The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00208

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Full Text

Volume 19 Number 22
Hollywood, Florida Friday, November 10, 1989
Price.35 Cents
CAMERA Analyzes Media Bias
By JUDITH S. ANTONELLI
Jewish Advocate
Excitement filled the air at
the Boston Park Plaza Hotel
ballroom last Sunday, as
nearly 1000 people came
together to strengthen the
movement to combat media
distortion of Israel whenever
Kristallnacht
A Memory
For Our Times
With methodical precision
during the night of Wednes-
day, November 9th, and early
morning of Thursday, Novem-
ber 10, 1938, SA, SS and Nazi
stormtroopers, disguised in
plain clothes, assembled in pre-
arranged meeting places and
fanned out to selected targets
in the Jewish communities of
Germany, Austria and the
occupied Sudetenland (the
Third Reich).
Following Gestapo instruc-
tions, these Nazi agents axed
windows, demolished furnish-
ings, wrecked houses, smashed
store fronts, ravaged mer-
chandise, torched synagogues
and arrested 20,000 30,000
Jews. As the well-coordinated
destruction took place, most
neighbors just watched.
By Friday morning, Novem-
ber 11, nearly 100 Jews were
dead, 7,500 Jewish businesses
had been destroyed and more
than 275 synagogues had been
razed or burned. The majority
of the Jews arrested were sent
to the German concentration
camps of Dachau, Sachsenhau-
sen and Buchenwald. Carpets
of crushed glass and debris
covered the streets of the
Third Reich.
The German public labeled
this event "Kristallnacht," or
the "Night of Broken Glass."
Some American newspapers
dubbed it "Black Thursday,"
while others, comparing the
destruction with the physical
attacks against Jews in Czarist
Russia, called it the "Night of
Pogroms."
Within days of the event,
Hermann Goering, Reich Min-
ister of the Four-Year Plan,
issued the Decree Eliminating
the Jews from German Eco-
nomic Life. A 25-percent
"flight" tax on all Jewish prop-
erty being removed from Ger-
man territory and a fine of one
billion marks ($400 million)
were levied on the Jewish com-
munities to "compensate" for
the damages wrought by the
Nazis. Goering expropriated
all remaining Jewish busi-
nesses by transferring their
Continued on Page 7
and wherever it occurs.
Speaking at the national con-
ference of CAMERA (Commit-
tee for Accuracy in Middle
East Reporting in America),
Norman Podhoretz, editor of
Commentary Magazine,
stated, "This political and
moral assault is a familiar
experience to Jews in the dias-
pora; now it is the fate of the
Jewish State. There is a steady
stream of hectoring and har-
assment, unctuous in its pro-
fessed concern for Israel's
'soul\"
"If we do not exert ourselves
to prevent a new Palestinian
state, we will be guilty of
complicity in the destruction of
Israel, and will be cursed bjr
future generations of Jews, '
he continued, describing the
worst possible scenario "The
Day After Israeli With-
drawal." Even the best scen-
ario would lead to civil war
between Palestinian factions
in the new state, and interven-
tion by Syria as "peace-
keeper," Podhoretz said. He
characterized this as "the
Lebanonization of the new
Palestinian state. Having
tasted a bit of Syrian rule, the
Continued on Page 3
Many synagogues in Germany were burned out or down in November of 1938 in what became known as the infamous 'Night
of Crystal.' It was during that night of violence that SS, SA, and Nazi stormtroopers in plain clothes also burned shops and
destroyed the homes and possessions of thousands of Jews. This was a significant step towards the Holocaust. It was the
beginning of the end of a dynamic culture and unique way of life that was a thousand years old.
Back From The USSR:
Soviet Jews In Panic
r
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Soviet Jews are in a "panic"
about tightening U.S. emigra-
tion policies and "horrendous"
anti-Semitism is increasing
their fears, said Hinda Cantor,
who just returned from a 10-
day mission in Leningrad and
Moscow.
Cantor, co-chairman of the
South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, who joined some
75 Americans including nine
from South Florida on the
mission, said the conference
marked the first time a Soviet
Jewry organization has held a
meeting in Moscow.
"The meetings confirmed
what we as Soviet Jewry activ-
ists already knew, but the rest
of the community doesn't
understand," Cantor told The
Jewish Floridian.
"The problem for Soviet
Jews is not over everyone
thinks all we have to do is
resettle them here."
Besides the narrowing
of U.S. emigration quotas for
the Soviet refugees, Cantor
said she learned that the
Israeli government has been
slow, and, in some cases taking
over a year, to send the invita-
tions that the Soviets Jews
need to go to Israel.
In addition, there are still an
estimated 2,000 Soviet Jews
who have been denied permis-
sion by Soviet authorities to
emigrate and retain their
"refusenik" status.
Cantor, who coordinated the
American participation in the
conference, which was hosted
by the Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews, was joined by her
husband Howard and South
Floridians Jackie and Michael
Abels, Marilyn Himmel,
Michael Tryson, Stephen
Cohen, June and Ron Daniels,
and Ellen Roth, an aide to U.S.
Sen. Bob Graham.
On one hand, she said, the
policy of glasnost is working.
"We went to public restau-
rants and danced the hora,"
she said.
But with more openess, for-
mer government "anti-
Zionism" has evolved more
into public forums for neo-
Nazis, who are threatening
and stirring up hatred against
Jews, Cantor said.
"We describe the trip as the
highest of highs and the lowest
of lows. You meet people, fall
in love a million times and
know you have to leave and
you're lucky you can leave and
go to the United States.
...Many of them said, 'Put me
in your suitcase.' "
THIRD CLASS
BULK RATE
OS POSTAGE
PAID
JEWISH
FLOMOIAN


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
Viewpoint
Kristallnacht and Reunification
This week marks the 51st anniversary of
Kristallnacht, the night on which Adolf
Hitler's ultimate purpose against the Jews
of Germany and the world became crystal
clear.
The Night of the Broken Glass resulted in
the death of 36 Jews and injury to many
more. Destruction of synagogues was mas-
sive, hence the broken glass. Seventy-six
Jewish houses of worship were completely
destroyed and 191 others were set on fire.
The Nazis used the assassination of the
third secretary of the German embassy in
Paris as the reason for their rampage,
during which night some 30,000 Jews were
sent to the concentration camps at Buchen-
wald, Dachau and Sachsenhausen.
After Kristallnacht, the Jewish commu-
nities in Germany and Austria were vir-
tually dissolved, and the Holocaust
assumed its new and tragic dimensions.
Of Greater Importance
Observance of Kristallnacht this year is
made more important by increased talk of
the reunification of Germany, something
which seemed unthinkable only months
ago.
While the apparent lessening of Com-
munist total rule over East Germany is
commendable, it is far too early to talk
about union with democratic West Ger-
many. Election of a new East German
leader and the flight to freedom of tens of
thousands of East Germans are not enough
to end the concerns of not only world
Jewry, but of the entire free world.
Two global conflicts, World Wars I and
II, which brought death to tens of millions
and virtual annihilation to European Jewry
are far too much evidence against a reuni-
fied Germany.
Even Bonn's admirable pro-Israel stance
of the Jewish State's first years has been
modified sharply. Both West and East
Germany have assumed attitudes favoring
the PLO which do not equate with their
supposed strong stand against interna-
tional terrorism.
Significant Anniversaries
Kristallnacht is the first of several signi-
ficant anniversaries in November, includ-
ing the Balfour Declaration, the 1947
United Nations partition which established
the basis for the State of Israel and the
infamous UN resolution equating Zionism
with racism.
Horrors of the Night of the Broken Glass
are still real to the numerous Holocaust
survivors who now live in our community.
Their ominous warning can never be for-
gotten.
The Jewish
FloribiAH
o South Broward
FHEDSHOCHET
E0cto< nd Publisher
( Fre4 Skmrktl
Published Bi-Weafcly
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
\JJ9i
Religious Insensitivity
Is Exhibited
By A Racially Sensitive Professor
JOANC TEGLAS. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING 1 373 4605 COLLECT
Mam Office 1 Plant 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 1 3734606
MunWr JTA. Set** Arti. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA
Friday, November 10,1989
Volume 19
12CHESHVAN5750
Number 22
By ALAN M. DERSHOWITZ
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (JTA)
Imagine a white professor in
a state university announcing
to his class that he intended to
grade "by a stricter standard"
all black students who
attended a memorial service
for Martin Luther King. There
would be an immediate and
justified outcry from civil
rights advocates throughout
the country.
Leading the chorus of criti-
cism would be Dr. Harry
Edwards, the Berkeley soci-
ologist who has become the
symbol for the demand for
sensitivity toward, and equal-
ity for, black athletes.
Yet it was Professor Harry
Edwards who displayed
incredible insensitivity toward
Jewish students by scheduling
the midterm in his introduc-
tory sociology class on Yom
Kippur, the holiest Jewish day
of the year.
Virtually all Jews whether
Orthodox, Conservative,
Reform or even secular
regard Yom Kippur as the one
day on which they will not
participate in work or school
related activities.
According to Jewish law, it
is absolutely forbidden to write
or attend classes on Yom Kip-
pur. Jews spend the entire day
in synagogue, praying and
fasting. Even non-observant
Jews acknowledge there is
something special about this
Day of Atonement.
Professor Edwards knew all
this when he deliberately
scheduled his midterm exam
for Oct. 9 well before the
middle of the term. He knew it
because a memorandum is cir-
culated to the faculty each
year specifying the date on
which Yom Kippur falls and
setting out the official Berke-
ley policy of avoiding conflicts
between "the academic calen-
dar and religious holy days."
He also knew that in a class
of 500 students, there would
be a considerable number of
Jewish students who observe
Yom Kippur. One student,
Naomi Snyder, who had
always attended synagogue
and fasted on the holiday, felt
compelled to violate her religi-
ous principles: "I felt I would
be at a disadvantage by not
taking the midterm, but it put
me in a situation where I felt
that I was backing out of my
own religion," she told The
New York Times.
When numerous students,
Jews and non-Jews alike, com-
plained about this insensitiv-
ity, Edwards gave an excuse
that would have made a white
Mississippi voting registrar
proud during the 1950s: "It
was the best time for an
exam." He then added the
following provocation: "That's
how I'm going to operate. If
the students don't like it, they
can drop the class."
Edwards spent an hour of
class time defending his action
in a talk characterized by
freshman Chris Fogliani as
"pretty weird." According to
Fogliani, Edwards, the spokes-
man for sensitivity toward
black athletes, "didn't seem
very sympathetic toward the
Jewish students' feelings."
To aggravate matters,
Edwards refused to schedule a
makeup a simple matter
that is routinely done by col-
lege instructors. Instead, he
decided to punish the students
who had gone to synagogue by
requiring them to write a
makeup research paper that he
announced would be graded by
a stricter standard than used
for the midterm.
No wonder some Jewish stu-
dents felt compelled to violate
their religious observance. The
ones who attended religious
services were threatened with
stricter standards which
translates into lower grades
for comparable performance.
This is unequal treatment
based on religion. In addition
to being insensitive and anti-
Semitic, it is also an unconsti-
tutional abridgment of the stu-
dents' free exercise of religion,
as well as a violation of Califor-
nia law. Berkeley is a state
university, and Edwards' deci-
sion to discriminate against
Jewish students who observe
their holiest religious day of
'state
worship constitutes
action.'
The Supreme Court has said
that the constitutional guaran-
tee to free exercise of religion
means that a state cannot put
"substantial pressure on an
adherent to modify his behav-
ior and to violate his beliefs,"
absent a compelling govern-
ment interest.
A state actor like Professor
Edwards cannot deny some-
one an "important benefit"
because he or she refuses to
violate a religious require-
ment. But Edwards condi-
tioned the Jewish students
receipt of fair grades an
important benefit to which stu-
dents are entitled on a viola-
tion of the Jewish religion.
A California statute also for-
bids Edwards' conduct. It
states that any student at the
University of California must
be allowed to take all tests
"without penalty, at a time
when that activity would not
violate the student's religious
creed."
The only time the university
can escape this requirement is
when accommodating the stu-
dent creates an "undue hard-
ship." The university has the
burden of proving that it could
not "reasonably' have accom-
modated the students' religi-
ous needs.
Here Edwards could easily
have scheduled the exam on
another day, or provided for a
makeup examination to be
graded by the same standards
as the regularly scheduled
test.
Edwards chose to behave
insensitively and to disobey
the law. In America, the law
guarantees rights to all citi-
zens and must be applied
equally. Edwards should be
proud of himself for sensitively
struggling to protect the
rights of black athletes. He
should be ashamed of himself
for insensitively violating the
rights of his Jewish students.
Alan Dershowitz i$ a profu*or oi
Harvard Law School


CAMERA.
Friday, November 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
Continued from Page 1
Palestinians might welcome
the return of Israel," he
added.
Ruth Wisse, professor of
Jewish Studies at McGill Uni-
versity, spoke on "Inverting
History and Events: The Cam-
paign to Delegitimize Israel."
Inversion has turned Jews
"from a nation of victims to a
nation of villains," she
explained. "It is a war being
waged against Jews worldwide
with a great deal of intellectual
and monetary resources
behind it."
Arab propaganda has been
so successful, Wisse main-
tained, because "Jews have
had no incentive to counter-
[>ropaganda. We want to be
iked and tolerated. A major
disincentive is the fear that
fighting back may make things
worse."
So Jews have "agreed to
become the defendant, to be
held to a higher standard," she
continued. "We are used to
being held by God, the Perfect
Judge, to a perfect standard,
but that is different from being
held to perfection by a kan-
garoo court which will use it as
an excuse for extermination at
a later point. We have taken
the posture of a defendant
agreeing to stand trial."
Wisse defined as a serious
problem "the point of collusion
between sustained enmity and
the liberal imagination. There
is a liberal disinclination to
recognize Arab hatred. The
liberal imagination detests
aggression and force and
camouflages aggressive inten-
tion in order to avoid dealing
with arms and defense. It sees
people as good, and conflict
resolution as the solution."
The inversion of history has
gained "day-by-day credibility,
and a generation is growing up
with it as fact," Wisse
asserted. This has occurred
through two phases estab-
lishing symmetry between the
two sides, and then turning
Israel into the aggressor.
"Explanations are calcu-
lated to conceal rather than
reveal the truth," she stated.
"Israel is on public trial as a
way of life. Instead of seeing
the conflict as a war of states
that want to destroy a neigh-
bor against a state that wants
to survive, the Arab war
against the Jews is turned into
an Israeli war against the
Palestinians. People want to
oelieve Jews are responsible.
If Jews, who are usually rea-
sonable and tolerant, are
responsible, then the problem
can be solved. But if the Arabs
are responsible the outlook is
very bleak.
Alan Keyes, former U.S.
ambassador who appeared on
the panel discussion following
Days of Rage on PBS, offered
his analysis of the root of the
problem of media bias against
Israel. Stating that he doesn't
"watch TV news anymore as a
matter of principle," Keyes
lamented that "50 percent of
people get all their information
from TV and are living in a
fictionalized world."
"Why should the media sign
on to an underlying desire to
destroy Israel?" he asked. "Is
it done with good intention?
They think they are right, and
are motivated by a deep moral
commitment that justifies
their selectivity and enables
them to move from informa-
tion to persuasion."
There has been a "total shift
in concept, in the paradigm of
the Middle East," Keyes con-
tinued. "Instead of the issues
of peace, security and war, a
human rights paradigm has
been substituted. Once there is
the view that an innocent pop-
ulation is being oppressed and
deprived, and the victim has
been identified, there is no
patience with the details of
background and history. Emo-
tions are inflamed and there is
the urgency to do something
now.
"This paradigmatic shift has
devastating implications," he
warned. "Days of Rage was
journalism that fit the para-
digm. There is no Arab role in
this conflict anymore, have
you noticed that? The para-
digm doesn't have room for
it*
Calling the establishment of
a Jewish State "an insult to
the manhood of the Arab
which must be revenged,"
Keyes went on to condemn the
double standard which the
media "tacitly allows" by
ignoring Arab tyranny.
"Why do the so-called cham-
pions of Palestinian freedom
not champion it in Jordan,
which is mostly Palestinian,
even though the king recently
tried to change the census to
hide this fact?" Keyes
demanded. "In their demand
for democratic aspirations, the
Palestinians dare not speak
the name of freedom in the
Arab world. I am looked upon
as an ungodly heretic for cal-
ling for a truly representative
government in the state of
Jordan."
Arab responsibility must be
clearly articulated under the
human rights paradigm that
exists today, he concluded.
Professor Alan Dershowitz
of Harvard Law School spoke,
he said, "not as a Jew, not as a
Zionist, but as a human rights
activist." Emphasizing his civil
libertarian view that the
answer to media distortion is
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"more speech, not less"
through censorship, Dershow-
itz stressed the importance of
"correcting every misstate-
ment of fact, because once lies
are allowed to be repeated
they become the truth."
Human Rights Hypocrisy
Human rights advocates are
being "turned into hypocrites
all over the world," he stated.
"One comes away [from the
media] believing that Israel is
among the worst human rights
offenders in the world today.
Israel doesn't even belong in
the same volume with other
human rights offenders. Israel
is condemned more often than
any nation in the world, but it
belongs near the very top of
the list of those most sensitive
to human rights. No country so
threatened has ever given so
much concern to human rights.
"Any democracy can be pro-
voked into overreaction. That
is the goal of the intifada.
Palestinians determine the
number of casualties by put-
ting women and children in the
front line. The U.S. has never
had a provocation comparable
to Israel's, yet it detained
Japanese-Americans in camps
with no due process,"
Dershowitz maintained.
Noting that the freest press
in the Arab world exists under
Israeli rule on the West Bank,
and that if there are elections
there it would be "the first
election ever In all of the Arab
world," Dershowitz said the
problem is not that the media
focuses too much on Israel, but
that it does not pay enough
critical attention to the Pales-
tinians, the PLO and the
Arabs.
"Here are some stories we
have not seen on TV," he said,
listing 21 topics as recommen-
dations for future PBS docu-
mentaries. These included: the
anti-Jewish aspects of the
Palestinian movement; PLO
support of the Chinese repres-
sion; Arab voices of dissent
against PLO terrorism ("a
very short show"); a history of
Arab democracy, election and
free speech ("another short
show' ); what Arab children
are taught about Jews and
Israel ("That one could be
three to four hours"); the Arab
boycott and its anti-Semitic
Continued on Page 7
Sam Halpern of Elizabeth,
N.J., a survivor of a Nazi
concentration camp, a leading
U.S. retailer and developer
and a builder in Israel, has
been designated as the 1989
recipient of the fifth annual
Elie Wiesel Holocaust Remem-
brance Award, State of Israel
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V
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
Steve Rose 'Fellow' Of NAHD
The WDZL will be among the attractions featured this year at the
Broward County Fair, November 16-26 at Gulfstream Park in
Hallandale.
Stephen E. Rose, director of
development at The Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged (MJHHA) at Douglas
Gardens, has achieved the
status of "Fellow" of the
National Association for Hos-
pital Development (NAHD).
Recognized as the highest
level of achievement in the
field of health care resource
development, Rose was the
only recipient in the Southeast
to receive this honor this year.
Commenting on the presen-
tation, Judge Irving Cypen,
MJHHA chairman of the
board, said "this recognition is
well-earned."
The National Association for
Hospital Development is a
2500 member organization of
professional development offi-
cers. Founded 23 years ago
there have been close to 10,000
who have been members of
NAHD. Of this group, only 150
have achieved the standing of
"Fellow". Rose, who served as
Bonds To Honor Carol Owen
The Banking Industry Divi-
sion of the State of Israel
Bonds will honor Carol R.
Owen, President of The Fam-
ily Bank of Hallandale at a
Cocktail Reception, to be held
Thursday, November 16th, at
the Hollywood Beach Hilton,
at 5 p.m. Mr. Owen served as
President and is now Treas-
urer of the Kiwanis Club of
Hallandale; was President and
is now a Board Member of the
Hallandale Chamber of Com-
merce; on the Hallandale Com-
munity Development Commis-
sion, and is a former Director
and Officer of Broward Eco-
nomic Development Board.
Mr. Owen is on the Hallan-
dale Firefighters & Pension
Board an served 19 years as
Director and Officer of the
American Lung Association of
Broward Glades, Henry
County. He served as Commis-
sioner of South Broward Hos-
pital for 8 years.
Dr. William Korey, Com-
mentator and Authority on
World Affairs, will be guest
speaker. Dr. Korey is Director
of B'nai B'rith's International
Council and is in charge of
research for the B'nai B'rith
International Council.
Carol R. Owen will be pre-
sented with the City of Peace
Award. For information, call
920-9820.
Stephen E. Rose
this year's Region IV educa-
tion chairman, was responsible
for the successful regional con-
ference held in Key Biscayne,
in June.
Rose is also active in com-
munity service and as a volun-
teer. He has served as presi-
dent and state director
of B'nai B'rith; and on the
Boards of both the Jewish
Community Center and Feder-
ation Young Leadership in
Dallas. Currently a member of
the Board of Temple Solel,
Rose and his wife, Ellen, are
residents of Hollywood.
City of Miramar Purchases Temple
The Miramar City Commis-
sion overwhelming voted in
favor of a proposal to purchase
Temple Israel and convert it
into a multi-purpose recrea-
tional facility.
At a special meeting Monday
evening, commissioners voted
5-0 to spend $810,000 to pur-
chase the 17,000-square-foot
facility,
Leaders of a Hare Krishna
group sought to purchase the
synagogue but members of the
community expressed strong
opposition to tne transaction.
The city submitted their offer
after the Krishna group failed
to meet a deadline, city offi-
cials said.
Temple Israel officials
accepted the city's offer.
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Friday, November 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
Helen Berkowitz Receives Award From Yeshiva U.
Helen Berkowitz of Hollyw-
ood and New YorJc City was
honored by Yeshiva University
Women's Organization
(YUWO) at a dinner following
its annual benefit on Nov. 4, at
Lincoln Center in New York.
Mrs. Berkowitz, a former
teacher and school admini-
strator, received the Jewish
Education Award in recogni-
tion of "her abiding dedication
to the enrichment of higher
Jewish education at Yeshiva
University."
The benefit, celebrating
YUWO's 60th anniversary,
featured a performance by the
Balalaika and Domra Society.
The event, supported by
YUWO members and friends
of the University, was held on
behalf of YUWO's scholarship
fund for deserving students.
Mrs. Berkowitz and her late
husband, Louis, endowed a
scholarship fund for new
Americans at Yeshiva Univer-
sity. She has also endowed the
Lottie Glass collection of edu-
cation books at the Hedi Stein-
ood Boards of Brandeis Uni-
versity and the Miami Douglas
Jewish Home for Aged.
In addition, Mrs. Berkowitz
is affiliated with Temple Beth
Shalom in Hollywood and Cha-
bad of South Broward in Hal-
landale.
Mrs. Berkowitz has served
as president of the Lubavitch
Women's Division National
Committee for the Futherance
of Jewish Education. She has
also been active in
B'nai B'rith, Israel Bonds, and
Hadassah.
Mrs. Berkowitz is a graduate
of Hunter College of The City
University of New York and of
New York University's Gra-
duate School of Education.
Deborah Hospital
Luncheon, Nov. 19
Deborah Hospital Founda-
tion Hallandale Hollywood
Chapter will hold a Gala
Fund Raising luncheon honor-
ing their Woman of the Year
Leanora Schneider Mindlinger
at the Sheraton Bal Harbor
Hotel, Collins Avenue at 97th
Street on Sunday, November
19th at noon. For information
call 961-2918.
Helen Berkowitz
berg Library at the Univer-
sity's Stern College for
Women and has established
the Helen Berkowitz Personal
Endowed Scholarship Fund at
Stern College.
Mrs. Berkowitz is a member
of the Education Committees
of both the South Broward
Federation and Temple Sinai.
She also serves on the Hollyw-
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
Synagogue News li[i|JJ
AJC To Honor
Gustafson And Krant
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Weekend services will be
held at Temple Beth Shalom,
1400 North 46 Ave., Hollyw-
ood, on Fri., Nov. 10, at 5 p.m.,
in the Jack Shapiro Chapel,
conducted by Rabbi Albert
Cohen and lay leaders; Satur-
day, November 11, in the main
sanctuary, conducted by Dr.
Morton Malavsky, rabbi, at 9
a.m.
Weekday services are held
at 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. in the
Jack Shapiro Chapel. Sunday
services are at 8 a.m. For
additional schedule, call 981-
6113.
TEMPLE SINAI
Friday evening Services on
November 10th will begin at 8
p.m. with Rabbi Kapnek offici-
ating and Hazzan Lindenbaum
and Cantor Wichelewski
chanting the Liturgy. The
Jewish war Veteran's Robert
K. Franzblau Post 177 & Aux-
iliary will participate during
services and will co-sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat.
Saturday Morning Service,
Nov. 11, will begin at 8:45 a.m.
with Rabbi Kapnek, Hazzan
Lindenbaum and Cantor
Wichelewski officiating.
Bat Mitzvah
MICHELLE IVRY
GREENSPOON
Michelle Ivry Greenspoon,
daughter of Ellen and Gerald
Greenspoon will be called to
the Torah as Bat Mitzvah on
Sat., at 7 p.m. at Temple Beth
Shalom in Hollywood.
Michelle attends Pine Crest
School where she is in the 8th
grade. She also attends the
Beth Shalom Hebrew School
pre-confirmation class.
Weekend pulpit flowers will
be tendered by Michelle's par-
ents, in her honor.
Attending the celebration
will be her grandparents Mari-
lyn and Sheldon Reich and
Sonia and Adam Greenspoon
of Montreal, Quebec.
A Kiddush following the ser-
vice will be hosted by Mr. &
Mrs. Gerald Greenspoon.
Independent Singles
Independent Singles of Tem-
Sle Solel will hold a dance at
oodles Lounge Sheraton
DCOTA, 1-95 & Griffin Road
on Sunday, November 19th at
7:30 p.m. For information call
981-5542.
Candlelighting
Nov. 10 5:16 p. m
Nov. 17 5:13 p.m
Nov. 24 5:12 p.m
Dec. 1 5:11 p.m
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
Sisterhood will have a Paid-
Up Membership Supperette on
Tuesday November 14 at 8
p.m. at the Temple.
Young at Heart Group will
meet at the Temple at 2 p.m.
on Wednesday, November
15th.
There will be a PTO Meeting
on Thursday, Nov. 16th at 7:30
p.m.
Minyan meets daily at 8:30
a.m. and at 7:30 p.m.
On Friday, November 17,
the Shabbat Service at Temple
Sinai will begin at 8 p.m. in the
Sanctuary with Rabbi Richard
J. Margolis and Cantor Misha
Alexandrovich officiating. The
evening has been designated
as ORT Sabbath. Participating
in the Service will be Millie
Unterberger and Ruth Rosen
of the Hillcrest Hills Chapter
of ORT, Ruth Baker and Ruth
Finkelstein of the Grandview
Chapter, and Frieda Horwitz
of the South Ocean Group. The
Women's American ORT
Chapters will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat following the
Service.
On Saturday, November 18,
the Shabbat Service will begin
at 9 a.m. in the Sanctuary with
Rabbi Margolis and Cantor
Alexandrovich officiating.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Lift up now thine eyes, and look for all the land which
thou seest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever"
(Gen. 13.U-15).
LEK LEKHA
LEK LEKHA At the command of God, Abram left Haran and
journeyed to Canaan. There God appeared to him and said: "Unto
thy seed will I give this land" (Genesis 12.7). There was a famine
in the land of Canaan, and Abram took his household to Egypt. On
his return, he and his nephew Lot separated peaceably, Lot
choosing to settle in the plain of Sodom. In the battles between
the northern kings and those of the plain of Sodom, Lot was
captured. Learning of his nephew's plight, Abram armed his
followers and pursued Lot's captors. He defeated them and
rescued his nephew and the other captives from Sodom. God
made a covenant with Abram to give him and his seed after him
the land of Canaan ("The Covenant between the Parts"). When
Abram's wife Sarai saw that she was barren she gave Hagar, her
handmaiden, to Abram as wife. Hagar bore Abram a son, who
was called Ishmael. At God's command, Abram changed his name
to Abraham, and his wife's name to Sarah. He was circumcized
together with all the males of his household.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamir, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)
Bernard Mandler, president
of the Southeast Region of
American Jewish Congress,
has announced that Florida
House Speaker Tom Gustafson
and Broward County Port
Everglades Commissioner
Betsy Krant will be the recip-
ients of AJCongress Distin-
guished Civic Achievement
Award for 1989. In addition,
they will be recognized as
Broward County Man and
Woman of the Year, respec-
tively. A luncheon to honor
Representative Gustafson and
Commissioner Krant will take
place at the Sheraton Design
Center Hotel in Dania on Wed-
nesday, November 29 at noon.
Representative Fred Lipp-
man (D-Hollywood) will serve
as program chairman for the
event. Honorary Chairs
include past award recipients
Broward County Commission-
ers Scott Cowan and Nicki
Grossman, Congressman
Larry Smith and Hollywood
Mayor Mara Giulianti. Pro-
gram co-chairs include Fort
Lauderdale attorney Elliot
Barnett, Hollywood deputy
city attorney Alan Koslow,
and Hollywood Commissioner
Suzanne Gunzburger.
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CAMERA
Friday, November 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Jews arefir8t-cla88 citizens in America who have
a right and a'duty to complain, Dershowitz
concluded. "Until the media gets it right
complain! We have nothing to fear from the
truth."
Continued from Page 3
"Arab propagandists have
found a direct line into Ameri-
can classrooms. Under the
guise of teaching peace, it
incites students against
Jews," Jacobs warned. Its
"moral equivalence" and
assertion that Jews and Arabs
basically got along before the
establishment of Israel is "a lie
wrapped in a fairytale," he
added. "If anti-Semitism is a
light sleeper, then PBS has
just placed 40,000 alarm clocks
in American classrooms."
Jerold Auerbach, professor
of history at Wellesley Col-
lege, spoke about The New
York Times. Beginning with
Thomas Friedman's coverage,
Auerbach went on to say that
"the more intriguing issue
here is the prolonged Jewish
identity problem" of the
Times.
"The Ochs and the Sulzber-
gers never wanted the paper
to seem too Jewish, he
reminded his audience. "If
Jews, as Friedman claims, are
the leading players in a biblical
superstory which intrigues the
West so much, then how does
one explain the Times' pro-
found silence during the Nazi
era?" After elucidating some
examples of the paper s rele-
gation of Holocaust news to
minor stories on inside pages,
Auerbach concluded, "Who
says history doesn't repeat
itself? The Times' coverage is
as problematic as ever."
David Wyman, the non-
Jewish author of The Aban-
donment of the Jews, was the
last speaker and he dared to
make a charge which none of
the Jewish speakers did: that
the "significant factor" in
media bias now as well as
during the Holocaust is anti-
Semitism.
"I have no hesitation in cal-
ling a spade a spade," he
asserted. "I am very particular
about leveling that charge, but
I am forced to that conclusion.
It is not intentional. The peo-
ple in the media would not
personally mistreat a Jew. But
beneath the surface, unconsci-
ous and uncrystallized, there is
a definite negativity toward
Jews that is deeply engrained
in Western society, the legacy
of 2000 years. Almost all non-
Jews are infected as children,
but each of us can confront
that prejudice and subdue it."
As an example he cited an
NBC radio broadcast of April
6. 1988 that referred to "the
killing ground known as the
West Bank" and "the daily
ritual of killing that takes
place" there. "Get it? Wyman
asked." Jews, killing, ritual.
Blood libel.
"I challenge the people of
the mass media today to
embark immediately on a
course of serious self-
examination," Wyman urged,
"regarding their feelings
about Jews, what they're
doing regarding Israel, why,
and what it may lead to." He
added that "Jews who have
allowed themselves to be
used" in the media's delegitim-
ization of Israel should also
engage in such self-
examination.
implications; and other state-
less refugees whose need for a
homeland "is stronger than
the case for a 23rd Arab coun-
try."
Jews are first-class citizens
in America who have a right
and a duty to complain,
Dershowitz concluded. "Until
the media gets it right com-
plain! We have nothing to fear
from the truth."
The CAMERA conference
included visual presentations
by Andrea Levin, executive
director of the Boston chapter,
on bias in The Boston Globe,
and Reuven Koret, a, member
of Boston CAMERA, on bias
in ABC, NBC and CBS.
Charles Jacobs, deputy direc-
tor of Boston CAMERA,
spoke about the PBS teacher's
guide, Arab and Jew:
Wounded Spirits in a Prom-
ised Land.
Kristallnacht
Continued from Page 1
ownership to "Aryan" hands.
Panic swept the Jewish com-
munities. Thousands packed
Western European and Ameri-
can consu-
lates pleading for exit visas,
but the total requests far
exceeded the stringent immi-
gration rules and regulations
established by such countries
as France, Great Britain, the
United States, Canada and
others. Of approximately
500,000 Jews remaining in the
Reich at the time of "Kristall-
nacht," about 160,000 were
able to get out.
"Kristallnacht" marked the
intensification of a 5-year anti-
Semitic program initiated by
Adolf Hitler soon after he
assumed power in 1933.
Between January 30, 1933,
and November 9, 1938,
through a series of laws, Jews
had been systematically denied
their civil rights within the
German community and
deprived of the right to gainful
employment. The violent phys-
ical violations of November 9-
10 were the first attacks on
Jews to go beyond the borders
of Germany, affecting incor-
porated Austria and the newly
occupied Sudetenland.
News stories filled the front
pages of papers in the United
States and close to a thousand
editorials were printed. Amer-
icans reacted initially with out-
rage. Pledges streamed from
parishes, congregations and
school districts to adopt and
shelter Jewish families and
their children. Calls for an
economic and political boycott
of Nazi Germany poured into
Washington from trade uni-
ons, civic associations and par-
ent-teacher associations, as
well as from leaders of both
political parties.
The events of November 9-
10 were a significant step on
the road to the Nazis' "final
solution of the Jewish ques-
tion." Within two months fol-
lowing "Kristallnacht,"
Hitler, in a major address to
the German Parliament, prom-
ised the destruction of the
Jewish people throughout
Europe should there be war.
Jews were inexorably con-
signed to the Nazis' "Kingdom
of Night."
The pretext for the Nazis'
criminal attacks against the
Jews was the November 7
assassination of the Third
Secretary in the German
Embassy in Paris by a teenage
refugee Jew protesting the
forced expulsion of his family
from Germany.
Americans should remem-
ber the tragedy of "Kristall-
nacht"" as an event that
demonstrates the need for
national resolve to respond to
government-sponsored perse-
cution anywhere in the world.
Remembrance also calls for
national rededication to the
principles of tolerance and
freedom of choice that form
the very foundation of our
democratic society.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset began its winter ses-
sion with a festive salute to the
Hebrew language.
It was in honor of "Hebrew
Language Year," which is
being celebrated in all Israeli
schools.
"We don't fully appreciate
the miracle we have lived
through the revival of our
ancient language," Education
Knesset Salutes Hebrew Language
Minister Yitzhak Navon told
the packed chamber.
The special session was
attended by President Chaim
Herzog, members of the
Hebrew Language Academy
and relatives of Eliezer Ben
Yehuda, the acknowledged
father of modern Hebrew.
But Navon, a former presi-
dent of Israel, excoriated the
infiltration of foreign words
into the Hebrew vernacular,
sometimes "adapted" by
Hebraized pronunciation.
He said their use, when the
Hebrew language had per-
fectly adequate words of its
own, revealed a national psy-
chological syndrome.
People seemed to lack pride
in their own culture and heri-
tage, he said.
The Hebrew Language
Academy regularly coins new
words, usually new forms of
existing roots, to cope with the
changing needs of modern
society.
But many of them fail to
catch on.
For example, Israelis persist
in referring to supermarkets
as the "super" pronounced
"sooper" rather than the
Language Academy's "mar-
kol."
Another word frequently
heard is "bigdil," a Hebraiza-
tion of "big deal" used to
express cynicism. But that
quality can also be expressed
in modern or biblical Hebrew.
Knesset Speaker Dov Shi-
lansky admonished his collea-
gues to improve their Hebrew
style, diction and vocabulary.
"We must show an example,
because the ears of the nation
are bent to hear us," he
exhorted the lawmakers.
A cynic might not agree.
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Full Text
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
I
I
Viewpoint
Kristallnacht and Reunification
This week marks the 51st anniversary of
Kristallnacht, the night on which Adolf
Hitler's ultimate purpose against the Jews
of Germany and the world became crystal
clear.
The Night of the Broken Glass resulted in
the death of 36 Jews and injury to many
more. Destruction of synagogues was mas-
sive, hence the broken glass. Seventy-six
Jewish nouses of worship were completely
destroyed and 191 others were set on fire.
The Nazis used the assassination of the
third secretary of the German embassy in
Paris as the reason for their rampage,
during which night some 30,000 Jews were
sent to the concentration camps at Buchen-
wald, Dachau and Sachsenhausen.
After Kristallnacht, the Jewish commu-
nities in Germany and Austria were vir-
tually dissolved, and the Holocaust
assumed its new and tragic dimensions.
Of Greater Importance
Observance of Kristallnacht this year is
made more important by increased talk of
the reunification of Germany, something
which seemed unthinkable only months
ago.
While the apparent lessening of Com-
munist total rule over East Germany is
commendable, it is far too early to talk
about union with democratic West Ger-
many. Election of a new East German
leader and the flight to freedom of tens of
thousands of East Germans are not enough
to end the concerns of not only world
Jewry, but of the entire free world.
Two global conflicts, World Wars I and
II, which brought death to tens of millions
and virtual annihilation to European Jewry
are far too much evidence against a reuni-
fied Germany.
Even Bonn's admirable pro-Israel stance
of the Jewish State's first years has been
modified sharply. Both West and East
Germany have assumed attitudes favoring
the PLO which do not equate with their
supposed strong stand against interna-
tional terrorism.
Significant Anniversaries
Kristallnacht is the first of several signi-
ficant anniversaries in November, includ-
ing the Balfour Declaration, the 1947
United Nations partition which established
the basis for the State of Israel and the
infamous UN resolution equating Zionism
with racism.
Horrors of the Night of the Broken Glass
are still real to the numerous Holocaust
survivors who now live in our community.
Their ominous warning can never be for-
gotten.
The)cW1sJl

FREDSHOCHET
Edilo< and Publisher
of South Broward
Frtd Skfhtt
Published Bi Weekly
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive EdilO'
<%JT\
Religious Insensitivity
Is Exhibited
By A Racially Sensitive Professor
JOAN C TEGLAS. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING 1 3734605 COLLECT
Main Oflice Plant 120 N E 6th St. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 1 373*805
Member JTA. Seven Arts. WN8. NE A. AJPA. and FPA.
Friday. November 10,1989
Volume 19
12CHESHVAN5750
Number 22
By ALAN M. DERSHOWITZ
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (JTA)
Imagine a white professor in
a state university announcing
to his class that he intended to
grade "by a stricter standard"
all black students who
attended a memorial service
for Martin Luther King. There
would be an immediate and
justified outcry from civil
rights advocates throughout
the country.
Leading the chorus of criti-
cism would be Dr. Harry
Edwards, the Berkeley soci-
ologist who has become the
symbol for the demand for
sensitivity toward, and equal-
ity for, black athletes.
Yet it was Professor Harry
Edwards who displayed
incredible insensitivity toward
Jewish students by scheduling
the midterm in his introduc-
tory sociology class on Yom
Kippur, the holiest Jewish day
of the year.
Virtually all Jews whether
Orthodox, Conservative,
Reform or even secular
regard Yom Kippur as the one
day on which they will not
participate in work or school
related activities.
According to Jewish law, it
is absolutely forbidden to write
or attend classes on Yom Kip-
pur. Jews spend the entire day
in synagogue, praying and
fasting. Even non-observant
Jews acknowledge there is
something special about this
Day of Atonement.
Professor Edwards knew all
this when he deliberately
scheduled his midterm exam
for Oct. 9 well before the
middle of the term. He knew it
because a memorandum is cir-
culated to the faculty each
year specifying the date on
which Yom Kippur falls and
setting out the official Berke-
ley policy of avoiding conflicts
between "the academic calen-
dar and religious holy days."
He also knew that in a class
of 500 students, there would
be a considerable number of
Jewish students who observe
Yom Kippur. One student,
Naomi Snyder, who had
always attended synagogue
and fasted on the holiday, felt
compelled to violate her religi-
ous principles: "I felt I would
be at a disadvantage by not
taking the midterm, but it put
me in a situation where I felt
that I was backing out of my
own religion," she told The
New York Times.
When numerous students,
Jews and non-Jews alike, com-
plained about this insensitiv-
ity, Edwards gave an excuse
that would have made a white
Mississippi voting registrar
proud during the 1950s: "It
was the best time for an
exam." He then added the
following provocation: "That's
how I'm going to operate. If
the students don't like it, they
can drop the class."
Edwards spent an hour of
class time defending his action
in a talk characterized by
freshman Chris Fogliani as
"pretty weird." According to
Fogliani, Edwards, the spokes-
man for sensitivity toward
black athletes, "didn't seem
very sympathetic toward the
Jewish students' feelings."
To aggravate matters,
Edwards refused to schedule a
makeup a simple matter
that is routinely done by col-
lege instructors. Instead, he
decided to punish the students
who had gone to synagogue by
requiring them to write a
makeup research paper that he
announced would be graded by
a stricter standard than used
for the midterm.
No wonder some Jewish stu-
dents felt compelled to violate
their religious observance. The
ones who attended religious
services were threatened with
stricter standards which
translates into lower grades
for comparable performance.
This is unequal treatment
based on religion. In addition
to being insensitive and anti-
Semitic, it is also an unconsti-
tutional abridgment of the stu-
dents' free exercise of religion,
as well as a violation of Califor-
nia law. Berkeley is a state
university, and Edwards' deci-
sion to discriminate against
Jewish students who observe
their holiest religious day of
worship constitutes "state
action.'
The Supreme Court has said
that the constitutional guaran-
tee to free exercise of religion
means that a state cannot put
"substantial pressure on an
adherent to modify his behav-
ior and to violate nis beliefs,'
absent a compelling govern-
ment interest.
A state actor like Professor
Edwards cannot deny some-
one an "important benefit'
because he or she refuses to
violate a religious require-
ment. But Edwards condi-
tioned the Jewish students
receipt of fair grades an
important benefit to which stu-
dents are entitled on a viola-
tion of the Jewish religion.
A California statute also for-
bids Edwards' conduct. It
states that any student at the
University of California must
be allowed to take all tests
"without penalty, at a time
when that activity would not
violate the student's religious
creed."
The only time the university
can escape this requirement is
when accommodating the stu-
dent creates an "undue hard-
ship." The university has the
burden of proving that it could
not "reasonably* have accom-
modated the students' religi-
ous needs.
Here Edwards could easily
have scheduled the exam on
another day, or provided for a
makeup examination to be
graded by the same standards
as the regularly scheduled
test.
Edwards chose to behave
insensitively and to disobey
the law. In America, the law
guarantees rights to all citi-
zens and must be applied
equally. Edwards should be
proud of himself for sensitively
struggling to protect the
rights of black athletes. He
should be ashamed of himself
for insensitively violating the
rights of his Jewish students.
Alan Derskowiti is a professor at
Harvard Law School
m


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
Steve Rose 'Fellow' Of NAHD
The WDZL unit be among the attractions featured this year at the
Broward County Fair, November 16-26 at Gulfstream Park in
Hallandale.
Stephen E. Rose, director of
development at The Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged (MJHHA) at Douglas
Gardens, has achieved the
status of "Fellow" of the
National Association for Hos-
pital Development (NAHD).
Recognized as the highest
level of achievement in the
field of health care resource
development, Rose was the
only recipient in the Southeast
to receive this honor this year.
Commenting on the presen-
tation, Judge Irving Cvpen,
MJHHA chairman of the
board, said "this recognition is
well-earned."
The National Association for
Hospital Development is a
2500 member organization of
professional development offi-
cers. Founded 23 years ago
there have been close to 10,000
who have been members of
NAHD. Of this group, only 150
have achieved the standing of
"Fellow". Rose, who served as
Bonds To Honor Carol Owen
The Banking Industry Divi-
sion of the State of Israel
Bonds will honor Carol R.
Owen, President of The Fam-
ily Bank of Hallandale at a
Cocktail Reception, to be held
Thursday, November 16th, at
the Hollywood Beach Hilton,
at 5 p.m. Mr. Owen served as
President and is now Treas-
urer of the Kiwanis Club of
Hallandale; was President and
is now a Board Member of the
Hallandale Chamber of Com-
merce; on the Hallandale Com-
munity Development Commis-
sion, and is a former Director
and Officer of Broward Eco-
nomic Development Board.
Mr. Owen is on the Hallan-
dale Firefighters & Pension
Board an served 19 years as
Director and Officer of the
American Lung Association of
Broward Glades, Henry
County. He served as Commis-
sioner of South Broward Hos-
pital for 8 years.
Dr. William Korey, Com-
mentator and Authority on
World Affairs, will be guest
speaker. Dr. Korey is Director
of B'nai B'rith's International
Council and is in charge of
research for the B'nai B'rith
International Council.
Carol R. Owen will be pre-
sented with the City of Peace
Award. For information, call
920-9820.
Stephen E. Rose
this year's Region IV educa-
tion chairman, was responsible
for the successful regional con-
ference held in Key Biscayne,
in June.
Rose is also active in com-
munity service and as a volun-
teer. He has served as presi-
dent and state director
of B'nai B'rith; and on the
Boards of both the Jewish
Community Center and Feder-
ation Young Leadership in
Dallas. Currently a member of
the Board of Temple Solel,
Rose and his wife, Ellen, are
residents of Hollywood.
City of Miramar Purchases Temple
The Miramar City Commis-
sion overwhelming voted in
favor of a proposal to purchase
Temple Israel and convert it
into a multi-purpose recrea-
tional facility.
At a special meeting Monday
evening, commissioners voted
5-0 to spend $810,000 to pur-
chase the 17,000-square-foot
facility,
Leaders of a Hare Krishna
group sought to purchase the
synagogue but members of the
community expressed strong
opposition to the transaction.
The city submitted their offer
after the Krishna group failed
to meet a deadline, city offi-
cials said.
Temple Israel officials
accepted the city's offer.
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FILES


Volume 19 Number 22
Hollywood, Florida Friday, November 10, 1989
Price.35 Cents
CAMERA Analyzes Media Bias
By JUDITH S. ANTONELLI
Jewish Advocate
Excitement filled the air at
the Boston Park Plaza Hotel
ballroom last Sunday, as
nearly 1000 people came
together to strengthen the
movement to combat media
distortion of Israel whenever
Kristallnacht
A Memory
For Our Times
With methodical precision
during the night of Wednes-
day, November 9th, and early
morning of Thursday, Novem-
ber 10, 1938, SA, SS and Nazi
stormtroopers, disguised in
plain clothes, assembled in pre-
arranged meeting places and
fanned out to selected targets
in the Jewish communities of
Germany, Austria and the
occupied Sudetenland (the
Third Reich).
Following Gestapo instruc-
tions, these Nazi agents axed
windows, demolished furnish-
ings, wrecked houses, smashed
store fronts, ravaged mer-
chandise, torched synagogues
and arrested 20,000 30,000
Jews. As the well-coordinated
destruction took place, most
neighbors just watched.
By Friday morning, Novem-
ber 11, nearly 100 Jews were
dead, 7,500 Jewish businesses
had been destroyed and more
than 275 synagogues had been
razed or burned. The majority
of the Jews arrested were sent
to the German concentration
camps of Dachau, Sachsenhau-
sen and Buchenwald. Carpets
of crushed glass and debris
covered the streets of the
Third Reich.
The German public labeled
this event "Kristallnacht," or
the "Night of Broken Glass."
Some American newspapers
dubbed it "Black Thursday,"
while others, comparing the
destruction with the physical
attacks against Jews in Czarist
Russia, called it the "Night of
Pogroms."
Within days of the event,
Hermann Goering, Reich Min-
ister of the Four-Year Plan,
issued the Decree Eliminating
the Jews from German Eco-
nomic Life. A 25-percent
"flight" tax on all Jewish prop-
erty being removed from Ger-
man territory and a fine of one
billion marks ($400 million)
were levied on the Jewish com-
munities to "compensate" for
the damages wrought by the
Nazis. Goering expropriated
all remaining Jewish busi-
nesses by transferring their
CtimmaA on Page 7
and wherever it occurs.
Speaking at the national con-
ference of CAMERA (Commit-
tee for Accuracy in Middle
East Reporting in America),
Norman Podhoretz, editor of
Commentary Magazine,
stated, "This political and
moral assault is a familiar
experience to Jews in the dias-
pora; now it is the fate of the
Jewish State. There is a steady
stream of hectoring and har-
assment, unctuous in its pro-
fessed concern for Israel's
'soul'."
"If we do not exert ourselves
to prevent a new Palestinian
state, we will be guilty of
complicity in the destruction of
Israel, and will be cursed by
future generations of Jews, '
he continued, describing the
worst possible scenario "The
Day After Israeli With-
drawal." Even the best scen-
ario would lead to civil war
between Palestinian factions
in the new state, and interven-
tion by Syria as "peace-
keeper," Podhoretz said. He
characterized this as "the
Lebanonization of the new
Palestinian state. Having
tasted a bit of Syrian rule, the
Continued on Page 3
Many synagogues in Germany were burned out or down in November ofl9S8 in what became known as the infamous 'Night
of Crystal. It was durina that night of violence that SS, SA, and Nazi stormtroopers in plain clothes also burned shops and
destroyed the homes and possessions of thousands of Jews. This was a significant step towards the Holocaust. It was the
beginning of the end of a dynamic culture and unique way of life that was a thousand years old.
Back From The USSR:
Soviet Jews In Panic
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewiik Flaridian Staff Writer
Soviet Jews are in a "panic"
about tightening U.S. emigra-
tion policies and "horrendous"
anti-Semitism is increasing
their fears, said Hinda Cantor,
who just returned from a 10-
day mission in Leningrad and
Moscow.
Cantor, co-chairman of the
South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, who joined some
75 Americans including nine
from South Florida on the
mission, said the conference
marked the first time a Soviet
Jewry organization has held a
meeting in Moscow.
"The meetings confirmed
what we as Soviet Jewry activ-
ists already knew, but the rest
of the community doesn't
understand," Cantor told The
Jewish Floirxdian.
"The problem for Soviet
Jews is not over everyone
thinks all we have to do is
resettle them here."
Besides the narrowing
of U.S. emigration quotas for
the Soviet refugees, Cantor
said she learned that the
Israeli government has been
slow, and, in some cases taking
over a year, to send the invita-
tions that the Soviets Jews
need to go to Israel.
In addition, there are still an
estimated 2,000 Soviet Jews
who have been denied permis-
sion by Soviet authorities to
emigrate and retain their
"refusenik" status.
Cantor, who coordinated the
American participation in the
conference, which was hosted
by the Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews, was joined by her
husband Howard and South
Floridians Jackie and Michael
Abels, Marilyn Himmel,
Michael Tryson, Stephen
Cohen, June and Ron Daniels,
and Ellen Roth, an aide to U.S.
Sen. Bob Graham.
On one hand, she said, the
policy of glasnost is working.
"We went to public restau-
rants and danced the hora,"
she said.
But with more openess, for-
mer government "anti-
Zionism" has evolved more
into public forums for neo-
Nazis, who are threatening
and stirring up hatred against
Jews, Cantor said.
"We describe the trip as the
highest of highs and the lowest
of lows. You meet people, fall
in love a million times and
know you have to leave and
you're lucky you can leave and
go to the United States.
...Many of them said, 'Put me
in your suitcase.' "
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CAMERA
Friday, November 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Jews are first-class citizens in America who have
a right and a'duty to complain, Dershowitz
concluded. "Until the media gets it right
complain! We have nothing to fear from the
truth."
- Kristallnacht
Continued from Page 3
"Arab propagandists have
found a direct line into Ameri-
can classrooms. Under the
guise of teaching peace, it
incites students against
Jews," Jacobs warned. Its
"moral equivalence" and
assertion that Jews and Arabs
basically got along before the
establishment of Israel is "a lie
wrapped in a fairytale," he
added. "If anti-Semitism is a
light sleeper, then PBS has
just placed 40,000 alarm clocks
in American classrooms."
Jerold Auerbach, professor
of history at Wellesley Col-
lege, spoke about The New
York Times. Beginning with
Thomas Friedman's coverage,
Auerbach went on to say that
"the more intriguing issue
here is the prolonged Jewish
identity problem" of the
Times.
"The Ochs and the Sulzber-
gers never wanted the paper
to seem too Jewish, he
reminded his audience. "If
Jews, as Friedman claims, are
the leading players in a biblical
superstory which intrigues the
West so much, then how does
one explain the Times' pro-
found silence during the Nazi
era?" After elucidating some
examples of the paper's rele-
gation of Holocaust news to
minor stories on inside pages,
Auerbach concluded, "Who
says history doesn't repeat
itself? The Times' coverage is
as problematic as ever."
David Wyman, the non-
Jewish author of The Aban-
donment of the Jews, was the
last speaker and he dared to
make a charge which none of
the Jewish speakers did: that
the "significant factor" in
media bias now as well as
during the Holocaust is anti-
Semitism.
"I have no hesitation in cal-
ling a spade a spade," he
asserted. "I am very particular
about leveling that charge, but
I am forced to that conclusion.
It is not intentional. The peo-
ple in the media would not
personally mistreat a Jew. But
beneath the surface, unconsci-
ous and uncrystallized, there is
a definite negativity toward
Jews that is deeply engrained
in Western society, the legacy
of 2000 years. Almost all non-
Jews are infected as children,
but each of us can confront
that prejudice and subdue it."
As an example he cited an
NBC radio broadcast of April
6, 1988 that referred to "the
killing ground known as the
West Bank" and "the daily
ritual of killing that takes
place" there. "Get it? Wyman
asked." Jews, killing, ritual.
Blood libel.
"I challenge the people of
the mass media today to
embark immediately on a
course of serious self-
examination," Wyman urged,
"regarding their feelings
about Jews, what they're
doing regarding Israel, why,
and what it may lead to." He
added that "Jews who have
allowed themselves to be
used" in the media's delegitim-
ization of Israel should also
engage in such self-
examination.
implications; and other state-
less refugees whose need for a
homeland "is stronger than
the case for a 23rd Arab coun-
try."
Jews are first-class citizens
in America who have a right
and a duty to complain,
Dershowitz concluded. "Until
the media gets it right com-
plain! We have nothing to fear
from the truth."
The CAMERA conference
included visual presentations
by Andrea Levin, executive
director of the Boston chapter,
on bias in The Boston Globe,
and Reuven Koret, a member
of Boston CAMERA, on bias
in ABC, NBC and CBS.
Charles Jacobs, deputy direc-
tor of Boston CAMERA,
spoke about the PBS teacher's
guide, Arab and Jew:
Wounded Spirits in a Prom-
ised Land.
Continued from Page 1
ownership to "Aryan" hands.
Panic swept the Jewish com-
munities. Thousands packed
Western European and Ameri-
can consu-
lates pleading for exit visas,
but the total requests far
exceeded the stringent immi-
gration rules and regulations
established by such countries
as France, Great Britain, the
United States, Canada and
others. Of approximately
500,000 Jews remaining in the
Reich at the time of "Kristall-
nacht," about 160,000 were
able to get out.
"Kristallnacht" marked the
intensification of a 5-year anti-
Semitic program initiated by
Adolf Hitler soon after he
assumed power in 1933.
Between January 30, 1933,
and November 9, 1938,
through a series of laws, Jews
had been systematically denied
their civil rights within the
German community and
deprived of the right to gainful
employment. The violent phys-
ical violations of November 9-
10 were the first attacks on
Jews to go beyond the borders
of Germany, affecting incor-
porated Austria and the newly
occupied Sudetenland.
News stories filled the front
pages of papers in the United
States and close to a thousand
editorials were printed. Amer-
icans reacted initially with out-
rage. Pledges streamed from
parishes, congregations and
school districts to adopt and
shelter Jewish families and
their children. Calls for an
economic and political boycott
of Nazi Germany poured into
Washington from trade uni-
ons, civic associations and par-
ent-teacher associations, as
well as from leaders of both
political parties.
The events of November 9-
10 were a significant step on
the road to the Nazis' "final
solution of the Jewish ques-
tion." Within two months fol-
lowing "Kristallnacht,"
Hitler, in a major address to
the German Parliament, prom-
ised the destruction of the
Jewish people throughout
Europe should there be war.
Jews were inexorably con-
signed to the Nazis' "Kingdom
of Night."
The pretext for the Nazis'
criminal attacks against the
Jews was the November 7
assassination of the Third
Secretary in the German
Embassy in Paris by a teenage
refugee Jew protesting the
forced expulsion of his family
from Germany.
Americans should remem-
ber the tragedy of "Kristall-
nacht"" as an event that
demonstrates the need for
national resolve to respond to
government-sponsored perse-
cution anywhere in the world.
Remembrance also calls for
national rededication to the
principles of tolerance and
freedom of choice that form
the very foundation of our
democratic society.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
x****^**
Synagogue News
AJC To Honor
Gustafson And Krant
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Weekend services will be
held at Temple Beth Shalom,
1400 North 46 Ave., Hollyw-
ood, on Fri., Nov. 10, at 5 p.m.,
in the Jack Shapiro Chapel,
conducted by Rabbi Albert
Cohen and lay leaders; Satur-
day, November 11, in the main
sanctuary, conducted by Dr.
Morton Malavsky, rabbi, at 9
a.m.
Weekday services are held
at 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. in the
Jack Shapiro Chapel. Sunday
services are at 8 a.m. For
additional schedule, call 981-
6113.
TEMPLE SINAI
Friday evening Services on
November 10th will begin at 8
p.m. with Rabbi Kapnek offici-
ating and Hazzan Lindenbaum
and Cantor Wichelewski
chanting the Liturgy. The
Jewish war Veteran's Robert
K. Franzblau Post 177 & Aux-
iliary will participate during
services and will co-sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat.
Saturday Morning Service,
Nov. 11, will begin at 8:45 a.m.
with Rabbi Kapnek, Hazzan
Lindenbaum and Cantor
Wichelewski officiating.
Bat Mitzvah
MICHELLE IVRY
GREENSPOON
Michelle Ivry Greenspoon,
daughter of Ellen and Gerald
Greenspoon will be called to
the Torah as Bat Mitzvah on
Sat., at 7 p.m. at Temple Beth
Shalom in Hollywood.
Michelle attends Pine Crest
School where she is in the 8th
grade. She also attends the
Beth Shalom Hebrew School
pre-confirmation class.
Weekend pulpit flowers will
be tendered by Michelle's par-
ents, in her honor.
Attending the celebration
will be her grandparents Mari-
lyn and Sheldon Reich and
Sonia and Adam Greenspoon
of Montreal, Quebec.
A Kiddush following the ser-
vice will be hosted by Mr. &
Mrs. Gerald Greenspoon.
Independent Singles
Independent Singles of Tem-
ple Solel will hold a dance at
Boodles Lounge Sheraton
DCOTA, 1-95 & Griffin Road
on Sunday, November 19th at
7:30 p.m. For information call
981-5542.
Candlelighting
Nov. 10 5:16 p.m
Nov. 17 5:13 p.m
Nov. 24 5:12 p.m
Dec. 1 5:11 p.m
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
Sisterhood will have a Paid-
Up Membership Supperette on
Tuesday November 14 at 8
p.m. at the Temple.
Young at Heart Group will
meet at the Temple at 2 p.m.
on Wednesday, November
15th.
There will be a PTO Meeting
on Thursday, Nov. 16th at 7:30
p.m.
Minyan meets daily at 8:30
a.m. and at 7:30 p.m.
On Friday, November 17,
the Shabbat Service at Temple
Sinai will begin at 8 p.m. in the
Sanctuary with Rabbi Richard
J. Margolis and Cantor Misha
Alexandrovich officiating. The
evening has been designated
as ORT Sabbath. Participating
in the Service will be Millie
Unterberger and Ruth Rosen
of the Hillcrest Hills Chapter
of ORT, Ruth Baker and Ruth
Finkelstein of the Grandview
Chapter, and Frieda Horwitz
of the South Ocean Group. The
Women's American ORT
Chapters will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat following the
Service.
On Saturday, November 18,
the Shabbat Service will begin
at 9 a.m. in the Sanctuary with
Rabbi Margolis and Cantor
Alexandrovich officiating.
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Lift up now thine eyes, and look for ail the land which
thou seest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever"
(Gen. 13.14-15).
LEK LEKHA
LEK LEKHA At the command of God, Abram left Haran and
journeyed to Canaan. There God appeared to him and said: "Unto
thy seed will I give this land" (Genesis 12.7). There was a famine
in the land of Canaan, and Abram took his household to Egypt. On
his return, he and his nephew Lot separated peaceably, Lot
choosing to settle in the plain of Sodom. In the battles between
the northern kings and those of the plain of Sodom, Lot was
captured. Learning of his nephew's plight, Abram armed his
followers and pursued Lot's captors. He defeated them and
rescued his nephew and the other captives from Sodom. God
made a covenant with Abram to give him and his seed after him
the land of Canaan ("The Covenant between the Parts"). When
Abram's wife Sarai saw that she was barren she gave Hagar, her
handmaiden, to Abram as wife. Hagar bore Abram a son, who
was called Ishmael. At God's command, Abram changed his name
to Abraham, and his wife's name to Sarah. He was circumcized
together with all the males of his household.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Woliman-Tsamir, published by Shengold. The volume is available
at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038.)
Bernard Mandler, president
of the Southeast Region of
American Jewish Congress,
has announced that Florida
House Speaker Tom Gustafson
and Broward County Port
Everglades Commissioner
Betsy Krant will be the recip-
ients of AJCongress Distin-
guished Civic Achievement
Award for 1989. In addition,
they will be recognized as
Broward County Man and
Woman of the Year, respec-
tively. A luncheon to honor
Representative Gustafson and
Commissioner Krant will take
place at the Sheraton Design
Center Hotel in Dania on Wed-
nesday, November 29 at noon.
Representative Fred Lipp-
man (D-Hollywood) will serve
as program chairman for the
event. Honorary Chairs
include past award recipients
Broward County Commission-
ers Scott Cowan and Nicki
Grossman, Congressman
Larry Smith and Hollywood
Mayor Mara Giulianti. Pro-
gram co-chairs include Fort
Lauderdale attorney Elliot
Barnett, Hollywood deputy
city attorney Alan Koslow,
and Hollywood Commissioner
Suzanne Gunzburger.
L **
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Friday, November 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
Continued from Page 1
Palestinians might welcome
the return of Israel," he
added.
Ruth Wisse, professor of
Jewish Studies at McGill Uni-
versity, spoke on "Inverting
History and Events: The Cam-
paign to Delegitimize Israel."
Inversion has turned Jews
"from a nation of victims to a
nation of villains," she
explained. "It is a war being
waged against Jews worldwide
with a great deal of intellectual
and monetary resources
behind it."
Arab propaganda has been
so successful, Wisse main-
tained, because "Jews have
had no incentive to counter-
firopaganda. We want to be
iked and tolerated. A major
disincentive is the fear that
fighting back may make things
worse.'
So Jews have "agreed to
become the defendant, to be
held to a higher standard," she
continued. "We are used to
being held by God, the Perfect
Judge, to a perfect standard,
but that is different from being
held to perfection by a kan-
garoo court which will use it as
an excuse for extermination at
a later point. We have taken
the posture of a defendant
agreeing to stand trial."
Wisse defined as a serious
problem "the point of collusion
between sustained enmity and
the liberal imagination. There
is a liberal disinclination to
recognize Arab hatred. The
liberal imagination detests
aggression and force and
camouflages aggressive inten-
tion in order to avoid dealing
with arms and defense. It sees
people as good, and conflict
resolution as the solution."
The inversion of history has
gained "day-by-day credibility,
and a generation is growing up
with it as fact," Wisse
asserted. This has occurred
through two phases estab-
lishing symmetry between the
two sides, and then turning
Israel into the aggressor.
"Explanations are calcu-
lated to conceal rather than
reveal the truth," she stated.
"Israel is on public trial as a
way of life. Instead of seeing
the conflict as a war of states
that want to destroy a neigh-
bor against a state that wants
to survive, the Arab war
against the Jews is turned into
an Israeli war against the
Palestinians. People want to
oelieve Jews are responsible.
If Jews, who are usually rea-
sonable and tolerant, are
responsible, then the problem
can be solved. But if the Arabs
are responsible, the outlook is
very bleak.
Alan Keyes, former U.S.
ambassador who appeared on
the panel discussion following
Days of Rage on PBS, offered
his analysis of the root of the
problem of media bias against
Israel. Stating that he doesn't
"watch TV news anymore as a
matter of principle," Keyes
lamented that "50 percent of
people get all their information
from TV and are living in a
fictionalized world."
"Why should the media sign
on to an underlying desire to
destroy Israel?" he asked. "Is
it done with good intention?
They think they are right, and
are motivated by a deep moral
commitment that justifies
their selectivity and enables
them to move from informa-
tion to persuasion."
There has been a "total shift
in concept, in the paradigm of
the Middle East," Keyes con-
tinued. "Instead of the issues
of peace, security and war, a
human rights paradigm has
been substituted. Once there is
the view that an innocent pop-
ulation is being oppressed and
deprived, and the victim has
been identified, there is no
patience with the details of
background and history. Emo-
tions are inflamed and there is
the urgency to do something
now.
"This paradigmatic shift has
devastating implications," he
warned. "Days of Rage was
journalism that fit the para-
digm. There is no Arab role in
this conflict anymore, have
you noticed that? The para-
digm doesn't have room for
it."
Calling the establishment of
a Jewish State "an insult to
the manhood of the Arab
which must be revenged,"
Keyes went on to condemn the
double standard which the
media "tacitly allows" by
ignoring Arab tyranny.
"Whv do the so-called cham-
pions of Palestinian freedom
not champion it in Jordan,
which is mostly Palestinian,
even though the king recently
tried to change the census to
hide this fact?" Keyes
demanded. "In their demand
for democratic aspirations, the
Palestinians dare not speak
the name of freedom in the
Arab world. I am looked upon
as an ungodly heretic for cal-
ling for a truly representative
government in the state of
Jordan."
Arab responsibility must be
clearly articulated under the
human rights paradigm that
exists today, he concluded.
Professor Alan Dershowitz
of Harvard Law School spoke,
he said, "not as a Jew, not as a
Zionist, but as a human rights
activist." Emphasizing his civil
libertarian view that the
answer to media distortion is
"more speech, not less"
through censorship, Dershow-
itz stressed the importance of
"correcting every misstate-
ment of fact, because once lies
are allowed to be repeated
they become the truth."
Human Rights Hypocrisy
Human rights advocates are
being "turned into hypocrites
all over the world," he stated.
"One comes away [from the
media] believing that Israel is
among the worst human rights
offenders in the world today.
Israel doesn't even belong in
the same volume with other
human rights offenders. Israel
is condemned more often than
any nation in the world, but it
belongs near the very top of
the list of those most sensitive
to human rights. No country so
threatened nas ever given so
much concern to human rights.
"Any democracy can be pro-
voked into overreaction. That
is the goal of the intifada.
Palestinians determine the
number of casualties by put-
ting women and children in the
front line. The U.S. has never
had a provocation comparable
to Israel's, yet it detained
Japanese-Americans in camps
with no due process,"
Dershowitz maintained.
Noting that the freest press
in the Arab world exists under
Israeli rule on the West Bank,
and that if there are elections
there it would be "the first
election ever in all of the Arab
world," Dershowitz said the
problem is not that the media
focuses too much on Israel, but
that it does not pay enough
critical attention to the Pales-
tinians, the PLO and the
Arabs.
"Here are some stories we
have not seen on TV," he said,
listing 21 topics as recommen-
dations for future PBS docu-
mentaries. These included: the
anti-Jewish aspects of the
Palestinian movement; PLO
support of the Chinese repres-
sion; Arab voices of dissent
against PLO terrorism ("a
very short show"); a history of
Arab democracy, election and
free speech ("another short
show ); what Arab children
are taught about Jews and
Israel ("That one could be
three to four hours"); the Arab
boycott and its anti-Semitic
Continued on Page 7
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, November 10, 1989
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset began its winter ses-
sion with a festive salute to the
Hebrew language.
It was in honor of "Hebrew
Language Year," which is
being celebrated in all Israeli
schools.
"We don't fully appreciate
the miracle we have lived
through the revival of our
ancient language," Education
Knesset Salutes Hebrew Language
Minister Yitzhak Navon told
the packed chamber.
The special session was
attended by President Chaim
Herzog, members of the
Hebrew Language Academy
and relatives of Eliezer Ben
Yehuda, the acknowledged
father of modern Hebrew.
But Navon, a former presi-
dent of Israel, excoriated the
infiltration of foreign words
into the Hebrew vernacular,
sometimes "adapted" by
Hebraized pronunciation.
He said their use, when the
Hebrew language had per-
fectly adequate words of its
own, revealed a national psy-
chological syndrome.
People seemed to lack pride
in their own culture and heri-
tage, he said.
The Hebrew Language
Academy regularly coins new
words, usually new forms of
existing roots, to cope with the
changing needs of modern
society.
But many of them fail to
catch on.
For example, Israelis persist
in referring to supermarkets
as the "super" pronounced
"sooper" rather than the
Language Academy's "mar-
kol."
Another word frequently
heard is "bigdil," a Hebraiza-
tion of "big deal" used to
express cynicism. But that
quality can also be expressed
in modern or biblical Hebrew.
Knesset Speaker Dov Shi-
lansky admonished his collea-
gues to improve their Hebrew
style, diction and vocabulary.
"We must show an example,
because the ears of the nation
are bent to hear us," he
exhorted the lawmakers.
A cynic might not agree.
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Friday, November 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
Helen Berkowitz Receives Award From Yeshiva U.
Helen Berkowitz of Hollyw-
ood and New York* City was
honored by Yeshiva University
Women's Organization
(YUWO) at a dinner following
its annual benefit on Nov. 4, at
Lincoln Center in New York.
Mrs. Berkowitz, a former
teacher and school admini-
strator, received the Jewish
Education Award in recogni-
tion of "her abiding dedication
to the enrichment of higher
Jewish education at Yeshiva
University."
The benefit, celebrating
YUWO's 60th anniversary,
featured a performance by the
Balalaika and Domra Society.
The event, supported by
YUWO members and friends
of the University, was held on
behalf of YUWO's scholarship
fund for deserving students.
Mrs. Berkowitz and her late
husband, Louis, endowed a
scholarship fund for new
Americans at Yeshiva Univer-
sity. She has also endowed the
Lottie Glass collection of edu-
cation books at the Hedi Stein-
ood Boards of Brandeis Uni-
versity and the Miami Douglas
Jewish Home for Aged.
In addition, Mrs. Berkowitz
is affiliated with Temple Beth
Shalom in Hollywood and Cha-
bad of South Broward in Hal-
landale.
Mrs. Berkowitz has served
as president of the Lubavitch
Women's Division National
Committee for the Futherance
of Jewish Education. She has
also been active in
B'nai B'rith, Israel Bonds, and
Hadassah.
Mrs. Berkowitz is a graduate
of Hunter College of The City
University of New York and of
New York University's Gra-
duate School of Education.
Deborah Hospital
Luncheon, Nov. 19
Deborah Hospital Founda-
tion Hallandale Hollywood
Chapter will hold a Gala
Fund Raising luncheon honor-
ing their Woman of the Year
Leanora Schneider Mindlinger
at the Sheraton Bal Harbor
Hotel, Collins Avenue at 97th
Street on Sunday, November
19th at noon. For information
call 961-2918.
Helen Berkowitz
berg Library at the Univer-
sity's Stern College for
Women and has established
the Helen Berkowitz Personal
Endowed Scholarship Fund at
Stern College.
Mrs. Berkowitz is a member
of the Education Committees
of both the South Broward
Federation and Temple Sinai.
She also serves on the Hollyw-
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