has appeared as a panel
member and master of ceremon-
ies for the Israel Tourist Corp.
The Advanced Gifts Luncheon
will be the first in a series of
events planned by the Women's
Division of Federation for their
part in the \'.'~\ combined cam-
paign. Prerequisite for attendance
will be a minimum donation of
$365.
Campaign chairman for the
Women's Division's 1971 campaign
Ls Mrs. Stanley Greenspun. Mrs.
Choi Lodge Members
Nominate Officrs
Nomination of Chai Lodge No.
2574, B'nai B'rith of Hollywood of-
ficers was held at their regular
monthly meeting this week at the
Home Federal Bank Building in
Hallandale. Th-> program for the
evening also featured a demonstra-
tion of the K-9 C >ips by Sgt Rich-
ard North of the Hollywood Police
Department. Zach Bial, the Lodge's
specialist on Israel, announced
that a Jewish culture study group
will be meeting at his home. Mr.
Bial is also investigating the prac-
ticability ol Chai Lodge adopting
a Kibbutz in Israel, and will re-
port to Lodge members on his find-
ings at an early date.
Secret Meetings Of
Jordanians, Arabs
Reported In Beirut
JERUSALEM (JTAI A
number of prominent West Bank
Arabs have reportedly met se-
cretly with a similar number of
Palestinians from Jordan in
Beirut recently. The partici-
pants, including two former Jor-
danian Cabinet ministers who
are now residents of the West
Bank, were said to have dis-
cussed the future of their terri-
tory and the possibility of estab-
lishing a new entity indepen-
dent of King Hussein's regime
in Jordan.
Israeli authorities on the Wi St
Bank prohibit political activities
especially any that might be
directed against King Hussein,
but are powerless when it comes
to such activities taking place
on foreign soil, and Jordanian
authorities do not permit any
activities calculated to strength-
en Palestinian elements within
the Jordanian population, so the
West Bankers left for Beirut
via Cyprus, ostensibly to settle
"family at.airs." the Jewish Tel-
egraphic Agency has learned.
Diamonds it Jewelry
Appraised
STATE LICENSED
APPRAISERS
MORNINGSTAR'S
119 N. 20th AVENUE
Hollywood
923-2372 923-2373
Luncheon Honors '
Mrs. Milton Klicr
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom held its annual "Sweet-
heart Luncheon" this week in the
temple's Social Hall with Char-
lotte Cooper, star of the show
"Goodbye Koptzln, Goodbye Pau-
per," providing the entertainment.
This year's luncheon honored
Mrs. Milton Klicr. who served as
the president of the Sisterhood
from 1966 to 1967 and has always
'ven a dedicated worker for the
Sisterhood. Mrs. Idler has di-
rected many or the theatrical pro-
luctl ins put on by the Sisterhood.
Members of the planning com
mittee for the luncheon included
Mrs. Stanley Margolls and Mrs.
Albert Kobert, coehalrmen: Mrs.
Mo-ten Levin, tickets and reserva-
tions: Mrs I.eon Cutler, publicity.
1 Mrs. Sidnev Rosenberg Mrs. Rieh-
ard Lew and Mrs. Robert Rappel.
d( corations.
Also on the Committee were
Mrs. Herman Toll, Mrs. Irwin
Markowitz, Mrs. Martin Rhodes.
Mrs. Jerome Friedman, Mrs. Da-
vid Isaacs. Mrs. Harry Zimmer.
Mrs. Minnie Frank. Mrs. Bernard
Lane. Mrs. Jack Richman, Mrs.
Rebecca Spigcl, Mrs. Gerald Bern-
stein, Ml, Al Kahane and Mrs.
Richard Finger.
Mrs. David Settlor is the current
presidents of the Sisterhood; Mrs.
Henry Jacobson is fund-raising
vice president.
Volunteer Training
Session Scheduled
Mrs. Stanley Greenspun. chair-
man of the 1971 Combined Cam-
naign of the Greater Hollywood
Jewish Welfare Federation Wom-
en's Division, has announced that
there will be a training session for
volunteer solicitors at her home
Thursday morning. Feb. 25. All
members of the Women's Division
who wish to participate in the
work of the 1971 campaign have
been invited to attend.
Dr. Jim Young, Field director of
the Council of Jewish Federation
and Welfare Funds, who is con-
sidered an expert in the field, ol
gift solicitation, will conduct the
meeting, which will take the form
of a group dynamics training ses-
sion.
V
Louis S. Rosen, (left) president of the Presidential Towers
Social Club and Carolyn Davis, vice chairman of the Apart-
ments Division, chat with Rev. Carl Voss at the recent meet-
ing of the Jewish Welfare Federation's Apartments Division.
United Health Foundation Gathers Kidney Crisis Data
in response t.. the emerg< ncy
request of the University Of Miami
Artificial Kidney Center, a meet-
ing was held by a number of Dade
health organizations attempting
to determine the scope of the im-
mediate crisis and the community
facilities available to meet it.
The United Health Foundation,
which Dr. Everett Shocket serves
as president, and the Compreh, i>
sive Health Planning Council were!
commissioned to gather additionall
data needed to solve the emergi nJ
cy situation and help cope with tl
long range programming and
budgeting problems. The Found
tion is the health planning
program coordinating agency of]
DON'T KILL TIME
SPEND IT WHERE IT'S NEEDED!!!
DO YOU LIKE TO TALK Off THE PHONE?
MAKE IT WOtTHWHILt TALK.
Join the Phonathon group of Greater Hollywood's Federation
2-3 Hours In The Evening
DO TOO LIKE OFFICE ATMOSPHEKE BUT SHIRK RESPONSIBILITY?
You can dream while you lick stamps, soal envelopes and for
some privileged low, there is even the opportunity
to stuff the envelopes you soal... Name Your Hours
DO YOU LIKE BEING PART Of THE SCtNt?
Is your talent public relations?
You can use it where it's needed working for Federation.
CALL 927-0536 ASK FOR SANDI
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
JOEL MARC WILENTZ,M.D.
RICHARDS. GREENE, M.D.
DERMATOLOGISTS of
PIANTATION, MEDICAL CENTER
660 NORTH STATE kOAD #7
TAKE GREAT PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THE
OPENING OF THEIR SECOND SUITE OF
OFFICES AT
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2100 EAST HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD.
HALLANDALE.- PHONE
920-1066
920-1067
PLANTATION: PHONE
587-7195
587-9490

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401 E. Hallenlale Beach Blvd.
Robert Smith Owner
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see the most beautiful and unusual "Home Decor" and
Gifts ever assembled in one shop; and our custom-made
Flower Arrangements have won us new customers from
near and far.
So the next time you are on Hallandale Beach Boule-
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We will greet you with a smile!
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Members ol MMtOr Cttanja American t >pim
Open Mof.clj, Tliruuqti Sjiu'djy
lOOOOOOOBOl
eailMRHRHRaa


Friday. February 19, 1971
*w#* FhrkHnr
Sw^^*****^******************^^^^V^AAAAAAAA Page '/
scene aWnd
by M,rjo Nevins
i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^vwwwv
Tuesday. Feb. 2, marked the official opening of Jewish Wel-
i, Federation's 1971 campaign. The setting was the Diplomat
Country Club, and believe me it was fun having dinner with over
103 men and maybe five other women The event was of-
ficlaHy called the A. L. Mailman-Joseph Gabel Special Gifts Din-
ner (and believe me some of those gifts were SPKCIAL!) Abe
and Joe were beaming at the results.
David Schoenbrun, whom, we all know from radio and tele-
\ ision, was there. He was a doll about posing for pictures by
the time the evening was over we all felt as though we had
known him forever. Hollywood City Commissioners were repre-
sented by Tommy Wohl and Bob Anderson. (Tommy and his
wife recently presented a Day Care Center building for the
Carver Ranches area.I The medical profession was represented
by dozens of Hollywood doctors including, of course. Dr. Harry
TVrmesly. who was on the dais as one of the past presidents of
Federation.
Around the room were seen Howard Fuerst. Bernie Milloff.
Norman Atkin, Milton Caster, Tom Rodenberg, Reuben Klein.
A Kin Fisher. David Teperson, Pete Weinstein and many more.
The Rabbinate was represented by Rabbi Samuel Jaffee,
Rabbi Morton Malavsky and Rabbi David Shapiro. Canadians
Jack and Henry Blatt were there. (They are the builders and
developer* of Bonaventurc and spend a good part of the year
here in Hollywood.) Bill Horvitz and Jesse Martin were on the
dais. Bill, another past president of Federation, had just ac-
cepted the presidency of the "1 Lively Arts Festival" to be held
in March. Jesse, of course is the 1971 campaign chairman for
Federation. Ben Saltcr was another past president on the dais
along with the current president, Bob Gordon. Incidentally, Bob's
June was among the few women there.
Over in a corner as the cards for pledges were being called,
Abe Salter was working at his usual chore of adding up the
totals; I really think he enjoys this part of his job. All the other
men seemed to enjoy the evening and be pleased by the amount
pledged for the work of Federation.
Relaxing on the Hollywood Beach as we all watched the
planes pulling the different advertising banners. I was delighted
to see one which called attention to Teen Age Hot Line and gave
the phone numl>er for teenagers to call any time of the day or
night. The time and the sign were donated by the operators of
the advertising plane service. What a great way to contact youfcg
people and make them aware of this great telephone project/
Pat Henrghan, former Recreation Director for Hollywood
and now their Community Services Director, was the person
responsible for Bill Horvit/.'s acceptance of the 7 Lively Arts
presidency. They've been friends for more than 20 years and Pat
i i that Bill was just right for this job Spoke to Abe Dur-
the builder and the president of the newly-formed Temple
Soiet (He, too, was at the Advanced Gifts Dinner of Federa-
tion.) He was enthusiastic about his new temple and "the really
great" group of young people who are working very hard to get
this'congregation going. At a recent board meeting they voted
to employ a permanent Rabbi and expect to have an announce-
ment to make liefore long.
Howard Fuerst has taken on the job of heading the Medical
Division for Federation's current campaign Florence and
Howard's daughter, Nancy, is due to be Bat Mitzvah this month
. Spent some time with Jeff Mann, Seymour and Mitzi's son,
the other day we discussed his new venture in the photography
business. I can never lose track of Jeff's age; he was Bar Mitz-
vah the first year we moved to Florida. In addition to that.
MiUd and I pushed baby carriages together, buck in New York.
i Just recently I was looking over some of the creative wrlt-
ing of the extremely talented Stuart Hopen, who was a finalist
In the annual Achievement Awards competition of the National
Council of Teachers of Knglish. Stuart is also a talented artist.
11 is proud mom and dad are Selma and Joe Hopen.
JHctur of j Hillel Community Day School
JOSEPH ALSOP r Plans Junior High, Department
Continued from Pag 4
cial problem, because doing so
would lead to "Big Govern-
ment."
Instead, the President is go-
ing to be running againsl "Gov
erness Government." In other
words, he is going to be saying
that trying to solve our great
social problems by the dictati
of a remote federal bureaucracy
just has not worked despite all
our efforts.
UK IS GOING to be saying,
too, that we must press for so-
lutions of these problems, how-
ever expensive. And he is going
to urge pressing for solutions at.
the grass roots, by the itatft
and local governments that besi
understand how the problems
appear locally.
So the Democrats in 1972 are
likely to have to run for "Gov-
erness Government"; and
against relief for property tax-
papers and reduced income and
corporate taxes. It seems an
uphill job.
The executive board of Hillel | each successive year, he said, un-
Community Day School has ap- tjl a ful1 nine-grade school with
proved plans to establish a junior
Home Federal
Announces
Appointment
Thomas Wohl, president of Home
Federal Savings & Loan Associa-
tion, has announced the appoint-
ment of Erik G. B. Johansson as
the institution's controller.
Mr. Johansson, a native of Stock-
holm, Sweden, was graduated from
junior college there. He studied
accounting at Wayne University
in Detroit, Mich., and received
his B.B.A. in Accounting from the
University of Miami before en-
tering the savings and loan field
as an auditor. He and his wife.
Doris, and two sons live in Miami
Beach.
After serving in the Swedish
cavalry during World War II, Mr.
Johansson joined the Swedish Mer-
chant Marine. After a fire at sea
caused the crew to abandon ship
between the Azores and Trinidad.
he and the ship's officers spent six
months in Barbados awaiting in-
surance investigation of the sea
disaster. While there, he met Doris,
whose family had lived there since
the French Revolution. He re-
turned to Sweden, but later went
back to Barbados to be married
to her.
Economic conditions in Barbados
were such that he turned to this
country In search of a livelihood,
eventually making his way to
Pontias, Mich., where he found
work with a utility company as a
repairman, and enrolled in the
university.
After receiving his accountant
degree, which took 10 years for
him to obtain while working nights,
he and his family came to Flor-
ida, and became connected with
the American Savings & Loan
Association as treasurer, a position
he hrld until his recent appoint-
ment as controller.
I)K. JOEL B. DENNIS
high school program starting with
the seventh grade next fall, Dr
Joel B. Dennis, president of the
school announced.
Higher grades will be opened
both elementary and junior high
school departmer$a are estab-
lished. Plans for a senior high
school will l>e studied and acted
upon in the spring of 1973, he
reported.
A limited number of graduates
from public elementary schools
will b" accepted for the 7th grade
in September. Classes on the jun-
ior hir:h level will be limited to
20 students and such candidates
for admission must show a su-
perior record of scholastic achieve-
ment.
The dual curriculum will in-
ii:de both general and Hebraic
Itudies such as are currently of-
fered on th" elementary school
level. Th junior high program
Ml! be completely departmental-
"l with S|.....laltzed instructors
the various subjects, according
'o Dr. Dennis.
Hillel will be housed In its pres-
ent location In the school building
if Ti mple B -th Shalom, 1725 Mon-
roe St., I ollyv >>'! for the aca-
lemis year, 1971-72.
Parents are asked to call the
ichool office for additional infor-
' on.
CM
C4V IR-
REGULAR PRICE LIST
Shompoo & Set ......4.00
Hop. Cut........... 3.00
Manicura..........2.50
Color Rinse ........ 1.00
Touch-up, Single.....8.00
Touch-up, Double ... 12.00
BY APPOINTMENT
927-1170
OPEN WEEKDAYS 9-5
FRIDAYS 9-9 SUNDAYS 9 1
SPECIAL
PERMANENT
WAVE
Regularly $25.00
Including
Shampoo & Set
Pitt here view our line Art Exhibit by Contcmpor/iry Artists-
(NEXT TO HOLIDAY INN)
1937 HARRISON STREET HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
2 hrs. Fiee Porking on City Lol On Von Buren, between 19tH 8. 20th Ayes.
PICTURE FRAMES
CUSTOM CREATED TO THE INDIVIDUALITY OF THE SUBJECT
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WHICH TO SELECT
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FRAMES t PICTURE RESTORING
> PORTRAITS IN OILS
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STUDIOS Ar
2032 HARRISON ST. 5
IN DOWNTOWN HOLLYWOOD
Phone 923-3267
JOIN OUR
HOLIDAY WEEKEND
CRUISE GROUPS
IN 1971
3 and 4 DAY CRUISES
NASSAU and FREEPORT
SPECIAL LOW RATES
For Information Call'.
981-2203 or Write:
AtC TRAVEL
120 N. 46th AVENUE. HOLLYWOOD HILLS, FLORIDA 33021
PLEASE SEND CRUISE DETAILS
NAME:
ADDRESS: PHONE:
If:


Page 8
-Jewistifhrknor)
Friday, February 19, 1971'
OUR TOWN

by bobbe schlesinger
RACE FOR LIFE
Move over Pearl Mesta. You've been re-
placed by Ho'.lywood's own fiostess with the most-
est. LYNN FONTAINE. Her flower-flUed ocean-
front home, surrounded by sun, sand, ocean-
breezes and pounding surf, provided the perfect
setting for tliis fabulous femme's hospitality.
Forty members of the South Broward Chapter of
the American Cancer Society were in\ ited there
one Tuesday morning for a work-meeting and
champagne-brunch. Dining on steak and eggs
while sipping Champagne, the charity-minded
femmea combined a little fun-raising with their
fund-raising. Twas all for the purpose of solidi-
fying plans for the two-pronged benefit coming
up in April with all proceeds going to the Amor-
can Cancer Society. A gala evening cocktail-
buffet supper featuring an auction of rare coins,
paintings, porcelain, jewelry and objets d'art will
be held April 2nd at Emerald Hills Country Club.
And. if that prospect isn't enough to tantalize,
there'll also be a chance for you sea-going salts
to win three brand spanking-new boats and/or a
cruise tor two with deluxe accommodations
aboard the MS Song of Norway. On April 14th
a luncheon and day at the races is on tap at
Gulfstream Race Track tor all the racing en-
thusiasts. WOODY VVOOniU'RY has consented
to emcee the festivities and Mrs. ERNEST SAY-
FIE prize winning artist, will donate one of her
'xquisitely executed paintings as the door prize.
And. what is more, GOVERNOR and MRS. REU-
BEN O'DONOVAN ASKEW will !* the Hon-
rary Chairmen. Heading up all the exciting ar-
rangemer.ts are Mrs. .HAN WESTER and Mrs.
IILTON MYERS. Together these two ladies
have assembled the hardest working members
r the community as hostesses tor the twin
events. Contact them please if you have any
goodies to donate to the upcoming auction: Mrs
Robert Burger, Mrs. Donald Berman, Mrs. Wil-
'iam Bill Mrs. Donald Bulllngton, Mrs. Milton
"aster, Mrs. Yale Citrin, Mrs. R-inert Collins,
Mrs. George Crane, Mrs. Joseph W. Davis. Mrs.
Herbert Elkins, Mrs. Kurt Flanagan, Mrs. Hugh
Fontaine, Mrs. William Foster. Mrs. Alfred
GeronemtUr, Mrs. Robert Hutchison, Mrs. Peter
Irving, Miss Ch irlotte Ingalls, Mrs. John Kellner,
Mrs. William King, Mrs. Hy Kones, Mrs. Norman
Landman, Mrs. Dale Lindberg, Mrs. Dan Lo-
renzo, Mrs. Henry Mallon, Mrs. i-.iix-t McLaury,
Mrs. Albert Montella, Mrs. Van Poole, Jr., Mrs.
Paul Rodensky, Mrs. A. J. Ryan, Jr., Mrs. Ernest
Sayfie, Mrs. Sheldon Schlesinger. Mrs. Marvin
Shuster, Mrs. Axel Strauch, Mrs. Fred Sultan,
Mrs. Leon Sultan, Mrs. Clarke Walden. Mrs.
Ronald Woody, Mrs. Marcus Zzar, Mrs. William
Cox and Mrs. Maurice Wolfinger.
COMMUNITY CONCERT
ASSOCIATION PRESENTS
The Community Concert Association kicked
eff its 1970-71 season with the presentation of
The First Chamber Dance Company of New
York. The five dancers acquitted themselves well
in displaying their versatility and the unique
character of chamber danc as an art form. Since
(here was no supi>orting corps de ballet, each
dancer consistently played a major role on stage
throughout the entire performance. Those Holly-
wood devotees of "things cultural" turned out
n masse for the festivities and some brought
.long the kiddies. TILI.E FRIEDMAN and KIT-
TY LEE were there and so were the TED SOR-
l.N'S. MARZI and DOUG KAPLAN and the LEE
JAFFEES. LIBBY (MRS. SHELDONt WILL-
ENS. SELMA HOPEN. ELAINE PITTELL. and
ESTELLE PODIS made the scene with their
little ones and during intermission, MIMI SA-
BRA was glimpsed exchanging chatter with
sister. Mrs. SY LEVIN and daughters JODI and
MINDY. DODIE and her Dr. PETE WEIN-
STEIN made a handsome family picture with off-
spring SUSAN, JULIE and STEVEN while Dr.
LOU JOBLOVE proudly escorted his pert 'n
petite NATALIE with children, RICKY and DI-
ANE. Staunch supporters of the ballet, ELSIE
SPECHLER and SANDRA FRIEDMAN were on
mg gent, does his fair share of big game fishing
JULIUS GOLDSTEINS. Mr. G., a most engag-
gent, does his fair share of big game fishing
(most recent chest-popping catch was a 70 lb.
ailfish i and more than a fair share of volunteer
work at Memorial Hospital to boot. Next offering
by the Community Concert Association will be
the Soloi.-t Veneti String Ensemble on tap
for February 20th at the South Broward High
School Auditorium and another goodly group of
music lovers is expected.
A HIT AT PARKER
"How to Succeed In Business Without Really
Trying," the award winning Broadway hit, open-
ed Monday eve at the Parker Playnouse, and it
was i smasher! Recreating their original roles in
the Abe Burrows, Frank Locator laugh getter,
Roliert Morse and Rudy Vallee were superb. The
first nighters seemed to agree as evidenced by
their enthusiastic raves during intermission.
Chatting with Pucci-clad CAMILLE SULTAN
and hubby, LEON, and that handsome twosome,
Dr. and Mrs. JUAN WESTER (Jordana, inci-
dentally, doing marvelous things to a black
Valentino midi I was the one and only BEVERLY
McDERMOTT (she heads up a talent agency of
the very same name I. Bev was equally excited
with the prospects of her latest assignment com-
ing up in March. She'll be in charge of casting
for the movie "The Godfather" starring Marlon
Brando when the crew arrives in Florida for a
3-week stooting stint. Since Bev renewed a long-
si aiding luncheon invitation to yours truly, de-
cided to take hei up on it provided I be permitted
to choose the time and place. Well, folks, the
lunch date is set now. T'will be a boxed lunch on
location wherever and wherever Marlon Brando
happens to be filming!
PEOPLE AND PLACES
The MILTON SPIERS are anxiously await-
ing the arrival of MOLLIE'S sister and brother-
in-law. the MAT M. KAHNS. Mr. and Mrs. K.
recently celebrated 50 years of wedded bliss at a
grand party given in their honor in Highlands
Park. Illinois. They'll be staying at PERCY
COWANS Hollywood home while Mr. C. jets
up to Chicago for the wedding of his grand-
daughter. JAN COWEN to DANNY PHILLIPS-
BORN.
Local femmes appeared in some dazzling duds
at a private little fun gathering for 20. CARO-
LYN i MRS. MILTON) CASTER wore a silver
topped grey jumpsuit while Dr. NORMAN AT-
KIN'S wife. NANCY, donned a white ribbed
sweater and pony print hostess skirt. Sjxirting a
yummy chocolate brown floor length number
with feather-trimmed sleeves, JOAN RODEN-
BERG was a delight to the eye as well as the
ear. Her quick wit sparked the party spirit and
I; pt the fun folk in stitches.
Mr. Stork, who flies the South Broward route,
has been up-up and away recently delivering
precious packages. Eight lb. 10 oz. DEBORAH
LORI arrived at the home of investment coun-
selor. RICHARD KNEE and his pretty wife.
FRANCTNE and the GEORGE ALLEN'S are
overjoyed with their latest addition to the
household, ROBERT TODD. Heartiest Congrats
to the mommas and poppas!
STEVEN ROMANIK, handsome son of the
LEONARD ROMANIKS, will be flying to Wash-
ington, D.C. come March to participate in the
Presidential Classroom for Young Americans
Program. He'll be attending 24 seminars and par-
ticipating in group discussions and conferences
concerning government. And. its all under the
tutelage of several high-ranking federal officials.
Those six splendid fellows of "Federation"
lunching at Emerald Hills Country Club were
MIKE RUVEL. BOBBY BAER, JESSE MARTIN.
Dr. NORMAN ATKIN, JOEL ROTTMAN. and
Dr. HOWARD FUERST. Howard's spouse.
FLORENCE, was also lunching there that day
but with a different group (The eighty female
duffers of the Emerald Hills Women's Golf Asso-
ciation). Florence served as installing officer for
the new slate of officers. Here they be: RUTH
COHEN, president. 'GLORIA GREENSPUN,
vice president; EVELYN BUCHBINDER. record-
ing secretary; JOAN STOLOVE. corresponding
secretary; and MARY BLOOM, treasurer. Con-
gratulations all yqu pretty putters.
Entries Being Accepted
n Poetry Competition
Entries are now being accepted
for the nth annual 7 Lively Arts
Poetrv Competition, which is held
in cooperation with the Hollywood
Recreation Department under the
direction of Miss June Justice.
All entries In the cutest, spon-
sored by the Seven Lively Arts
Festival Inc., must be received by
Monday, March B. They should be
addressed to Miss June Justice, in
car' of the Hollywood R
lion Department, -0.-50 Polk St.
First, second and third prizes
will be awarded to each of the fol-
lowing age groups: A college
and adults i lit years of age and
older I; B 10th, 11th and 12th
graders; C 7th, 8th and 9th
graders; D 4th. 5th and f'.lh
grades, and E 1st 2nd and 3rd
graders,
Children in the first through
sixth grades do not need to type
their entries. They mast, however,
be neitly and iegibly written in
ballpoint pen in four copies, on
one side of the paper only, with
absolutely no art work. The name
age. street address, town, tele-
phone number, name of school and
grade must lie written at the
bottom of each page.
All other entries must be typed
on four (41 shci ts ,>f paper, 8V4 x 11
inches. One original and three
dark carbon conies are allowed \'
they are clear and legible, and the
name, home address, teleph me,
college or school attended 'if a
student] must appear at the i>i-
tom of each page.
Any subject may be used as a
theme; only two poems from any
one person will be accepted in the
general contest.
There will be three additional
"Special Memorial Awards" com-
petitions. Only one entry may >>.
submitted by each contestant for
hi se sp cial awards; the fan
copies must be identified In the
same manner as described
Entries in the Mab '. Price
Award competition, which is open
to all ages, must be done ,, ,
sonnet, in Shakespearean form on
an) subject.
The Frank Bowers Award is al-
so open to everyone, Entries must I
be op a patriotic theme and not
over 24 lines' long.
The Clarence Cone Award is
()1k:i t.i college students and adults i
only. The entry is to t>e a lyric
poem, not over 24 lines in length.
Winners will be notified ind
trophies wi'l be presented on Po-
etry Night, March 29, at Holly.
wood Recreation Center. 2030 p ilk '
Street
Judges for each age category I
will be announced shortly. Further!
information may be secured by
calling Mrs. Jane Rose, performing I
arts supervisor, at the recreation]
office.
Perry Appointed To
New ZOA Committee
Sam J. Perry, president of the I
Broward Zionist District, has bet-n |
appointed as a member of th( N
Committee on Soviet Jewry!
formed recently by the Zionist]
Organization of America.
This new Committee is th ini-
tial form of official expression o!|
the ZOA's deep concern tor the
fate of the Jews of the Soviet]
Union. Its special activities in thi-|
ires have previously been
I in cooperation with th-I
American Jewish Conference on|
5o< ii t Jewry.
DIRECT FROM MIAMI
Passover In Israel
APRIL 6th to APRIL 20th
IncludesTransfers2 Meals A Day
SightseeingSeder In Jerusalem
ALL-INCLUSIVE $939.00 per person
Also
22 DAYS ISRAEL/LONDON $1045.00
22 DAYS ISRAEL/LONDON/GREEK ISLAND
CRUISE ..... $1136.00
All Rates First-Class Hotels
i BUDGET TRAVEL
3808 South Ocean Drive
Hollywood, Florida 33020
(opp. Galahad Apts.)
JDUDGE
927-1693
947-1535 (Miami)
Dining & Dancing Nightly Till 2 A.M.
m Florida's Newest & Smartest Supper Club
I Joe DeCatlo Trio Q Sonny Bell 'ano
Organ
Serving Lunch Daily from 11:30 a.m.
Harold 8. Ruth Lunch"s STAGECOACH INN
^ 4520 Haliandata Blvd. Hollywood. Phone: 983-4068
IF YOU THINK YOU'VE HAD 6000
CHINESE FOOD BEFORE.. .TRY
CHRISTINE LEE'S GASLIGHT
WE AIS0 SERVE THE FIMEST STEAKS IN MIAMI
located in the Golden Strand Hotel
ReservaticI **' "^ CoUbu Aven"*


Friday. February 19, 1971
*Jewisl Ihrilit,
Page 9





A dream
is worth dying for
only if
it's worth living for.
Something can be worth dying for only if it's
worth living for.
The people of Israel understand this. They
know that life need not depend on a particular
plot of land. But, if it does, it is only symbolic of
a far greater cause afar more substantial dream.
To them and to Jews throughout the world. Israel
represents an end to a tormented four thousand
year history. A history scarred by hatred! oppres-
sion and attempted genocide. It represents a
dream to be free of fear, brutal injustice and in-
humanity.
And to defend that dream the people of Israel
make unprecedented sacrifices. In money and in
tears and in blood. That is their task in the battle
for Jewish survival.
Ours is to see that the dream is not an illusion.
To keep the gates open to every Jew who wishes
tocome. by transporting, settling and training im-
migrants seeking freedom from persecution. By
building clinics and rehabilitation centers for the
old and the handicapped and the diseased.
What we must remember, more than ever be-
fore, is our historic and moral obligation to make
the dream worth living for. to those who believe
it's worth dying for.
Survival means sacrifice. The Israel Emergency Fund.
GIVE TO THE REGULAR AND
EMERGENCY CAMPAIGN OF THE
GREATER HOLLYWOOD
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION


Vaqe 10
vJewisti fhrkUari
Friday, February 19, 1971
letters to the editor
t lillllli. Klnridfcin-Shiiftir:
I
American Jews annually havej
i mtrlbuted liberally to the need*
i l Israel, and our Jewish comnum-
In Hollyw >od hu been able t<>
icreaie 11 U.J.A. contribution
each year. Bui the Increased needs
Israel and th" ravages <>f Infla-
tion have greatly reduced the ef-
tivenetts of our dollar contrlbu-
1 ons and our Federation leaders
lit fully .-.mind us that when
> g\y ihe s tme. we give less.
We must prepare now to seek out
u i;i| other potential sources ot
t Mils toi the future.
One especially fertile field is
mi- :i specific bequests in our
l>\ id'ia! u ilR Many can amply
oviri security for their beloved
New Chapter Of American
Israeli Lighthouse Here
Tin' Minnie Goldstein Chapter
i American Israeli Lighthouse of
i i-,i iii an organizational
i ecently at tin- Home Fed-
i ,il Bank Building In Hal! indale.
Mrs. l- s Rubin is president of
t is n<->\ chapter, which was form-
< by a group ot women who work*
t I lor th;^ cause before coming to
South Florida, The organization
helps to support Midal Or, a re-
habilitation center in Haifa which
t Hches tl"' blind to become self
itutning. Persona interested in
lining ari' inviti\i to contact Nan-
cj Cohen, 581 Blue Heroon Dr.,
. illandale,
*
ones and also include U.J.A. in a
i kMcU t > the will. The magnifi-
cence of Israel has given Jews ev-
erywhere a new pride and feeling
of greater stature. It has made
our Jewish heritage more mean-
ingful. It would be both pathetic
and tragic t i ignore this oppor-
tunity while we still are in this
world.
To fully appreciate th.- depth of
our feelings for Israel, just Imagine
the possibilirj or a catastrophe oc-
curring to Israel,
Now remind yourself that hind-
sight never changed anything.
ARTIIIK \V. FELDMAN
Holl>-\voo This Week In History
19*) Soviet
40 Years Ago This Week: MM
Britain's clarification of i's 19M
White PaiKM- denied a ban on Jew-
ish immigration to Palestine and
Jewish land buys there, re-denned
landless Arabs" as those displaced
by Jewish purchases, denied de-
nunciation of Jewish organizational
efforts, and permitted the Jewish
Agency to use only Jewish labor
on its projects. Dr. Chalm Welz-
mann, who had quit his Zionist
posts over the White Paper, called
the new letter "a basis for cooper-
ation." But Vladimir Jabotlnsky
threatened Zionist Revisionist
secession.
' r
in the
died in
Riga said Soviet
Closed all Kiev
IF IT UOVES ONE S rtP CLOSkft, WE'LL PUT A HOCEN DOVID OK IT.'
Reports from
authorities had
synagogues.
Rabbi Adolf Schwarz. rector ol
Vienna's Jewish Theological Semi-
nary for 38 years, died at th age
of 84.
The daughter of Ma.j. Ferdinand
Esterhazy horsewhipped Jacques
Richepin backstage alter the Paris
Opening of his play The Dreyfus
Affair."
10 Years Ago This Week: 1961
Dr. Robert Servatius, Adolf
Eichmann's attorney, chose Men-
del Scliarf from a list of Israeli
lawyers willing to aid him.
Reports from Moscow said the
Kremlin had approved publication
of the first USSR Yiddish |.....iodl-
cal since the late 1940s "Sovietish
Ileimland." to In- edited by Aaron
VergeHs.
Ilya Ehrenburg reported that
poet Oslp Mandelstam, who had
disappeared
purges, had died in a Siberian
prison,
"Israel's position in the United
Nations now faces new tsts and
challenges, and the road ahead is
likely to be rougher than it has
been for several years," said Am-
bassador Michael Comay. "There
are many signs that the Arab
states want to develop a new dip-
itic offensive ."
.1 wish leaders urged stronger
cultural and spiritual ties between
IS. Jews and Israel to counteract
the "conformity and lack of pur-
. ,.. il life in suburbia."
Bavarian indemnification of
\'./': victims reached $41 mPlion in
I1 10, for a total since 1948 of
$220.44 million.
New York City's Appellate Court
reversed a lower-court decision
barring public speeches by c orge
i.i- coin Rockwell.
M ss arrests of Jews were re-
ported from Morocco, where they
had been protesting repression.
Sen. J. W. Fulbright of Arkan-
sas criticized Israel for what he
called her press censorship, her In-
vasion of lite Sinai, her violation of
r v agreements and her minimiza-
tion of the number of refuge-.
Presidert Ben-Zvi asked D I
B( n-Gurion. who had quit as Pre-
mier over the "LavOfl Affair," to
form a new Israeli government.
Louisiana's State Supreme Court
overturned a :ower-court ban on
. mixed male-female seating in Che-
vra Thlllm synagogue.
So much to see, so much
to do in Israel...GO!
You've been thinking about It, dreaming about it... why wait
any longer? Go this year, and go GREEK LINEthe favorite of
so many thousands, the Golden Route to Israel! On your way to
Israel and back, enjoy a luxurious, restful vacation at sea.
Continental cuisine or gourmet Kosher meals under the strict-
est supervision. A rabbi and Synagogue grace our ship. Sun-
drenched decks, open-air pools, lounges, nightclubs, ballrooms,
theatre. And Greek Line sailings coincide with major religious
and cultural festivities in Israel.
SAILING DATES: April 19, June 14, July 12, September 7. October 12
QUEEN ANNA MARIA
For colorful folder, reservations, call your Travel Agent or ths
g GREEK LINE ^J^h
Registry: Greece
25 S.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, Fla. Tel. (305) 373-6434
Williams, Dimond InttrnatMMl
flBUDETOTHE
WLDERHESS
JOFTHEEUERBLflDES
% By John O'Reilly
S John O'Reilly shows thatun-
Boater's Guide
Jewfish Creek to Long Key
By William G.TwesdeJI
"It's a tremendous little vol-
^ j...... w ....) muni iuv Ull- .,
J limited boating adventures a- mne wait vacationers, winter resi-
J dents, weekenders, and locals
both on the deep blue waters
^ of the Gulf Stream and in the
% tabled backcountry wilderness
% of Florida Bay.
Martenhoff, Miami Herald
"A must for campers or boat-
ers planning to take this trip."
The rloridaNaturalist
64pp., illus. 12.50
at your bookstore or send
check or money order to
^ 64pp., illus. S2.50
S fft UNIVERSITYOFIWBPRESS
l Gables, Flo. 33124
\ rn uiiiutruaiY i
^ ^* Dwer 9088, Coral Gt
I


Friday. February 19, 1971
+Je*lst) fhrkUan
Page 11
Bank Elects Directors, Officers
Robert Anderson, president nnrl
newly-elcctori vice ohairmnn of the
Board of Directors of Hollywood
Bank and Trust Company, has an-
nounced the election of new direc-
tor, Walter R. Pearson. Jr. and
Reese B. James, and the promo-
tion of three officers at the fi-
nancial institution.
Mr. Pearson, b native of Okla-
homa, first came to Hollywooil as
;i naval officer in 1944 after e,rad-
uatlng iumma cum laudV from
Princlpia College and receiving a
Masters i-l Business Administra-
tion degree from Harvard Unlver-
\ He began his banking career
in !!)4S and became affiliated with
Hollywood Bank and Trust Co. in
1955 as cashier. Ho was promoted
In vice president and cashier in
1956 and senior vice president and
e.ishier in 1986. He attended Ston-
ier Graduate School of Banking
;,t Rutgers I'niversity, and holds
a graduate certificate from The
American Institute of Banking.
A past president of the Holly-
wood Rotary Club and the Brow-
ard County Chapter of the Amer-
ican Institute of Banking, Mr.
Pearson is a oast officer and di-
rector of the Greater Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce and an ac-
tive member of the Committee of
One Hundred of Hollywood. Also
active in South Klorida tennis cir-
cles, in 19>8 he was the sewnd
ranked senior pi tyer in Florida.
Mr. James, a native of North
Carolina, was educated there, and
lH't;an his hanking career in 1940
with a prominent bank in Phila-
delphia. He became Branch Man-
ager before joining the staff of
Hollywood Bank and Trust Co. as
assistant cashier in 1953. He be-
came vice president in 1954 and in
1956 was promoted to senior vice
president and loan officer. Mr.
James holds a graduate certifi-
cate from the American Institute
of Banking and is a long-time
member of the Greater Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce. He has
lived with his wife. Mary and
two sons in Browar.i County sincp
1953.
The officers elected by the local
bank are John R. Galloway, pro-
moted from auditor to comptrol-
ler; Mrs. Cathleen Anderson and
Mrs. Anna May Vellekoop. pro-
moted to assistant cashier.
Mr. Galloway's banking career
l>egnn in his native state of Ohio
in 1957, and he has been with the
local bank since 1968, serving as
auditor until his recent promotion
to comptroller. A member of the
American Institute of Banking.
he has received training at Inter-
national Accountants in Chicago,
the American Institute of Banking.
National Association of Bank Audi-
tors and Comptrollers and Bank
Administration Institute. Mr. Gal-
loway and his wife, Faye live in
Fort I.auderdale.
Mis. Anderson, a native of Pom-
pano Beach, who attended Brow-
ard Community College and is a
graduate of Broward Business Col-
lege, began banking at Hollywood
Bank and Trust Co. in 1955. She
uas president of Broward County
Chapter of American Institute ,,!
flanking from 19G9 to 1970, was m
A.I.B. governor for 11 years. A.IB.
Social Committee chairman for
two years, chairman of A.I.B.
Women's Committee for nine
years and was named A.I.M. Wom-
an of the Year in 1968. Prior to
her promotion to assistant cashier
her title was executive secretary
to the president.
Mrs. Vellekoop came to the lo-
cal bank as a bookkeeper in 1956
and has (wen assigned to the In-
stallment Loan Department since
1P57. She was born and educated
in New Jersey, has had 15 years
accounting experience and 17
years in banking and has com-
pleted four A.I.B. courses. Mrs.
Vellekonr> is a past president of
Credit Women International. Brow-
ard County Chapter. She lives
with her husband, William V-lle-
koop. their son and her mother in
Pembroke Pines.
The officers reelected by the
Board of Directors included A. L.
Mailman, chairman ot the board:
K. J. Schwaback. honorary chair-
man of the board; Robert Ander-
son, president and vice president
of the hoard: Robert W. Gordon,
Walter R. Pearson. Jr. and Reese
B. James, senior vice presidents;
Lewis H. Cohen, vice president
and trust officer; Roy T. Strainge.
Jr. and Jack F. Tingle, vice pres-
idents: G-egory F. Miller, trust
officer: Henry H Wardle. ass;s-
tant vice president; Mi's. Olive
F'nlT.son, P-ivkl R. Furr, John
Giordano. Robert O. Gritter, Rob-
ert Hmth. Mrs. Barbara J. Love.
Mrs. Carol A. Reed and Barry I.
Wade, assistant cashiers, and Rob-
ert W. Schear, Jr.. assistant trust
officer.
Bank directors reelected were:
Stanley M. Beckcrman, Slvpard
Broad. Daniel J. Connor, Gerald
Eaton, Robert W. Gordon, William
D. Horvitz, C. H. Landefield, Jr.,
Dr. Byron M. Pell, Dr. Myron I.
Segal; Joseph X. Shure, H J. Sie-
rcI, Sherwood Spencer and Ben
Tobin.
Hollywood Bank and Trust Com-
pany, which has just completed its
20th year of serving area residents,
paid a 10 stock dividend to
shareholders of record Jan. 18.
Mrs. A. Margolis Is
Board's Speaker
At Open Meeting
The national president of Bran-
dels University Women'- Commit-
tee, Mrs. Abraham Margolis. fiom
BostOi Mass.. was the guest
Bpeaki r at ib i organization's open
board meuting and coffee at tin
home of Airs. A.iron Schecter Ol
Hollywood, this week.
The Council ol Broward County
Chapter of Brandeis Women in-
cludes the Mesdames Hy Kones. I
Ned Gordon. John Prowant, Aaron '
Schecter, David Aranow, Maddy
Kest, Reuben Km:., Harry Schorr,'
Jack Alexander, Sheldon Hoffman,,
A. P. Weinberg, Paul Rodensky, j
Harry Sommers. Henry Kest, J. |
Smolian, Robert Hoffman and
Joseph Sternberg. I
Past presidents on the Advisory-
Board headed by Mrs. Lawrence
Nusbaum are: Mrs. Bernard Mil- j
ioff, Mrs. Lawrence Nusbaum. Mrs.
Alfred Geronemus, Mrs. Louis Ben-
net. Mrs. Norman Wrubel, Mrs.
Robert Gordon, Mrs. Maddy Kest,
and Mrs. Joseph Sternberg.
Merrill Bank of Baltimore, Md.,
Arthur Belfer of New York City,
Maxwell Cumminga of Montreal,
Raymond Kravis of Tulsa, Okla..
and Mh\ Zivian of Palm Beach
were inducted as Brandeis Uni-
versity Fellows at the recent an-
nual dinner in Palm Beach.
M.M.
Mou.-ie Meyers
Campaign Chairman
Apartments Division
of Jewish
Welfare federation
says.
s
Plans for meetings and fund raising events are under way in
some 50 different buildings, it has been announced.
Galahad III residents were very strongly moved by the read-
ier.,' of a very eloquent introduction to two Israeli films by Sidney
Shipman. More than 200 people watched the films. Committee tor
the building consists of Simon Hecht, vice chairman; Joseph
Friedman and Jules 15. Gordon eochairmen, and committee mem-
bers Marti.'i A lerbach, Abe Bader, David Cohen. J. Dobkin, Mor-
ris Goldstein. Aaron Greenberg, Arthur Greenberg, Louie ix-fko-
witz, Bernie Levins, Meyer Levy, Sam Schwartz and Harry
SUverman.
Oxford Towers and Stratford Towers residents almost 100
ol them held a joint meeting under the dire.-non of vicechairman
Philip Olender and Col. Martin Oster. They viewed films by
United Jewish Appeal.
Galahad North and Galahad West showed the same films on
Thursday, Feb. ll. The Sea Air Towers will show the films on
Feb. 22, Galahad Cowl on Feb. 25, and the Parker Plaza on
Feb. 28.
George Gordon has been chosen honorary chairman for
Galahad North and William Broder as cocbairman. Committee
members for the building include Jack Blickstein, Leo Beer. David
Barnett. Peggy Broder. Ben Fishstine. Albert L. Farr, Ben Feld-
man, Mary Feldman. Martin Hasps), Mrs. Max D. Honeyman. Ben
Miller and Morris Polakoff.
Louis S. Rosen has been appointed chairman for the Presi-
dential Towers for the 1971 campaign. His eochairmen will be
Carolyn Davis, Dr. David Teperson and Meyer Kirsner.
Your Suggestions Are Welcome...
Readers of The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hoi.y.
wood are requested to make suggestions for columns, feat mis or
ideas they believe will enhance the columns of this publication.
Your suggestions are welcome and should be mailed to:
2037 Tyler Street, Hollywood, Fla. 33020
The Publisher
^^^v^A^
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Paqe 12
9-JewistincrOdlgan
Friday, February 19. 1971 -tl
Some of the men who attended the recent
A. L. Mailman-Joseph Gabel Speciid Gift* Pinner
ROBERT ANDERSON (left) and ABE DURBIN
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. (left) Robert Gordon. President of Federa-
tion, and Max Low
Jesse ]. Martin, (left) Campaign Chairman of the 1971 Cam-
paign, Joel Rottman and Robert Baer
Dr. David Teperson, (left) Thomas Wohl and Allan Orlove
Dear Reader:
You will receive a card in the mail: In order
to insure receiving your copies of The Jewish Floridian
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood through the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Greater Hollywood please
sign and return the card immediately. Your coopera-
tion is appreciated.
FRED K. SHOCHET
Publisher
Invention Might Be
Pollution's Solution
Morris Klein, Hie president of
Appliance City, Inc.. in the Holly-
wood Mall, reportedly lias been
Issued a "patent pending" number
by the U.S. Patent Office for his
'Internal Combustion Engine with
Zero Pollution Emission."
After more than 20 years of
dreaming. Mr. Klein has modified
the standard internal combustion
engine of his Chevy van so that
il will run on hydrogen, producing
an exhaust of pure water vapor.
Using somewhat the same prin-
ciple as that utilized in the Apollo
spacecraft, the hydrogen, which is
stored in a long cylinder behind
the front seat of his vehicle, is in-
troduced into his van's engine
through a "venturi tube" and
spark plugs set off the reaction
between it and the oxygen nor- j
mally found in the atmosphere,
producing the iwcr required to
run the vehicle.
"Powerwise." Mr. Klein says, '
"hydrogen is about 40*/. more ef-
ficient than regular gasoline, or
about the same as 120 octane fuel.
But the noxious gases produced
by burning hydrocarbon fuels such
as gasoline are not present in the
exhaust of an engine burning hy-
drogen and oxygen," he declares.
This steam-producing hydrogen
powered engine may end the smog
problem, help solve man's pollu-
tion woes, save the world's hydro-
carbons for the manufacture of
chemicals and the world's oil re-
serves from rapid depletion, Mr.
Klein predicts.
Since a minimum of retooling
would have to be done in order to
modify the standard internal com-
bustion engine, Mr. Klein believes
that only a year or two would be
required to begin production. He]
visualizes full hydrogen cylinders
Ik ing exchanged for empties at
i service stations where gasoline is
! now pumped into an auto's tank.
He is confident that hydrogen can
be mass-produced for about the
same price as gasoline, although it
is relatively high priced right now.
Local chemists and Detroit au-
tomotive sources confirm the fact
that the system will produce an
abundance of power, but they were
j skeptical about its safety. Mr.
i Klein, however, Considers the
I system completely safe. Hydrogen,
\ he points out, is an element that
'; is lighter than air. It would diffuse
I very quickly if it should escape.
j and thus is far less likely to ex-
plode than gasoline.
The engine of any car can be
} converted for between $200 and
$300, Mr. Klein says. If his engine
catches on, oil will no longer lx-
such a "kingpin" in world affairs
and there will no longer be "have"
and "have not" countries in the
world. "And just think of a smog-
free world," he smiles.
MAURIE MEYERS (left) end MICHEL JOELSON
Nancy, daughter of Dr. and Mrs
Howard Fuerst. will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah Friday night, Feb.
26. at Temple Sinai.
to Scott, the son of Mr. and Mrs,
Paul Glasel, will become Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, Feb. 27, at Temple
Sinai.
GREATER HOLLYWOOD'S
JEWISH WELFARE FEDERATION
WOMEN'S DIVISION
March 4 Advanced Gifts Luncheon-Home Mrs. Myron Segal
March 11 Pace Setters Meeting-Home Mrs. Asher Hollander
March 18 Special Gifts Meeting-Home Mrs. Donald Berman
Malch 25 High Lighters luncheon-Hemispheres
WADLINGTON
FUNERAL HOMES, INC.
140 S. DIXIE HIGHWAY, HOLLYWOOD
Phone 923-6565
Hollywood's Oldest
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"A Service Within The Means 01 All"
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
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Please send me literature on the above. .
NAME: ._______
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
SERVING CONSERVATIVE and REFORM JEWISH FAMILIES
JOHNSON-FOSTER
FUNERAL HOME, INC.
1650 HARRISON ST. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. PHONE: 922-7511
Paul J. Houlihan, Konnoth E. Loomli, Gl.nn A. Strunk
L.r.D.


liday, February 19, 1971
*Jewlsti rkridUnn
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Pcge 14
*-Jewlstncrkilar
Friday, February 19. 1971
Israel Newsletter
By CARL ALPERT
West Bank Arabs Take A Second Look
SOME ISRAELIS ONCE advocated early return
of the occupied West Hank to King Hussein, no1
80 much for political as foi economic reasons. "Why
should we have to bear the bur-
li n ol feeding and providing vital
services to a million Arabs who
ild prefer Arab, rather than
! raeli rule?" they asked. "We've
enough financial burdens ol
our own."
The realities of the three and a
h i. j rs since the Six-Day War
have put the situation in an cn-
tirelj different perspective, however. For one thing,
th( West Bank has not become an economic burden
on Israel. It pi ivides a market for Israel products
and Is b source of unskilled and semi-skilled labor
i ah industry and agriculture in Israel, which is
seriously short-handed. Official figures put the num-
ber of Aries from the occupi d areas who cross the
line daily lor johs in Israel at 30,005; the number is
probabl) much higher.
At the gami time, the West Hank has main-
tained its trade relations with Amman, and through
Jordan, with the rest oi the Arab world as well. The
so-called "open bridges" program has proved to be
a masterpiece ol political/economic policy. For the
first time the Arabs ol the Wesl Bank have practi-
callj unit impered commercial access to markets and
sourci s to both the..- east and west.
The physical after-effects of the war wen'
slight. The battle was over in only four days in this
area; damage was at a minimum, and recovery was
rapid. Furthermore, about hall of the West Bank
population lives ofl farming, n sector which was
least affected. Government workers, legal profes-
sions, white collar workers, tourism, were the
groups hint the mosi.
From the outset, Israel's policy w is to l.clp put
iiii i.ea cm its feet. Administration of tin- West
Bank is, for the most part, carried on by Arab ci-
vilian government. Efforts have been made to min-
imize relations with what i> to them, after all, a
conqueror. Thi Israel flag Ls seldom seen, the pres-
Capital Spotlight:
By JOSEPH POlAKOFr
Soviet Embassy's Upset
pi.Vi.--- BEARING THE Star of David flown by an
American-Cans li i Labor Union ind a "silent vigil" by
a handful of Washing! m .1 va ha e jangled the nerves
of Soviet di| A [ton.
The setting for a s rles if incidents which stirred the
diplomats to demand police intervention is a half-mile
from the White House in the heart of Washington's most
tigious commercial area. There on opposite sides of
L8th Street N.W., are the Soviet Embassy and the
Philip Mu i iy Building, named for the legendary labor
leader who ruse from the coal mines to the leader hip of
the Congress for Industrial Organizations (CIO). In that
budding are the headquarters of tile International Union
ol Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers (IUEl whose
president is Paul Jennings and secretary-treasurer is
David Joseph Fitzmaurice.
The original development which led to the incidents
began virtually unnoticed on Dec. 10 when a dozen Jews
came to the broad entrance to the Philip Murray Build-
ing to pray and stare for 15 minutes at the Soviet Em-
bassy, their way of expressing solidarity with the Jews
on trial in Leningrad,
For 2(1 consecutive days, except for Saturdays and
Sundays, sometimes in bitter weather, the Jews met
daily without disturbance. Their little gathering became
known s 'The Silent Vigil." But on the 21st day
.bin. 7 the Executive Protective Service (EPS), a
special police force formed by the U.S. Secret Service to
guard the While House and diplomatic establishments in
Washington, broke up thai day's vigil.
An EPS sergeant on duty al the Embassy came
across the strei I and told them they must move from the
aiea. Soviet officials within the Iron-fenced structure
complained thai ih.-.v were in ng "molested" by tlie group,
the sergeant said. Faced with the order, the lews de-
ted,
The in xi day, about 30 Jews gathered, including five
rabbis. Tb> same sergeant told the group that the So-
viet Officials had protested against this "demonstration"
which was "molesting" them. David Amdur, of the Jew-
ish Comniunily Council of Washington, asked the S"rgeant
to state the charge. The sergeant told him he was carry-
ing out his superior's order and urged "I'm asking you
to go; please leave."
Despite the continued police disruptions, apparently
at Soviet insistence, the "vigil" is continuing. Brant Coop-
eismith, of the American Jewish Committee's Washing-
ton Chapter, said "We plan to come back daily as long
as there is a problem for Soviet Jewry."
nice of Israeli soldiers hardly felt, and there are
only 160 civilian officials, in contrast to 1.500 Arabs
engaged in thi various functions of local government
As on.' vv.il.r put il. an Arab NablUS can be born
in a hospital, reared, educated, married, raise chil-
dren and finally be buried all without recourse
to or contact with any Israeli soldier or official, or
even without seeing one.
The policy has been not meicly pas-i'.e. but
positive as well. Guidance has been provided for
agricultural development, for furtherance ol home
Cl ifts, for improvement in construction and indus-
trial methods. The results have Oeen marked. The
West Bank is now manufacturing icxtiles. furni-

S00K REVIEW By Seymour B. liebman
Challenge and Response:
A Program For Europe
AMKAIl'.lilt OK THE German Bundestag since
1948, Franz Josel Strauss who was Brandt's
election, ha- taken the title of his book. Challenge
and Reapoase I Atheneum Publish-
ers, Sd.95i from Arnold Toynbee's
theory of history.
StraUSf believes that the day of
the European nation-state is past
and emphasizes the necessity of
moving toward a united Europe.
The creation of a continental state
is necessary if Europeans desire
to m.ant tin control of their own
he says.
lorevvard was written by the illustrious
Frenchman. Jean-Jaoques Servan-Schrelbcr. Both he
and Her: Strauss ire concerned with the constantly
growing efficiency and domination of the two
super-powers. Strauss' theme is that Europeans must
have a united Western Europe "which would sooner
or later have at its disposal all the attributes of
power, Including nuclear power."
Servan-Schreiber gives a brief but excellent
synopsis < Soviet regimi by most Russians and why the sys-
tem has failed miserably in Eastern Europe, Ancnl
Russia, he writes, "Here i- a country which, though
i: gives ..U its children a rcess to modern education,
i liu- i's youth from free though!
life, Here, loo, is a country where bril-
'.'i technological achievement* seem to go hand in
hand with striking economic I un where th re
"i ime, a shorl e
lrv in" p e '
li,- li Americ i we h ive heard little ol the c >l-
I the European Defense Community In 1954
Because ol this failure, we continue t>> c ute
millions of dollars to NATO which, I regrel to say,
is a paper tiger. Enlightened men such as Strauss
and ServanSchreiber arc voices calling out in th-
wilderness ol Europe where xenophobia and na-
tionalism are vet forces.
ture plastic products, sandals, candy, medicine, etc.,
with markets In Israel and in the rest of the Arab
world as well. The economic miracle has not been
log) upon the people and the leaders of the area who
recall only too well that the Amman government
had treated them like a colony, and had failed to
encourage any industrial or economic self-develop-
ment in onk r to preserve it as farmland. B source of
food for Jordan.
Many problems still remain: There Ls still no
solution for the frustrated intellectual. Youth is
. in revolt as a result of the collapse of the
patriarchal society. These are conditions in which
political ferment takes place But West Bank Arabs
arc beginning to take a new hard, thoughtful look
at the prospects which face them in the future.
As We Were Saying: By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Rights Of Children
BVEB SINCE Maj 15, 1967, when the Supreme Court
ruled that Juvenile court proceedings are criminal trials
to be conduct..I under procedures thai meet constitutional
itandards of due process of law, the
older heads among us had a bunch that
the rights of American children were
going to secure constant vigilance and
attention.
Some 1G00 recommendations came out
of the White House Conference on Chil-
dren and Youth held ten years ago
Those recommendations were generated
al a time when the black revolution was
aborning, when sit-ins shocked the square*, when bias m
our immigration policy was shameful. In the decade that
followed, the drug problem shook the nation, the demand
for hundreds of new day care ccntors intensified, the
Structure of family lit" was severely threatened, child
abuse case histories piled ever higher, and the drain of
our adventure in Vietnam upon our domestic treasury
Infuriated a huge sector of our populance,
A few of the I960 recommendations have been real-
ized. Bui the persistent demand for the establishment of
a top level OffiOC for Child Advocacy emanating from
the lACemixr, 1970, White House Conference drama-
vi.iiniwt n i's P ople who reallj care about the young
will idy all of the 1970 recommi ndatkms with dedica-
tion. Mo:.- than that, they will pick up Senator Walter
Mondale's challenge to lobbj I ssive
! is!.': :: so thi t ,;'. vandal ol hunger and negle.'t af-
fecting ei.il.ii :. BO frightfully vviP be ended.
Sin. Mot d primarily concerned with the 10,000.-
Vmi lean children in migrant families, the kills of Ap-
palachia, Indian youngsters, Chicanes, Puerto Means,
Blacks. These are ground down by poverty in a sea of
national affluence. They have language handicaps, suffer
from the uprooting characteristic of migrant life, want
for medical care, face bleak futures. They count. So do
all the other children of our country.

By PHILIP SL0N10VITZ
Was Mark Twain Anti Semitic?
WAS MARK TWAIN an anti-Semite, as has been
claimed? Maxwell Geismar, one of America's
mesi distil i l literarj critics and authors, who
expos i ihe anti-Scmiti m ol Henry James, denies
it in iiis notable work "Mark Twain: An Ann
Pro het" p ibllsh. d by Houghton Mlfflln Co
The e- iv "Concerning the Jews" bj Mark
Twain, in b ys, pp. an .1 n Harper's in s -a
1WH. and contained the famous Twain comment:
"If tin s' itlstlcs are right, fie jews constitute but
one percent of the human race. It suggests a neb-
ulous din puff of star dust lost in the blaze of the
Milky Way. Properly the Jew ought hardly to be
heard of; but he is heard of, his always been heard
of. He is as prominent on the planet as any other
people, and his commercial importance is extra-
vagantly out of nroi>ortion to the smallness of his
bulk. His contributions to the world's list of great
names in literature, science, art, music, finance.
medicine, and abstruse learning are also way out
of proportion to the weakness of his numbers. He
has made a mai-velous fight in this world in all
m
tiie ages: and has done it with his hands tied be-
hind Mm. M. could be vain of himself and be c.x-
cusi .1 lor it.
The Egyptians, the Babylonian and the Persian
ose, id the planet with sound and splendor,
'ben I.i.le I to dream-Stuff and passed away: the
und i" Roman followed and made a vast
they arc gone; other peoples bam sprung
up and held their torch high for a time, but it
I it. and they sit in twilight now, or hav.
i I. The Jew saw them all, beat them all, and
1 nov what he always was, exhibiting no decad-
"" Infirmities of age, no weakening of his
parts, no slowing ol his energies, no dulling of his
dert and ag.;r. Ssive mind. All things are mortal but
'be Jew; all other forces pass, but he remains. What
is the secret ol hi, immortality?"
Thus the record regarding Mark Twain stands
fully attested to and Maxwell Geismar has aided
immensely in clarifying the Twain-Clemens attitude
toward the Jews.

'


Friday. February 19. 1971
-Jewisti rkridian
Page 15
Israel Proposes Face
To-Face Talks
By Special Report
JERUSALEM The Israeli
and Egyptian leaders have be-
gun a curious exchange in which
they talk lo each oilier about
various Middle Kast issues via
speeches made to their respec-
tive parliaments, lather than
conveying tlieir offers and coun-
teroffers through Dr. Gunnar V.
Jarring, who was commissioned
by the U.N. to mediate the dis-
pute.
It wan later reported that
Prime Minister Golda Meir had
formally informed Dr. Jarring
ol the most recent proposal and
counterproposal between the two
nations.
Mrs. Meir replied to President
Sadat's offer to reopen the Suez
Canal if Israeli forces would
withdraw partially from its east
bank in the next 30 days in her
s| "i eh to the Knesset Tuesday.
"Israel is willing to negotiate
ihe reopening of the canal with
Egypt even ns a separate issue
from the other points on which
we and the Arabs are harshly
at odds," she said.
Mrs. Meir proposed "face-to-
lace" Israeli discussions about
widening Cairo's bid and said
that Israel would like to nego-
tiate agreements which would
reduce tension along the canal
and enable civilians to live along
the waterway once more.
Egypt's President had called
the proponed partial withdrawal
"a first st< p In giving up all the
Arab territory they captured In
the 1067 war." Mrs. Meir, how-
ever, itaw this as an attempt to
achieve a strategic advantage
without making any actual
progress toward peace, and de-
clared that Israel will not pull
hack from the canal without a
i"-a'; agreement or at least a
mutual withdrawal pact.
"Israel is ready ... to give its
hand to opening the canal to
free International shipping of
all nations," Mrs. Meir said. "\vV>
would even be willing to discuss
proposals aimed at normalizing
civilian life In that area and a
mutual de-escalation of the mil-
"Direct, face-to-face contact
would make it easier to examine
every proposal with the purpose
of achieving unequivocal agree-
ments .,! all provisions," she de-
clared, "including the conditions
and times for imph mentation."
In Cairo,, an Egyptian govern-
ment spokesman called .Mrs.
Melr's statement "a clear rejec-
tion of the president's proposal.
"This statement reaffirms Is-
rael's insistence on imposing its
conditions on the Aralm," he
declared.
Although President Sadat pro-
posed that Israel withdraw par-
tially from the Suez Canal area,
observers noted, not a thing was
said about the Egyptians pulling
back. Kgyptian government and
military officials arc also known
t.) he opposed to direct contats
of any kind -except for military
encounters- -and they almost
certainly do not want Israeli
ships sailing through r reopened
canal. Thus the prospect of Arab
acceptance of Mrs. Meir's offer
is not considered bright.
7?c/,
9
ictts
rervicca
HAUANDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
126 N. E. 1st Ave. 4*
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BETH EL (TEMPLE) 1S51 S. 14 Av
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. 41
BETH SHALOM (TEMPLfV. 17
Monroe 8t. Conservative Rabbi
Morton Malaveky. Cantor ..vino
Gold. 44
SINAI (TEMPLE). 1201 Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro
Cantor Yehodah Hellbraun. 47
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL (TEMPLE) 4S20 S.W. 85th St
Coneervative. Rabbi Elliot J. Wlno-
grad. Cantor Abraham Koater. 4*
MARGATE
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. 4101
N.W. th St. ___________
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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19
Hollywood Scholarship Foundation Luncheon Noon Diplomat Hotel
Boy Scout Sabbath 8:15 P.M. Temple Sinai
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 21
USY Services 9 A.M. Temple Sinai
TUESDAY, fEORUARY 23
Sisterhood Temple Beth El Donor Luncheon Moon, Diplomat Hotel
Hollywood Chapter Hodassah Book Review 1 P.M. Home Federal
Bldg. Hollywood
American Jewish Committee Meeting 8 P.M. 1st Federal Bldg.
Us Olas Blvd.
WEDNESDAY, EEBRUAR/ 24
B'nai B'rith-Broward N. Dode Council-10 A.M.
City of Hope South Broward Chapter Luncheon Moon, Diplomat Hotel
Temple Sinai Men's Club Luncheon Noon Temple Sinai
THURSDAY, flBRUARY 25
Jewish Welfare Federation Women's Division-Training Session-
9:45 AM. home of Gloria Greenspu*
Miramar Chapter of Pioneer Women Meeting 7:30 PM. Mirowar
Corns*. Center
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27
USY Weekend Progrom-Temple Sinai
Ladies Auxiliary of Broward County Medical Ass. Dinner Donee
7:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28
Temple Sinai Minyan Club Breakfast 9 A.M. Temple Sinoi
Broward Zionist District Meeting 8 P.M. Temple Sinai
MONDAY, MARCH I
National Council of Jewish Women Board Meeting 9:30 AM.
Temple Sinai General Membership meeting 12:30 fM.
Hollywood Chapter Deborah Board Mooting
TOtSDA Y, MARCH 2
Meadowbrook Chanter Women's American ORT Home Federal BMg.
Hallandale
Hollywood Hills Chapter ORT luncheon and Fashion Show 11:30
M. Mssm Mia's Res too rant, 1301 Fed. Hwy., Dank*
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3
Temple Sinai Men's Club Luncheon Noon Temple Sinai
THURSDAY, MARCH 4
Jewish Welfare Federation Women's Division Luncheon Home of
Mrs. Myron Soigel
AY, MARCH J
rttj
Question
Box
'' ,\. ,;. r,:-: :.',. I : :'.,.! ;.'-:;.:; :.;:::,;; ::;.:, By RABBI SAMUBL J. FOX
Why nre the Benedictions of
the "Shmoneh Ksreh" (the main
body ol the prayer) not repeated
in the evening service f r the
public hn they are in the morn-
ing and afternoon services?
The rabbis originally had a dis-
pute as to whether the obligation
for the prayer of Ma'ariv i i.e., the
evening prayer) had the same
measure of obligation as the oth-
er two prayers (i.e.. the morning
and afternoon one). One of the rea-
sons for considering this prayer
less obligatory than the other two
is the contention that the prayers,
especially when recited by a con-
gregation In public, represent the
daily sacrifices which were offered
in the temple of old.
In the days f the temple there
were only two regular daily sac-
rifices, i.e., the lamb offered in the
morning and the lamb offered in
the afternoon. Thus, the evening
prayer Ls not directly related to
the sacrifice, except for those who
claim that even if no new sacrifice
was offered regularly in the eve-
ning, the parts of the afternoon
sacrifice were still burning on the
altar in the evening. Thus the eve-
ning prayer may refer to this resi-
dual smoldering of the parts of the
afternoon sacrifice on into the
evening hours.
However, even if the prayer is
not a public obligation, it is still
a matter of private obligation for
each individual to communicate
his feelings to the Almighty every
evening. Thus, as far as the ben-
edictions of the "Shmoneh Ksreh"
are concerned, they arc recited by
the individuals in the congrega-
tion but not repeated by the can-
tor to show that the obligation Ls
private and not public.
It should be pointed out, how-
ever, that the congregation still
has to assemble for prayer in a
public fashion in the evening for
the recitation of the "Shema" with
its appropriate blessings, since
this is very definitely a public ob-
ligation.
Why is it that on Friday night
there la sort of abbreviated repe-
tition ol thene benedictions?
A number of answers have been
given for this practice. Some say
(Tur) that this is done so as to
prolong the service for the sake of
the latecomers who may face dan-
ger if they had to walk home alone.
Others claim that this is done be-
cause the benedictions of the Sab-
bath prayer include the recitation
of a benediction which is called
"Kiddush" man's declaration of
the sanctity of the day of the Sab-
bath.
When s group Ls togeth >r
there is an obligation to pro-
claim the sanctity of th d ty
in whatever activity one is nor-
mally engaged. However, since the
Kiddush benediction proclaims that
th" prayers are designated as Sab-
bath prayers, it cannot !>e recited
alone but must be cast as part of
the prayer benedictions. Thus, it is
recited along with an abbreviated
version of the other benedictions.
The reason for the abbreviation
Ls again to demonstrate that the
week-day evening service or in gen-
eral the obligation of prayer in th'1
evening is only a private obliga-
tion and that the primary obliga-
tion for some repetition of the
service on Friday evening is for
the sake of the public srmetification
of the Sabbath.
Some paint out still further that
Kiddush could have been made
over the wine in the public servic '
of the synagogue, but it was done
as a repetition of the prayers for
the sake of those congregations
which could not afford to have
wine thus being extended as a
regular procedure in all congrega-
tions.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
I
Mishpatim
"Now these arc the ordinances which thou shalt set before
them ." (Chapters 21-24)
Many of the commandments recorded in this sedrah are in
concise form. This presentation of their salient principles in
accordance with rabbinic interpretation of the biblical text.
MASTER AND SERVANT: Heading the list are the laws to
safe-guard the human treatment of servants. A purchased He-
br. w servant must be set free by his master after six years of
Service. If his wife and children follow him into servitude they
live with him. Should he become so attached to his master and
" family that he finally asserts his desire to remain Ixyond the
six years, he may make a declaration to this effect before the
judges, and his master pierces his ear to the door of the house
with an awl; he may then continue to serve until the year of
jubilee.
CAPITAL PUNISHMENT: The death penalty may be im-
- posed for the following crimes; wi'.full murder, iwhen death is
posed for the following crimes; willful murder, (when death is
causedby accident, the accused may escape the vengeance of the
next of kin by moving to a city of refuge,' striking a parent and
napping, the practice of witchcraft, bestiality, and sacrificing
to idols.
INJURIES TO THE PERSON: The law of retaliation 'life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth' i is applicable only in
the case of willful murder. For all other injuries to the person,
the wrongdoer is made to pay medical expenses, and monetary
compensation as well as donations for the loss of earnings.
Among the cases listed are the following: injuries inflicted in
a fight; miscarriage caused accidentally by men during a brawl
or quarrel; death caused by a vicious animal whose owner, know-
ing it to be dangerous, failed to take proper precautions. Neg-
ligence and theft, compensation must also be paid for damage to
property. If an animal is killed by falling into an uncovered pit.
the irson responsible for this negligence must pay the value
to its owner. Theft is punished by five-fold restitution for an
ox and four-fold for a sheep, when the animal has been killed
or sold. Should the thief be caught with it in hLs possesion, he
must restore the stolen animal and give the owner an addi-
tional animal as a fine. A householder can plead justifiable homi-
cide if he kills a burglar breaking in during the night, but he
may be charged with murder if he kills a housebreaker during
the day. A thief who cannot make restitution is sold into slavery.
Additional laws arc listed relating to moral offenses and mis-
cellaneous precepts of behavior and observances.
................ .i-..... .....-.......-.........- _
Interview With Kurzman,
Author Of 'Genesis 1948'
By SKYMOIR B. LIKBMAN
If Dan Kurzman had come to
this area under the aegis of Israel
Bonds or one of our other national
fund-raising organizations, his
presence would have been hailed
m the press and other mass media.
As it was. his views on the present
situation in the Middle Kast, given
during an interview with a Minn'
Herald reporter, appeared on its
editorial pages. Bui his brief visit
to South Florida was enjoyed by
only a fortunate few; he spoke
only before a small luncheon h. Id
by the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
Our visit with Mr. Kurzman
was an experience; he revealed the
reasons behind his decision to un-
Vrtake the writing of "Genesis
considered by reviewers
holars to be the definitive
work on Israel's War of Indepen-
dence, and some of the work thai
went into gathering material for
it.
In the summer of 1966, Mr.
Kurzman, a foreign correspondent
for the Washington Post, was do-
ing research on the Middle East.
He was shocked to realize that
nothing comprehensive had been
written on the 1948 war. despite
its great drama and importance to
Jewish and world history. He de-
cided to undertake the enormous
task; his tools included a "cheder"
education in San Francisco, a de-
gree in Political Science, plus
graduate study at the Sorbonne in
Paris following World War II, a
stint as reporter for Internationa'
News Service, another as corre-
spondent for the Jerusalem Post,
and affiliation with the National
Broadcasting Company, which sertt
i'm to the Middle East in 1952.
Mr. Kurzman traveled through
ill the Arab states gathering ma-
il rial for "Genesis 1948." He in-
terviewed first and second-line
Arab politicos and generals, and
had access to much unpublished
Arab material.
"In early 1967," Mr. Kurzman
revealed. "Zahariah Muheddin told
. me that Nasser would have liked
1 to make peace with Israel, but lie
vas convinced that he would l|e
assassinated within four hours sf
le signet! a peace treaty. Israel
ad visions of peace when Nasser
nme to power in 1954," he eoc-
Jnued. "He was considered a mo*-
.rate. When his plans for a social
.evolution failed, however. Nasser
isose the cheap political course.
.-!. turned to anti-Israel propa-
ganda, and thus became a prisoner
f his own chicanery."
In his interviews with West
Bonk Arabs, Mr. Kurzman found
ihat a great majority were ready
?0 compromise with Israel, but
Jiey feared reprisals from Arab
guerrillas and militants. Both
Arabs and Jews si>oke nostalgic-
ally of their former pleasant re-
lationships with each other, but
this line would end abruptly whew
the conversation turned to i>olitics.
he reported. "I believe that one oc
the few rays of hope for peace is
the failure of West Bank Arabs t
cooperate with the Arab Pales-
tinian terrorists who, by the way,
haw lost much face in their drub-
bing by the Jordania Army," Mr.
Kurzman said.
Mr. Kurzman, author of "Sub-
version of the Innocents," whicb
won the 1963 Overseas Press Club
Award, received the 1964 Froat
Page Award for his foreign re-
porting. His "Santo Domingo: Re-
volt of the Damned" received the
George Polk Memorial Award.
Asked what impression the peo-
ple of Israel made upon him dur-
ing his recent vLsit, Mr. Kurzmas>
n plied that he found them more
devoted to their nation than the*
were prior to 1967. They complain
less, fewer speak of possible emi-
gration, and there is greater ce>-
hesiveness among the various seg-
ments of the population. Their
closeness to annihilation has pro-
duced a drastic change in their
viewpoint, he believes. They have
found that there are more im-
portant aspects to life than the
mere fulfillment of material de-
sires.


Page 16-
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