The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00174

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Thejewisfo
of South Broward
iber26
HoUywood, Florida Friday, December 9,1983
BAMMmM
Jews play
ig force
^passion to play
prtory well known,
those games
I serious factor in
Bidaism world-
Bake on special
m. Two of those
Bayers, swim-
n Hollywood.
ts words
Ms actions
Reagan talks a
pie, attor-
I Morris
but when it
to it, he just
ier, despite
tells Prime
lamir. Page 4.
mss still
g Jews
ktO 15 percent
erica, accor-
AJCommittee
ployed, and
K even with a
economy, do
lood. Page 13.
m means
liberty
rd to discredit
[you see one
mour eyes.
i Its message
,jntly needed
>m to practice
on, whatever
and brotherhood
irersal. Page 5.
JGG unites
generations
Price 35 Cents
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS of South Broward Harold Shapiro, who
organized the Intergenerational Alliance, and Temple Beth Shalom singer Mark
Cohen meet each other for the first time face-to-face at the center
As almost anyone
who works with the
young and old would
tell you, a certain in-
definable rapport exists
between these age
groups.
They are a lot alike
even though the years
that separate them
might suggest
otherwise.
Maybe it's that
quality of honesty that
seems to be shared by
young and old; maybe
it's that both
generations generally
share a lesser burden
than others because
they are not in a work-a-
day, pressured world;
maybe it's that the
young realize the old
Continued on Page 11
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM'S Joan Cohen leads the
singers in a command performance for the JCC's
Senior Adult Center. From left, students Jodi
Holkin, Randi Gottlieb, and Clifford Felon perform
Sinai's cantor chants
Song of Freedom now
to the accompaniment of pianist Joe Tywoniak. More
get-togethers of the pen-pals are planned, with all
their meetings going on videotape.
By STEVE KATON
Asociate Editor
Only a handful of Russians can
say it, but Misha Alexandrovich
had it made.
In 1969, he was earning 10
times what the highest-paid
engineer in the Soviet Union was
being paid (2,000 rubles a month);
he had a huge, luxurious apar-
tlment in Moscow, a vacation
villa, chauffeur and even a gar-
dener.
But Cantor Alexandrovich
yearned for the freedom to be a
Jew not an unheard of desire,
but not possible in communist
Russia. He also wanted to perform
in song worldwide.
The renowned lyric tenor had
been captured in June 1940 as the
Soviets occupied Kovno,
Lithuania. In the next 25 years he
performed before 4 million people,
giving 3,000 concerts and selling
20 million records.
At the peak of his half-century
career, he was awarded the two
highest prizes a Soviet concert
singer could attain: He became a
Meritied Artist of Russia and re-
ceived the Stalin Prize.
Stalin had attended two of his
Continued or Page 6
Sinai Cantor Alexandrovich


Page 2
The
Jewish Floridian of South Brvward
LIFT lifts
67 women
to heights
of awareness
The first Learning through
Informed Federation Tours
(LIFT) program of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
Women's Division attracted 67
participants to its first destina-
tion: the Southeastern Holocaust
Memorial Center at FIU.
Goldie Goldstein, executive
vice president of the center,
facilitated a program to let the
Federation women know how
their dollars are being used ui
accumulating visual and oral
documentations of Holocaust
survivors and liberators so that
Never Again'' will come true.
The center is on a constant
search to videotape anyone who
witnessed the atrocities of the
concentration camps. "Soon
there will be no one left to say 'I Service
was there; I saw the Nazis kill,' "
Mrs. Goldstein said.
According to co-chairwomen
Avis Sachs and Sandi Gelfand
and Helen Cohan. WD Com-
munity Kducation vice president,
the next LIFT buses will be
rolling Thursday. Jan. 12. 1984.
to another beneficiary agency of
Federation. Jewish Family
Hollywood. Friday. IV^I]/
Future tours ,
Jewish High Srkl" *
Florida-HilS 5*l
Miami Home and 2?
the Aged at I
and Camp Kadima
For.more informal**
the Women s Db
8810
ision
Ift not easy to be a Riverside.
x
i
i
i
Being the best at what you do is
never easy.
There can be no let-up of effort.
No compromising of high standards.
And no cutting of necessary service.
For nearly 70 years, we've tried hard
to be the best. It began with Charles Rosenthal,
Riverside's founder.
It continues today in the hands of
Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management.

It is the kind of leadership which
working closely with Orthodox, Conservative
and Reform Rabbis, actually helped set the
standards for Jewish funeral service
They understood that being a Jewish
busfnet r hEd t0 ^ mre th^n jUst a
tht A-SS kAeYr k WaS a Very sPecial calIinS
tradition commitment to Jewish
nmwi.Afnd th knowledge and resources to
provide funeral service that was truly Jewish.
That's why today, Riverside is the w*
respected name in Jewish funeral service in
the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious Advisor
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
_, Mr-ortal Cbapl. I /''"?'? /,,-arll
The most respected name in Jewish lunei*
service in the world. rfgj
Sponaurias Tfc GUARDIAN PLAN* frmmagti Fuwd
-Tr-


rood, Friday, December 9,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 3
ewish solidarity grows on sporting fields
Games people play big drawing card to Israel
MARV GLASSMAN
years ago, Barry Gurland's
f Jewish culture consisted of
folk music, studying the
d and learning to speak He-
Hut since attending the Mac-
Games in Israel, Gurland
to see sports as another
of expressing Jewish
ity.
fieri- is just a special excitement
, seeing Jewish athletes from 34
js coming together in Israel to
ete and express their solidarity
Fellow Jews," beamed Gurland.
then, my identification with
increased and I became more
yed with the American Macca-
iames organization."
Maccabian Games are
every four years in Israel, fea
the top Jewish athletes from
ad the world competing in more
[25 sports.
iny of the gold medal winners at
laccabiah Games have gone on
ccess at the Olympics, as well as
kssional sports. Among past
cipants were swimming great
Spitz and tennis stars Shlomo
stein and Andrea Leand. The
Maccabian Games will be in
jirland is Florida vice president
Jnited States Sports for Israel,
supports the American team
! Maccabiah Games.
ijcording to Gurland, the origins
of the Maccabiah Games stem from
the time Jews were not allowed to
compete in the Olympics. Today's
goal, in addition to bringing Jewish
athletes together in Israel from all
over the globe, is to remind the
youngsters that they are Jewish.
"It renews commitment in the
athletes," Gurland says, "because
while training three or four hours a
day, many lose sight of the solidarity
of their religion."
In addition to the traditional
sports (basketball, volleyball, lawn
ball, gymnastics, weightlifting,
swimming, diving, chess, bridge,
etc.), cultural events, such as
synchronized dancing, will be dis-
played at the games.
The Sports for Israel official, who
himself was not active in sports
while growing up, will attend the '86
games. He says there are seven
athletes from Florida in training, and
he plans to hold trials in the area to
interest more youngsters.
Two swimmers from the Holly-
wood area, David Glassman and Eric
Liff, will be representing South
Broward in Brazil (see related story).
This month the United States will
be sending 120 athletes to Brazil to
compete at the Pan American Mac-
cabi Games for Jewish athletes from
North and South America.
Gurland says, "In addition, our
top junior athletes, age 16 and under,
will be competing next summer in
U.S. SPORTS FOR ISRAEL Vice President Barry Gurland
Detroit at the North American
Youth Maccabi Games."
Gurland, a partner in the Hallan-
dale accounting firm of Gurland and
Goldberg, has been a South Florida
resident 14 years.
His credits in Jewish philanthrop-
ic work include being president of
BBYO for the state of Florida, a
member of the National Young
Leadership Cabinet of United Jewish
Appeal and chairing the Accoun-
tant's Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
He and his wife and two children
live in North Miami.
uth Broward boasts two top swimming aces
I

T*.?V *'*vi.^,*t*-, -.T--r


By STEVE KATON
Associate Editor
Stroke sixteen-thousand yards a day,
every day, for fifty-two weeks a year and you
have a winner. But only if enough natural
talent's there to begin with.
Object: Be the best swimmer in the United
States. Or even the world.
These are the ingredients consuming two
young Hollywood boys. The passion to be
the best began nine years ago for one 15-
year-old, and seven years ago for the other.
Eric Liff first hit the water at age 6; Mi-
chael Glassman was 8 when he began swim-
ming seriously. At 10, Eric was best on the
Gold Coast and has a trophy to prove it. In
the 50-yard breast stroke, Michael set a Gold
Coast record as an 11-year-old.
Both Hollywood boys are hard at work
these days, every day, preparing to compete
Dec. 22-31 in San Paulo, Brazil, in the Pan
American Maccabi Games. A total of 120
Jewish athletes from North and South
America are to vie. Only two swimmers from
the state of Florida have been invited: Eric
Liff and Michael Glassman.
The next Maccabiah Games in Israel will
be in 1985.
Eric, son of Howard and Merry Liff, and
Michael, son of David and Helen Glassman,
put in this typical day:
Swimming at Pine Crest from 5:30-7:30
a.m.: school at Nova until 3:30 p.m.; "land
exercises"(Nautilus) from 4-4:45 p.m.; back
in the water to practice from 5-7 or 7:30 p.m.
Both boys now do most of their training at
Pine Crest. Asked how else they spend their
time, both boys could not think of a thing, at
first. Swimming is their all-consuming work.
However, they maintain "A" averages in
school; Michael snow-skis and surfs, and
Eric's on the student council, National
Honor Society, the Exchange service club
and water skis.
Both boys credit their coaches, Bob
Zeitlin, Gary Butts and Glen Kaye, for their
success.They say the Pine Crest Swim Club
has the fastest medley relay in Florida.
In a room full of trophies, Eric and Mi-
chael cannot help but reminisce about past
victories, and work hard and pray a lot for
Brazil, Israel and beyond.
CONTEST, this time; Michael Glassman and Eric
, both 15 and from Hollywood, take a few moments
from practicing for Pan American Maccabi Games
er this month in Brazil.
i/ia/om' event response
wises overflow crowd
esponse to the Jewish Feder-
i of South Broward "s Shalom
it, Sunday, Dec. 18, at 2:30
at the Holiday Inn (Hilton)
South Ocean Drive "has been
fling short of fantastic."
Recording to Hrenda Greeen-
chairman. the object of
lorn" is to introduce new
ents to Federation: "Make
aware of what Federation is
bout, what it is contributing
welfare of Israel and South
ward."
Jut not only new residents are
come, she adds. "Even if you
have lived here many years,
you're invited to find out about
'the Central Address for Juda-
ism' in South Broward," Mrs.
Greenman says.
Guests for the Dec. 18 beach
event will be the Hod Hasharon
Singers, direct from JFSB's Sis-
ter City in Israel. The singers will
perform a medley of tunes in
Hebrew, English and Yiddish.
Complimentary wine and
cheese will be served. .Contact
Judy Nemeth at Federation (921-
8810) for further details.
'LIFE BEHIND LIFELINE' winners Joyce Newman [left] Beverly Shapiro and Janie
Berman (right) accept their Public Relations Award in behalf of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward from Robert L. Adler of Chicago, a member of the board of directors
of the Council of Jewish Federations [CJF] and chairman of the Public Relations
Awards Committee. The prize-winning, 22-minute Elm depicts the story of Federation,
with emphasis on the South Broward community. The award waa presented recently at
the CJF General Assembly in Atlanta.


Page 4
The
Jewish Fhn^anofSouthBww^
Hollywood, Friday
TheJCWIsh
of south STCward
Frta ShOChtl _.,,.
FREDSMOCMET STEVE KATON SUZANNE SHOCHEl
Editor and Publlahar Aaaooata Editix Eiecutiva Erjuoi
Pubiianad Bi Waakly Second Class Postage paid at Maltandala. Fla USPS 864500
HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUOERDALE OFFICE Am Savings 2S00 BlOg 2500 E HaMandala Baacn
Blvd Suita 707G. HallandaM. Fla 13009 Pnona 4540
Abraham B. Halpam. Advertising Supenrlor
Main Oftica S Plant 120 NE 6th St. Miami. Fla 33132-Phone 1-3734M6
Poalmealer Form MTt return, to Jeerlah Florldlan. P.O. Bos 01-2173. Miami. Fla. 33101
Jewish Federation ol Soutn Bro*ard olticera President Or Philip A Levin. Vice Presidents Dr
Saul Singer. Ted Newman and Nat Sedley. Treasurer Dr Howard Barron. Secretary Otto
Stieber. Eecutive Director Sumner G Kaye SuOmit material lor puWication to Steve Katon.
associate editor
Member JTA. Seven Arts. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area 33.50 Annual (2 Year Minimum 371. or ov membership Jewisn
Federation ol South Broward. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Fla 33020 Phone 921 810
Out of Town Upon Request
Friday. December 9.1983
Volume 13
3TEVETH5744
Number 25
A better Chanukah
Chanukah is a joyous occasion, as we are
recalling once again now, right in the midst
of the holiday. It celebrates a happy event
the restoration of the Temple and the
Maccabbean reestablishment of Jewish
hegemony over the Graeco-Assyrian op-
pressors.
But the fact is that we are hard-pressed
to recall a genuinely happy Chanukah
celebration in the past few years, indeed
perhaps, as far back as before the Yom
Kippur War of 1973. It was on that oc-
casion that, not only Israel but the world at
large suffered the first blows against its oil
supply, which plunged nations everywhere
into fears and economic anguish.
Thereafter, there was no Chanukah on
which the tale of the cruse of oil with its
one-day supply that lasted eight days
(hence the miracle of Chanukah) did not
ring hollow in the hearts of free people
everywhere.
More recently, since the Israeli operation
in Lebanon, with its attendant quagmire of
public relations in the media, the
celebration of Chanukah seemed especially
bleak.
But this year, there appears to be some
brighter cause for merriment. The people of
Lebanon are still wracked by war. Syria, as
in ancient days, once more threatens Israel
as President Assad refuses to lead his
troops out of the Bekaa. The Soviet Union
seems suddenly to have a stronger hold on
the Middle East than it ever had before.
Still, there is a reversal of fortune so far
as the relationship between Israel and the
United States is concerned. The very
meaning of Chanukah as an event marking
the Jewish struggle for religious freedom
seems especially applicable to the struggle
for freedom in that part of the world today,
and the United States appears now more
clearly disposed to joining the struggle as a
friend of Israel, not as a reluctant foe.
Only last year, when the ties between the
two countries were at their lowest ebb, who
would have thought of this as possible so
soon? ___________
OO^OOO
,ya/t/iv fo4ulVU ()l&e/in Reagan talks big
on Israel, offers less
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
Special to the Flondian
The visit to Washington of '"^Pne
SSSSSBh
been that promising.
In return for some minor U.S. gestures and
general consultation with Israel, the ad-
ministration expects more Israel, concessions fa
Lebanon, a lessening of Israel s opposition to
arms sales to 'moderate' Arab states and
Consideration of Israels attitude towards the
defunct Reagan Peace Plan. This ,s toeItalian
order for U.S. diplomacy and certainly too
much for Israel to swallow.
Unless President Reagan is willing to offer very
concrete proposals. Israel is not prepared to
jeopardize its national security in return for an
American pat on the back.
The paradox of a relatively sympathetic State
Department and a hostile Defense Department is
largely explainable in terms of the attitudes of
Sefretarv of Slate George ShulU and Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger. Although both are
former Bechtel Corp. employees la firm with close
Saudi Arabian ties), they differ in their basic
approach to treatment of Israel.
Shultz. whose education about Middle East
politics was accelerated by personal rebuffs from
Jordan and Svria. is at least willing to explore
avenues of cooperation and lessening of tensions
between Israel and the United States. In doing
so. he is not "tilting" toward Israel, but is
showing an appreciation for the reality of Arab
intransigence and Israeli reliability.
Weinberger, on the other hand, has been an
implacable opponent of closer cooperation with
Israel and this negative attitude is reflected by
actions of lower ranking Pentagon officials. The
message from the top has been clear stay away
from Israel, we have to worry about how our Arab
friends will react.
President Reagan ultimately must decide
which view will prevail But given his long
The Priluki
personal association with WeinbentoL
California days together, and thepXM
having yet another secretary of suter
will probably try to steer a middle com-
will simply not be sufficient if IsraebWl
United States are to indeed forge an 2 I
strategic partnership and pursue the J?
in achieving peace. ^1
We will know soon enough if the Rew-
Shamir summit was show or subsunceiv
betting here in Washington is ihatawiSl
short of what is required to put US pofo
toward Israel on the right course rWt
countries and right for peace and subilii.
Middle East.
A back-handed tribute to Israel's sum
the Congress was paid by former PrttjS3
Carter and Ford earlier this month attbsG
Center at Emory University in Georgia.C
and Ford complained of Congress thwart
ability to pressure Israel and recomn__
Blue Ribbon Commission to set forth"
guidelines for future American policy ntb I
Middle East.
The conference was notable for ilsondj
attacks on Israel, thereby fully justifying^!
government of Israel's refusal to officiitfaJ
ticipate. Those countries represented wtnfa
Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Syria. Jordan.tall
"the West Bank"' and the Palestinianc
munity." In order to get a flavor ol the fa
proceedings and ex-President Carter in
t ributions the I-ebanese and Egyptian
representatives actually appeared at tinai
defending or explaining Israel spositunt
A commission such as that envisagedbiO
and Ford would be a threat to betterUJ.li
ties and to Israel's security. It is both winj|
part of our system of checks and balancatU
the Congress maintain an active role in &>
fluencing foreign policy.
Congress is answerable to the Americai
while commission members are answers!* J
one. other than an Arab client here or tin
Given Carter's recent pronouncemenu.oai
even wonder whether brother Billy would* |
included! But the Emory conference wu
laughing matter and its futureinitatmi
be monitored and reacted to accordingly
legaey continues
By ABBA BEN YAMIN
(Hebrew name for Abe Halpern)
In Priluki in the Poltava region of the Ukraine,
the winter and spring of 1920 was exceptionally
cold and dreary. When the snow began to thaw
about April the mud was ankle-deep, making it
difficult to walk.
The economic situation was poor. Food was
scarce, there was much hunger, and sickness
began to approach epidemic proportions.
My family was very ill. too, and confined to the
hospital several times.
Our one hospital on the outskirts of town was
filled. Contagious diseases began to take their
toll. The Jewish community had to cope with
many deaths and there were several funerals a
day.
In the fall of 1920,1 spent three weeks in the
hospital from Rosh Hashana through Yom
Kippur and the first five days of Sukkot. I didn't
know what was happening to my family at home,
but was certain that our cousin, friends and
neighbors were helping out.
On Yom Kippur I began to improve and spent
most of the day reciting the Yom Kippur Services
from a small pocket edition of the traditional
Machtor. The Untana Tokef prayer, which tells
about who shall live and who shall die during the
coming year, I read thret or four times that day.
Thursday, the fourth day of Sukkot, I was
released and walked home, taking an hour, not
the usual 20 minutes.
When I finally got home I found my mother
and my older brother, ltVi, very ill. My 11 year-
old younger brother was in good health. That day
and all that night I took care of my mother and
brothers.
Early the next morning. I managed to talk to
the doctor. When I described the symptoms he
told me to take my mother to the hospital im-
mediately Our friendly Christian neighbor took
us to the hospital with his horse and wagon Mv
mother was admitted about noon.
I was told that she had an internal problem and
required surgery. I waited about five hours and
then was allowed to see her for a few minutes I
was told the operation was successful and*
needed rest.
My mother asked me to go home and
my brothers. I told her that 1 would bebat
her in the morning. As I was leavingsnt
me and said: u
"My non. I wut you to remember*
your life. We have had much sickant, r
trouble. When you are very hungry Md
to get a piece of bread not even auffri*
satisfy your own hunger, don't eat it w)
Break it in half and share it with sen*"*
who may be hungrier than you.
Saturday I arose at dawn I w"nged
same good neighbor for a pitcher ol nuu
to my mother.
Carrying the milk. I walked te the ^
slopping to rest several limes *u*
weakness. 1 arrived there about ft w
into the room which had four beds, i m
in which my mother had been lying f
empty.
I aaked the nurse where my ^fjt
said very aharplythat my mother aw
night and was in the morgue.
The pitcher fell from my hand, spiiy^
I couldn't understand how such a aw
could make such a big mess.
1 ran after the nurse and ahouttd jW
to see my mother. She replied angruy
would have to wait until 9 o ckx*
I
arou
ami
liu nave vj wan %----------
found the morgue, it was locked JJ
around to the back, broke a *"^P
and crawled in. There were six "*T,,
with sheet*. On the second nei ".
who seemed to be sleeping a restful urn
Until then I waa hoping that it**
mistake. I went to the &**+*
mother could remain in the URja
iCiMl
m hoping tnai".-- wi
: to the office Wfinjortj
moiner cou.u remain in the hosp"""^(i]
arrangements for the funeral. lesH -Jj|
because of the Sabbath the funeral co-
place until Sunday. .^
I walked from the hospital toU*JJi
town to tell our cousin about my
Continued on Pag*8


rood, Friday, December 0.1983
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 5
ra
^
\eliaious Libertu
rue Meaning of Chanukith
By SAMUEL SILVER
TER THE unforgettable Six-Day War, a
sgster said, "Mother, I will never disbelieve the
i again."
is hard to discredit miracles if you see one be-
Iyour very eyes.
Chanukah comes back to us again, we feel that
Kill celebrate it this year with extra fervor. We
always admired the story of the Maccabees,
oday'fl "lighting Jews" in Israel have brought
holiday up to date. They have not only emulated
ancient predecessors; they have outdone them.
SI) YET CHANUKAH and its message are still
ll 1 > needed today. For the way in which the
la> has been transmitted to us provides an
jote lo .jubilation exclusively motivated by sue-
lul belligerence.
jr sums have always cautioned us not to go all-
I in tin Chanukah hoop-la over the military
:'\ in understand not only that Judah and his men
fclu well but also lo prize what they fought for.
|iul I he purpose' of their struggle was not to prove
, they could defeat the enemy. It was designed to
bIJsh the principle of religious liberty.
[he noblest trail of today's Maccabees in Israel is
their abstention from vindictiveness. Menaced by an
enemy who promised to exterminate them, they
have not sought to humiliate those whom they van-
quished. No voice is raised for vengeance. Today's
heroes in Israel seek not the extinction of the foe, but
the removal in the heart of the foe of the evil inten-
tions which drove him to aggression.
WHFN YOU CONFRONT an Antiochus or a
latter-day Antiochus like Nasser, there are two
dangers. One is that you may be beaten. The next
one is even worse that, if you defeat him, you may
succumb to nis tactics or his outlook. Thank heaven
that the wisdom of our sages, those who gave
spiritual leadership to the Hasmoneans of old down
to those who provide the same moral guidance
today, has kept us from capitulating to the ways of
the enemy after overcoming him in battle.
Chanukah extends beyond the area of warfare. It
is a time of family gatherings, for the fortissimoing
of the joys of the home. It is a time for the blessing
of the candles, symbols of the brightness we can
bring to our loved ones and to society at large. It is
an occasion for prayers of thanks to that Invisible
Source of strength Who urges us on to a better life.
It is a time of gift-giving not only to our children but
also to causes which will make freedom and brother-
hood more enduring.
Happy Chanukah
Alfred Golden, President
Douglas Lazarus, F.D., Manager
William Settles
Jack Kasdan
Carl Grossberg
Riverside Memorial Chapelt
St
H1
?*.."#'.
-What __
other coffee
would I
choose?"
man,
Erika
Ballerina
'To be a great ballerina
takes concentration
and precision. And
too much caffoin sure
doesn't help. That's
*hyldrinkSanka.*
^^^
rSanKpl
<.T rwpaopla who o**CQWga. out no* certain. Kc*eMi**f

r7r.--1>:^.:-?':
c;;rvrur,?'.;'-'-',ii-"
"Sunsweet Prune Juke.
Its not just good for my body
j
Everyone knows that Sunsweet Prune Juice has a variety of
vitamins and minerals. So when people see me drinking it.
they usually figure that I drink it to stay healthy. Actually,
that's only half the reason. It also happens to taste delicious.
And why not.. .it's a rich. 100o natural fruit juice, with
no sugar or preservatives added. I enjoy Sunsweet Prune
Juice often. After all, how often do you find something
that's good for you and that p.itrii/r'r^i
tastes good. too? 3 U l\ jW t L I
To your health
Here's a good deal
an Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Good on any size of Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Retailer This coupon is redeemable lor I0< (plus 7 handling) when
mailed 10 Sunsweet Prune Juice, PO Box 1404. Clinton, IA 52734
provided it has been used lor a purchase in accordance with this
otter. Any other use constitutes fraud Invoices proving ourchase
ol sufficient stock to cover coupons presented lor redemption must
be shown upon request Void if use is prohibited taxed or other-
wise restricted by law Cash value l/20< OFFER LIMITED TO ONE
COUPON PER PURCHASE This offer expires October 31 1984
SUNSWEET GROWERS, INC.
70450 600151
CERTIFIED KOSHER
10

OFF


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Hollywood, Friday.
GorQiT)Ui)ity Calendar
December
10, Saturday u.S. Sen. Christopher Dodd will
address Jewish Federation of
South Broward Premiere Gifts
Dinner, Diplomat country
CluD, beginning at 7:15 p.m.
11-13, Rummage Sale, Sisterhood of
Sunday-Tuesday Temple Israel of Miramar
9 a.m.-4 p.m.
11,Sunday
12, Monday
13, Tuesday
15, Thursday
18, Sunday
19, Monday
20, Tuesday
Association of Parents of
American Israelis meets at
Jewish Federation of Fort
Lauderdale, w Sunrise
Boulevard, 1:50 p.m. Speaker:
Avl Harpaz, Israeli consul for
economic affairs.
'is Orthodoxy Becoming a
political Tool?" is topic of
Temple Beth El Breakfast
Seminar at 9:50 a.m.
Yehoshua Trigor, new consul
general of Israel for Florida and
Puerto Rico, keynotes
"Celebration 55" luncheon,
women's League for Israel,
11:50 a.m. at Pier 66.
Sisterhood of Temple Beth El
Luncheon at noon. Speaker:
Sam S. weinstein, Teenagers:
Their Problems."
Book Fund Luncheon, Brandeis
women of Greater Hollywood,
Holiday inn, South ocean Drive,
11:50 a.m.
Hod Hasharon Singers at Temple
Beth El at 11 a.m.
Art & Fashion show, Sisterhood
of Temple Israel of Miramar,
6:50 p.m.
Chaim Potok discusses his books
at Temple Sinai, 8 p.m.
Technion women, S. Broward
Chapter, meets at Galahad North
at noon.
American Jewish congress,
Hollydale Chapter, meets new
director, Rabbi Dennis waid, at
Galahad South, noon.
h merest S1,000 Dinner,
Jerry Gleekel, at Country
Club, 5 p.m
Your Community Calender welcomes newt of your Jewish orien-
ted organization All meeting*, times and their locations should be
directed to Steve Katon, associate editor, at the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Calendar information must
be recivad at leest two weeks before publication date.
TEENAGERS
Can have the Experience
of SEEING Europe like a
European during the Summer
of 1984
The 24 Day Tour Includes:
City of London 6 Day Stay with English Host Family
* Italy The Vatican France Luxembourg
* Austria Liechenstein Switzerland.
For Brochure, More Info. Call:
Elsie Msnlscalco 962-4485
Cantor Alexandrovlch

Continued from Page 1
concerts on the Black Sea and at
the Bolshoi Theater. Molotov,
the Russian troope at the front.
In 1943. he was called beck to
Leningrad to sing before the
behalf.
Seven days !,(-. i. .
approved The 8o*>
thedoorwouklbeil^.1'
ndrovich says. Tb,
_jna vo sing uvimv i Khrushchev and many other top Mvai 0fficer trapped from the JJ J.S Z2!***T'
mvernment officials also lauded Baltic. in that year and a half be "owed pr**^
P. ._., 1W1 mnrprtfl. Fnr 91/. ..__
him.
Alexandrovich's fame followed
him from the Jewish Conserv-
atory in Riga, Latvia, where he
was a student at age 6. Two years
later he gave his first public con-
cert; he was hailed as a "wunder-
kind," traveling all over Europe
for eight years with his father.
At 13 his voice changed and he
took up the violin. At 17 he
studied in Italy with Benjamino
Gigli. learning to perform in
Italian. Russian and German.
As fascism and then Nazism
swept Europe in the 1930s, opera
and concert halls were closed to
Jews. Alexandrovich turned to
the synagogue to survive. In
Riga, he learned from the cantor
and choir leadership and studied
from recordings of the famous
cantors of the day.
In 1938, he took his first posi-
tion as cantor in Kovno,
Lithuania. He freelanced in any
operas that would take him. A
month before World War II
began, he was performing in
Moscow. He gave up everything
back home, but managed to stay
alive, remaining in Moscow.
For l'i years, he entertained
gave 350 concerts.
After the war ended,
For 2'/, yearihe "^
After the war ended, hia cantor at Temple rJ3?4
popularity soared aa he appeared J?.bore "%**!!
frequently on Moscow Radio. But Uwted States, "^f
his quest for freedom never died. Hia first position k
His letters to Soviet officials for was in New YorkatTeLiT
permission to sing outside of Jeshoua on Broadway
Russia kept coming. In 26 years. h -af-J'
he says, he never received, reply. ^ .J^JJgji
In 1968. the Russian Jewish the Alexandroviches uS'
movement to Israel was begun, idence in Hollywood
Alexandrovich's application for a Sinai, through Rabbi
visa was among the first to be Margolis. had inviud i3
filed. He spent a year as a refuse- South Florida
nik Prime Minister Golds Meir. -
he says, personally spoke to then- T'D.flmfll \ ,*" ,-
UN. Secretary General U Thant {"*" bma' 120
to intervene on the cantor's
Maxwell House; Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House* Coffee
The full pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House*
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, no matter what your preference--
instam or foundwhen you pour
Maxwell House? you pour flavor At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup
K Crrtilml Ko*h,
..."'
!+**'
I Iwmg tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century


tood, Friday, December 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 7
VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS
&&toS&*^;
mm-




fiff
.
WH



-


---', -
*

...tesM^WWWMifci *->
.*/
r

k;
- -v-
' -
^p
GreatJaste
with Ultra LowTar.
That's Success!
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
"V'r.

->4
^U*,
*5
mg
5mg
6 mg. "ur". 0.6 mg ncotint *. pw ogawu by FTC mmhod.


P>e8
The Jewish Flnriduin of South Broward
Hollywood, Prida>
Priluki legacy continues
Continued from Page 4.
It was a very long walk, the air was cnilly and I
shivered all the way but not from the cold. It took
me three hours to get there. The cousin im-
mediately went with me to our apartment and
made some food for us. After resting for a while I
went to the synagogue. It was between "Mincha"
and Maariv" (the afternoon and evening prayers).
I spoke to one of the leaders of the synagogue
and he told me I would have to wait until after the
evening prayers. They cannot talk about a funeral
until then.
After the evening service. I spoke to the rabbi,
thegabbi. shamas (sexton) ana trie cantor. I was
told there will be three other funerals Sunday.
Since Sunday was Hoshana Rabba. the seventh
day of Sukkot. all funerals have to be completed
before sundown. Monday was Sh mini Atzaret,
the eighth day of Sukkot. and Tuesday was
Simchat Torah. and funerals not completed before
sundown would have to be held over until
Wednesday.
They assured me, however, my mother would
be buried before sundown. It would be the last
funeral that day. The "Chevre Kadisha" (sacred
society) members were sent to make the proper
preparations. I was instructed to bring my
mother from the hospital when the third funeral
started.
Sunday morning our cousin and her friend
came to our place, and our neighbor and his wife
took us to the hospital with his horse and wagon.
They waited there while I waited at the cemetery.
When the third funeral approached, the rabbi
told me to bring my mother. I went back to the
hospital and we all walked behind the wagon to
the cemetery.
When we returned home, my cousin stayed
with my brothers who had not attended the
tuneral. I walked to the synagogue to say thefirst
Kaddish. Walking back home that eve,ng the
first winter snow began to fall. It continued all
night as did my tears.
As I write about these events 63 years later,
they are as vivid as if they were yesterday.
' The memory of those months was the clunax of
my childhood through hardsh.p trouble and
fear, amid the constant struggle of Jew.shl.felor
physical and spiritual survival. It fa like a three-
dimensional picture, not quite in focus, suddenly
blending together clear and sharp.
The memory of those events, the pogrom in
Itchya the shtetle where 1 was born and grew
up the years of study at the Ukrainian branch
of the Lomza Yeshiva in Priluki. and most im-
portant my mother's last words to me are a
significant part of my life.
Kabbi Israel Cioldstein. an outstanding leader
of American and Israeli Jewish life, said it this
way:
BEING A JEW
in the broadest definition means
first, the accident of birth;
second, the fact of choice, choosing to remain
Jewish despite the difficulties;
thirdly, the act of cognition, learning to know
the history and literature of his people so as to
understand its soul and appreciate its place in the
world, and
finally, the act of transmission, transmitting
to the next generation his heritage and the will to
carry it on so that the Jewish people may not
perish from the earth.
THE MOVIE THAT PEOPLE ARE TALKING ABOUT...
"A MOVING MOTION PICTURE..
A LOVE STORY... A TRIUMPH "
irt-ncShalil.NWTVTdDAVSIKW

"WONDERFUL!
VIT WILL MAKE YOU FEEL
/WARM ALL OVER!'
/ -Ren fowl.
I SYNDICATED COLUMNIST
"A HAPPY OCCASION..."
-Jatk Kroll.
NEWSWEEK MAGAZINK
"A SWEEPING
MUSICAL DRAMA!"
-Richard Corliss. TIMK MAGAZINE
; "BARBRA STREISAND
GIVES 'YENTL' A
HEART THAT SINGS
AND A SPIRIT
THAT SOARS..."
-PEOPLE MAGAZINK
B A R B R A STREI SAND
YENTL
.ifibnwith mustf.
UNITED ARTISTS \ Rak\u iophi M VENTL" MANOV PMINRIM AMYIRVis.
........-IACKROSENTHAL-4 BARRA STREISAND -YENTI III! H SHIVA. BoYn ISAAC BA>HtVlssijrtn
. MKHHII(.KAM) k ALAN b MARILYN BEftUMAK v. ,,. Larry Dl Waa>
p<; jbmo uonic 4 i *-*? BUSTY LEMORANDf >. HARBRA STREISAND -.
-. -J..-J i.,.. x .-.-. _v -A-
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DEC. 9
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a.-ct dwl mm to Alaska and Hawa.. chick your op^aw ** B ^
KT


/wood, Friday, December 9,1963
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 9
so.- -.:;-:
I
i :

.
NORTON
TIRE CO.
umrl
aim*
?
Coach Howard Schnellenberqer
LOWER PRICES, EXPERIENCE AND
INTEGRITY THAT SAVE YOU MONEY
HIFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC, POLYESTER
CORD. FIBERGLASS BELT
WHITEWALLS
P155/80B12
| Plus 1 50
RET
W
AilY
*"*.
SIZE PRICE FET sizr PHICE M.I
P155/80B13 31.97 152 P215/75B14 44.25 2 24
P165/80B13 33.81 1 58 P225/75B14 46.57 2 45
PI 75/80813 35.75 1 70 P155/80B15 35.75 167
P185/80B13 37.93 1 79 PI65/80615 37.44 183
P175/75B14 38.79 1 70 P205/75B15 44.14 2 13
P185/75B14 39.88 186 P215/75B15 45.60 2 37
P195/75B14 41.82 200 P225/75B15 47.78 252
P205/75B14 42.92 211 P235/75815 50.10 272
W8
HFGoodrich
LIFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
P155
F80R13i
I Plus 1 50
FET
SIZE
P165/80R13 43.46 M P205/75R14 55.06 i2 *
175/80R13 45.02 183 P215/75R14 56.10
185/80R13 46.28 P225/75R14 | 59.97
IP195/75R14
PRICE
FET
195/70R13 47.11 ,95 P195/75R15 55.37
SIZE
PRICE
FET
-i--------------
2 49
2 67
P205/70R14 52.76 2 24P205/75R15 57.25
P175/75R14 46.39 187IP215/75R15 59.45 2M
P185/75R14 48.57 2 00|P225/75R15 61.63
213
52.76
IPREMHJM 4 PlY
POLYESTER CORD WHITE
P235/75R15 66.13 296
2 21
2 44
SAFETY
SERVICE
EVERY STORE HAS
CERTIFIED
TO SERVE YOU
Most ot our mechanics have
been TESTED and CER-
TIFIED by the National In-
stitute tor Service Excel-
lence They are available at
any ol our stores listed be-
low with a star
WE DO QUALIFIED,
EXPERT WORK ON
ALIGNMENT
WHEEL BALANCE
HI SPEED or COMPUTER
COMPUTE FRONT
END WORK
AIR CONDITIONING
CHECK-UP
Keep your unit performing
in top condition Available at
stores listed below with a ( )
7!Ray6ed&
o
v
Install new disc pads Re-
surface rotors Install new
seals Repack bearings
Check calipers Check
system Inspect master
cylinder Add fluid as re-
quired Ad|ust and bleed
as required Check and ad-
iust rear brakes Road test
IBPWII
30.000 Mil* Limited Warranty
OIL CHANGE
FILTER & LUBE
2 74
SIZE
A78x13 25.26 '60 P165/B0R13 35.62'67
C78x13 28.20
C78xi4 28.83 '89
E78x14 30.03 2 06 P185/7SRH 41.25 193
PHICE fMX
H78x14 34.74 2
G78x15 33.26 238
I 77
hAvowoOeee
i en 2. Ply.
MAXI-TRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL WHITE
SIZE
PRICE FE T
P175/80R13 38.39 164
P185/80R13 40.09 78
F78x14 31.48 216 P195/75R14 42.62 2 06
G78x14 33.18 2 26 P20S/75R14 43.9Q 231
H78x15 34.96 2 55 P225/75R15ia772 70
L78x15 36.94 2 80 P235/75R15 53.61 2 89
P215/75R14 45.892*'
P215/75R15 46^8 2 49
UP TO 5
0TS0F
PREMIUM
OIL (Bulk)
NEW FILTER
COMP LUBE
0MOS'
USSNGt*S
4NOHGMI TRUCKS
We Will Meet Any Legitimate Advertised Tire Price
NORTON TIRE COa LIMITED WARRANTY
30 DAY MONEY
BACK GUARANTEE
i Mr at* reaioa roa are not comieieiy MM wiHi any Mm
patsengei car lire ,ou buy inxn Norton Tiro Co inn it
aloag wttti ,ov. origin>l invoice wrein 30 cart t* Kit Halt of
owtkiu ana Ml money nil M iMMM hi Ml no am
lion aiked1 Roj haiaidi and commercial veHiclet ai ~-3
MM
? QUALITY VALUE PERFORMANCI
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALL
SIZE
145-13 38.39 '63
155- 13 40.84 I' 42
165-13 |16.20 55
175-14 56.30 208
165/70-13
185/70-14
MXL
PRICE FET
<~7,
185x14 57.74 i2 15
16515 54.391172
47.40
185/70-13 55.51 1 78
62.40 "
1 55
P-METRIC TUBELESS
'X* WHITEWALL
SIZE
PRICE RE T
m^P155/8QR13;41.a16
P165/80R13 46.54
TUBELESS
BLACKWALL
P185/80R13! 58.16 9
195/70-14 205/70-14 IP185/75R14 62.01 2 00
83.69 92.46 |P'95/75R14|65.11
FET 2 27 FET 2 40
1 50
1 64
2 13
THE NEW GENERATION RADIAL
BLACKWALL
;P205/75R14 70.73! 2 34
165/70-365 77.08 7? P215/75R15 74.98 2 59
220/55390
WHITE
107.49
P215'75R14 73.66;?49
SHE I PRICE |F.E.T.P205/75R15; 71.95)2 44
use
ME
SPECIAL 180/65-390l 90.30|''P225/75R15|77.18
)/P235/75R15l86.45
185 14
6 PLY
IMPORT TRUCK
59
SI 10"
MM
naicit
(MICA ,
muc imisl
YOKOHAMA
40,000 MILE UMITED
WARRANTY
Y865 STEELBELTED Y889 Steel Belted Radial |
RADIALS
SIZE
FOR MOST FOREIGN *. DOMESTIC 175 70SR13
SMALL 1 INTERMEDIATE CARS
SIZE
PRICE
155SR12 31.18 136
RET
;i85'7qsri3 44.62 7a
n 31.94 T77'95/70SRi4i5Q.45 3O9
155SR13 33.97 I '48
185/70SR14 47.25
I 91
205/70SR14 57.14 2 40
165SR13 36.13
I 60
175SR14 41.98
I 84
185SR14
IROEF
165SR15
i 96
SMALL TRUCK
SPECIAL
Y45 WHITEWALL
41.30
I 79
600 14
6 PLY
41
28
SHOCK
lABSORBEF
alonro-MMIc-
IRELLI
41 Hal
' iff
ilfcflH ,
low cost, hwm Mileage po/"7f| '
RA0UL IUCXWALL
|0FF
Most Amomcan Cart
ABOUT OUR
8 POINT SAFETY
SERVICE CHECK
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13 39.19 "' 185/70SR13
175SR14
185SR14
PReCE
165SR15 49.67
RET
1 19 165/7QSR13 41.68 26
181 1
MML STEEL BELTS
SIZE
115 175/70SR13
165SR13J 42.50 'M 185/70SR14 S5.Q2 65
PPJCE RET
195/70SR14 59.84 lae
1 32
1 57
211
WE ALSO CARRY
P5, P6. P7 and PS
SIZES TO FIT MOST AMEPJCAN 1
laJPORT CARS AT MOST STORES
fj, MVOLUTOrARt All
rTJ SEASON fUOMl HIGH
PtRF0RAaK( STf(I MIT M
SI0E WAIL FOR AOOE0 STREN6TM
SIZE
PR*CE
195/70HR1
205/70HR1
34 2 19
NORTON
>*<_ t "a>l -
TIRE C
ALL STORES OPEN 7:30 AM
SAfETY
CENTER
owe.---------------- .CORAL GAMES .CUTLER ReOOC
MmIm Car* eo~o -"? loieos o~.w. msm
\W. noaiTH mum .MUiUM/run iraw aau
"A Mia >- HUM' i?'tna-s> in mm
Am Eltrttl '*H atMIRMACM .tHAiai AIRPORT
n^JVri_fc iioeai ie*Si <' m nu amaBeai jojiioi
DlRfflCM .MAMIMACH .WfSTMUkW
MteueaAeaeariMU mik* i
""i**" t*tewTNeM .mAii m innate sbmam
mmiiM ego's n.n *' 'vs ins eomsi M'oiie
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WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS



Th, JmUk FhHdianofSouthBww^
Hollywood, Friday,
/Is A tht> /.i/i/i/
S24t|

Time to remember
... a time to forget
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rood, Friday, December 9,1963
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 11
i ^

J BQPK ^k9
-^^^^^^j T
to *~Trt VVSww v

'A mm' w.
m f^HrV.: !t^fIIIHI *3| a. 1
OBVIOUSLY HAPPY pen-pals MoUie Frenberg and
Shawn Birken share some thoughts and smiles last week
during the first Intergenerational Alliance meeting
sponsored by the JCC.
[HE TUNES of Joe Tywoniak [rear), Arthur Stein [left] sings along with students
mple Beth Shalom. Pictured [from left] are Jodie Holkin, Clifford Felon, Pamela
Ison and Leor Apel. The Intergenerational Alliance was to meet again for a
hikah party, and the seniors are to attend a play at Temple Beth Shalom Dec. 21.
fntire experience between the two groups is being videotaped to be marketed.
\C unites generations
I miii 111.i 11 from I'.ii'.i' I
only teach them and
:'ly demand what
ills do, and that the
ing renew youth in
ild
his is what the
tergenerational
liance, a new program
promoted by the
". isli Community
iters of South
ward, under the
fction of lay leader
bold Shapiro and
th the guiding hand
Cleanor Bernstein,
;ctor of the Senior
iter at 2838
plywood Blvd., is all
kit.
'To foster the
itionship between
i seniors and children
to get them to know
We Hope
)u Never Need Us
But If You Do
' Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
ity Memorial
Monument, Inc.
10 Northeast 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
each other's needs, that
is our goal," Shapiro
says. "There certainly
is a commonality that
exists there, a special
relationship."
The idea was born
with pen-pals. The
students at Temple
Beth Shalom Day
School and the seniors
at the JCC
corresponded. And then
the day came last week
when they would meet
for the first time.
"Even with their own
grandchildren nearby,
the seniors eagerly
awaited meeting their
new friends," Shapiro
tells. And the
youngsters were just as
anxious and nervous
about their initial face-
to-face contact.
What is unique about
the meeting is that it
was videotaped, as all
sessions between the
generations will be. The
object is to produce a
marketable product
that will tell a poignant
story of the generations
in Hollywood, Fla.
Shapiro, whose
contribution to the
JCC, a recipient agency
of the Jewish
Federation of South
Broward, is helping pay
for the pilot program, is
certain that his money
is being well spent.
"All you have to do
to know that," he says,
"is look in the eyes of
the people, young and
old."
SING-ALONG PARTNERS Missy Barrish and Rachel
Postal |right], who had corresponded through the JCC's
Intergenerational Alliance, get together in song last week
at the JCC.
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You've got what It takes.
3


i. Friday, December 9,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 13
study shows worsening plight of poor
proving U.S. economy no help to Jewish jobless
[ MURRAY ZUCKOFF
JTA Reporter
1.ANTA Jewish un-
dent in this country is a
problem despite an
I economy. An estimated
ercent of the total Jewish
ktion is economically
disadvantaged and vulnerable.
Those most vulnerable are
workers over the age of 40 and
working women in all
brackets.
age
These are some of the findings
m a study the American Jewish
Committee submitted to rep-
resentatives of the House
Subcommittee on Public
Assistance and Unemployment
Compensation Committee on
Ways and Means.
The A J Committee study,
"Jews on the Edge," presented a
grim litany on the growing
problem of Jewish unemploy-
ment and the plight of the Jewish
poor. One of the consequences of
the current economic situation, it
reported, is the changing eco-
nomic structure of American
Jewry.
That structure, which in the
past was characterized by a pre-
ponderance of white collar and
professional workers, is turning
around because many in the
public and private sectors of the
economy are now unemployed or
underemployed. This is leading
Continued on Page 14
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TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON-AND THIS IS IT
This is the time for hard logic Simply put here it is.
Since August 12,1982 when the Dow Jones industrial average stood at 776.92 to the time of this writing
it has increased to 1268.80 (November 21,1983).
Many people have been blessed with increased stock values. Perhaps you did't have one of the top
performers, but again you may have some real appreciated gains In the equities you hold.
No one really knows if we are at the "top of the gain" but lets suppose there is a correction due. why
not take the following suggestion serelously:
SET UP A PERSONALIZED PHILANTHROPIC FUND with the Jewish Federation of South Broward
This fund will bear your name or the name of anyone else you wish to designate, you can establish the
Fund by contributing your appreciated stock or other property to the Foundation and bv completing
a simple form.
YOUR TAX ADVANTAGE
An income tax deduction may be taken this year since contributions to your Fund are treated as gifts
to a public charity.
The fair market value of your appreciated long-term securities is deductible up to 30% of your con-
tributing tax base.
There is no tax on income within you Fund.
You may continue to contribute to the Fund enabling you to make larger contributions during high
income years and especially after a windfall.
There is no cost to establish the Fund and no cost to operate it.
WHAT CAN THE FUND DO?
'Recommendations from you for disbursement of Income and/or principle to recognize charitable
purposes are acceptable.
All grants require approval by the Legacy Endowment Fund which reserves the right to determine
If the recommended beneficiaries are consistent with the Funds charitable purpos*.
Ail checks going out have the name of the Fund on them. Example: "The Harry and Artene stein Philan-
thropic Fund.
remember: Capital gains are avoided on the transfer of appreciated stocks to set-up a Philanthropic
Fund.
Don't miss out on this opportunity to "bank- your gains.
Rx ftirther lnforrnatk)n, please call Mkft^
how to effect the transfer of those appreciated securities, and of course, consult your own tax advisor.
t*> IIS MS MS
1 mi its as K*
!g Sr
17 MS MSI
til tJS 4SS <
.ft
I* I
Legacy and Endowment Fund
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Fla. 33020
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2IS- a Ltnw ta I) Musts OS S4V.4


Page 14
The JtwtMk Floridian of South Broward
Honywood,Frid.y,DtB,.
Jewish joblessness
Coo tinned from Page 13
to a downward mobility.
The study also stated that
there is ongoing concern about
the implications of growing
Jewish joblessness for Jewish
continuity and stability. "For
one thing, economic disad-
vantage often leads to alienation
or disconnection from the Jewish
community," it noted. "Reports
from around the country suggest
that memberships are down in
synagogues and communal in-
stitutions."
It cited a statement by Rabbi
Ernst Conrad of Temple Kol Ami
in West Bloomfield, Mich., that it
is young families of professionals,
educators or business people who
are most affected. Another
implication of growing unem-
ployment or underemployment is
the effect it is having on growing
numbers of educated young
Jews.
Albert Ascher. the executive
director of the Jewish Vocational
Service and Community Work-
shop of Detroit, characterizes
this group as "a new generation
of downwardly mobile Jewish
youth who now doubt that their
; level of occupational achievement
will equal to their parents "
A St. Louis demographic study
done in 1981. when the jobless
rate was about 3 percent of the
Jewish population, revealed that
56 percent of the unemployed
were male; 59 percent were under
35; 74 percent were in the $25,000
income bracket: 64 percent were
married; 62 percent were white
collar, 15 percent were in sales:
and 56 percent did not belong to a
synagogue. These data were
corroborated by data collected in
1963 from the St. Louis Employ-
ment and Vocational Services,"
the AJCommittee study added.
According to a report from the
Atlanta Jewish Vocational
Service, cited in the study, 33
percent of the Jews who
requested employment help were
women under age 29. "These data
illustrate the special vulnera-
bility of Jewish women who tend
to have less education and less
occupational mobility than
Jewish men," the study said.
"The St. Louis demographic
study revealed a similar pat-
tern."
Similarly, a recently conducted
Chicago Metropolitan Jewish
Population Study revealed "that
there are 37,000 economically
disadvantaged and vulnerable
Jews in our community, which is
about 15 percent of our estimated
Jewish population of 248,000.
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These individuals are rep-
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composed largely of the elderly
and young families," the
AJ Committee study reported.
The Jewish Board of Family
and Children's Services of New
York City also found that
"middle to lower class families,
who up till not have been able to
sustain themselves financially,
are beginning to fall through the
safety net, creating a new group
of poor in the communities."
The AJCommittee study noted
that the report on New York City
pointed out that following cuts in
public aid programs, one-third of
all Jewish households receiving
public benefits lost all or part of
such benefits and, in 11 percent
of the Jewish households in-
volved, jobs had been lost or
working hours reduced.
Dr. Ephrain Royfe. executive
director of the Philadelphia
Jewish Employment and
Vocational Services, was quoted
as saying that factors con-
tributing to the current kweta of
Jewish unemployment mchide
cuts in governmental spending
which have eliminated social
work and other service positions,
the decrease in teaching and
university positions resulting
from decreased population and
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increases in the number of small
business failures; and the lack of
opportunity for Jewish college
graduates with degrees in liberal
arts.
"Each new reality involves an
area to which Jews have tradi-
tionally been drawn." the
AJCommittee study said. It
referred to Royfe who cited "a
loss of 150,000 manufacturing
jobs in the Philadelphia area in
the last decade" which has led to
a decrease in the number of
engineers, sales and marketing
personnel. attorneys, ac-
countants and others who
support a manufacturing base.
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Iwood, Friday. December 9,1963
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 16
IPAC events termed big success
their South Broward organizers
_ successful appearance of
nas Dine, executive director
he American Israel Public
jts Committee (AIPAC), at
| champagne receptions in
Broward was made
|ble through the efforts of:
jbert D. Katz, Florida
fcnal chairman; Dr. Stanley
dies, executive committee;
Pittell, S.E. Florida
dinator; and co-chairman
Ja and Sheldon Levin, Doris
[Herbert Tolpen and Eleanor
Paul Weiner.
?-chairmen at Hillcrest are
Cohen, Harvey Fell, Joe
nond and Rose Sarner. The
nittee consists of Hannah
Joe Bloom, Dorothy
nuchin, Gertrude and Sol
Marc Gilbert, Stuart
lid, Ben Haiblum, Gloria
e, Ralph Jaffee, Sam Kotler,
Mishler, Morris Ratner,
othy Rodnon, Sol Royal, Sam
erberg, Harry Smallberg,
on M. Winograd and Mary
|fe.
he 1983 AIPAC Committee.
Ith Broward Chapter, is made
bf:
lancy and Norman Atkin,
and Howard Barron,
net and Joe Bloom, Nancy
I Herb Brizel, Candy and Ross
rk, Tamara and Alvin Cohen,
and Lewis Conn, Meral and
Ehrenstein, Gert and Sol
Lin. Ann and I-owis Fineman,
>dra and Charles Friedman,
i and Marc Gilbert, Mara and
i (.mil,mi i. Ruth and Herman
ckman and Rosemarie and
rman (ioodman.
Bther and Allen Gordon, Lor-
e and Fred Greene. Joan and
: Gross. Suzanne and
raid (iunzburger. Kay la and
fciuld llersh. Gertrude Hor-
tin. Sylvia and Mort Kalin,
nerta and Gary Karen, Ellie
U Herb K;n/. Jy/$y> n>yi iihisr- j
|n Katz, IWrfa" and "Jflimmer "
Im Kmht'llo and Paul Koenig,
Va Krieger, Gloria and Phil
bin and Meron Levitats.
Judy and Fred Lippman, Toby
i: George Liplon. Karen and
anlcv Margulies, Audrey and
En Meline, Lynn and Martin
lndeJssohn, Barbara and
mi's Fox Miller. Rhona Miller,
rry and Norman Morrison.
|yre and Ted Newman. Klaine
Bob Pittell, Phyllis and Nat
Richer, .loan and Jerry Itaticoff
1 Vicki and Joe Raymond.
lloyee and Alan Roaman.
Irbara and Jeffrey Rosenberg.
prence and Leon Roth. Avis
and David Sachs. Marge and
Jack Saltzman, Merle and Joel
Schneider. Joanne and Steven
Schoenbaum, Benita and Joe
Schwartz, Dina and Nat Sedley
Beverly and Alvin Shapiro,
Sheryl and Fred Sherman, Susan
and Saul Singer, Sheila and
Larry Smith, Evelyn and Otto
Stieber, Valerie and Paul Sum-
man, Rita and Stan Weinatein
and Sally and Milton Winograd.
Tlw camp VQU^wwyi wanted to 90 to.
Dr. Chalm Potok
will Appear on
SUNDAY, DEC. 18th, 8:00 P.M.
At Temple Sinai, Hollywood
1201 Johnson St.
Individual Tickets Now Available
at $15.00
Series Tickets (4 Shows) $50.00
call 920-1577

V .
Tl
IR.X*
in the Beautiful Shenandoah Mountams of West Virginia
IO.C.
Co-ad a-araafc camping lo<
ch.IO.an 9116 1-10
Co*] 4-ajaah Hwon tor
ch.lo.an graoaa -6
Good 4-wOTk aion to.
loonaoaft 7th- 10th gradaa
mi cutn nuim inch aciiwiiiis tmiitm soom ka tnmt < nuajmM
Mk Irma Wn Gvaaatta IccUtti Sunnj Ml Ciiiam Crtta
vat ln rtarara Oacw and Nwuj inakna Malim Sun am K smt jm i"<_______
10 Old Court Road
Baltimore. Md 212W
(301) 4*4-2233
Outstanding Computer Program At AN Levels
Camp Reunion For oM I New CamperaDecember 2
7 to Ml p.m. Temple Beth Shalom. 1400 N. 46 Am, MoBy
where shopping is a pleasure 7days o week
ALL PUBLIX BAKERIES OPEN AT 8 AM

IEMISPHERE'b B'nai
I'rith Night for Israel,
rhursday, Dec. 15, at 8
) m. is to honor William
'ittman, according to Ie-
fl Bonds Committee
Chairman Harry N. Stein-
rg and Co-chairman Lila
cker.
Cinnamon
Raisin Rolls
$159
6-ct.
pkg.
An all time favorite
each
:ran Muffins
$109
e-ct
pkg.
Plain
Prune or Apricot
Muffins....................... 49 C ~~~
I Frozen, ready to bake and i
Bear Claws 3 99* GOUlTliet Hi
D' Oeuvres
Prices Effective
December 8th thru 10th. 1983
$1Q95
Dolphinmania Tickets arc Getting Scarce,
But There's Still Time to Win!
Afl Winning Tickets Must be Claimed
by December 22,1983.___________
Publix


Page 16
Th* Jewish FloridJonof South Broward
Holljrwoqd, Frida
y.
Hillcrest leads the way
in Premiere Gifts giving
The Hillcrest community again
is leading the way in contri-
butions to the 1983-84 United
Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward Cam-
paign.
At its recent Premiere Gifts
event, hosted by Hillcrest Chair-
man Marc Gilbert and his wife,
Ann, the community raised
pledges of $180,000, far ahead of
the 1982-83 effort.
"The momentum and high-
energy are there this year for Is-
rael," Gilbert said. "Hillcrest will
surpass its goal, with flying
colors for the South Broward
Jewish community and,
course, for Eretz Israel."
Guest speaker was Sanford
Hollander, associate national
chairman of UJ A.
Next Federation function at
Hillcrest, according to Gilbert,
will be the $1,000 minimum cock-
tail reception Tuesday, Dec. 20.
at 6 p.m. Jerry Gleekel. an
expert on Israeli and Mideast
history and current events, will
be keynote speaker.
For further information,
contact Reva Wexler at Federa-
tion (921-8810).
*?*m
H ALL AND ALE CULTURAL ARTS INr
CULPAT PRESENTS
THETOYMAKER"
Musical
60 Singers,
Dancers. Actors
(Ages 3 to 17)
Annette Edwards,
Director
'A MAJORITY OP ONPI
3 Act Comedy
Florence Rote, fa
Sat. Jan. u & 21
8:00 p.m. $7,508 50
Sun. Jan. 15
2:30 p.m. $6.50/5.50
(Reserved Rows)
Sun, Dec. 18
2.30p.m. $450/3.50
7:30 p.m. $6*5
(Reserved Rows)
At TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th Ave., Hollywood
Group Discounts For Infor.: 454-1268
Sage Plaza #27 800 E. Hall. Bch. Blvd.
Marc Gilbert
Counselors can make
better parents of you
Mr. and Mrs. R., in their mid-
205, came to Jewish Family Serv-
ice of Broward County a year ago
when they felt their son. 7-year-
old Robert, had become unman-
ageable.
He constantly threw temper-
tantrums when they did not do
what he wanted, refused to sleep
in his own bed, ate snacks all over
the house, and let his friends take
out all of his toys, dismantle
them, and leave his room in com-
plete disarray.
The counselor examined Mr.
and Mrs. R.'s expectations of and
ideas about parenting. Because
Robert was the R.'s first child,
they did not know how to deal
with him.
Their ideas regarding child-
rearing and their roles as parents
were extremely vague. Mr. R.
came from a family where few
rules were set. His parents
worked long hours in their store,
so he was left to fend for himself.
Because his father played a
small part in his life, he wanted to
be a "buddy" and "pal" to his
son. He was afraid that if he set
limits on Robert's behavior, the
child would not like him.
Mrs. R. came from a large,
loving family where she was the
youngest of six brothers and sis-
ters. Because she was coddled
and overprotected, she felt moth-
ering was synonymous with
overindulging her son.
Through counseling, the R.'s
learned that children need clear
definitions of what is expected of
them. They learned that this
involved setting limits on
behavior aa well as enforcing con-
sequences for unacceptable ac-
tions.
As the R.'s examined their
ideas about parenting, they
realized they needed to work to-
gether in disciplining their son.
Mr. R. saw that he could enjoy
Robert much more when the child
acted in a socially acceptable
manner and treated him with
respect.
Although Robert was initially
upset when the R.'s established
behavioral miss, his temper-tan-
trums gradually diminished.
Mrs. R has gotten firmer and
more consistent in dealing with
Robert and has learned to check
her desire to overprotect him.
The R.'s are still in therapy,
consolidating the gains they have
made, and the future looks bright
for them.
If you have any questions or
teel that we can help, contact
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd.. Hollywood. 33021.
Telephone: 9660956. Hours -
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3500 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort Lau-
derdale, 33319. Telephone: 735-
3394. Hours Monday. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to5 p.m. Thursday 9a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and the
United Way of Broward County.
Ifs Easy to Feel Like a Million
Without Spending a Dime
At first glance, it's |ust a living room
filled with furniture Or maybe its
a garage filled with tools Or a close!
filled with clothes
Jt rhigbt not be worth much to you.
but to us it's worth millions It's worth
medicine and medical supplies for
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible Of course, we will be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience A licensed
appraiser is available upon request.
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets
Its that easy And you'll feel like a
million without spending a dme.
75V39M(DMto)
l5713NW.27th.Ave
500 NE 79th St
13149 HaKandale Beach BM3
lrvmg Cypen Chairman of trie Board
Harold Back. PresKtont
Aaron KravAz. ChaKman. Thrift Shop
Commttee
Fred 0 Hal. EiecuUve Director
NowDialingls As Quick
As Qne,rEvOeeeRinge
Add Speed Callinglb
^fourResent Service.
0
With Speed Calling you can dial
frequently called local or long distance num-
bers by dialing just one or two digits. So you
don't waste time looking up numbers and
dialing them. No equipment needed; works
with either rotary or Touch-Tone* phones.
Available for either eight or 30 frequently
called numbers. To order call your Southern
Bell business office.
r Southern Bell
no installation Charges Apply Between Now and Dec. 15,1983


Lood, Friday. December*,'1983
Th* Jewish Floridian ofSouth Broward
Pgel7
.-.-. ..-'-
*.--
sunrise,
sunset.
sunrise,
sunset.
sunrise,
sunset.
sunrise,
sunset.
sunrise,
sunset.

-. -j .
sunrise.
$939.00
(Airfare, hotel, and a car included.)
. .- .
,w
i
Announcing El Al* Sunsation Six Vacation to Israel.
Imagine getting six sunrises, and five sunsets, in
Israel for only $939.
Including round-trip airfare. A superior hotel in
Jerusalem or Tel Aviv.
And a complimentary Avis Rent A Car, yours for
five days. ,
Who can do this for you? Only El Al, the Airline
of Israel. ,
Throw in an extra $100, and you II get our deluxe
package-accommodations at Jerusalem's King David
Hotel, or the Dan Hotel in Tel Aviv.
And if six days just aren't enough, and you want to
extend your stay (who wouldn't?), we can arrange
^ Seea travel agent, or call El Al at 1-800-223-6700
and ask about our exclusive Sunsation Six Tour. But
hurry this offer ends in February
Quickly go the days.
For complete tour details, call or write Sunsation Six Tour Desk:
El Al Israel Airlines, 850 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022.
Name
Addro-.
City
State
Zip
Price per person/double occupancy effective November 15.1983 to February
29.1984 Offer not valid from 12/15/83 to 1/5/84. One Avis car per double
room; gas, mileage, and insurance charges not included. If named hotels
unavailable, comparable accommodations will be substituted.
Package price based on Miami-Tel Aviv round-trip only. For prices from
your area, contact a travel agent or El Al.
The Airline of Israel


Page 18
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Hollywood, Frida
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
After 12 years, refusenlks win precious free^
YURI TARNOPOLSKI. the
47-year-old chemist, regularly
writes to his wife OLGA in
Kharkov from the Labor camp in
Chita region, where he is serving
a three-year sentence for
"defaming the Soviet state." But
Olga has not been allowed to visit
her husband since his June trial.
The information given to
HAIM ELBERT that no charges
will be brought against his im-
prisoned son LEV for possessing
and distributing drugs has now
been given to him in writing.
DR. INNA MIZRUKHINA,
Lev's wife, who with her 12-year-
old son KARMI was staying in
Moscow with friends, will return
to Kiev. She hopes to go back to
work
On advice of friends. VLADI-
MIR LIFSHITZ. the Leningrad
computer programmer, started
taking food again this week after
a 14-day protest hunger strike.
Lifshitz who. since his applica-
tion in 1981 for an exit visa, lost
his job and was threatened by the
authorities with prosecution for
"leading a parasitic way of life."
although he made many attempts
to get work in his profession. "It
was the constant harassment by
the officials that drove him to
protest" one of his friends said
this week. "Although he is no
longer on hunger strike, he will
continue to fight for his right to
be employed."
In the past Russian authorities
would grant exit visas to Jews
who completed prison sentences
and who applied lor permission to
emigrate, since 1979 none of the
former Prisoners of ( onscience
were allowed to leave. They are:
BORIS CHERNOBILSKY.
Horn 194 1 Moscow Released
November 1982. Imprisonment 1
year
KIM FRIDMAN. Born 1934.
Kiev Released 28th March 1982.
Imprisonment 1 year.
GR1GORY GEISHIS. Born
1960 Leningrad Released 14th
July 1982 Imprisonment 2 years.
GRIGORY GOLDSHTKIN
Born 1931. Tbilisi. Released
March 1979. Imprisonment 1
year.
BORIS KALENDAREV.
Born 1957. Leningrad. Released
March 1981. Imprisonment 2
years.
EVGENY LEIN. Born 1939.
Leningrad. Released 6th June
1982. Imprisonment 1 year.
MARK NASHPITZ. Born
1948. Moscow. Released June
1979. Imprisonment 5 yearsof
exile.
IDA NUDEL. Born 1931.
Moscow Released 28th March
1982. Imrisonment 4 years of
exile.
DMITRY SHCHIGLIK. Born
1947. Moscow. Released Jury
1981. Imprisonment 1 year.
ISAAK SHKOLNIK. Born
1936. Vinnitsa. Released July
1979. Imprisonment 7 years.
VICTOR SHTILBANS. Born
1941. Leningrad. Released June
1971. Imprisonment 1 year.
VLADIMIR SLEPAK. Born
1927. Moscow. Released Decem-
ber 1982. Imprisonment 5 years
exile.
ALEXANDER VILIG. Born
1956. Bolgrad. Released 1980.
KOSHER RECIPES
EASY* DELICIOUS
Send stamped envelope S1.00
KOSHER KITCHEN
P.O. BOX 215
New City, W.Y. 10956
Imprisonment VA years
SHLOMO GOTTMAN and
family, who received exit visas.
have left Leningrad.
NEW YORK (JTAI Eitan
,Finkelstein and his family have
'finally been granted exit visas U
vears after applying for them.
They will be leaving Vilnius for
'sraelnext month.
Finkelstein. a physicist and
Jewish activist applied to
emigrate with his family in 1971
and was repeatedly denied per-
mission to leave. Since then, he
has been working on menial jobs
after having been dismissed from
his job as physicist
During the 12 years he also
devoted hi9 spare time to Jewish
studies.
Because of his involvement in
the study of Jewish history and
culture and hi.
thesamizdatjolK^^
USSR." FinkelstS ?
target of ***
was reported
harass
Medicare & Nursing Homes
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A free booklet is now available to help you
know what benefits are available under
Medicare.
For FREE Booklet Call
Dade: 944-6340 BROW: 457-9717
Courtesy of Hallandale Rehabilitation Center
A skilled Nursing Home
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i, Friday. December9,1963
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 19
Concord Cafeteria Owner
Now Directing Dining at
arlyle on the Bay Retirement Apartments
ianley Worth, a South
fida restaurant pioneer who
ed and operated the Concord
plena, a Miami Beach land-
fk. for the past 36 years, has
iertaken the responsibility for
kitchen and dining room
ration at Carlyle on the Bay, a
t-class retirement apartment
(ding at 1900 N. Bayshore
ve, Miami.
Vorth, who at 64 is younger
the building residents,
Bed the Concord in May of this
r He cited rising costs and
plining income as the primary
sons.
I'll costs me $23,000 every
^nth just to open the doors,"
Drth explained, "and that only
tared the fixed expenses no
^d. no supplies and no help!"
lather than retire himself,
jrth accepted an offer from the
of the former owner of
liftman's Cafeteria, one of
(orth's major competitors and
ii her South Florida Jewish-
flv restaurant legend.
The son. Elliott Messing, owns
\d manages the Carlyle. a 10-
m apartment building which
|n\ ides lunch and dinaer to its.
pidents every day as part of the
mi lily rental fee tor the one-
ptroom apartments.
|' When 1 first saw this
iperty," Messing said. "1 im-
(I lately recognized the
pYntcle; they were the same age
(I. generally speaking from
same background as the
iple who came into my father's
Jfeteria, where 1 worked when I
- a boy.
And when I found out that
lanley was going to be availa-
t houghl he would be perfect
|i the food service operation at
Carlyle."
Evening meals include full-
Durse dinners, with choice of
(leal. chicken or fresh fish and an
Bsortment of desserts every day.
' Residents at the Carlyle enjoy
lesseri most of all." Worth
Jtateci. "and we feel as though
hey deserve the pleasure at tins
}tage in life."
The atmosphere and ambiance
the Carlyle convey a sense of
Community to new residents, and
management and employees
trive to provide supportive,
efree living for the retired
ople who live there. In fact, the
Carlyle may seem more like a
ixury hotel than an apartment
building.
Services which are offered with
pie yearly leases include weekly
lid service for each apart-
nent, a van and chauffeur for
transportation to area shopping
enters, banks and doctors' ap-
Jintments. a 24-hour-a-day
loorman. a 24-hour-a-day
censed nurse on premises, and
In active activity program for the
sidents.
The Carlyle is licensed and
egulated by the Florida State
)epartment of Health and Re-
|hal>ihtatives Services (HRSl
tinder provisions for "Adult
ongregate Living FaciUties"
\CLFs.
As such, the Carlyle can
provide health-related services to
|the residents in addition to living
accommodations.
The full-time nurse is available
Ifor medical assistance and to help
I residents secure necessary health
care from appropriate sources fail
the community. The chauffeur
can drive residents to and from'
doctors' offices something the
facility couldn't legally do unless
it was classified as an ACLF by
the HRS.
Each apartment is equipped
with two emergency switches, in
the bedroom and in the bath-
room, which will alert the nurse's
station in time of special need.
All of the residents at the
Carlyle enjoy the secure, pleasant
and comfortable environment.
And none require the level of
medical attention or services
provided by nursing homes. The
staff is composed of concerned,
aware people who are sensitive to
the problems of aging, isolation,
loneliness and separation from
loved ones, so common for senior
citizens.
"Our residents still maintain
an independent lifestyle," Worth
said, "and we try to make them
feel at home."
Fresh flowers are always used
to decorate the tables in the
dining room, and tablecloths are
used for dinner.
The kitchen will prepare spe-
cial diets for those residents who
require them, and Worth makes
certain that salt is not used for
cooking even though other
seasonings are "just to keep
things interesting."
Supporting Worth in the
kitchen is the chef who worked
for him at the Concord for the
last 20 years. John Carraway.
"John started working for us
when he was just 18. alter
moving to Miami from Alabama.
"He wanted to become a chef,
and we were able to take the time
to teach him. John knows how to
prepare entire meals, and the way
food should be presented He can
cook special dishes as well as
American and Jewish^style
food."
According to Worth, the
Carlyle doesn't use a set month-
' to-month menu. He plans the
menu by selecting dishes that
will be appealing and then adds a
few unexpected twists to make
sure the residents have some-
thing to look forward to at meal-
time.
"Dining is an important time
for retired people. It's the best
time for conversation and inter-
action with friends, and that's
important to all of us."
Each apartment at the Carlyle
is equipped with a kitchen, wall-
to-wall carpeting and individual-
ly controlled heating and air
conditioning. Some apartments
have balconies overlooking
Miami or Biscayne Bay.
Apartment interiors, corridor
patterns and open areas in the
three-year-old building all utilize
dramatic colors and feelings. Art
work, wall hangings and con-
temporary images add boldness
and vitality.
Major activities scheduled for
the residents include live
entertainment twice a week,
exercise classes three times a
week, history and current events
discussions, ceramics, movies,
book reviews and travelogues,
bingo and frequent special
events.
Residents of the Carlyle like to
tell their family and friends that
they enjoy the best food in South
Florida.
They point with pride to the
traditional meal served on Friday
evenings and the fresh fruit they
are encouraged to take back to
their own apartments from the
dining room for afternoon or
evening snacks.
But the only way to confirm
the quality, quantity and per-
sonality of the food and food ser-
vice at this outstanding retire-
ment apartment building is in
person, over lunch or dinner.
"Just the way Mother used to
cook," Worth said, smiling, as
several residents came up to
voice requests for future meals.
' For information call 371-3035.




-*. .
Pag. 20
The Jewish Floridian ofSouth Broward
Hollywood, Friday, n^.
Charitable remaindeTtrusts come in two varieties
excess of this 30
This is the last of a three-part series concerning Estate the saJe
Planning by Ronald H. Drucher, a CPA and attorney who If the contribution were made
is a member of a national accounting and consulting firm ^ a unitrust (annual payment
based in Philadelphia. This article first appeared in the based upon fixed PercfnU
Jewish Exponent. For further information, contact the value), %f*g"g| rf *
Legacy and Endowment Fund of the Jewish Federation of g"S which could be utilized
South Broward at 921-8810.
"~ "," -*-'-L Utilized nvr fk Z0 '""""I
"adjusted gross income," which
is essentially equal to the total of
ordinary income and short-term
capital gains phis 40 percent of
long-term capital gains.
The balance of the deduction in
utilized over the su**^
year period. ^"tfr*
The use of chariuw,
also has extremely
Cottoned on fcOowi,,^

By RONALD H. DRUCKER
Estate, retirement and fi-
nancial planning have become in-
creasingly important subjects in
our volatile, inflationary environ-
ment. Lack of security that one's
job, marriage or. for that
matter, anything lasts for life
has caused millions of people to
seek professional help with these
complex issues.
Although this article will focus
only on estate planning, compre-
hensive estate planning should be
integrated with meaningful re-
tirement and lifetime financial
planning. We'll begin with the
basics:
An estate plan is an arrange-
ment for the use. conservation
and transfer of an individual's
accumulated wealth at death. In
formulating an estate plan, it is
important to emphasize that the
minimization of estate taxes at
death is only one consideration.
A well-conceived plan concerns
itself with the creation of an es-
tate where none would otherwise
exist, the increase of an existing
estate to meet the needs of the
owner and his family, and the
preservation of the estate from
unnecessary taxes and costs.
As an individual's economic
and persona] circumstances
change, so do his estate-planning
objectives and requirements. To
carry out these changing objec-
tives, periodic updates of the es-
tate plan are essential.
Tax-saving techniques are fre-
quently employed to achieve
estate-planning objectives. By
minimizing taxes, an individual
will have a larger estate to pass
on to family or to other beneficia-
ries.
The estate tax is imposed on
the market value of the
decedent's assets less certain
deductions, such as debts, ex-
penses of administering the es-
tate and transfers to charities.
In general, all types of assets
are subject to estate tax. includ-
ing personal residence, real estate
investments, proceeds of life
insurance, securities, partnership
interests and certain pension
benefits
Estate planning in the 1980s
has been dramatically affected by
the Economic Recovery Tax Act
of 1962 IERTA). The article will
highlight some tax savings and
incentive provisions in the fed-
eral-estate and gift-tax area.
Generally, there are two types
of charitable remainder trusts
the charitable remainder unitrusi
and the charitable remainder an-
nuity trust Don't be put off by
the terms.
A unitrust annually pays a
fixed percentage of the value of
the value of the trust assets to
the donor (you) for his life, or for
a fixed term of not more than 20
years. It may be drafted so that
the spouse of the donor continues
to receive payment during his or
her lifetime.
After the deaths of the donor
and spouse, or the expiration of
the term of years, the remaining
amount of the trust passes to th>
charity or charities designated in
the trust instrument. (Thus, the
term "remainder trust.")
The annual payment which
may be made quarterly or on a
more frequent basis, thus
depends upon the market per-
formance of the trust portfolio;
the greater the market value, the
greater the payout. Consequent-
ly, a well-managed unitrust could
aa
amount to the donor (you) for his
life, or for a fixed term of not
more than 20 years. It may also
be drafted to provide continuing
payments to a spouse for the
period during which he or she
survives the donor.
As is the case with the uni-
trust. following the deaths of the
grantor and his spouse, or the
expiration of the terms of years,
the remaining abount passes to
the charity or charities design-
ated in the trust instrument.
The annual payment, which
may also be made quarterly or on
a more frequent basis, does not
depend on market values, but will
continue as long as there are
funds in the trust.
Consequently, the designated
income is virtually assured, al-
though value may be eroded by
inflation.
The transfer of assets to an an-
nuity trust or a unitrust will not
result in gift taxation as long as
the donor names himself as an in-
come beneficiary of the trust.
The contribution to the charit-
able trust generates a charitable-
contribution deduction equal to
the present value of the charita-
ble remainder, based upon ac-
tuarial tables.
Therefore, the older the current
income beneficiaries and the low-
er the specified rate of return to
the beneficiaries during their life
times, the greater the charitable
deduction.
For example, based upon age
63. the contribution of 100,000
in appreciated securities to. a
charitable-remainder annuity
trust (which is to pay the donor
annually a dollar amount equal to
10 percent to the contribution),
would generate a current charita-
ble-contribution deduction of ap-
proximately 15 percent of the
contribution.
If the donor wished to receive a
payout greater than 10 percent,
the charitable deduction would be
less than the amount based on a
10 percent payout, since the
value of the remainder interest
passing to charity would be
decreased.
Additionally, the trust could
sell the securities and reinvest
the proceeds in higher-yield as-
sets to enable it to make the
required payout.
Since the trust does not incur
capital-gains tax. the principal
and thereby the income are not
reduced bv this tax as thev would
An annuity
py
trust, con
a fixed
The Hottest Combo
InNewOrleans
THE NEW ORLEANS HILTON RIVERSIDE & TOWERS
W
eve got the heat of the
city... and we play it
vour way on the hanks of
the rolling Mississippi. Come pick
up the New Orleans tempo w ith
us.
You'll find the sweet harmony
of this city's great culinary styles
in our nine restaurants, including
Winston's 4-star cuisire. Kabby's
for fresh seafood the
way we like it down yon-
der le cafe hromeliad
for Sunday Jazz Brunch.
Italian Festa lots ef
other good times. Try a
little night music in
Rainforest for dancing.
or Pete Fountain s for
truly hot jazz.
Play it a whole other way in
Rivercenter Tennis and Racquet ball
Club. Indoor and outdoor courts.
a jogging 'rack.
gym. whirlpools
and saunas are
only part of our
athletic center...
and to cool down
there's our two
pools, both on
terraced decks.
And once out-
side, '.on II find
the city at your
feet. No other hotel puts you right
in the middle of the Worlds Fair.
and only steps from the
French Quarter. Super
dome, central shopping
and business districts.
Nobody else plays it
our way.
New Orleans Hilton
Riverside & Towers
and you: We're going to
make beautiful music
together.
For information and reservation* call vour
Hilton Reservation Service listed in the
hue pases ot your telephone book


irood, Friday, December 9,1988
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 21
writable remainder trusts
Ltinued from preceding page
Ltax implications.
in individual creates such a
and he and his spouse are
nly non-charitable beneficia
his estate will receive a
table deduction for the value
remainder interest and a
1 deduction for the value of
inuity or unitrust interest.
example, assume the indi-
ll transfers $100,000 in ap-
led securities to the trust
[income to himself and his
Le for life.
the values remain constant,
Itate would be entitled to a
D00 charitable deduction as
is marital deduction for the
of the income interest pas-
his surviving spouse.
instead, the individual
Ifers a "qualified income
1st" to his spouse (spouse is
lwl to all income from the
(for life, payable at least an-
nually), with a remainder to char-
ity, the entire value of the prop-
erty will qualify for a marital
deduction.
At the spouse's death, the
entire value of the property will
be included in her estate. How-
ever, the property passing out-
right to charity at her death will
qualify for a charitable deduction
The Toymaker'
set for Dec. 18
"The Toymaker" will be pres-
ented at Temple Beth El, 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood, on Sun-
day, Dec. 18, at 2:30 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. sponsored by Hallan-
dale Cultural Arts, Inc. This
children's musical has a cast of 60
singers, dancers and actors rang-
ing in age from 3 to 17.
in her estate.
The role of life insurance in es-
tate planning has changed with
the new rulings. Consult with
your estate planner for details.
An appropriate estate planning
strategy for one individual may
be totally wrong for another.
Proper estate planning requires
thorough analysis of each situa-
tion an analysis which must
consider personal objectives first
and taxes secondarily.
Happy Chanukah
Joel Marc Wilentz, M.D.
Richard S. Greene, MX).
Joseph A. Arena, M.D.
Garry B. Gewirtzman, M.D.
Harold S. Rabinovitz, M.D.
Marvin Gottlieb's
Lomar Rental Apt's
3501 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Florida
We Appreciate Your Business
Phone 966-7600 624-4777
Alan D. Podis, M.D., F.A.C.S.
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF HIS OFFICE TO
Emerald Village Professional Plaza
3870 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
Adult and Pediatric Urology
Surgery of Male Impotence
Male Fertility
(305)966-7900
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Shabbat and Kashrut observance must be foremost among our priorities!
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In evolutionary change in Judaism not revolutionary change
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H
The Jewish Ftoridion of South Brcward
Hollywood, Friday, rw.
GOING WEST Western Young Leadership of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward recently celebrated Chanukah at the home of Eilene and Barry TopperljertJ.
A total of 65 Federation activists heard a discussion led by Susan Maker [second from
right 1 and Susan Symore [right) on 'Jewish Identity Gifts for needy Jewish children,
to be distributed by Jewish Family Service, a beneficiary agency of Federation, were
collected.
Technlon members aid


Congressman and Mrs.
Lawrence J. Smith
Grant and Lauren
Wish You
a Happy Chanukah
May this Festival of Lights bring a Yen
Blessed with Peace, Health and Happintsi
Pud
tar by Larry 9-*k to OHffJM Cam**** Jo.pl, Epn. ^
In making Dynomat
HAIFA A chemkV sep-
aration instrument develop by
the Lidex Corp. of Haifa hasUen
named "one of the 100 mo^t
significant technological ad
vances of 1983" by the Dun and
Rradstreet publication Industrial
Research and Development.
It is the second consecutive
year that the Lidex Docpr. has
been recognized by the
magazine's annual international
competition.
The liquid chromatography
separation system. callet
Dynomat. was developed by two
members of the Technion-lsraei
Institute of Technology's
IVpartment of Chemistry.
Professor Michael Cais and Dr
Moahe Shimoni Lidex s
scientific general manager, and
research and development
manager, respectively.
The Lidex Corp. is partially
owned by the Technion Research
and Development Foundation
Ltd.. a private company sponsor-
ing scientific ventures in which
Technion personnel serve as
principal investigators.
The Dynomat is designed for
quick, precise separation of com-
pound chemical mixtures, and
has a wide variety of uses in
scientific research and analysis
Applications involve the
manufacture of solid state
electronic components. the
development of new polymers
and plastics, as well as facilita
ling genetic engineering research
B'nai B'rith fetes Schwab
Ben Schwab, a leader of B'nai
HMlJfila'HallarKlaW'. wjl receive
B
the prestigious Guardian of the
Menorah Award of the B'nai
B'rith Foundation at a Sunday
brunch. Dec. 18. at 11 am in the
LaMar Social Hall
Schwab a founder of the
1-aMer Uxlge in 1975. has been
actively involved in civic affairs
in the community during the past
eight years
A name New Yorker, he was
president of Temple Fmanuel of
Boro Park and, served on the
board of directors' of the Jewish
Theological Seminar. and
Maimonides Hospital High on
his priority list are the Youth
Services of B'nai B'rith. the
Hillel Foundations and the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization
programs all over the United
States
Radio Personality Barbara
Studley. who has just returned
from Israel, will be a guest on the
program
'Israeli Diary9 features Herzog
Chaim Heraog. Israel's pitw-
:< M nnci the ummer ol 1983. ts
featured in a half-hour intarviaw
on Channel J s Israeli Diar\
Wednesday IVc M at 10:30
p m
Host-producer Stanley Rosan-
blatt traveled to Israel "to inter-
N|e rfa ner ambassador
to the I'nited Nations and
member of the Labor Partj
Some of the mbjsctt discussed
in this program are Herzog s new
role as president, the Begin re-
tirement, the Lebanon troop pull-
back. Arafat s decline. Israel s
Bonds will honor
the J. Goldmans
Parker Plaza IsraW Bond Com
mute* will honor Joseph and
Martha Goldman at a "Night for
Israel Tuesday. Dec 13. at 8
p m in the Gold Room
The Goldmans will receive the
prestigious City of Peace Award
Joey Russell wiU entertain
economic problems, and the W i H
Bank peace proa H
"We're sticking with B'nai B'rith's
Senior Security Supplement"
IrsAScrioiK
Business... c %'.
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em lobe there nrn it tumt
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trood, Friday, Decembers, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Page 23
JEWISH COMMLMTY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838HOU.YWOGOBt.VD HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 3 J020
921-6511
iter dance
Singles (20-40) of the JCC are
hold a Winter Dance Saturday,
c 10, at 9 p.m. at Hillcrest
antry Club. Continuous music,
ash bar and free valet parking
fbe offered.
tod drive
ngle members and friends of
JCC are invited to donate
for the Broward Commu-
Blood Center on Thursday,
15, from 7-8 pjn. at the JCC.
luce
Ixpressly for college-aged
Hes, the JCC is sponsoring a
tor Wonderland Dance Sun-
I, Dec. 25, at 8 p.m at the Fort
derdale JCC. 6501 W. Sunrise
1 The event is being co-spon-
i by the JCCs of South
trard and Fort Lauderdale
Hillel. all beneficiary
bcies of the Jewish Federa-
latse*
he JCC is offering a full
lur season of new classes.
ses, starting in January, in
caligraphy, sketching and
Jiting. Israeli folk dancing,
dish for all ages, yoga exer
iH'Kinning intermediate
Jge. couples bridge and ulpan
n versat ional Hebrew!. Pre-
slration is required.
["he JCC will be offering a yoga
ri-isi- class at the center. A free
nonstration class will be given
[Karla on Monday, Jan. 23, at
i.in The eight-week course will
I Jan. 30-March 19. 7-8:45 p.m.
tmputan
The JCC will be offering a
k I computer course. The
ss will be on Tuesdays 1-3 p.m.
five weeks at Radio Shack
fenputer Center. The session
II run Jan. I0-Feb.7.

rt*%ix>3:;:\ry.
JALAHAL) WEST is to
elebrate Israel's 35th
iniveraary in a salute to
Samuel and Ann Berner
>a Wednesday, Dec. 14, at
f p.m. in the Social Hall.
Israel Bonds Chairman
Alfred Lowy and Co-
lairman Dorothy Hodes
"1 be in charge.
'Sugar A Spice'
The Southeast Focal Point Se-
nior Center is planning a trip to
the Marco Polo Hotel Jan. 15, to
see "Sugar and Spice" a musical.
Limited seating reserved. Call
Rosalie or Rachel at 921-6518.
Art class
An art instruction class is
being offered at the Southeast
Focal Point Senior Center on
Thursdays at 1 p.m.
Lecture
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward and the JCC will
present a lecture series on
"Adults on Jewish Family Life,"
beginning Monday, Jan. 9, 1984,
at 10 a.m.
'Precious Legacy'
There will be three tripe to the
Bass Museum to view "The Pre-
cious Legacy" planned by the
Southeast Focal Point Senior
Center: Jan. 14, Feb. 21 and
March 14, 1984. Reservations are
limited to 20 persons each trip.
Holiday party
Sunday, Dec. 11. at 2 pjn. is
the day for a Holiday Party at
the Southeast Focal Point Senior
Center. Entertainment and re-
freshments.
Art exhibit
An exhibit of the art works of
Gloger Goldfarb will take place
Dec. 16. at 10:30 a.m. at the
Southeast Focal Point Senior
Center. 2838 Hollywood Blvd.,
Hollywood.
Hll the nachas
fit to print ?
Never let it be said that the Jewish commu-
nity in Glasgow is a quiet one. There are nine
shuls, two Hebrew schools and five youth orga-
nizations. And if you think all this activity is
enough to make headlines, you're right.
Because Glasgow even has a weekly newspaper
which records and celebrates the various
marriages, births and bar mitzvahs!
Pleading this good news is apt to bring more
than just a smile to one's lips. Quite
often it brings the taste of fine scotch
whisky to one's lips, too. In America,
such news is often greeted with J&B
Rare Scotch. Its flavor, created by
skillful blending perfected over the
centuries, has made it this country's
most popular scotch. And, if we may
be permitted a bit of editorializing,
has amply justified its reputation as
the scotch that whispers.

w
hjspera.
86 Prod Blended Scotcn Whi*y. 1983 The PaMtngun Corporation. NY

1
ISRAEL with EILAT
Back by popular demand, repeat of our 19 Day Israel In-Depth Tour.
A special candlelighting ceremony will be held at the Wall to reaffirm
wedding vows and to reaffirm commitment to the City of Jerusalem.
DATES:
MICE:
INCLUDED:
March 26th. April 25th. May 9th. May 16th. June 4th
183300
Round Trip Airfare from Miami and But to Miami Airport
Full Israeli Breakfast Daily
All Dinner*
11 Days of Comprehensive Sightseeing Evan Mora
Deluxe and Top of the Line Hotels:
Plozo or Laromma Jerusalem, Plaza -Tiberias,
Laromme Eilat Astoria Tal Aviv
Dinner/Dance, Israeli Fashion Show. Lectures, Folk Singing. Folk Dancing.
Cruise on the Sao of Galilee, Special "St. Patars Fish" dinner in Tiberias,
Jerusalem Nightclub. Visit to home of the Israeli President, "Musk with Isaac".
EXTRAS:
OPTIONAL 3 NIGHT EXTENSION TO LONDON $ 1 ft A
ASK ABOUT OUR GROUP INCENTIVES W
THINK ISRAEL THINK JEFFERSON TRAVEL.
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
PRICE PER PERSON DOUBLE OCCUPANCY. AIRFARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE
JEFFERSON TRAVEL
TAMARAC HALLANDALE PELRAY WEST PALM
I
726-3334
458-6500
495-0703
664-3366


Pag* 24
The Jewish FhndianofSouthB^ward^
HoUywood, Friday,.
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
SOFT PACK 100s FILTER. MENTHOL 2 mg. "'" 0.2 mg. mam
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