The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00135

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
w


Volume 19 Number 3
Hollywood, Florida Friday, February 10, 1989
Price.35 Cents
Vanik Supports Amendment Waiver
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) For-
mer Representative Charles
Vanik has added his voice to
those urging a waiver of the
U.S.-Soviet trade restrictions
that bear his name.
In a conversation with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
Vanik recommended that
American businessmen "place
their support behind" an 18-
month waiver of the 1974
Jackson-Vanik amendment.
The amendment is the most
punitive of a number of U.S.
laws linking the Soviet's emi-
gration policy to their trade
with U.S. businesses.
Vanik's recommendation,
which he extended to the Jew-
ish community, is further indi-
cation that longtime critics of
the Soviet Union are ready to
acknowledge big improve-
ments in its emigration policy.
Last year, nearly 19,000
Jews were allowed to leave the
Soviet Union, and 30,000 to
40,000 are expected to be let
out this year. In 1986, by con-
trast, only 914 were allowed
out.
Earlier, the Board of Gover-
nors of the National Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry passed a
resolution saying the confer-
ence will continue its process
of "looking toward a new pol-
icy in the near future if emi-
gration, and the climate in
which it functions, are sus-
tained."
The resolution was confir-
mation of a joint statement by
the National Conference and
18 other Jewish organizations
calling for a review of U.S.-
Soviet trade policy.
The American Jewish Con-
gress announced that their
Governing Council voted to
recommend to other organiza-
tions that they also agree to
support a waiver of Jackson-
Vanik.
"Because the conditions (in
the Soviet Union) are demon-
strably and dramatically im-
proved, it is useful to demon-
strate we are responsive,"
Philip Baum, associate execu-
tive director of the AJCon-
gress, said.
A decision to waive Jackson-
Vanik would have to come
from President Bush. Last
month his administration said
they would require a "strong
consensus" of support among
the public before they would
consider such a waiver.
The business community is
said to back a waiver, but
consensus is not altogether
apparent among Jewish organ-
izations and other human
rights groups.
Micah Naftalin, national
director of the Union of Coun-
cils for Soviet Jews, told a
news conference in Washing-
ton that "it is vital that we
withhold playing the Jackson-
Vanik card the most import-
ant remaining concession
until Soviet promises are con-
verted into actual perform-
ance."
If emigration reaches 30,000
to 35,000 this year, said Naf-
talin, he would agree to a
repeal of the 1974 Stevenson
Amendment, which puts a
$300 million ceiling on loans
available to the Soviets from
the Export-Import Bank for
the purchase of American
goods.
Naftalin said Jackson-Vanik
should be waived only if emi-
gration reaches the 60,000 per
year level, according to the
wishes of Vanik's co-signer,
the late Sen. Henry Jackson
(D-Wash.). Jackson died in
1983.
Vanik disputed the 60,000
figure. Speaking with JTA
from his office in Washington,
Vanik said the amendment he
co-wrote as the Democratic
congressman from Ohio con-
tained "no fixation about a
number at all."
Rather, it sought policies
that "would be indicative of a
condition in which Soviet citi-
zens who desired to leave can
leave."
PROTESTING NAZIS' PARDON. Demonstrators protest outside the Dutch Parliament in
The Hague after that governmental body voted to pardon Franz Fischer, 87 and Ferdinand
Aus der Fuenten, 79 who had been serving life sentences for Nazi war crimes. The two had
served US years in prison and were believed to have been the world's longest-held war
criminals. Following their release from prison, Fischer and Aus der Fuenten were
transported via Dutch ambulance to the Dutch-West German border. (AP/Wide World Photo)
-Human Rights Report Indictment
Israel's human rights violations have
increased significantly since the uprising,
now in its 14th month, began, the United
States State Department said in a highly
critical analysis in its annual worldwide
human rights report.
The intifada, or uprising, in the adminis-
tered West Bank and Gaza Strip caught the
Israeli government by surprise and soldiers
"untrained and inexperienced in riot control,
responded in a manner which led to a substan-
tial increase in human rights violations," it
was reported.
The Israeli critique in the annual report,
which focused on severe human rights abuses
in numerous countries, captured lead head-
lines after its release on Tuesday.
U.S. Congressmen indicated that the report
is not likely to result in the withholding of the
$3 billion in annual military and economic aid
the U.S. gives Israel it s largest recipient
of foreign aid. However, officials also said the
report will be taken very seriously and indi-
cated extreme pressure will be placed on
Israel to change its military policy.
Israeli officials initially defended its
actions against daily provocations in the
territories and "violent riots involving
Molotov cocktails, rocks, firebombs and other
lethal weapons," it was reported.
Israeli officials also said that, with few
exceptions, Israeli soldiers "maintain as best
they can, the standards of proper conduct
that no country in the world could maintain,"
according to a statement reported by Deputy
Foreign Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
The United States has publicly maintained
that its support of Israel is primarily based
upon Israel's role as the key ally in the Middle
East.
Secretary of State Baker:
No Pressure on Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Secretary of State James
Baker III has made clear that
he believes peace in the Middle
East can only come through
direct negotiations between
Israel and the Arabs, not
through U.S. pressure on
Israel.
"It is not the role of the U.S.
to pressure Israel," Baker said
in an interview published in
the weekly Time news maga-
zine.
"At the same time, it is in
Israel's interest to resolve the
issue. Both sides have got to
find a way to give something."
Baker stressed that while
the United States plays an
important role in the Mideast,
"it is important that we not
permit the perception to
develop that we can deliver
peace, that we can deliver
Israeli concessions."
He said a lasting peace will
only come through "direct
negotiations between the par-
ties, not something mandated
or delivered by anybody from
the outside, including the U.S."
Baker added that the United
States "must do whatever we
can to enhance the prospects
of the parties negotiating the
problem out among them-
selves."
Baker said that the Bush
administration will continue
the policy of the Reagan
administration in supporting
Continued on Page 9


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
Hemispheres Honors Fenstersheib Humorist Entertains
The State of Israel Bonds
Tower of David Award will be
presented to Charles Fenster-
sheib Thursday, Feb. 16, 8
p.m., at the "Night for Israel
Celebration" in the auditorium
of the Hemispheres, in Holly-
wood.
Sponsored by the
B'nai B'rith Lodge, Hadassah
and B'nai B'rith Women units,
all at the Hemispheres, the
evening's program will feature
humorist Emil Cohen.
Kalman Rado is honorary
chairman of the event and Sey-
mour Fendell, Frances Litt-
man and Sally Sirotkin are
co-chairmen.
Refreshments will be served.
Charles Fenstersheib
Evelyn And Henry Goldstein To Be Honored
For their concern about
Israel's welfare, the Jewish
people, and the practice of
tzedekah and mitzvot in the
community, Evelyn and Harry
Goldstein have been selected
as honorees at the Hollybrook
"Night for Israel" celebration
Sunday, Feb. 19, 8 p.m., in the
Hollybrook clubhouse in Pem-
broke Pines.
The honored couple will be
presented with the Israel
Bonds Scroll of Honor.
American-Israeli humorist
Danny Tadmore will be fea-
tured on the program as he
offers both a serious talk on
the State of Israel and the
current economic and political
situation, and entertains.
Joe Rose is chairman of the
event, which is sponsored by
Hollybrook B'nai B'rith
Lodge.
Refreshments will be served.
Galahad To Honor Stromfelds
Galahad III will honor Sara
and Irving Stromfeld at a
"Night for Israel" and present
the couple with the State of
Israel Bonds Scroll of Honor.
The event will be held Sun-
day, Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m., in the
Galahad III social hall, Holly-
wood.
Comedienne Charlotte
Cooper, third generation of a
Breakfast Honors
Mollie Feinberg
The De Soto Park-Venetian
B'nai B'rith Unit, No. 5398 is
sponsoring a "Salute to
Israel" breakfast Sunday, Feb.
19, in the De Soto Park Social
Hall, 751 Three Islands Boule-
vard, Hallandale.
Mollie Feinberg will be hon-
ored with the State of Israel
Bonds City of Peace Award.
Special guest will be humor-
ist Mickey Freeman. Event
chairman is David A. Chizen.
Sheldon To
Entertain Bonds Night
Baritone Bert Sheldon will
entertain at the Fairways
2 North-Irvington Gardens'
a "Bonds Night for Israel" Cele-
= bration Tuesday, Feb. 14, 8
p.m. in the social hall, 600-700
| NE 14 Ave. Hallandale.
s
aa The sponsoring Israel Bond
s committees are chaired by
% Howard Ostrin of Fairways
S North, and Julius Rosnick and
x Fanny E. Katz of Irving Gar-
- dens.

Refreshments will be served.
European theatrical family,
will entertain and refresh-
ments will be served.
Mildred and Philip Mintz are
chairpersons of the sponsoring
Galahad III Israel Bond Com-
mittee.
For Bonds
Emil Cohen, humorist and
user of the Yiddish idiom, will
entertain at the Hallmark
Social Hall, 3800 S. Ocean
Drive, Hollywood Wednesday,
Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m.
Chairman of the Hallmark
Israel Bond Committee is Mar-
tin Cohen; sponsoring group is
the Hallmark B'nai B'rith,
Harry S. Truman Unit No
5321.
Refreshments will be served.
Condos' Night
For Israel
Clifton condominium and
Parker Dorado will hold a joint
"Night for Israel" celebration
Sunday, Feb. 19, in the Parker
Dorado recreation hall, 3180
So. Ocean Drive, Hallandale.
Humorist Emil Cohen will
entertain and spark the festiv-
ities.
The event is sponsored by
Clifton Condominium's and
Parker Dorado's Israel Bond
Committee, chaired by Ruth
Schwartz, Roz Solomon, Mary
Liebman and Norman Lappin.
Library Concert
A concert featuring the Car-
evala Players will be held
Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2 p.m., at
the Hallandale branch of the
Broward County Library Sys-
tem.
The free concert will be
played by violinist Reva Freed-
man, Carol Freedman on cello,
and Pat Marcus on piano.
The program is sponsored by
the Friends of the Hallandale
Library.
Jeanette and Jerrold Schwartz will be honored at the Carriage
Hills B'nai B'rith Lodge No. S218's "Salute to Israel" breakfast
Sunday, Feb. 12, 9:30 a.m. in the Carriage Hills clubhouse,
Hollywood. The Schwartzes will be presented with the State of
Israel Bonds Scroll of Honor. Guest entertainer will be Emil
Cohen.
Plans For School Expansion
Plans are on the drawing
board for Phase II of Beth
Shalom Academy West at
8950 Stirling Road, Cooper
City.
Architect for the project is
Sam Shapiro, a former student
of Beth Shalom Religious
School.
The new facility will enable
the school to grow beyond the
eighth grade and have a SAC
Center (Student Activity Cen-
ter), housing administration
offices, pool, ritualarium and
more.
The present 24,000 square
foot facility was built a year-
and-one-half ago.
Estimated construction cost
is $1.5 million and various pro-
jects have been proposed in
order to begin construction. A
school parent Michael Fein-
berg, a member of Beth Sha-
lom, has offered matching
funds in the sum of $750,000.
The warmth of tradition.
i
Free Federal Consumer
Information Catalog.
~ I > It's a special time of the week when families
gather, traditions are renewed and there's
plenty of time to relax and enjoy the rich,
delicious taste of Maxwell House* Coffee
m
House MgjgNi
> CERTIFIED KOSHER
GENERAL
FOODS
IMS QmHI Food! Cwporaton
Maxwell House* Coffee. Always... Good to the Last Drop!



Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
Dr. Sol. Stein
Amb. Benjamin Abileah
Histadrut Foundation
Former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Arthur Goldberg and
Ambassador Benjamin Abi-
leah, Israeli Consul General in
Toronto, will be among those
who will pay tribute to Dr. Sol.
Stein, founding president of
the Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion, at a banquet in his honor
Sunday, Feb. 26, at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton. The gala
marks Stein's 50-plus years of
public service to Zionism and
Labor Israel.
Goldberg, who as American
ambassador to the UN, was
credited with the authorship of
UN Resolution No. 242 follow-
ing the Six Day War, will, in
his capacity as founding chair-
man of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation, present the third
Medallion of Honor to Stein.
Ambassador Abileah, who
has been a member of his
country's Foreign Service
since 1962, will review the
current political and economic
problems facing Israel's new
Unity Government.
Following the banquet a
"Cafe in Tel Aviv" setting will
feature examples of Jewish
folklore.
For information: 531-8702.
Brandeis Book Store Opens
The North Dade, Hills and
Hollywood chapters of Bran-
deis University National
Women's Committee have
combined to open a used book
store in the California Club
Mall, No. Miami Beach. Sales
will benefit the university's
library.
Book store hours are
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays
through Saturdays, with late
hours on Wednesdays until 9
p.m.
a
CAMP BARNEY MEDINTZ
Summer Overnight Camp
Located in the mountains of North Georgia
Sponsored by
The Atlanta Jewish Community Center
OUR 27th SEASON
Invites you to join us for a special event
OPEN HOUSE GATHERING
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1989
7:30 PM at David Posnack JCC
5850 South Pine Island Road, Davie
Meet Larry Melnick, Supervisor of Camp Barney Medintz
Find out why 500 children are already registered for the
1989 program.
Camp Barney Medintz offers exciting overnight camp-
ing services for children completing grades 2-10.
Children from Jewish communities throughout the
Southeast join us every summer. Become part of our
family.
Camp Dates
1st session: June 18-July 14
2nd session: July 16-August 11
Camp Barney Medintz
5342 Tilly Mill Road
Dunwoody, GA 30338
(404) 396-3250
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Close to 100 people attended the Aquarius of Hollywood's Salute to Israel Breakfast which hon/rred
Sally and Sol Stein. The Steins were presented with the Israel Bonds Tower of David Award.
Pictured at the event, at which more than $300,000 was pledged for State of Israel Bonds, are, from
left, Chairpersons Dan Levenson, Eleanor Shuman and Bernard J. Goldberger; Sally and Sol
Stein; Dr. Ruth Grvber, the guest speaker; and Lucille Rosenberg, president ofB'naiB'rith David
Ben Gurion unit, a co-sponsor of the junction.
Israel Histadrut Foundation
23rd ANNUAL MID-WINTER CONFERENCE
FESTIVE BANQUET
IN TRIBUTE TO DR. SOL STEIN ^r
----------------POUNDING PRESIDENT----------------
IN GRATEFUL APPRECIATION OF OVER A HALF CENTURY
OF DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AND INSPIRING LEADERSHIP
TO THE CAUSE OF ISRAEL AND LABOR ZIONISM.
Sunday, February 26,1989; 5:30 p.m.
Fontainebleau Hotel, Miami Beach, Florida
Followed by.
"Cafe In Tel Aviv"
loptwfull
An Evening Of Jewish Folklore
Wine Food Song
PRESENTATION
OF MEDALLIONS
OF HONOR BY
Justice Arthur J Goldberg
MAJOR ADDRESS
Benjamin Abileah
Consul General Of
Israel in Toronto
Mort Freeman
Well-Known Singer
and Cantor
COUVERT: Banquet-Dinner $40
COUVERT: Cafe In Tel Aviv $20
Shoshana Ron
Popular Chanteuse
R.S.V.P 531-8702 (Dade)
462-5740 (Broward)
Dietary Laws Observed


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
^^^^ -~ ,-----i i i~Lri_rLrLi~i-rLri-ri-Ci-rLrLi~Lr
Viewpoint
WWAAA*VWWW
MMAAAAAMAMMAMA^A*
The New President's
Commitment
In a piece entitled "George Bush: Promises
to Keep," The Washington Post compiled a list
of fully 161 campaign promises that Vice
President Bush made as he lobbied America
for his boss' job.
The areas covered range widely from educa-
tion and economic issues to crime and drug
abuse to energy, the environment and ethics.
There are sections dealing with health and
space and summits.
From our perspective, some of the most
trenchant commitments are in the areas of
civil rights and foreign policy.
Given the increase of hate crimes in this
country, given the desire by many to restrict
the rights of a few, there can be no more
important national direction to this new
administration than to truly make this land
the Constitutionally secure one it ought to be.
On the international landscape, President
Bush will be shadowed by his firm resolve not
to offer sanction to the formation of a Pales-
tinian state. Given that he does, indeed,
encourage Palestinian participation in a poten-
tial Mideast resolution, Bush must have Solo-
monic wisdom to determine the fine lines.
In recent days, the administration's honey-
moon period has been reflected through a new
Washington mirror of ethics. That President
Bush is demanding only the best from his
appointees should put even greater stress on
his own fulfillment of campaign promises.
Political Debauchery
There is democratic sordidness at work
when the political process is bastardized by the
primary win of a former Grand Wizard of the
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.
Is it possible that the good people of a
Louisiana congressional district dismissed the
possibility that even one vote counts? And,
that they did so collectively?
oust -resriMQ
sJT*<>
When David Duke won a spot in a runoff
after a special election last week, the agenda
of the National Association for the Advance-
ment of White People which he heads was
on the ballot.
It got a frightening 33 percent of the total
vote.
Anti-Semitism on the Rise
There is no glory in being first or near the
top in the recently published survey relating to
incidents of anti-Semitism in the United
States.
After a four-year decrease in the number of
anti-Semitic acts and harassments, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith reported a
fifth-year high.
And Florida, together with New York and
California, led in such incidents.
The hostility measured over a 10-year period
offers no surcease of concern that, surely,
anti-Jewish bias and acting out on the
hatefilled belief system is very much a part
of the American scene.
Still.
That perpetrators of such acts pegged their
vandalism and attacks on the rationale of the
ongoing Arab uprising the intifada and the
50th anniversary of the Kristallnacht the
Night of Broken Glass in Germany and
Austria, serves no palliative purpose.
Excuses never are needed when bigotry
seeks its outlet.
These demonstrations, even when recorded
as grafitti and simple vandalism, should never
be dismissed. Too often, they are precursor to
arson and bombings and assaults.
As was the case in 1988.
With an increase of more than 18 percent in
vandalism and a 41 percent increase in per-
sonal threats and attacks, neither the ADL,
which monitors these trends, nor any Ameri-
can of good will should rest.
With anti-Semitism on the rise, every citizen
is threatened.
BACK PAIN?
Let W Star RobbWeller
show you the facts on
how you can get your
BACK ON TRACK
BACK ON TRACK"* the exciting new, and medically
approved 32 minute VHS Video Tape is filled with the
answers fo the most asked questions about back
pain. It includes instructions, advice, graphicsand exer-
cises. A self-help guide for understanding and treating
back pain.
For help on getting your BACK ON TRACK'" simply fill
out the enclosed coupon TODAY!
Retail value $39 95 Special Introductory Offer
1TAPC $19 95
plus $3 00 pottage and handling (Sales tax Incl./ 2-3 week del.)
BOX. INC.. 1575 West 49th St Suite 123. P.O. Box 110400. Hialeah, Fl 33011-0400
Enclosed find my' J check/money order, or charge my I Visa I I MasterCard
tor______VHS copies of Bock On Track
Enter every number of your credit card
#_________________________________
Exp Date
-/_
.Mo Yr
Make check payable to BOT.INC
Nome__________________________
Address________________________
City____________________________
Apt
Signature_______________________________
Vtdoolnpequubtynquainntoied Copyright 19S6 BOt mc
State .
Zip.
Maligning the Establishment
By RABBI
MARC TANENBAUM
The recent conference of lib-
eral -to-left intellectuals organ-
ized by Tikkun magazine was
impressive in terms of the
numbers of participants who
attended, as well as the re-
ported quality of the discus-
sion.
From everything I could
read in the press, it was less
than impressive by virtue of its
knee-jerk bashing of "the Jew-
ish establishment" and Israel.
I have been involved as a
professional in several "Jew-
ish establishments" for some
37 years. During most of these
decades, I do not recall seeing
any of the Tikkun core leader-
ship manning the barricades to
Florida To Host
Dem Women
The Democratic Women's
Club of Florida will host the
National Federation Demo-
cratic Women's Convention
May 25-28, at Saddlebrook
Resort, 25 minutes north of
Tampa. The theme of the con-
vention is "National Federa-
tion of Democratic Women
Shine in '89."
Democratic women from all
parts of Florida will meet Sat-
urday, Feb. 11, at.Ashley
Plaza in Tampa, to finalize
convention plans.
save Jewish lives or solidify
Israel's security.
No human institution or per-
sonality, including the so-
called "Jewish establishment"
and Tikkun itself, are beyond
criticism.
But for the critique to be
taken seriously, it needs to be
truthful, balanced and fair.
That honesty requires ac-
knowledgment of certain basic
truths: It was the major Jew-
ish agencies that mobilized
American and world opinion
and political support that
resulted in the liberation of
several hundred thousand
Soviet Jews.
The same case can be made
for Ethiopian Jewry, our co-
religionists from Arab coun-
tries and defense of Jews in
South and Central America.
The Tikkun leadership, to
my knowledge, also has had
little to do with the historic
improvement in Jewish-
Christian relations in many
parts of the world.
The remarkable political and
economic support of Israel by
the United States is largely
attributable to the decades-
long mobilization by "the Jew-
ish establishment of Ameri-
can public opinion.
With all the real problems
world Jewry faces, I shudder
to think of what might happen
if the maligned "Jewish estab-
lishment" did not exist, and all
we had to depend on were
Tikkun'8 polemics.
ThejcwisVi
ot South Broward
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
6 f-W.SWAW
Published Bi Weekly
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Fsecutive Editor
JOAN C TEGLAS. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING 1-3734605 COLLECT
Main Otlice & Plant: 120 N.E 6th St. Miami, Fla 33132 Phone 1 373-4606
Mtmbrr JTA. Seotn Arts. WNS. NEA. AJPA. ut FPA.
Friday, February 10,1989
Volume 19
5ADARI5749
Number 3


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
By BERNARD JOSEPHS
London Jewish Chronicle
LONDON (JTA) Alleged
Nazi war criminals living in
Britain could face trial here
next year, if the government
accepts the recommendations
of a group of British legisla-
tors.
Peter Archer, vice chairman
of the All-Party Parliamentary
Group, said it would take
about six months to enact leg-
islation to make it possible to
prosecute suspects who are
British citizens, or residents of
the United Kingdom.
"If things go well, we could
Britain Could Prosecute Ex-Nazis
see the first prosecutions
before the end of the next
year," said Archer, who is a
former solicitor general.
Similar legislation recently
took effect in Canada and Aus-
tralia.
Archer's group has passed
its proposed changes on to the
government's War Crimes
Inquiry for review.
The panel, established by the
home secretary last year, is
headed by former director of
public prosecutions, Sir Tho-
mas Hetherington.
Parliamentary sources said
they believe he will support the
proposals when he presents his
findings within the next few
months.
But there are several techni-
cal issues to be resolved,
Archer told a news conference
at the House of Commons.
First is the questions of
"retroactive legislation." The
second is extending the juris-
diction of British courts to
crimes committed outside Brit-
ish territory typically the
Soviet Baltic states.
Another issue to be resolved,
Archer said, is the reliability of
evidence provided by the
Soviet authorities on whose
territory much of the Holo-
caust occurred.
All of these problems could
be overcome, said Archer. The
question was "whether the
government wishes to do what
we are proposing."
According to Archer, there
is nothing to prevent Parlia-
ment from passing retroactive
legislation. "The issue is
whether to do so is fair or not.
We say that when these things
took place, they were recog-
nized as being monstrously
wicked and condemned by
international law.
"We are not talking about
making something a criminal
offense which, at the time it
was committed, was not con-
sidered criminal," Archer said.
With respect to jurisdiction,
he pointed out that British
courts may now try crimes of
hijacking and terrorism com-
r.iitted overseas.
White Supremacist
Wins Primary
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Amer-
ican Jewish leaders are con-
cerned about an avowed white
supremacist's victory in a pri-
mary election for a seat in the
Louisiana House of Represen-
tatives.
David Duke, former grand
wizard of the Knights of the
Ku Klux Klan, won 3,995 votes
in the special primary election,
which was called to fill a
vacancy in the statehouse. The
seat represents the city of
Metairie, a largely white sub-
urb of New Orleans.
Duke received 3,995 votes,
33 percent of the tally in a
seven-person race. He will face
the first runner-up, John
Treen, a longtime mainstream
Republican, in a runoff elec-
tion Feb. 18. Last November,
Duke, 38, was a candidate for
U.S. president.
Duke has been for about
eight years president of the
National Association for the
Advancement of White Peo-
ple.
According to a report pre-
pared in 1987 by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, Duke has shied from
publicly declaring his bigotry.
But the report said his
group's publication, NAAWP
News, "reflects the true
nature of his brand of racism,"
including "numerous articles
which attack blacks, Jews,
Zionism and Israel, and exploit
for propaganda purposes such
controversial racial issues as
busing, affirmative action and
nondiscriminatory immigra-
tion laws."
At Louisiana State Univer-
sity in 1970, Duke was listed as
an organization leader by the
National Socialist White Peo-
ple's Party of Arlington, Va.
He then founded the White
Youth Alliance and was photo-
graphed wearing a Nazi brown
shirt and a swastika armband.
He began his own Knights of
the Ku Klux Klan in 1975 in
Louisiana, appointing himself
grand wizard and sole deci-
sion-maker. He claimed in
media interviews that the
"new Klan" refrained from
bigotry and violence.
Jewish reaction to Duke's
electoral victory was one
largely of concern, with a
spokesman at the Jewish com-
munity federation in New
Orleans registering a guarded
reaction.
BECAUSE ALL TOURS
ARE NOT CREATED EQUAL..
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL PROGRAM
Quality, Service And Value From The World's Largest, Most Respected
And Most Traveled Jewish Travel Program.
ISRAEL FLORIDA STYLE
DIRECT EL AL FLIGHT DEPARTURES FROM MIAMI
May 22 July 17 October 16
June 19 September 11 October 30
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
DADE (305) 673-9100
BROWARD (305) 763-8177
WEST PALM BEACH (407) 689-0258
NATIONWIDE TOLL FREE (800) 221-4694
AND, TO FIND OUT WHY 350.000 SAVVY TRAVELERS HAVE
CHOSEN AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS TOURS, COME
HEAR ABOUT OUR SPECTACULAR INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
PROGRAM AT A TRAVEL PRESENTATION NEAR YOU!
Miami Beach
2 PM Tues. Feb 21, 1989
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
4144 Chase Avenue
Boca Raton
7 PM Wed. Fee 22. 1989
HOLIDAY INN GLADES ROAD
1950 Glades Road I 95
Waal Palm Baach
2 PM Wed. Feb 23. 1989
ROYCE HOTEL
1601 Belvedere Road
35 DAYS
7 NIGHTS JERUSALEM
2 NIGHTS TIBERIAS
4 NIGHTS TEL AVIV
7:30 PM Tues. Feb 21. 19P.9
INVERRARY COUNTRY CLUB
3840 Inverrary Boulevard
Hollywood
2 PM Wed. Feb 22. 1989
HOLLYWOOD BEACH HILTON
4000 South Ocean Drive
RSVP at numbers listed above
Benjamin D. Holloway of
Grove hie, Florida and New
I York City has been named the
recipient of the 1989 Stephen S.
Wise Award of the American
Jewish Congress. Holloway,
vice chairman of the Equitable
Life Assurance Society of the
U.S., is a trustee of Duke Uni-
versity, which his family
founded, and a director of the
Whitney Museum of American
Art. He has previously been
honored by the Jewish National
Heritage Trust, and the Smith-
sonian Institution.
Plain 'n' Fancy
Friendship' Cottage Cheese & Fyvita' Crisp Bread, Perfect.
Make them part of your fitness program, j- Hawwrigrwprixotgbw^ f" TSuwrAcniimrt coupon/expires vxm\'
because Friendship Cottage Cheese is low
in fat and Ryvita Crisp Bread is high in fiber.
Now, just add your favorite topping and
spread the good news!
ATTENTION HIRING!
Government jobs your
area. $17,840 $69,485. Call
1-602-838-8885 Ext. R 9035
JSAVE204
I on any variety I lb. or larger
I
I
I
SAVE20 Cottage Cheese
MR GROCER W* i*deem te coupon lor 20tplue at handano,
hi luomaad at pan payment prowano, torm c* tm otar have
dmt compiwo By you nd in* consumer tor on* package o)
ptcaad FnandaNp Grind day product Any otter ue* specaa*
fraud Any sates la> must ba paid by conaumar mvoeai ehowng
purchase ol uMconl dot* to covar coupon* mun ba shown on
request Coupon* may not b assigned or tsnetorred by you Cash
v*iu* 1(20 ot on* cant For payment mad to Fnandahip Coupon
PaoampBOnCankH.PO Bo. B7M. Newport P**ch. CA 92858 Vo
where aaad. prohtnad or imcbd by law
NOTE: Lima ona coupon par cuatomar 71481- JM89
on any variety
RYVaTA
I Crisp Bread
RYVTfi
GROCER Send coupon to Shaflar. Clarice, P.O. Boa M0743. B
Paso. TX 88588 0743 You wK ba retnbureed tie lace vafcj*
plus 8 handling lor product tpacaad Any othar uaa may
consliiulefraud Voidiltransferrad.assignad. raproducad.
taxed. iKansad. restricted or prohibited by law Ptoot-of-pur
chase may ba required Only U.SA RYVTTAa leal in may
submit Consumer pay* any tax Cash value 1 20c OFFER
LIMITED TO ONE COUPON PER PACKAGE
41136 105151,
J


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
Na'amat Convention Leaders Named
Marcia Pevsner of Skokie,
Illinois, has been appointed
national chairwoman
of Na'amat USA's 31st
national biennial convention to
be held in Chicago, August 6-9.
Sylvia Lewis of Akron, Ohio,
has been named convention
program chairwoman.
Pevsner, who has been a
member of Na'amat USA for
29 vears, is a national board
member and is in charge of
fund raising efforts in the mid-
west area. A frequent traveler
to Israel, she was one of 19
women nationwide selected to
participate in a two-week lead-
ership seminar held there in
1986.
Sylvia Lewis is also on the
national board, serving as
national program and educa-
tion chairwoman. She is imme-
diate past president
of Na'amat USA's Akron
Chapter.
Former editor of the Akron
Jewish News, Lewis is also
president of the women's divi-
sion of the Akron Jewish Com-
munity Federation. In both
1985 and 1987, she served for
two months on an Israeli army
base, as part of the civilian
Volunteers for Israel program.
From Paterson To
Plans for the second annual
"Paterson (N.J.) Day" in Flor-
ida Sunday, March 5, have
been announced by Chairman
Sheldon Kay, now of Fort
Lauderdale. Reservations will
be limited to 500 on a first-
come basis.
This year's reunion will be
held at Crystal Lake Country
Club in Pompano Beach.
The day's program will
begin with brunch at 11:30
a.m. and conclude at 4:30 p.m.
Reservations, at $17 per per-
Florida... A Reunion
son with checks made out to
"Paterson Day," should be
sent to Sheldon Kay at 332
Fern Drive, Fort Lauderdale
FL 33326. For information:
Kay, 389-0286, or former
Police Capt. Jules Krakowen,
at 389-4762.
Infantry Reunion
The 30th Infantry Division
Association will hold its 43rd
annual reunion June 13-16, at
the Sheraton-Valley Forge
Hotel, King of Prussia, PA.
Of all soft pack 100's
By U.S. Gov't. testing method.
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
ALL BRAND STYLES SHOWN ARE 100mm.
Competitive tar levels reflect either the Jan. '85 FTC Report or FTC method.
BOX: Less then 0.5 mg. "tarT less than 0.05 mg. nicotine, SOFT PACK
FILTER, MENTHOL: 1 mg. "tarT 0.1 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette, FTC
Report JAN. '85; BOX Ws: Less than 0.5 mg. "tarT less than 0.05 mg.
nicotine. SOFT PACK Ws, RLTER: 2 mg. "tarT 02 mg. neotine, SOFT
PACK DCs, MENTHOL: 3 mg. "tarT 0.3 mg. nicotine, ev. per cigarette
by FTC method.

. y


"III
."<'.....>,'".
.
Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Anita Perlman Honored By Hebrew U.
Anita M. Perlman, a resi-
dent of Fort Lauderdale and
Chicago, will receive an honor-
ary fellowship from the
Hebrew University of Jerusa-
lem at a tribute dinner in her
honor given by the North
Broward chapter of the Ameri-
can Friends of the Hebrew
University. Attorney Joel
Reinstein is chairman of the
event, which will be held
Thursday, Feb. 16, at the Mar-
riott Cypress Creek Hotel.
Perlman, a recipient of the
American Friends of the
Hebrew University's Scopus
Award, was a Founder of the
university, along with her late
husband, Louis. The couple
had given scholarships to fund
trips to Israel and had donated
an athletic field at a Children's
home and a wing in the Weiz-
mann Institute. They were
also recipients of an Israel
Bonds Award, the B'nai B'rith
Presidents Medal, an award
from the March of Dimes, and
honors from Brandeis Univer-
sity and the Jewish National
Fund in Chicago.
Anita Perlman was the moti-
vating force behind the crea-
tion of B'nai B'rith Girls and
was one of the founders of the
B'nai B'rith Youth Commis-
sion. She was the first woman
to receive the Legion of Honor
Award from BBYO and to
head the commission. She also
worked with PTAs, little thea-
tre groups and the YMCA.
Elected to the Chicago Hall
of Fame in 1962, Anita Perl-
man is listed in Who's Who in
World Jewry and in Who's
Who in American Women. A
member of the Broward Hall
of Fame in Florida, she is also
a life member of the Anti-
Defamation League and, with
her late husband, recipient of
the ADL Humanitarian
Award. She was also president
of the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation in the Fort
Lauderdale area and president
of the Fort Lauderdale Jewish
Community Center.
AJCongress Tours To Leave From Miami
Beginning in May, South
Floridians on the American
Jewish Congress' Israel Travel
Program will be able to depart
directly from Miami Inter-
national Airport on those tours
beginning May 22, June 19,
July 17, Sept. 11, Oct. 16 and
Oct. 30.
The 15 day tours will feature
direct flights between Miami
and Tel Aviv aboard El Al
Israel Airlines; accommoda-
tions in five-star hotels in Jeru-
salem, Tiberias and Tel Aviv;
touring directed by veteran
AJCongress guides; full Israel
breakfasts and dinners daily;
and evening entertainment.
The American Jewish Con-
gress' 1989 tour program
includes more than 200 tours
to Israel as well as tours and
cruises to more than 40 coun-
tries on six continents. For
information: 800-221-4694.
Holocaust Council Director
WASHINGTON (JTA) the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Sara Bloomfield has been Council, succeeding Lyle
named executive director of Ryder.
Broward's first KOSHER retirement center.
Be MUUJ& PtQMaiit
MANOR
Where Caring Comet Naturally
Tastefully Decorated
Nursing Supervision 24 hrs.
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts & crafts
Licensed A.C.L.F.
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool & Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services daily
Easily accessible
RETIREMENT LIVING THE WAY YOU
WOULD LIKE IT TO BE
WE WELCOME INQUIRIES PLEASE CALL 961-8111
3535 S.W. 52nd Ave. Pmbrok Park, Florida 33023
Off Hallandaie Beach Blvd.
THE WAY
WATERS
SUPPOSED
TO TASTE.
Imagine water that tastes fresh
and dear as a spring. Water
without sodium, pollutants, or
carbonation. Water with nothing
added, nothing taken away. "rhat's
water the way it should taste.
That's fresh, pure Mountain Valley
Water.. .from a natural spring in
Hot Springs, Arkansas. Taste it.
You'll be tasting water for the very
first time.
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114
:'yAl SPRING .',
V0T CARBONATt
**r
-Mountain
Valley
Water
HOI SPRINGS *M
71'Mll
The
beauty
unfolds
At Hamilton House, we know that
beauty is "more than skin deep"...
that it must continually unfold in a
community or a relationship, revealing
more and more of its qualities the
closer you inspect it.. the longer you
know it.
So. we have created a rental senior
living communityHamilton House in
Plantationto set new standards for
excellence and exceed the most
demanding expectations.
Each spacious floorplan includes its
own washer and dryer, separate dressing
areas in each master bedroom, and
walk-in closets. All plans have lovely
views and a screened balcony or patio.
Some also feature bay windows.
Each private residence is tied into
the 2 4-hour medical emergency
network, and has around-the-clock
security. Should the need arise,
assisted living is also available
Every resident enjoys meals
prepared by our nationally recognized,
award-winning chef served in the
gracious setting of the Hamilton House
dining room.
At Hamilton House, you also receive a
written guarantee that your rent will
never increase more than one-half of the Consumer Price Index
each year.
If you're interested in a full-service senior living community that
surrounds you with comfort, security and caring friends, please
come and see for yourself how the beauty unfolds at Hamilton House.
Our Information Center at 8500 West Sunrise Boulevard in
Plantation, is open Mon.-Fri. 9-5: Sat.-Sun.l -5. Evenings by
appointment. Visit us today!
A New Standard for Senior Living
8500 West Sunrise Boulevard, Plantation, Florida 33322 (305) 476-8500


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
Frieda Leemon Guest Speaker At Luncheon
Frieda Leemon, past
national president of Na*amat
USA, will be tfuest speaker at
the annual Spiritual Adoption
Luncheon of Na'amat USA's
South Florida Council Wed-
nesday, Feb. 15, noon at Tem-
ple Beth Shmuel (Cuban
Hebrew Congregation) of
Miami Beach.
Leemon, a winter resident of
Boca Raton, lias served on the
executive committee of the
.Jewish Agency and the World
Zionist Movement and on the
national board of the' Ameri-
can Zionist Federation. She is
also active in the World Pio-
neer Women and the World
I^abor Zionist Federation.
Highlight of the luncheon
will be the presentation of the
1989 "Celebration of Women"
award to Rep. Elaine Bloom
(D., Miami Beach), deputy
majority leader of the Florida
House of Representatives.
Making the presentation will
be Harriet Green of Miami
Beach, national vice president
of Na'amat USA.
Felice P. Schwartz of Miami
Jefferson Bank
Figures Up
.Jefferson Bancorp, Inc., a
publicly-held bank holding
company, owning and operat-
ing banks in Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach counties, has
reported a substantial increase
in consolidated net income for
the fourth quarter of 1988.
The Miami Beach-
headquartered corporation has
also announced unaudited fig-
ures which show increases in
consolidated net income, de-
posits, assets, net loans and
stockholders' equity for the
year ended Dec. 31, 1988 over
the year ended Dec. 31. 1987.
According to Jefferson Ban-
corp board chairman Arthur
H. Courshon, "the strong
increase in the final three
months of 1988 indicates that
the expansion of the Jefferson
Banks into Broward and Palm
Beach counties has achieved
all initial expectations, and our
presence throughout the Gold
Coast area of Florida is fully
accepted by the business and
general communities."
Courshon also notes that the
end-of-the-year figures "re-
flect the continuing strong
financial and economic climate
in the tri-county area of South
Florida." He added that the
bank plans to provide Gold
Account service, full trust
department services and lend-
ing resources to individual and
business customers in the
entire Gold Coast area.
Jefferson Bancorp, Inc.
operates four banks with 10
offices in Miami Beach, Key .
Biscayne, North Dade, Sunny
Isles, west Boca Raton, Hol-
lywood, Fort Lauderdale and
Lauderdale Lakes.
Red Cross Training
The American Red Cross is
training volunteers to assist at
its blood pressure clinics.
Classes will be held Monday,
Feb. 13, 9 a.m.-l p.m., at chap-
ter headquarters, 2120 W.
Broward Blvd., Fort Lauder-
dale.
Information: 581-4221.
Frieda Leemon
Beach, the council's vice presi-
dent and the national public
relations chairman of Na'amat
USA, is serving as luncheon
chairman.
The afternoon program will
also feature a special musical
tribute to the working women
and children of Israel by Can-
tor Daniel Kaizler of the
Cuban Hebrew Congregation.
Cantor Kaizler is a former
soloist with the Israeli Army
Choir.
Bond Leaders Meet
NewGovt. Heads
In the first weeks of 1989,
the State of Israel has been
visited by several important
non-governmental delega-
tions.
Seventy prominent U.S.,
European and Latin American
leaders of the Israel Bond cam-
paign participated in a three
day international Israel Bond
Top Leadership Delegation,
which met with Prime Minis-
ter Yitzhak Shamir and key
ministers in the cabinet.
The delegation was the first
by a major Israel-oriented
organization since the forma-
tion of the new government.
Israel Bonds had just com-
pleted a record-breaking year,
topping the previous campaign
for the fourth consecutive
year. The $631,078,000 total
represented an increase of $27
million over 1987 results.
Later in the month, Jan. 30,
more than 150 rabbis, repre-
senting conservative, reform
and orthodox congregations in
the U.S. and Canada, arrived
I
William Knobel, right, of Bermuda Club, Tamarac, is presented
with the Pikuach Nefesh Award of American Red Magen David
for Israel (ARMDI) by Robert L. Schwartz, ARMDI southeast
region director. The award is in recognition ofKnobel's contribu-
tion of an ambulance to Magen David Adorn in Israel, in memory
of his brother Julius. William and Julius Knobel previously had
contributed another ambulance to MDA.
for the fourth annual State of
Israel Bonds National Rab-
binic Conference. The group
met with Prime Minister Sha-
mir, Finance Minister Shimon
Peres and Tourism Minister
Gideon Patt as well as other
government officials, mem-
bers of the Knesset, religious
leaders, academics and tour-
ism industry representatives.
The synagogue High Holy
Day Appeals for Israel Bonds
in 1988 contributed a record
$64.8 million to the world-wide
$631-plus million total. The
synagogues' total Bond sales
in 1988 were $125 million.
Available at All Publix Stores and Fresh
Danish Bakeries, Fresh
HOT CROSS
BUNS........6 ,o, *179
$499
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only. Filled with
Fresh Strawberries (Single Layer)
Heart Cake........... *
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only, Decorated for
Valentine's Day, Heart Shaped
Chocolate Chip
Cookie.................. size $3"
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish
Bakeries Only, Filled with Cherries. Butter Cream
Cherry Log........... each *249
Cut 4 per full sheet
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only,
Mini Cannoli.........
Available at All Publix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries,
Angel Food Cake..
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only,
Fruit Stollen.........
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only. Baked Fresh
Raisin Pumpernickel
Bread................... i
10-oz.
pkg.
lib.
size
$139
$229
.b. *5
where shoppng rs q pleosme
Prices effective Thurs.. February 9 thru Wed..
February 15.1989. Quantity Righto reserved. Only in
Dade, Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. Lucie.
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 9
=a
Bar/Bat Mitzvaljs
MAYA EZRATTI
Maya Ezratti, daughter of
Anna and Itchko Ezratti, will
be called to the Torah at Tem-
ple Beth Shalom, Hollywood,
as a Bat Mitzvah on Friday,
Feb. 17, at the 8:15 p.m. ser-
vice.
Pulpit flowers and the Oneg
Shabbat will be sponsored by
the celebrant's parents.
Among those attending will
be Maya's grandparents, Rosie
and Moshe Ezratti of Holly-
wood, FL and Tanya Han in of
Tel Aviv, Israel.
DAVID ZITNER
David Jonathan Zitner, son
of Beverly and Charles Zitner,
will be called to the Torah at
Temple Beth Shalom, Holly-
wood, as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, Feb. 19, at the 9
a.m. service.
David attends Attucks Pub-
lic School and is enrolled in the
pre-confirmation class at Beth
Shalom.
Attending the celebration
will be the celebrant's grand-
parents, Helen and Matt
Yegendorf of Montreal, Can-
ada, and Linda and Sam Zit-
nzer of Hallandale.
The pulpit flowers and kid-
dush following the service will
be tendered by David's par-
ents.
JEFFREY KOPELMAN
Jeffrey Alan Kopelman, son
of Barbara and Joel Kopelman,
will be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah during the Satur-
day, Feb. 11 morning services
at Temple Beth Shalom.
Jeffrey is a seventh grade
student at Nova Middle
School, where he is a class
representative, and is in the
Hay class at Beth Shalom
Hebrew School.
Among those attending the
celebration will be Jeffrey's
grandparents, Robert Kopel-
man of Hallandale and Ger-
trude Schwartz of Hollywood,
FL.
ANDREW GROSS
Andrew David Gross, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell Gross,
will be called to the Torah of
Temple Beth Ahm, Hollywood,
as a Bar Mitzvah during morn-
ing services Saturday, Feb. 18.
Andrew is a student at Pio-
neer Middle School.
Special guests at the celebra-
tion will be Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Katz of Miami Beach.
LAURA GORENBERG
Laura Gorenberg, daughter
of Donald and Charlotte Gor-
enberg, will be called to the
Torah of Temple Sinai of Hol-
lywood as a Bat Mitzvah dur-
ing Shabbat morning services
Saturday, Feb. 11.
Laura is "twinning" with
Svetlana Shpilman, daughter
of Emmanuil and Violetta
Shpilman of Moldavian SSR,
USSR.
Laura, a seventh grade stu-
dent at Nova Middle School, is
a member of Temple Sinai
Kadima and of the Broward
Community College Symphon-
ette.
The pulpit flowers, Oneg
Shabbat and kiddush following
Saturday's service, will be
sponsored by the Gorenberg
family.
SYLVAIN DUBROFSKY
Sylvain Dubrofsky, son of
Lynn and Leonard Dubrofsky,
was called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah Saturday morn-
ing, Feb. 4, at Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood.
Sylvain attends University
School of Nova, where he is in
the eighth grade.
Attending the celebration
were his grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Dubrofsky,
Hollywood, FL and Val Clark
of Rancho Marrietta, CA.
AJC Fights Ban
On School Dancing
A Purdy, Missouri school
board's decision to ban school
dances in deference to the
demands of conservative reli-
gious public opinion is a viola-
tion of the Establishment
Clause of the First Amend-
ment, asserts the American
Jewish Congress.
In an amicus (friend-of-the-
court) brief submitted to the
U.S. court of Appeals in the
case of Clayton v. Place, the
AJCongress argued that the
Board has abandoned "its con-
stitutional duty to remain neu-
tral in religious matters by
enforcing as official education
policy the religious tenets of (a
religious) majority."
The AJCongress brief also
notes that a ban on dancing
would not be unconstitutional,
even though it touches on mat-
ters of morality, if it were
supported by legitimate secu-
lar concerns. It is only when
ostensibly secular practices
are in reality a manifestation
of religion that the Constitu-
tion is violated, AJCongress
claims.
No Pressure on Israel
Continued from Page 1
an international conference
"provided big proviso it
was properly structured and
provided its purpose was to
ead to direct negotiations
between the parties."
He said the Soviet Union
could play a role in Middle
East peace negotiations if it
was constructive, and that the
Soviets could demonstrate this
by restoring diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel, continue
allowing greater emigration
and "stop supporting states
that support terrorism, such as
Libya.*
Baker also said he had no
problems philosophically with
supporting pre-emptive strikes
against terrorism. "Some-
times such strikes are not onlv
iustified but almost required, '
le said.
Baker also promised that he
would not allow himself to be
controlled by the State Depart-
ment professionals. "I want to
be the president's man at the
State Department, instead of
the State Department's man
at the White House," he said.

No Sales to Saudis... Yet
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department said
that the Bush administration
has not yet made any decision
to sell Saudi Arabia 315 M1A1
Abrams tanks, seven multiple-
launch rocket systems, and up
to 110 F-16 or F/A-18 fighter
planes this year.
Those weapons, as well as
2,000 Mk-84 aerial bombs, 75
anti-jam radios, an air defense,
radar system, and mainten-
ance equipment for F-5 and
F-15 fighter planes, were con-
tained in the administration's
1989 "Javits Report," named
for late Sen. Jacob Javits (R-
N.Y.). The report lists arms
sales that may come this year.
State Department spokes-
man Charles Redman said that
the report sent by the Rea-
gan administration to Con-
gress on its last full day in
office was endorsed by the
Bush administration, but he
could not comment on it since
it was classified.
But Redman specifically
denied that any sale of
advanced aircraft to the Sau-
dis would occur in 1989. "We
do not have plans this year nor
do we anticipate notifying
Congress of any such sale this
year," Redman said of the
F-16s or F/A-18s.
The New York Times quoted
Saudi and U.S. sources as say-
ing the aircraft sale may be
proposed early in 1990.
Israel could receive 200 Stin-
ger anti-aircraft missiles, four
reconnaissance helicopters,
three artillery-locating radars,
as well as avionics, armament,
engine and airframe improve-
ments on 47 of its F-15 air-
craft, the Times and The
Washington Post reported.
Various potential weapons
sales to Egypt and Morocco
are also cited in the report.
A Capitol Hill source pre-
dicted that the Saudis will
want the F/A-18s over the
F-16s, but that, in any event,
the weaponry is geared mainly
for defensive uses.


^
FREE PURIM PARTY
Tuesday, March 7,1:30 PM
Hollywood Beach Hilton
S. Ocean Dr. (AlA) No. of Hallandale Beach Blvd.
- REFRESHMENTS -
GUEST SPEAKER:
Rabbi Morton Malavsky
Spiritual Leader Temple Beth Shalom, Hollywood
MUSICAL PROGRAM PROVIDED BY:
Harriett Ormont
accompanied on piano by: Cy Greene
SPONSORED BY:
UNITED CHARITIES
* two $50 Bond Door Prizes Furnished by:
American Bank of Hollywood
Call for reservations Limited Seating (Leave Name and Telephone Number]
(Broward) 921-0960 (Dade) 949-1921
(Reduced Parking)


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoljywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
B'nai B'rith Annual Reunion New Services For Memory Impaired
The annual reunion luncheon
of B'nai B'rith and B'nai B'rith
Women members from the
Metropolitan New York area
will be held Sunday, Feb. 19,
at the Holiday Inn in Fort
Lauderdale Beach.
Jewish humorist Emil Cohen
will provide the entertainment
and Charles Seibel will serve
as toastmaster.
Reservations are $19.50 per
person and seating is limited.
Information: Irving Luboff,
407-433-4870; Lyla Goodman,
407-496-3143; Naomi Fahrer,
407-272-6879; or Shirley Dia-
mond, 407-965-1343.
The Northeast Alzheimer's
Day Care Centers, adminis-
tered by the City of Deerfield
Beach, has announced an ex-
pansion of its present services.
A $250,000 grant from the
state, funded through Area
Agency on Aging of Broward
County, will finance a total
scope care continuum for all
memory-impaired persons in
northeast Broward County.
Officially licensed by HRS,
the center is now able to
deliver homemaker, compan-
ion and sitter services directly
to the home of patients and
their caregivers.
For information: 480-4460 or
480-4462.
Pompano Concert
A concert of Dixieland music
will be presented by Glendale
Federal Savings and Loan
Association and the City of
Pompano Beach Sunday, Feb.
12, 2-4 p.m., the municipal golf
course lawn at U.S. 1 and NE
10 St. Admission is free and
patrons are encouraged to
bring a blanket or lawn chairs.
In the event of rain, the con-
cert will be held in the Pom-
pano Gym.
IfthisishowFDR,
Walter Winchell, and the
King of Swing looked to you,
look into AmeriPlus 55.
SM
If you're 55 or over, you grew up with radio instead of
television. And with electric fans instead of central
air conditioning.
Nobody ever handed your generation anything
on a platter. But now, wed like to change that by
handing you a free AmeriPlus 55 checking account.
With unlimited check-writing, no monthly service
charges and none of the so-called package fees you'll
find at other banks. We'd like to give you free
special-design checks, free travelers checks, free
cashiers checks, free notary service, a free asset
management and estate planning consultation, and
more. With a qualifying minimum balance, we'll be
glad to give you all that, free. >^m^
To sign up, just hop into your ^^^ ____
Pierce Arrow, 1929 Maxwell... g\ IUICDI UlDCT
or somewhat newer model... a nd w% I \m IJ
visit your nearby AmeriFirst
Banking Center.
B/1NK
A Federal Savings Bank.
One of Florida's largest financial institutions.
For more information, phone us at: 1-800-354-3100.
if For AmeriPlus 55 free checking and other services, just maintain a minimum average daily balance of $5,000 for the total of all accounts
MJv (C.D.'s. savings, and checking), listed on your monthly statement. Or keep a S 1.500 average daily balance in your interest-earning checkinj
account. Regular checking accounts with lower balance requirements are also available. Ask us for further information.
ng


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11
NCCJ Honors Broward
School Board Member
Broward County School
Board member Neil Sterling
was one of five Broward and
Palm Beach county residents
presented with Silver Medal-
lions at the Broward Region
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews' (NCCJ) Broth-
erhood Awards dinner held
recently at Pier 66, Fort Laud-
erdale.
Sterling, president of M.
Sterling and past chairman of
the Broward School Board, is a
member of the senior advisory
council of Junior Achievement
of South Florida and the com-
munity advisory board of the
Junior League of Fort Lauder-
dale. He also serves on the
board of trustees of the Phil-
harmonic Orchestra of Florida
and is an honorary trustee of
the Broward Community Col-
lege Foundation. A member of
the board of directors of
United Way of Broward
County, he will be its general
campaign chairman for 1989.
He is also a member of the
High Court
Upholds
Public Criticism
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
High Court of Justice ruled
that the head of Mossad,
Israel's foreign intelligence
agency, is not immune to criti-
cism by the news media.
In rendering the decision for
the court, Justice Aharon
Barak said that with a few
exceptions, the right to free-
dom of expression overrides
claims of national security.
The High Court upheld an
appeal by the Tel Aviv weekly
Ha'ir against military censor-
ship. It ruled that a story
critical of the Mossad chief
whom it said would soon be
replaced may be published.
The only restriction allowed
by the court is that the identity
of the head of Mossad cannot
be revealed.
The censor contended that
public criticism of that official
would be detrimental to the
functioning of Mossad. Barak
rejected the argument, observ-
ing that while criticism is
unpleasant and sometimes
even harmful, its suppression
cannot be justified in a demo-
cratic society.
$
FOR CONSERVATIVE SAVERS
AUSTRALIAN BANKS ARE
PAYING 11.25% ON CDs,
GUARANTEED, AND YOUR |
CAPITAL WILL PROBABLY
INCREASE IN VALUE. IN
THE PAST 12 MONTHS
[THE AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR]
ROSE 24% AND IS
STILL RISING.
Call for free report.
HERITAGE FINANCIAL
8950 Villa La Jolla Dr.
Suit* 1200
La Jolla, CA 02037
(800) 373-2450
honorary board of directors of
the Fort Lauderdale Chil-
dren's Theatre and the board
of directors of the Greater
Fort Lauderdale Chamber of
Commerce, and a member of
Temple Bat Yam of Fort Laud-
erdale.
Other dinner honorees were
educator/civic leader Irma
Allen, a former president of
the Florida State Teachers
Association and director of the
Florida Education Associa-
tion; James Blosser, partner at
Ruden, Barnett, McClosky,
Smith, Schuster & Russell and
president-elect of United Way
of Broward County; Thomas
P. O'Donnell, president, pub-
lisher and CEO of the News
and Sun-Sentinel Co.; and
Peter Blum, chairman of the
board of Blums of Boca, chair-
man of the board of the Boca
Raton Community Hospital,
and former city commissioner
and two-term mayor of the
town of Manalapan.
"A World of Difference," a
travelogue covering journeys
to Israel and more than 40
countries on six continents, is
a highlight of travel presenta-
tions sponsored by the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress.
The presentations will be
Travel Talks
made Tuesday, and are: Feb.
21, 2 p.m., at Temple Beth
Shalom, Miami Beach and 7:30
p.m., Inverrary Country Club,
Lauderhill; Wednesday, Feb.
22, 2 p.m., Hollywood Beach
Hilton and at 7 p.m., Holiday
Inn, Boca Raton; and Thurs-
day Feb. 23, 2 p.m., at the
Royce Hotel,
Beach.
West Palm
Admission is free but reser-
vations are suggested. For
information: 305-673-9100 (in
Dade); 305-763-S177 (Brow-
ard); 407-689-0258 (W. Palm
Beach); or 800-221-4694.
oZZsl PASSOVER
tomS VACATIONS
Don't gamble
with your
Passover vacation
"Feel the fh'rsonal touch of professionals with M) years of experience."
3 FRESHLY PREPARED MEALS DAILY-2 TRADITIONAL SEDER SERVICES* TOPNAME ENTERTAINMENT
Acapulco
ACAPLUCO PLAZA
California
PALM SPRINGS RESORT
Palm Springs
Colorado
TAMARRON RESORT
Disney World Orlando
CnaHamoea Package S1M-S299
Caribbean Cruise
Florida departure and return
Spend your ENTIRE vacation
m the warm sunshine'
Florida
FONTAINEBLEAU HIL TON
INNISBROOK RESORT
SHERATON BAL HARBOUR
SANS SOUCI
Bahamas A Puerto Rico
AMBASSAii^--
Vermont
I AKE MORE'Y RESORT
$699
PACKAGES MOM
LOW COST AIRFARE A VAIL ABLE
N.Y. Area
TAMIMENT RESORT
PoconoMts Pennsylvania
RYE TOWN HILTON
Westcnester N y
Hungary
BUDAPEST with
JEWISH HISTORY TOUR
$
QQQ
Ff0n'*/ J PAY BY JANUARY 15 AND SAVE $300
3 Kol-K supervision is restricted to our tood service All meats are Glatl Irom N Y Cholov Yisroel upon request
ATLAS AMBASSADOR KOSHER TOURS
25 W. 43 Street. NYC 10036. (212) 575 8840 Outside N.Y. State Toll Free 800 752 8000
WE'RE #1
OUR STRENGTH
IS YOUR SECURITY
FIjORIDA bank EQUITY
Equity-to-assets percentages for the 11 largest bank holding companies operating in Florida.
Although not exactly the same as capital-to-assets ratios measured by federal regulators, bank
analysts said they are roughly comparable:
EQUITY/ASSET RATIO
BANKS AS OF DEC. 1988
JEFFERSON BANCORP, INC. 11.19%
Citizens & Southern Corp. 7.77%
First Florida Banks, Inc. 7.50%
Seacoast Banking Corp. of FL 6.84%
First Union Corp. 6.77%
Suntrust Banks Inc. 6.48%
NCNBCorp. 6.48%
Florida National Banks Inc. 6.10%
Barnett Banks Inc. 5.92%
Flagler Bank Corp. 5.84%
Southeast Banking Corp. 4.80%
AVERAGE 6.88%
SOURCE: J.B.I. RESEARCH
In the recent analysis of equity-to-assets percentages for the 11 largest bank hold-
ing companies operating in Florida shown above, our parent, Jefferson Bancorp,
Inc.. rated 1st with 11.19%.
ThatS 44% more than the second place company, almost double some of the
largest banking concerns doing business in the state and over 60% more than
the average of all of them!
Wb hope the security of your funds keeps you resting easy and the advantages of
our Gold Account Service please you as much.
JEFFERSON
BANKS
**

MIAMI BEACH NORTH SHORE KEY BISCAYNE
NORTH DADE HOLDTWOOD FORT LAUDERDALE
LAUDERDALE LAKES BOCA RATON
Dade: 532-6451
Broward: 739-3400 Palm Beach: 366-6900
Subsidiaries ol Jellerson Bancorp. Inc Members FDIC Federal Reserve System
lit
LENDER
.
...... .. -11


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
U.S. Chemicals Link Exposed
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American companies have
shipped large quantities of
substances that can be manu-
factured into chemical wea-
pons to Middle East countries,
U.S. Customs officials have
discovered.
The U.S. shipments were
uncovered as Customs officials
stepped up scrutiny of chemi-
cal exports, following revela-
tions that West German firms
were involved in shipping
chemicals to Libya for use in
an alleged poison gas plant.
According to recent reports
in The New York Times, Iran
was able secretly to recruit the
help of companies in Germany,
the United States and Asia to
increase its stockpile of chemi-
cal weapons.
Subsequent inquiries also
reveal shipments of chemicals
to Jordan and then, officials
believe, to Iraq. Presumably
such chemical weapons could
be used against Israel.
The findings came to light
during U.S. Customs investi-
gations of a Baltimore firm,
Alcolac International, whose
records drew attention
because of their use of vague
terminology indicating the
chemicals' destination.
American export law
requires special licensing of
chemicals that can be used in
the production of poison gas
and completely forbids their
shipment to Iran, Iraq and
Syria.
The findings of the investi-
gations came to light when the
American court documents
were recently made public in
Baltimore.
The investigations of Alcolac
revealed that an Iranian diplo-
mat, Seyed Kharim Ali Sob-
hani, working through the
Iranian Embassy in Bonn,
arranged three shipments in
1987 and 1988 of thiodiglycol,
a chemical used in the manu-
facture of mustard gas.
The first two shipments,
totaling 90 tons, went
through. But the third, weigh-
ing 120 tons, was intercepted
by Customs, which substituted
water for the chemical and
then traced its passage.
It is estimated that a ton of
thiodiglycol yields at least a
ton of mustard gas; 120 tons
will cover an area of about 60
square miles. Thiodiglycol is
also used in the manufacture
of ink and textile dyes.
To avoid the appearance of
breaking U.S. export regula-
tions, the shipping of the
chemical was effected through
circuitous routes, via Thessalo-
niki, Greece; Karachi, Pakis-
tan; and Singapore.
Federal officials in Balti-
more announced the arrests of
an official of a Brooklyn, N.Y.,
company and of a dutch busi-
nessman. They were charged
with organizing illegal export
of these chemicals to Jordan,
which they allegedly pur-
chased from Alcolac.
Officials believe the ultimate
destination of the chemicals
was Iraq.
Nicholas Delfino, an official
of the Nu Kraft Mercantile
Corporation of Brooklyn, and
Frans van Anraat, a Dutch
citizen identified as both a
European representative and
customer of Nu Kraft, were
arrested.
Delfino surrendered himself
in Baltimore, where he is free
on $500,000 bond.
Van Anraat was arrested at
his home in Italy, and perti-
nent documents found there
were seized by Italian officials.
America has asked that Italy
extradite van Anraat.
Alcolac pleaded guilty to one
count of knowingly violating
export laws.
Documents show that Nu
Kraft bought four shipments
of thiodiglycol, totaling 500
tons, from Alcolac between
November 1987 and March
1988. They were shipped via
Norfolk, Va., to Antwerp and
Rotterdam. Documents indi-
cate the chemicals were
destined for customers in
Western Europe.
Three shipments went to
Jordan. The destination of the
fourth is unknown.
The information was cor-
roborated with special Cus-
toms agent Donald Turabaugh
in Baltimore.
In Washington, State
Department spokesman
Charles Redman on Tuesday
praised U.S. export controls.
Redman affirmed that "the
government of Jordan has con-
sistently maintained a policy of
not acquiring chemical wea-
pons. We have no reason to
believe that policy has
changed."
The American findings
further point out the weakness
of West German laws involv-
ing such shipments. In Bonn,
Chancellor Helmut Kohl and
Foreign Minister Hans Die-
trich Genscher promised a vis-
iting World Jewish Congress
delegation that export laws
would be strengthened.
In light of the American
business involvement with
chemicals shipped to the Mid-
dle East, the WJC said it
"would seek to have all gov-
ernments tighten export con-
trol laws and strengthen crimi-
nal penalties" to further pre-
vent such happenings.
U.S.-W. German Belated Cooperation
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) West
Germany will act jointly with
the United States to make sure
no chemical weapons are pro-
duced at the Rabta plant in
Libya, which has already
received equipment and mate-
rial from West German firms.
Chancellor Helmut Kohl is
sending one of his top aides,
Wolfgang Schauble, to Wash-
ington shortly to coordinate
these efforts, it was
announced here.
Schauble will bring with him,
among other things, docu-
ments containing what the
government has learned from
its investigation of German
firms involved with the Libyan
plant.
Schauble will brief the
Americans on how Bonn in-
tends to halt any help to Third
World countries which could
be used to manufacture chemi-
cal or biological weapons.
Schauble's mission is seen
here as a blow to the prestige
of Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher.
Genscher was among the
German leaders who initially
dismissed as inconclusive
American evidence, since con-
firmed, that several West Ger-
man factories were contribut-
ing to the Rabta plant's wea-
pons capability.
Hungary Sanctions Hebrew
The Hungarian government
has granted the same official
status as other elective lan-
guages like Russian and Eng-
lish and has sanctioned teach-
ing Hebrew in select secon-
dary schools in Budapest. Gra-
duates of the Hungarian Cen-
ter for Jewish Studies at the
University of Budapest the
first center for Jewish studies
in Eastern Europe will
serve as instructors.
Permission was also granted
for the Rabbinical Seminary of
Budapest to train teachers as
well as rabbis to serve the
needs of the Jewish commun-
ity in Hungary in the future.
The Hungarian Jewish com-
munity and the Center for
Jewish Studies will jointly
develop a program of publish-
ing Jewish books in the Hun-
garian language for adults to
supplement the Aleph Library
for children.
How to drive to the Northeast
with your eyes closed.
Just put your car onto Amtrak's Auto Train. Then sit back and relax.
If you want, you can sightsee in our Dome Car. Meet new friends
over cocktails. Even take in a free movie. The Auto Train fESk leaves each
afternoon from just outside Orlando and drops you off the \mi next morning
near Washington, D.C. You and your car can travel at a special fare between Feb. 21
and June 19* Included is a delicious full-course buffet dinner ^ apd a tasty continental breakfast. Kosher
meals are available if you let us know in advance. Private QQ sleeping accommodations
are also available. The best fares go to those who make their reservations early. So call your travel
agent or call Wl l Amtrak at 1-800-USA-RAIL. Amtrak's Auto Train. It'll open your eyes to the
comforts of ^j taking the train instead.
Some restrictions may apply
ALL=
ABOARD
AMTRAK


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 13
fignqgoque JVfeu/s
Lecture By Rabbi Klein
TEMPLE BETH AHM
The Sisterhood will cele-
brate Sisterhood Shabbat
beginning with a Shabbat din-
ner Friday, Feb. 10, and par-
ticipating in services with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek and
Cantor Eric Lindenbaum.
On Shabbat morning, Feb.
11, Sisterhood will again par-
ticipate in services followed by
a luncheon with a study group
on "The Jewish Life Cycle."
Men's Club will meet Sun-
day, Feb. 12, 9 a.m.
Camp Chai will hold a reun-
ion Sunday, Feb. 12, noon,
featuring a bar-b-que and
"moon walk."
The Education committee
will meet Monday, Feb. 13,
7:30 p.m., and the Ways and
Means Committee Tuesday,
Feb. 14, 7:30 p.m.
Friday evening services,
Feb. 17, begin at 8 p.m., with
Rabbi Kapnek officiating and
Cantor Lindenbaum chanting
the Liturgy with the Kadima
Youth Group.
Services Shabbat morning,
Feb. 18, will begin at 8:45 a.m.
During services, the Bar Mitz-
vah of Andrew David Gross,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell
Gross, will be celebrated.
The temple's Annual Cab-
arat will be held Saturday,
Feb. 18, 8 p.m.
There will be no Religious
School Sunday, Feb. 19, and
no ECP or Religious School
Monday, Feb. 20.
The executive board will
meet Wednesday, Feb. 22,
7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Ahm is located
at 9730 Stirling Road, Holly-
wood. For information: 431-
5100.
TEMPLE BETH EL
On Friday, Feb. 10, Rabbi
Samuel Z. Jaffe will speak on
"The Last Temptation: The
Book, Not The Movie." The
flowers on the Pulpit are pre-
sented by Marion Sternfels in
memory of her husband, Les-
ter.
The Oneg Shabbat is being
sponsored by Hilda Arlen in
honor of her first great-
grandchild, Matthew Branden
Segerman.
On Saturday, Feb. 11, 10:15
a.m., Rabbi Jaffe will conduct
the Torah Study, followed by
Shabbat Service at 11 a.m. in
the Chapel.
Temple Beth El is located at
1351 So. 14 Ave., Hollywood.
For information: 920-8225.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Services will be held Friday,
Feb. 10, 5 p.m., in the Jack
Shapiro Chapel, conducted by
lay leaders.
On Saturday, Feb. 11,
9 a.m., services in the main
sanctuary will be conducted by
Dr. Morton Malavsky, rabbi,
assisted by Cantor Irving Gold
chanting the liturgy. During
the morning service, the Bar
Mitzvah of Jeffrey Alan Kopel-
man, son of Barbara and Joel
Kopelman, will be celebrated.
The ufruf of Gary Frohman,
son of Harriet Frohman and
the late Herbert Frohman, will
also be held during the Satur-
day morning service.
Services on Friday, Feb. 17,
8:15 p.m. will be in the main
sanctuary, conducted by Dr.
Malavsky, assisted by Cantor
Gold chanting the liturgy. Dur-
ing the service, the Bat Mitz-
vah will be held of Maya
Ezratti, daughter of Anna and
Itchko Ezratti. Pulpit flowers
and the Oneg Shabbat follow-
ing the service will be spon-
sored by Mr. and Mrs. Ezratti.
Services Saturday, Feb. 18,
will begin at 9 a.m. The Bar
Mitzvah will be celebrated of
David Jonathan Zitner, son of
Beverly and Charles Zitner.
Pulpit flowers and kiddush fol-
lowing service will be tendered
by David's parents, in honor of
the occasion.
Temple Beth Shalom is
located at 1400 No. 46 Ave.,
Hollywood. For information:
981-6111.
HALLANDALE JEWISH
CENTER
Sabbath services are held
Fridays, 8 p.m. and Saturdays
at 8:45 a.m.
Daily services are held at
8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. in the
chapel. *
Rabbi Carl Klein and Cantor
Joseph Gross officiate at ser-
vices. The Hallandale Jewish
Center is located at 416 NE 8
Ave., Hallandale. For informa-
tion: 454-9100.
On Tuesday, Feb. 14, noon,
Sisterhood will hold its
monthly meeting. Members'
spouses, friends and prospec-
tive new members are invited
to come at 1 p.m. for the
entertainment portion of the
program.
On Thursday, Feb. 16, 7:30
p.m., the last lecture of the
Hallandale Jewish Center
Adult Education Program's
lecture series will be given by
Rabbi, Dr. Carl Klein, on "The
Future of American Judaism."
The Center's new musical
show, featuring the Chai Duo
Karl Kritz and Harriet Kaye
and an orchestra directed by
William Gunther will be held
Sunday, Feb. 19, 7:30 p.m.
Sisterhood will hold its
monthly card party/luncheon
on Thursday, Feb. 23, noon.
TEMPLE SINAI
On Friday, Feb. 10, the
Shabbat service will begin at 6
p.m. in the Sanctuary with
Rabbi Richard J. Margolis and
Cantor Misha Alexandrovich
officiating. This monthly early
service is scheduled to encour-
age families with younger chil-
dren to attend. There will be
no 8 p.m. service that evening.
During Shabbat services
Saturday, Feb. 11, Laura Gor-
enberg, daughter of Donald
and Charlotte Gorenberg, will
become a Bat Mitzvah. Laura
is "twinning" with Svetlana
Shpilman, daughter of
Emmanuil and Violetta Shpil-
man of Moldavian
SSR, U.S.S.R. The pulpit flow-
ers for the Sabbath, the Friday
Oneg Shabbat, and the Kid-
dush following Saturday's ser-
vice will be sponsored by the
Gorenberg family in honor of
Laura's Bat Mitzvah.
On Sunday, Feb. 12, 1:30
p.m., in the Lipman Youth
Wing, the Leisure Institute of
Temple Sinai will present a
discussion on "Money Manage-
ment" with guest speakers
Attorneys Marvin Bornstein
and Bruce Gottlieb.
The Shabbat service Friday,
Feb. 17, will begin at 8 p.m. in
the Sanctuary with Rabbi
Emeritus David Shapiro and
Cantor Alexandrovich officiat-
ing. The Oneg Shabbat follow-
ing the service will be spon-
sored by Rose and Jack Orloff
in honor of his birthday and his
recovery from illness.
On Saturday, Feb. 18, the
Shabbat service will begin at 9
a.m. with Rabbi Shapiro and
Cantor Alexandrovich officiat-
ing.
On Sunday, Feb. 19, 1:30
p.m., in the Lipman Youth
Wing, the Leisure Institute of
Temple Sinai wijl present
Maynard Abrams, genealogy
expert and former mayor of
Hollywood, speaking on "Do
You Want to Track Your Fam-
ily?"
Temple Sinai of Hollywood is
located at 1201 Johnson St.,
Hollywood.
O
($J\*j E E
CAMP UNIVERSE
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
Set in a beautiful live oak forest on a 3 mile lake
in Central Florida
SKIING RIDING THEATRE ARTS
TENNIS SPORTS CIRCUS AND MUCH MORE
Family owned and operated for 32 years
Providing life long friendships, memories and fun
CALL 1-800-329-CAMP
Dr. Carl Klein, spiritual
leader at the Hallandale Jew-
ish Center, will lecture on
"The Future of American
Judaism" Thursday, Feb. 16,
at his Temple.
Rabbi Klein, who has had a
career as professor of Hebrew,
philosophy and Jewish history,
is the author of "Hungarian
Jews between Two World
Wars," "The Credo of Maimo-
nides," "The Anatomy of
Judaism" and "The Eternal
Book." He has also published
articles and essays.
In addition to being the spiri-
tual leader of the Hallandale
Jewish Center for the last 12
years, Rabbi Klein is a member
of the American Board of
Overseers and the Global
Board of Trustees of Bar-Ilan
University, a member of the
Rabbinic Cabinet of UJA, for-
mer president of both the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami and the South Broward
Council of Rabbis, delegate to
the World Zionist Congress of
the American Zionist organiza-
tion, and President of JNF of
Hallandale. In 1986, a Chair
was inaugurated in his name in
"Rabbinic Judaism" at Bar-
Ilan University.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman, right, of Temple Israel ofMiramar, is
presented with a pin and plaque by Charlene Golden, R.N., donor
services supervisor at the Memorial Hospital Blood Bank. Rabbi
Friedman, who was cited for donating five gallons of blood,
stresses the importance of giving and urges others to become
regular blood donors. It is safe, he says, causes little discomfort
and is very rewarding.
Ulpan Akiva Netanya
International Hebrew Study Center
Learn Hebrew in Israel
by the Mediterranean
with people from Israel and overseas. Intensive Hebrew study
in small classes combined with social and cultural activities,
tours and trips. For all ages (18-80) and for families with
children. Residential seaside campus. Flexible study pro-
grams at all levels open every month, summer and winter, all
year round. Accredited by many universities.
For a detailed brochure please write or telephone:
ISRAEL ULPAN AKIVA, P0B 6086,42160 Netanya. Tel:001-972-53-52312,
Sun-Thu: 9 AM-2 PM
USA: Dept. ot Education, WZ0.515 Park Ave.. New York, NY 10022 USA.
Tel: 212-752-0600 ext 259
SEE FOR YOURSELF.
SEE ISRAEL
f> w u&
II _^ imi Glott Kosher
J Passover
Deauville
AT
THE
1989
5749
HOTEL
BEACH 4
TENNIS
CLUB
-I ON THE OCEAN AT 67th STREET MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
0m of Miami Roach's
Largest and **'
Luxurltus Hotels
Nm Heatad
Pool Siba Jacuzzi
Atrobic Classes
600 Baautllully
Returblshed Accemmo-
dations Wide Ocean
Beacn 2 Pools
Children a Recreation
Room On Premises
Tennis Dancing
Entertainment
Shews Delicious Cut
sine Complimentary
Tea Ream
(pel
GJott Kosher
8-9*10
NIGHT PACKAGES
from'

INCLUDING
3 MEALS
DAILY
per person douDte occ
Plus Tea 4 Tips
' STRICTLY GLATT KOSHER
Religious & Cultural Programs Conducted
by Rabbis Jerome A Horach Markowltz
SEDURIM It SERVICES
WILL BE CONDUCTED
IV CANTOR
ASHERSCHARF
av
For Information & Reservations Call 1-$31 "3440
or Economy Travel 1-1531-3447
or write Passover 89 Deauville P.O. Box 402868
Miami Beach. Florida 33140__________
.


} r >
....-.'. M
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
Ask him how
his grades
were last term.
Call Israel.
See if your brother really
spends his free time in the li-
brary. With AT&T International
Long Distance Service, it costs
less than you'd think to stay
close. So go ahead. Reach out
and touch someone.^
ISRAEL
Economy Discount Standard
5pm-12am 12am-8am 8am-5pm
$ .89 $1.11 $1.48
AVERAGE COST PER MINUTE
FOR A 10 MINUTE CALL-
Average cost per minute varms depending on the length of the cell
Fwst minute costs more; additional minutes coet less. AH prices are
lor calls dialed direct irom anywhere m the continental U S during
the hours listed Add 3% tederal excise tax and applicable state
surcharges Can (or information or it you'd like to receive an AT&T
international rates brochure 1 MO S74-400C.
'1988AUT
AT&T
The right choice.
**
*-.


Friday, February 10, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 15
Documenting Hungarian Synagogues Israeli Test-Tube Twins
Documentation of the few
remaining Hungarian synago-
gues and their contents has
been initiated by researchers
from the Center for Jewish
Art of the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem, who recently
returned from a two-and-a-half
week visit, during which they
documented eight Budapest
synagogues.
In all, they examined and
described some 260 items,
including Torah scrolls and
their silver ornaments, decora-
tive Torah ark and bimak
(altar) coverings, ceremonial
lamps and some dedicatory
inscriptions.
Some five to nine other
Budapest synagogues in addi-
tion to some scattered
throughout the rest of Hun-
gary are expected to be exam-
ined on a return visit next
year.
In their searches in the
Budapest synagogues, the
researchers found few items
dating back earlier than the
19th century, although the
Hungarian Jewish community
itself goes back considerably
earlier than that. Older items
disappeared during or after
World War II, some finding
their way into private hands or
into the collections of the Jew-
ish Museum in Budapest.
Don t Forget!
Send your name and address for the
latest edition of the free Consumer
Information Catalog. Write today:
Department DF
Pueblo, Colorado 81009
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
first test-tube twins born to an
Israeli woman were success-
fully delivered by Caesarean
section at Sheba Hospital in
Tel Hashomer.
The infants, boys who are
fraternal, not identical, twins
developed from embryos that
had been stored in deep freeze
for six months. Each weighed
a healthy 7.7 pounds at birth.
The mother, who comes
from Ashkelon but was not
further identified, had under-
gone treatment for infertility.
Several of her ova were
removed and fertilized. But
the first batch implanted in her
uterus failed to develop. The
rest of the fertilized ova were
deep frozen until the patient
was ready to try for mother-
hood again.
In vitro fertilization was per-
formed at Assuta Hospital, a
private hospital in Tel Aviv.
When its obstetrics depart-
ment closed for budgetary rea-
sons, the patient was trans-
ferred to Sheba, a government
hospital.
The head of its obstetrics
department, Dr. David Serr,
said the chance of a fertilized
egg "taking" after being fro-
zen and transferred to the
womb is about 30 percent.
He said embryos can be kept
frozen for up to five years and
then defrosted for implanta-
tion.
This silver case for the scroll of
Esther was found in Hungary
and documented by research-
ers from the Center for Jewish
Art of the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem.
Parents of North America Israelis (PNAI) will meet
Sunday, Feb. 12, 1 p.m., at the Greater Miami Federa-
tion building.
Area Deaths
STOCKEL
Rose Goldenberg (nee Cohen), a resi-
dent of Hollywood, died Jan. 22. She
was the wife of Alfred Stockel and the
late Leo Goldenberg; mother of Bar-
bara Waldman and the late Kenneth
Goldenberg; and sister of Israel Cohn.
She is also survived by 17 grandchil-
dren and five great-children. Funeral
services were held in Maplewood, NJ.
DAYEN
Maye, a resident of Davie, died Jan.
24, at the age of 65. She is survived by
her husband Abraham (Sonny); son,
Dennis (Roz) of Hollywood; daughters,
Millie (Don) Cohen and Debbie (Gary)
Whalen of Sunrise; mother, Eva Katz;
sister, Sylvia Markowitz of Miami
Beach; and three grandchildren. Gra-
veside services were held at Beth
David Cemetery, under the direction
of Levitt-Weinstein.
FRANZBLAU
Tessie, a resident of Miramar, died at
the age of 80. Services were held Jan.
26 at Levitt-Weinstein Memorial
Chapels.
ROBINS
Regina, a Hallandale resident, died
Jan. 26. She was the wife of the late
Herman and is survived by her daugh-
ter, Alana (Lowell) Weinerman; niece,
Lorraine Bressack; and grandchildren.
Neal, Vicki and Stewart. Services
were held at Blasberg Chapel.
LAWSON
Murray, of Pembroke Pines, died at
the age of 77. Funeral services were
held in New Jersey under the direction
of Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chap-
els.
BIEDNEY
Louis, a resident of Hollywood, died at
the age of 64. Funeral services were
held at Levitt-Weinstein Chapel.
TEEMAN
Goldie, a resident of Hollywood, died
at the age of 72. Services were held
Feb. 5 at Levitt-Weinstein Memorial
Chapels.
TICKTIN
Reina, a Hallandale resident, died at
the age of 79. Services were held Feb.
5 at Levitt-Weinstein Memorial Chap-
els.
ZOLLER
Sylvia, of Hollywood, died Sunday,
Feb. 5, at the age of 85. A former
resident of West Caldwell, NJ, she was
the widow of Samuel Zoller; mother of
Melvin and Elliott; sister of Goldie
Mandell; grandmother of Larry, How-
ard, Walter, Linda and Clifford; and
great-grandmother of Sarah, Daniel,
Eli, Sasha, Lilly, Jason, Jenna and
Amanda. Services were held at River-
side Memorial Chapel, with interment
at Hollywood Memorial Gardens.
EICHEL
Leo, a Hallandale resident, died at the
age of 86. Services were held in Ohio
with arrangements handled by Levitt-
Weinstein Memorial Chapels.
HILZENRATH
Leo, a resident of Hallandale, died
Feb. 2, at the age of 79. He was a past
president and long-time member of
B'nai B'rith in Florida and in New
York and of the ADL, and founder and
first president of Queens College Hil-
lel. He had been a member of the
Hallandale Jewish Center. Mr. Hilzen-
rath is survived by his wife, Betty;
sons. Dr. Stephen (Susan) and Eugene
(Janet); daughter, Susan (Dr. Louis)
Mark of Palm Beach Gardens; and
eight grandchildren. Services were at
Levitt-Weinstein Chapel, Hollywood,
followed by entombment at Beth
David Cemetery.
LUBIN
Irving, a resident of Hallandale, died
Feb. 4. He was the husband of Mollie;
brother of Irene (Al) Goldstein and
Anne Newman and is also survived by
nieces and nephews. Memorial ser-
vices were held at Menorah Chapels.
QUINT
Benedict, of Pembroke Pines, died at
the age of 69. Graveside services were
held Feb. 6 at Vista Memorial Gar-
dens, with arrangements handled by
Eternal Light.

SHE NEEDS
YOUR HELP
Put your donations
to good use.
Help hundreds of frail indigent
elderly like her by donating to
I
ouglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
Thrift Shops
Proceeds used for medicine and supplies for
the elderly of your community
TO HELP THEM, WE NEED YOUR HELP
Furniture Clothing Household goods Appliances
Dade: 625-0620 Broward: 981-8245
Call for free pick-up of your fully tax-deductible donations
or visit our two convenient locations:
Miami
57t3 N.W. 27th Avenue
Hallandale
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
is a division ot the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital lor
the Aged al Douglas Gardens
a not-for-prolit organization
serving the elderly of South Florida lor 43 years

Sunday Bwinch & Jarl
f4>

A wedge of Jarlsberg makes a simple Sunday
one of life's special pleasures. Mild, all natural
Jarlsbergimported from Norwaybelongs
in your life. It's all natural, high in calcium
and protein. Don't let another Sunday slip by
without great tasnng Jarlsberg
makes it special
Himt fOOdt. Inc SUmtord CT 08801 X.


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, February 10, 1989
TAKE
RCH TASTE AT Vi THE TAR
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
Causes Lung Cancer, Heart Disease,
Emphysema. And May Complicate Pregnancy.
5 mg. "tar". 0.5 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.
O MM n.J. MVNOt.DC TOSACCO CO.
1


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EB62JE3N1_RFRIYO INGEST_TIME 2013-06-20T02:53:07Z PACKAGE AA00014306_00135
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES