The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00131

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
Volume 18 Number 26
Hollywood, Florida Friday, December 16. 1988
Price. 35 Cents
Rose To Head JNF
Campaign Committee
Jules Rose, past president of
the Food Industry Alliance,
has been appointed chairman
of the Jewish National Fund's
national campaign advisory
committee.
Rose will review and
upgrade JNF's established
fund-raising methods while
developing new, innovative
strategies. He states that he
hopes to help build a wider
public support base and send
JNF's message to more fami-
lies. The 87-year-old agency is
responsible for afforestation
and land reclamation in Israel.
A member and past presi-
dent of B'nai Harvest Lodge
he is a. trustee of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews. Recently, he received
JNF's Tree of Life Award.
JEWISH NATIONAL
FUND OF
Jules Rose
Barnett Named NCCJ
Dinner Chairman
Elliott B. Barnett, senior
partner at Ruden, Barnett,
McClosky, Smith, Schuster &
Russell, will chair the Broward
County's National Conference
of Christian and Jews (NCCJ)
Brotherhood Awards dinner.
George E. Barbar, CEO of
the Barbar Group of Boca
Raton, will be the Palm Beach
County chair.
The dinner, which marks the
tenth anniversary of the Brow-
ard NCCJ Region, will be held
Saturday, Feb. 4, at Pier 66,
Fort Lauderdale. At the affair,
several citizens of Broward
and Palm Beach Counties will
be presented the NCCJ Silver
Medallion awards for "their
leadership and personal exam-
ple in promoting understand-
ing and good will among all
groups and for their participa-
tion in civic and philanthropic-
causes benefiting the people in
our communities."
The Brotherhood Awards
Dinner is the one-time-only
fundraising event that enables
NCCJ to carry out its educa-
tional programs and services
to help bring about better
understanding and coopera-
tion among the diverse racial,
religious and ethnic groups in
the area. For information, call
the NCCJ office at 749-4454.
Americam Surgeons Help
Colombian Kids
A team of plastic surgeons
were sent recently to Bogota,
Colombia by the American
Jewish World Service to op-
erate on children suffering
from congenital defects, burns
and other accidents.
The international relief and
development organization of
the American Jewish com-
munity assists people in the
developing world regardless of
religious or ethnic back-
ground.
The four surgeon team per-
formed approximately 70 oper-
ations in a one-week period.
In cooperation with AJWS,
then Colombian Jewish com-
munity selected a hopital in
Bogota and financed the trans-
formation of an exisitng ward
into a surgical clinic.
In addition to his surgical
duties, Dr. John Grossman,
assistant professor at Brown
Univeristy and leader of the
team, lectured to physicians,
students and health practition-
ers. The surgical team will
return to Bogota every six
months to perform additional
operations and provide follow-
up treatment.
REAGAN AND RABBIS President Reagan receives a Chanukah gift, and menorah
from Hasidic Rabbi Abraham Schemtov of Philadelphia, second from right, and
other rabhis during a pre-holiday risit to the White House. (APIWide World Photo.)
International Workshops
At Ben-Gurion U.
A five day workshop on
amino acids, held at Ben Gur-
ion University of the Negev,
was funded by the US-Israel
Binational Science Foundation
and the E.I. Du Pont de
Nemours and Company.
The workshop was conceived
and organized by Prof. David
Chipman and Dr. Ze'ev Barak
of Ben-Gurion and Dr. John
Schloss of Du Pont.
Participating in the discus-
sions on "Biosynthesis of
Branched-Chain Amino Acids"
were 66 scientists from the
U.S., Great Britain, France,
Denmark, Italy, Germany,
Switzerland, Japan and Israel.
The recent discovery of the
ability to delay the production
of branched-chain amino acids
in plants and repress their
growth, without causing dam-
age to man or other living
Reunion
Graduates of Brooklyn Jew-
ish Hospital School of Nursing
are asked to contact Estelle
Corman, 584-3042, if they are
interested in a reunion.
organisms, has led to the pro-
duction of groups of new her-
bicides (weedkillers) by such
American companies as Dow
Chemicals, Du Pont and Amer-
ican Cyanamid.
By-products of the research
also interests food, wine and
plastic industry representa-
tives.
Another international
conference drew 50 doctors
and students from Canada,
Holland, Sweden, the U.S.,
and Zambia, along with medi-
cal students from Beersheva
and Jerusalem.
The conference on health
education covered areas of the
school, education for the pre-
vention of risk factors in heart
and circulatory diseases, first-
aid in the community, legal
medicine, the relationships
between smoking and lung
cancer and Sex Education.
The university's health edu-
cation project modifies health
behavior patterns of youth to
advance the cause of prevent-
ive medicine.
The university was also
the site of the fifth Inter-
national Conference of the
Euro-Asia Management Stu-
dies Association. Organized by
the Humphrey Institute for
Social Ecology, the two day
conference focused on employ-
er/employee relations. Partici-
pants came from England,
Germany, Holland, Hungary,
Japan and Scandinavia.
B'nai B'rith Award To Floridian
B'nai B'rith International's
Colonel Elliott A. Niles Award
for the Community Volunteer
Services (CVS) Volunteer of
the Year has been awarded to
Dr. William Zenvener of Col-
ony Point Unit No. 5291 in
District 5.
Since 1959, B'nai B'rith has
honored the memory of the
late Col. Elliott A. Niles, foun-
der of the Service Committee
for Armed Forces and Veter-
ans (SCAFV). Niles Awards
are presented annually to the
one man and one woman who
have been judged to have per-
formed the most outstanding
personal volunteer service on
behalf of the program of the
B'nai B'rith Commission on
Community Volunteer Ser-
vices.
Dr. Zenvener, a retired
physician, is CVS Chairman of
both the B'nai B'rith South
Florida Council and Florida
State Association.
Landmark First
Sentencing
JERUSALEM For the first time since
the Arab uprising in the territories began a
year ago, a Jewish settler has been convic-
ted and sentenced in an Israeli court for
killing or injuring a Palestinian.
Ysiarel Zeev, 38, an American-born set-
tler, drew a five-year prison term for
killing an Arab shepherd who had brought
his sheep to graze on land near the settle-
ment of Shiloh last May 5. Judge Zvi Cohen
suspended two years of the sentence, and
credited Zeev with seven months already
served while awaiting the trial.
A second Arab shepherd, wounded in
Zeev's action, was awarded $18,600 in
damages.
\


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, December 16, 1988
Sqnaqoque uMetus
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
HALLANDALE JEWISH
CENTER
The Sabbath service Friday,
Dec. 16, will begin at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Carl Klein's sermon
topic will be "Are We Respon-
sible for Each Other."
On Saturday morning, Dec.
17, services start at 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi Klein's sermon topic is
"The Unity of Jacob's Fam-
ily."
On Friday, Dec. 23, choir
services begin at 8 p.m. The
Hallandale Jewish Center's
1989 officers and directors will
be installed. Rabbi Klein's ser-
mon topic will be "Common
Responsibility Within the
Family."
On Saturday morning, Dec.
24, Sabbath services begin at
8:45 a.m., Rabbi Klein's ser-
mon topic is "The Destiny of a
People."
Daily services are held at
8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. in the
Chapel.
The Hallandale Jewish Cen-
ter is located at 4146 N.E. 8
Ave., Hallandale. For informa-
tion: 454-9100.
TEMPLE BETH AHM
On Friday, Dec. 16, evening
services will begin at 8 p.m.
with Rabbi Avraham Kapnek
officiating and Cantor Eric
Lindenbaum chanting the Lit-
urgy.
Services Shabbat morning,
Dec. 17, begin at 8:45 a.m.
During services, the Bar Mitz-
vah of David Baum. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Baum will be
celebrated.
On Sunday. Dec. 18, Sister-
hood will have a Brunch and
Men's Club will have its meet-
ing at 9:30 a.m.
The Ways and Means com-
mittee will meet Tuesday, Dec.
20. 7:30 p.m.
Services Friday evening,
Dec. 23, start 8 p.m., with
Rabbi Kapnek officiating and
Cantor Lindenbaum chanting
the Liturgy.
Shabbat morning services,
Dec. 24, begin at 8:45 a.m.
During services, the Bat Mitz-
vah of Sharon Ann Mullen,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Larry Mullen, will be cele-
brated.
The Temple's executive
board will meet Wednesday,
Dec. 28, 7:30 p.m.
Daily minyan is at 8 a.m.
and, on Monday-Thursday, at
7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth Ahm is located
at 9730 Stirling Road, Cooper
City. For information: 431-
5100.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Services on Friday, Dec. 16,
will begin 6:15 p.m. in the main
sanctuary, conducted by Dr.
Morton Malavsky, rabbi, and
assisted by Cantor Irving Gold
chanting the liturgical por-
tions. Services will be followed
by a kosher Shabbat dinner for
which reservations are neces-
sary.
On Saturday, Dec. 17, ser-
vices start at 9 a.m., with Dr.
Malavsky officating and Can-
tor Gold chanting the liturgy.
Dr. Malavsky may be heard
on the radio show, "Timely
Topics," on station WQAM,
560 on am dial, every Sunday
morning.
On Tuesday, Dec. 20, 6:15
p.m., a "Food For Thought"
program will be held in the
reception area. The guest
speaker will be followed by a
buffet supper.
Temple Beth Shalom is
located at 1400 No. 46 Ave.,
Hollywood. For information:
981-6111.
TEMPLE BETH EL
On Friday, Dec. 16, 8 p.m.,
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe will hold
a special service in the Sanc-
tuary for the consecration of
new members. A wine and
cheese reception at 7 p.m. will
precede the services.
On Saturday. Dec. 17, Rabbi
Jaffe will conduct the Torah
Study at 10:15 a.m., followed
by Shabbat service at 11 a.m.
in the Chapel.
The flowers on the pulpit
will be sponsored by Dr. Edith
Kaufman in memory of her
daughter. Jelew Kreiger.
The Oneg Shabbat is being
sponsored by Sisterhood of
Temple Beth El in honor of
new members.
Temple Beth El is located at
1351 So. 14 Ave., Hollywood.
For information: 920-8225.
TEMPLE SINAI
The Shabbat service Friday
Violinist Rosand At Temple Sinai
Aaron Rosand, one of the
last exponents of the grand
tradition of Romantic virtuoso
violin playing, will be featured
in the second program of
Temple Sinai's Cultural Series
Sunday, Feb. 5, 5 p.m. at the
temple, 1201 Johnson Street,
Hollywood.
Rosand's program will
include works by Vitali, Char-
lier, Auer, Brahms, Saint-
Saens and Sarasate as well as
a group of Hebrew melodies by
Achron and Bloc.
The American-born Rosand
made his debut at the age of
ten with the Chicago Sym-
phony and has, since then,
collaborated with such conduc-
tors as Leonard Bernstein,
William Steinberg, Erich
Leinsdorf, Fritz Reiner and
Kyril Kondrashin. He has per-
formed on four continents and
in concerts with the N.Y. Phil-
harmonic, the National Sym-
phony in Washington D.C. and
the Concertgebouw Orchestra.
For ticket information:
920-1577.
College Night
The first annual regional
College Reunion Night, spon-
sored by the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations,
will be held Thursday, Dec. 29,
at Temple Kol Ami in Planta-
tion. The program will include
dinner, singing and socializing
to a disc jockey and more.
All regional college age
youths are invited. For infor-
mation: 583-1726 or 475-9966.
evening, Dec. 16, will begin at
8 p.m. in the Sanctuary. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis and Can-
tor Misha Alexandrovich will
officiate.
On Saturday morning, Dec.
17, the Shabbat service will
start at 9 a.m. in the Sanc-
tuary with Rabbi Margolis and
Cantor Alexandrovich.
On Saturdav evening, Dec.
17, die temple s Young Singles
(ages 20's and 30's) will host a
Chanukah dance and party
starting at 8 p.m.
On Sunday, Dec. 18, the Lei-
sure Institute of Temple Sinai
will continue its weekly pro-
grams. Guest speaker will be
the Honorable Miette Burn-
stein, Chief Judge of the 17th
Judicial Circuit Court, who will
discuss the Criminal Justice
System. The program begins
at 1:30 p.m. in the Lipman
Youth Wing.
Winter vacation for the Paul
B. Anton Religious School
begins Thursday, Dec. 22.
Classes resume Tuesday, Jan.
3, at 4:30 p.m.
Shabbat services Friday
evening, Dec. 23, will begin at
8 p.m. in the Sanctuary of
Temple Sinai with Rabbi Mar-
golis and Cantor Alexandrov-
ich officiating.
During the Shabbat service
Saturday, Dec. 24, which
begins at 9 a.m., the naming of
Arielle Leah Hesse, grand-
daughter of Murray and Rosa-
lyn Wapnish, will place. In
honor of the baby's naming,
Mr. and Mrs. Wapnish will
sponsor the Kiddush following
the Service.
The Bat Mitzvah of Wendy
Stein, daughter of Mrs. Bar-
bara Stein, will be celebrated
Saturday, Dec. 24, 5 p.m., in
the Louis Zinn Chapel.
On Tuesday, Jan. 3, at 6:30
p.m., the First Tuesday Dinner
Series of the Temple's adult
Jewish studies program will
continue with a Soviet Jewry
Update. Participating in the
program will be Cantor Misha
Alexandrovich, a native of the
USSR and Soviet Jewry activ-
ists, Dan Levenson and Elaine
Pittell. Advance dinner reser-
vations are required for the
series.
Temple Sinai is located at
1201 Johnson St., Hollywood.
For information: 920-1577.
DAVID BAUM
David Baum, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Baum, will be
called to the Torah at Temple
Beth Ahm as a Bar Mitzvah at
Saturday morning services,
Dec. 17.
A student at Pines Middle
School, David is a recipient of
a Presidential Academic Fit-
ness Award and has taken
third place in the Literary
Fair. His hobbies are the com-
puter, baseball card collecting
and swimming.
Special guests at the cele-
bration incljde Dorothy Vann
of North Miami Beach, Ida and
Jerry Harrison of North Miami
Beach, and the celebrant's
brother, Alan.
SHARON ANN MULLEN
Sharon Ann Mullen, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Larry
Mullen, will be called to the
Torah at Temple Beth Ahm as
a Bat Mitzvah at Saturday
morning services, Dec. 24.
Sharon is a student at Pio-
neer Middle School.
Special guests at the cele-
bration will include the
celebrant's grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Jerry Berkowitz of
Cooper City and Mr. and Mrs.
Larry Mullen of Hollywood;
great-grandmother Edith
Freed; and sister, Heather.
WENDY STEIN
Wendy Stein, daughter of Mrs.
Barbara Stein, will be called to
the Torah at Temple Sinai of
Hollywood as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday, Dec. 24, at 5 p.m.
A seventh grade honor stu-
dent at Las Cerros Middle
School, Wendy enjoys reading,
cross county bicycling, volley-
ball and track and is a member
of the Kadima Youth Group.
Singles' Calendar
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles, ages 20s and 30s, have
planned several events for
January.
On Saturday, Jan. 7, a "Sin-
gles Spectacular" dance and
party will begin at 8 p.m. at
the Rexmere Village Audito-
rium in Fort Lauderdale.
The admission is $7 and
there will be snacks, drinks,
prizes, and music by a disc
jockey.
A picnic and barbecue will
take place Sunday, Jan. 15, 11
a.m., at Pavilion No. 5 at T-Y
Park in Hollywood. Admission
is $5 and volleyball and other
activities are planned.
A dance and party will be
held at the temple, 1201 John-
son Street, Hollywood, Satur-
day, Jan. 21, 8 p.m. A disc
jockey will provide the music
and the $7 admission will
include one drink and snacks.
For information, call Young
Singles President Gary Rodin,
893-2465.
More than a half million dollars was pledged for State of Israel
Bonds at a recent event at the Hallandale Jewish Center. Present
were, from left. South Broward Israel Bond Campaign Chairman
David Sklar; Dr. Carl Klein, Rabbi at the Hallandale Jewish
Center, and community leader Dan Levenson, receiving the State
of Israel Bonds Gates of Jerusalem Medal. The reception honored
Levenson.
A communitywide cocktail receptum for the State of Israel Bonds Prime Minister's Club and
Ambassador's Society oj Trustees was held recently at the home of Dr. and Mrs Robert Better
Among those attending were, from left, David Sklar. general chairman of the South Broward
Israel Bond Campaign; Dr. Better; Zelig Chmitz, guest speaker and executive vice chairman of the
A merxcan sectxon of the World Zionist Organization; Rabbi Dr. Ca rl Klein, spiritual leader of the
Hallandale Jewish Center, who presented the antique Israeli mezzuzah to Dr. Better; Helen Klein;
and community leader Dan Levxnson. Not shown is hostess Perla Better


Friday, December 16, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
Technion Students
Tutor Disadvantaged
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology sponsors an after-
school academic outreach pro-
ject in poor communities in
northern Israel.
Started in 1983, the Pro-
gram for the Advancement of
Technological Manpower
brings outstanding Technion
students and poor high school
students together to remedy a
growing deterioration in the
quality of high school science
and technology courses, par-
ticularly in those areas where
scanty funds have led to an
acute shortage of teachers and
equipment.
"Four years ago we realized
that there was a significant
decrease in the number of stu-
dents entering Technion from
poor regions, mainly from fam-
ilies of Sephardic and Druze
origin," says Professor Gad
Eilam, dean of students and
head of the program.
Eilan explains Technion felt
a responsibility to reverse this
loss of potential by bringing
these students up to a level
where they could compete with
more affluent youths and gain
entrance to the university.
The project was launched at
a high school in Kiryat Ata, an
industrial town ten miles
northeast of Haifa. Ninety-
eight Technion students were
selected to tutor 250 students
in mathematics and physics.
The following year, the pro-
gram was expanded and today
160 tutors teach 600 students
from nine institutions in math,
physics, computer science and
courses to enrich understand-
ing of science and technology.
Each tutor works with three
to six students in a three-hour
weekly session, and each tutor-
ial is visited by specialists in
holography, lasers, radio,
astrophysics and polymers.
Mini-courses are also offered
by special tutors in computer
software, hardware and other
subjects.
Technion tutors are selected
among outstanding students in
their second year of study or
higher. The position carries a
$1,000 annual scholarship.
Armed Forces News
Army Private Matthew S.
Sigel, son of Myrna Greenberg
of Sunrise, and Joel Sigel of
North Miami Beach, is now
serving in South Korea as an
indirect-fire infantryman with
the Second Infantry Division.
Volunteers
Reunion
A reunion of Volunteers for
Israel will be held Sunday,
Dec. 18,2-6 p.m., at the Jewish
Community Center, Soref
Hall, Sunrise.
Israel Kerem, a former offi-
cer in the Israeli Defense
Forces and sales manager of
El Al, will speak on current
conditions in Israel. The Jew-
ish Festival Choral group will
entertain.
BBYO Volunteer
Advisors Sought
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization, which has 20
chapters in Florida's "Gold
Coast" region is seeking vol-
unteer advisors for local high
school age groups.
Volunteers must be at least
21 years old, committed to
Judaism and Jewish life, enjoy
working with young people,
and be willing to work under
close supervision and partici-
pate in ongoing training.
Local chapters, which reach
out to almost 700 Jewish
teens, are curently in the Palm
Beach Gardens, Boca Raton,
Coral Springs, Plantation,
Hollywood, Pembroke Pines
and North Miami Beach areas.
The girls' component is BBG
(B'nai B'rith Girls); the boys,
AZA (Aleph Zadik Aleph).
For information: 581-0218.
Free Federal Consumer
Information (.at a log-
Dcpl DF. I'urhio. ( olor.Klo H1IXW
Professor David Gutman, right, dean of the faculty of medicine at Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology has been elected a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in London, an honor granted
to few foreigners. Also elected as a Fellow at the same time was Princess Diana, seated at left-
Professor Gutman is vice president of the International Society of Maxillo-Facial Surgeons and
the author of some 100 scientific publications. A graduate of the Faculty of Medicine at the
Sorbonne, his research interests include salivary biochemistry and bone replacement with
bioceramics.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, December 16, 1988
Delayniks Dilemma
Action by American immigration offi-
cials challenging the refugee status of
hundreds of Soviet Jewish emigrees can-
not be condemned out of hand, no matter
how disturbing the challenges now going
on in Rome.
The 179 Jews who have been denied
refugee visas, and some 300 other "delay-
niks" awaiting decisions by U.S. authorit-
ies, originally applied for and were granted
exit visas for Israel.
Two points are thus emphasized. First,
the State of Israel continues its essential,
ongoing role as a guaranteed refugee for
any Jew in the world, other than rare
exceptions for those proven guilty of seri-
ous crimes.
Second, the role of American Jewry in
encouraging Soviet Jews to settle in the
United States remains open to question.
Last year, $14 million was spent in this
country resettling Soviet emigres. This
year, the figure may reach $66 million with
Jews now leaving the USSR at a rate of
1,500 a month.
Saying all that, however, does not mean
that we should permit American authorit-
ies to say or imply that the persecution of
Jews in the Soviet Union is no longer a
serious problem.
It was the outcry of American and world
Jewry which opened up the gates for the
"Jews of Silence" to begin leaving the
Soviet Union more than a decade ago. We
should not and cannot let the promise of
glasnost be used to close the doors to
refugees from the Soviet Union, be they
Jewish, Armenian or any other nationality.
The frightening new development does
emphasize a need to re-examine the Israeli
position, supported strongly by the Zionist
Movement, that a primary responsibility is
to see that freed Soviet Jews go to the
Jewish State, the land for which they
requested emigration.
Viewpoint
Alternative Traditions
In a free society, all persons strive for
maximizing their rights. In a controlled
environment, that striving is often sty-
mied. And in a less-free culture, all such
attempts are thwarted.
It is therefore an exercise in paradox,
that in the one democratic state in the
whole of the Middle East, one entire group
of people is roadblocked on its way to full
freedom.
Last week, as Jewish feminists convened
in Israel, there were demonstrations at the
Western Wall. As women prayed on
their side of the partitioned wall rabbis
assailed them.
Garbed in the symbols of the faith
normally ascribed as religious mens' wear,
women read from the Torah at the Kotel.
Such was the response that the rabbi
responsible for the Wall compared "a
woman carrying a Torah is like a pig at the
Wailing Wall."
On Nov. 11, the Jewish Floridian fea-
tured a growing trend in a piece entitled
"Discounting the All-Male Minyan and
Counting the Other Half." Pragmatism,
reassessing roles and a penchant for equal-
ity dictates that many rituals frozen in
time and practice are slowly being re-
examined.
True, the Orthodox standards have pro-
tected and defended the sanctity and
stability of Judaism for generations. Tradi-
tionalists have withstood assaults on what
they see as a religious vanguard for the
ages. And, their timeless values have
helped the people Israel remain one.
Whether or not all restrictions are
removed or modified should be the focus of
study and respectful consideration. Absent
should be the knee-jerk and gut reaction
that finds its expression in history and
invective.
To George Shultz's Credit
While he may not share as prominent a
role vis-a-vis Israel as the late Harry S.
Truman, Secretary of State George Shultz
has set an ex post facto standard unsur-
passed by any of his predecessors.
In the most recent confrontation with
world opinion, Shultz stood firm and uns-
wayed in his determination to deny PLO
Chairman Yasir Arafat a visa in order to
address the UN on the Palestine question.
While the decision has proved unpopu-
lar, Shultz backed by President Reagan
has stood firm and delivered an unequi-
vocal message that the United States will
not be cowed by convention.
Youth Fellowships Program
The Edgar M. Bronfman Youth Fellowships in Israel a
program that will send 25 outstanding high-school students
to Israel for five weeks next summer to learn about the
land and its people is now accepting applications for
1989. The Fellowships, a program of the Samuel Bronfman
Foundation, cover travel, room and board and incidentals,
and are awarded solely on the basis of merit.
High school students in the United States and Canada
who will be seniors next fall (September 1989) may obtain
application forms and information by writing or calling the
Edgar M. Bronfman Youth Fellowships in Israel, 375 Park
Avenue, New York, NY 10152; telephone (212) 766-1526,
or (518) 465-6575.
The Jewish
FJoHMah
of South Broward
FndSktkrt
Published Bl-Weekly
FRED SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
1 xacutiva Editor
JOAN C TEGLAS, DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING 1 373-48US COLLECT
Main Olflca < Plant 120 N.E. 6lh Si. Miami. Fla. 33132 Phone 1-373-4BOS
Mr>ber JTA. Sevea Arti. WN8. NEA. AJPA. i FPA.
Friday, December 16,1988
Volume 18
8 TEVET 5749
Number 26
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Friday, December 16, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
Extremism of All Stripes
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
If you read the fine print of
the Palestine National Coun-
cil's political resolution and
take a fresh look at UN Secur-
ity Council Resolution 242, you
will understand why Washing-
ton has put the proposal on
hold, even though a number of
European nations appear to
move toward recognition of
the Palestinian state.
Resolution 242 was adopted
Nov. 22, 1967. On May 15 of
that year, Nasser's Egyptian
forces moved into Sinai.
Two days later, Cairo's
"Voice of the Arabs" radio
program announced that all
Egypt was "prepared to
plunge into total war which
will put an end to Israel."
Thus warned, Israel did
what any concerned nation
would do: It fought the Six-
Day War against a nation that
had telegraphed its bellicose
intentions.
Now comes the Palestine
National Council, scolding
Israel for seizing the land of
others by military invasion
while conveniently glossing
over Arab attempts to crush
Israel in 1948, and telling the
world that Resolution 242 call-
ed on Israel to yield all the
territories it has occupied
since 1967.
Cool heads among statesmen
drafting Resolution 242 frus-
trated Arab and Soviet deter-
mination to achieve the goal
Yasir Arafat and his hench-
man now claim was achieved.
In effect, both the Reagan
administration and President-
elect George Bush have made
it clear that the kind of unilat-
eral activity the Palestine
National Council has now
undertaken is not acceptable.
And since Arafat is now pos-
ing as a non-believer in the use
of what he terms "force," it is
interesting to note the Pales-
tine National Council's pledge
of solidarity with the Lebanese
Islamic Nationalist Forces.
As the world waits for
further developments and
prayers continue in hopes of a
genuine not an ersatz
Middle East peace, related
concerns call out for examina-
tion here.
Foremost is anxiety raised in
some quarters over the influ-
ence gained by Israel's religi-
ous right in the recent elec-
tion.
Exasperated by Reform and
Conservative Jewish leader-
ship's demands that Israel's
Labor Party and Likud reject
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any efforts by Orthodox par-
ties to impose exclusively
Orthodox standards and guide-
lines on all Israelis, Rabbi Max
Schreier, president of the Rab-
binical Council of America, has
called on American Jewish
organizations to cool it.
The American Orthodox
leader beholds "an avalanche
of unbelievable hatred and hys-
teria directed against the
Orthodox units in Israel."
America's newspapers and
radio stations catch blame for
picturing Orthodox Jews as
"Khomeinis, fascists, crazies
and medievalists."
Actually, Orthodox religious
parties want Israel's mass
transit to come to a halt on the
Sabbath; they're demanding
that abortions and autopsies
be outlawed; and they insist
that automatic citizenship be
denied to all converts to
Judaism save those performed
by Orthodox authorities.
All this adds up to a call for
every citizen of Israel to real-
ize they are to live in a theocra-
tic state.
Even though Schreier ex-
pressed the hope that Israel's
religious parties would be
moderate in their demands,
indignation in Conservative,
Reform and unaffiliated ranks
is bound to intensify.
It seems likely at this writ-
ing that traditional American
Jewish political support for
Israel will weaken and the flow
of economic support diminish.
There is still another per-
plexing concern, especially for
residents of Massachusetts
with some aspects of the 1988
Presidential campaign fresh in
their minds.
It has to do with Bush's
selection of New Hampshire
Gov. John Sununu as White
House chief of staff. In oppos-
ing the candidacy of Michael
Dukakis, both men trashed the
Bay State and belittled
Dukakis time after time.
Bush's use of such terms as
Harvard boutique, his unend-
ing effort to raise doubts about
Dukakis' patriotism and the
energy he expended blaming
Dukakis for the wretched con-
dition of Boston Harbor when
he knew most of the fault lay
in Washington all angered
Dukakis supporters.
Sununu's obvious jealousy of
Dukakis' ability to be singled
out as the most effective
governor among America's 50
so rankled him that he gave
high priority to denigrating
Dukakis.
Sununu is the mightiest
right-winger in a state with a
large share of cantankerous
citizens. Meldrim Thompson,
New Hampshire's governor in
the 1970s, put Henry Kissin-
ger on his select list of people
he considered no longer Amer-
ican.
Thompson accused Presi-
dent Carter of leading the
nation beside the communist
path to national suicide. He
lifted his glass to the doctrine
of white supremacy. He
sneered at Maine's Sen.
Edmund Muskie, citing his
Polish ancestry.
And it was Thompson who
put the capital flag at half staff
on Good Friday.
As most campaign watchers
know by now, Sununu is the
son of a Lebanese-American
who has close ties to a number
of Arab-American groups.
These groups look to this
man, now guarding the door
outside the Oval Office, to help
weaken Washington's tradi-
tion support for the only
democracy in the Middle East,
an ally in armed might.
So when the governors of 49
states signed a document
decrying the 1975 UN resolu-
tion equating Zionism with
racism, Sununu was the odd
man out. Formalizing views on
foreign political issues, Sun-
unu reasoned, was outside a
governor's range of obliga-
tions.
No? Then why did Sununu
sign a proclamation dealing
with the blooody war in Afgha-
nistan?
Now cast your eye on the
future: Saudi Arabia is
expected to try to buy several
billion dollars' worth of fine
American weapons.
Remember the battle that
raged over the 1981 sale of.
AW ACS surveillance planes to
Saudi Arabia? Arab potentates
were sitting in the U.S. Senate
salivating over their victory.
How will the Sununu-Bush
combine prove, as they claim,
that they have hearts full of
love for Israel?
Librarians Establish Scholarship
The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) will award an
annual $500 scholarship to an individul planning a career as
a librarian of Judaica. The award is intended to encourage
graduate studies in Library science by those with back-
grounds in Judaica.
Prospective applicants should request an application
from Sharona R. Wachs, chair of the Scholarship Commit-
tee, 1000 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12203. Deadline
for submission of application and supporting credentials is
Feb. 28, 1989.
The
beauty
unfolds
At Hamilton House, we know that
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that it must continually unfold in a
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more and more of its qualities the
closer you inspect it.. the longer you
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living communityHamilton House in
Plantationto set new standards for
excellence and exceed the most
demanding expectations.
Each spacious floorplan includes its
own washer and dryer, separate dressing
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walk-in closets. All plans have lovely
views and a screened balcony or patio.
Some also feature bay windows.
Each private residence is tied into
the 24-hour medical emergency
network, and has around-the-clock
security. Should the need arise,
assisted living is also available
Every resident enjoys meals
prepared by our nationally recognized,
award-winning chef served in the
gracious setting of the Hamilton House
dining room.
At Hamilton House, you also receive a
written guarantee that your rent will
never increase more than one-half of the Consumer Price Index
each year.
If you're interested in a full-service senior living community that
surrounds you with comfort, security and caring friends, please
come and see for yourself how the beauty unfolds at Hamilton House.
Our Information Center at 8500 West Sunrise Boulevard in
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appointment. Visit us today!
A New Standard for Senior Living
A
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8500 West Sunrise Boulevard, Plantation, Florida 33322 (305) 476-8500


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, December 16, 1988
David Posnack JCC News
U.S. Jews Aid Quake Victims

The David Posnack Jewish
Community Center, located at
5850 South Pine Island Road
(two blocks west of University
Drive on Stirling Road) Davie,
is providing the following pro-
grams:
Senior Stretch and Flex.
An ongoing exercise program
geared for people 55 and over,
this meets three times a week
Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, 9:15-10:15 a.m. in
the gym. Members are free;
non-members, $15 per week.
"News and Views A
Jewish Opinion." This discus-
sion group meets Wednesdays,
10:30-11:30 a.m., through Jan.
4. Topics range from A to Z
(Anti-Semitism to Zionism).
Members are free; non-
members, $5 per session.
A Support Group for
Widow and Widowers. Group
participants, age 55 and over,
meet Mondays, 10-11:30 a.m.,
through Jan. 16. (There will
not be any meetings Mon.,
Dec. 26, or Mon., Jan. 2.)
Members are free; non-
members, $5 per session.
The Senior Shalom Club,
open to anyone 55 and over,
meets Thursdays, 10 a.m.-
noon. Social and educational
programs are planned. Mem-
bers are free; non-members;
$3. On Dec. 15, Lenora Jaffe
will speak on "Changes in
Medicare Coverage A Dis-
cussion of the New Catastro-
phic Coverage and Private
Health Insurance. On Dec. 22,
a program on "Jewish Music
Listening and Discussion" will
be given by Dr. Max Bree.
For information about JCC
programs, call 434-0499.
A Day Trip to see "Dream-
girls" at Burt Reynolds'
Jupiter Theater is planned for
Wednesday, Dec. 21. The bus
will depart from the JCC at
9:30 a.m. and return about 6
p.m.
The fees of $40 for members
Courses In
Basic Judaism
The Southeast Region of the
Rabbinical Assembly will offer
a series of classes in Basic
Judaism beginning January 9.
The classes are specifically
geared towards those inter-
ested in converting to Judaism
and will explore Jewish history
and practice as well as holy
day and life cycle observances.
The course will meet for 15
Tuesdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m., at
the Jewish Federation Build-
ing of Greater Miami.
The Rabbinical Assembly is
the international rabbinical
association of the Conserva-
tive movement.
For information, contact
Rabbi Edwin Farber. 382-
3668.
Book and
Cake Fair
The Friends of the Sunrise
Library will hold a book and
cake fair and gift idea display-
Tuesday, Dec. 20, noon to 7
p.m., at the Sunrise Branch of
the Broward County Library
System, 6600 Sunset Strip,
Sunrise.
For information: 742-8585.
and $45 for non-members
includes transportation, lunch,
gratuity, and show ticket.
YOUTH ACTIVITIES
A WINTER MINI CAMP
for children in kindergarten
through sixth grade offers a
camp-like day, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
during school vacations. Pro-
grams vary with trips, sports,
arts and crafts, outdoor play,
group games, and special
interest programs. Children
are grouped by age with
mature counselor supervision.
Youngsters bring lunch, and
JCC provides a beverage and
snack.
Extended care is offered
from 8-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m.
The cost of the mini-camp is
$13.50 for members and
$17.50 for non-members, with
a discount in the second child
of members only. A minimum
four days registration is neces-
sary.
Programs planned include
ice skating on Dec. 21, bowling
on Dec. 22, movies on Dec. 23;
rollerskating on Dec. 26;
power hit on Dec. 27, Metro
Zoo on Dec. 28, movies on Dec.
29, super putt on Dec. 30 and
Chocolate Lady on Jan 2.
Teen Connection, for sixth,
seventh and eighth graders, is
for BBYO members. Partici-
pants receive a special mem-
bership pin and card, the
BBYO newspaper, and the
opportunity to take part in
inter-community events as
well as regularly scheduled
group activities. Yearly due's
are $15 for members of JCC;
and $30 for non-members.
For informaton: 434-0499.
NEW YORK (JTA) In
response to the devastating
earthquake that rocked Soviet
Armenia, B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional has pledged to donate
$2,500 in emergency relief
funds for the victims.
A check was to be presented
to Minister-Counselor Oleg
Derkofsky of the Soviet
Embassy in Washington.
The quake, which is esti-
mated to have killed tens of
thousands of people, curtailed
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorba-
chev's visit to New York. He
returned to Moscow to assess
the "serious destruction" .to
the mountainous section of
western Armenia, where the
republic's second-largest city,
Leninakan, is situated.
Refuseniks in Moscow and
Leningrad have also reacted
with sympathy to the victims
of the disaster by calling off a
hunger strike planned for
Human Rights Day, according
to the Long Island Committee
for Soviet Jewry.
The refuseniks issued a joint
statement saying, "In memory
of the Armenian victims of the
earthquake, we have decided
to cancel our planned hunger
strike on Dec. 10, and, in deep
sorrow and regret, we offer
our assistance."
U
,H
LOCATED IN THE BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS.
C0LEMAN
w
Kr WH.i.n.1 ^p
1989 REGISTRATION HAS BEGUN
7-15 Years of Age
WATERFRONT ATHLETICS
Swimming Football
Canoeing Softball
Sailing Soccer
Windsurfing Raquetball
White-Water Rafting Basketball
Tubing Karate
Fishing Track & Field
Lifesaving Tennis
Archery
Bodybuilding
Wrestling
PLUS
Hiking
Overnight Camping
Special Trips
Jewish Education
THE ARTS
Arts & Crafts
Drama
Photography
Creative Visual
Israeli Dance
Modern dance
Aerobics
Jazz Dance
FUN, SPORTS, CREATIVE &
PERFORMING ARTS IN A
JEWISH COMMUNITY!
IT'S A GREAT SUMMER
EXPERIENCE FOR CHILDREN
OF ALL AGES
Session I June 19 to July 17 Session II July 18 to August 14
8 Weeks June 19 to August 14
For additional information, in Atlanta 404-897-1462
please call: In Miami 305-592-4792
There will be a SPECIAL CAMP COLEMAN FAMIL YSHABBATSERVICE at 7:30 PM at Temple Beth
Am in Miami on Friday, January 6. EVERYONE is invited to worship with us on this special evening.
The service is being written by previous years' oampers and staff members of Camp Coleman and
service participants will include previous & current Campers/Staff. A special Shabbat dinner will
precede the service at a cost of $10.00, per person, at 6 PM, as well as a special Oneg at the end.
Please call the above Miami number for dinner reservaitons.
The warmth of tradition.
Shabbos dinner and Maxwell House Coffee.
It's a special time of the week when families
gather, traditions are renewed and there's
plenty of time to relax and enjoy the rich,
delicious taste of Maxwell House' Coffee
CEMTIFIEO KOSHER

Maxwell House Coffee. Always... Good to the Last Drop:

... ~,...


Labor-Likud Resume Unity Talks
By DAVID LANDAU
and HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Labor Party's Central Com-
mittee voted decisively to
resume negotiations with
Likud for a broad-based coali-
tion government.
Likud, still bogged down in
talks with the ultra-Orthodox
and far right-wing parties, was
unable to present Labor with
the fait accompli of a narrow
governing majority, as Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir had
hoped to do before the Central
Committee voted.
Israel Radio announced the
secret vote was 690-390 in
favor of an alliance with Likud,
as urged by party leader Shi-
mon Peres and almost all other
Laborites of ministerial rank.
Israel Television shortly
afterward said the vote was
638-349. By either count, it
was evident that many of the
Central Committee's 1,300-
plus members did not cast bal-
lots.
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IT 1-800-228-9898, or
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See for yourself
see Israel.
But simmering discontent
with the party's leadership,
widely blamed for its weaker-
than-anticipated showing in
the Nov. 1 Knesset elections,
did not surface at the Central
Committee session, contrary
to the predictions of some
observers.
The committee was con-
vened in response to a dra-
matic plea by President Chaim
Herzog for the two major par-
ties to get together and form a
broad, stable government for
the good of the country.
Its decision reversed that of
the party's 120-member lead-
ership bureau, which defied
Peres by rejecting a new
approach to Likud in an upset
vote here.
In favor were Peres, who is
foreign minister in the outgo-
ing Labor-Likud unity govern-
ment, Defense Minister Yitz-
hak Rabin and Education Min-
ister Yitzhak Navon, a former
president of Israel. Opposing it
were Labor Party Secretary-
General Uzi Baram; Yitzhak
Ben-Aharon, the 83-year old
former secretary-general of
Histadrut; and Michael Bar-
Friday, December 16, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Orthodox Protest Exemptions
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Hundreds of Orthodox Jews who
have served in the armed forces demonstrated here against
widespread criticism of the exemptions from compulsory
military service given to yeshiva students.
The reserve officers and soldiers conducted a march to
the Prime Minister's Office to show that the Orthodox are
an integral part of the security forces.
Yeshiva students and other religious Jews, meanwhile,
have decided to volunteer for armed patrols to secure the
old Jewish cemetery on the Mount of Olives after dark.
There has been a rash of vandalism at the cemetery.
About 100 tombstones have been desecrated this year,
apparently by Arabs.
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Zohar, a Knesset member and
longtime critic of the present
party leadership.
Peres put his position as
chairman on the line in an
impassioned plea. "My head is
in your hands," he said. "Any-
one who wants to cut it off can
do so."
In Jerusalem, meanwhile,
Likud signed a coalition accord
with the far right-wing Tehiya
party. It pledged, among other
things, to build 40 new Jewish
settlements in the adminis-
tered territories over the next
four years.
But Peres and other Labor-
ites made clear that their deci-
sion to negotiate with Likud is
contingent on its reopening
the agreements it reached
with the religious parties and
keeping the three secular
right-wing parties Tehyia,
Tsomet and Moledet out of
the projected government.
"We will go with the Ortho-
dox, because we courted
them," Rabin declared. But
Labor would not be part of any
government committed to a
massive settlement plan.
ar
o.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, December 16, 1988
Soviets Remove
Secrecy Ban
No Extradition For Terrorist
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Officials in Moscow have
removed an important ob-
stacle to the immigration of
Soviet Jews.
Soviet officials informed a
large group of long-term
refuseniks, many of them well
known, that their purported
knowledge of "state secrets"
would no longer be used as
grounds for barring their
immigration.
As many as 120 refuseniks
may be affected by the move,
according to the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews and
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
News of the development
came amid reports that Jewish
emigration continued its
steady rise last month. The
National Conference reported
that 2,334 Jews were permit-
ted to emigrate in November,
179 of whom went to Israel.
Some 15,640 Jews have been
allowed to emigrate so far this
year, compared to 8,155 last
year and a mere 914 the year
before.
Knowledge of "state
secrets" has long been used by
Soviet authorities as a reason
for barring the emigration of
people who are presently or
were previously working in
jobs deemed to entail classified
work. The secrecy designation
is also applied to people who
have served in the military
forces.
Soviet government officials
have frequently said they were
working on resolving this hotly
contested issue, in conver-
sations with Jewish leaders
and activists, interviews with
Western journalists and
exchanges with members of
the American government.
Kosharovsky Affected
Soviet leaders have some-
times maintained that the
secrecy designation can be
applied no longer than 10
years after a person leaves a
job so classified. The reality is
that the status is often extend-
ed for far greater duration.
Lifting of the secrecy desig-
nation does not guarantee per-
mission to emigrate, but does
clear a sizeable obstacle in that
path.
SHAMIR Offices Opens in New York
"SHAMIR," the Association of Jewish Religious Scien-
tists and Professionals from the Soviet Union has opened
offices in New York City. The goal of this organization is to
"ensure the survival of Soviet Jews as Jews within the
Soviet Union, in Israel and in the Diaspora.
Established in 1972 by Professor Herman Branover,
professor and innovator in the field of magneto-hydro
dynamics and the first Jewish doctor of science and full
professor allowed to leave the USSR, "SHAMIR" set out
to create Jewish awareness within the Soviet Union
through the promotion of Jewish education.
By JEAN COHEN
ATHENS (JTA) The
Greek government is refusing
to extradite a Palestinian ter-
rorist believed responsible for
the October 1982 machine gun
and grenade attack on the
main synagogue in Rome,
which left a child dead and 35
worshipers wounded.
Justice Minister Vaso Rotis
announced that Osama al-
Zomar, a member of the Abu
Nidal terrorist group, will not
be handed over to the Italian
authorities for trial.
His decision flies in the face
of a Greek Supreme Court
ruling in October 1984, upheld
in March 1985 by then Justice
Minister George Mangakis,
that Zomar be extradited.
Rotis' only explanation was
that "he is a Palestinian fight-
ing for his freedom."
The Greek government has
gone to great lengths to avoid
extraditing Zomar since he
was arrested on the Greco-
Turkish border in November
1982 trying to smuggle 130
pounds of explosives into
Greece.
He was sentenced to 20
months in prison, but freed
after 19 months for good
behavior.
While he was in custody, the
Italian authorities filed a for-
mal request for extradition.
Instead of complying, the
Athens government referred
the matter to the courts.
An appeals court decided in
favor of extradition. It was
upheld by a 5-0 decision of the
Supreme Court and confirmed
by the justice minister.
The extradition papers were
signed by Mangakis in March
SHE NEEDS
YOUR HELP
Put your donations
to good use.
Help hundreds of frail indigent
elderly like her by donating to
I
ouglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
Thrift Shops
Proceeds used for medicine and supplies for
the elderly of your community
TO HELP THEM, WE NEED YOUR HELP
Furniture Clothing Household goods Appliances
Dade: 625-0620 Broward: 981-8245
Call for free pick-up of your fully tax-deductible donations
or visit our two convenient locations:
Miami
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue
Hallandale
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
is a division ol the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens
a not-for-profit organization
serving the elderly of South Florida for 43 years
1985. Three days later, he
announced that extradition
was postponed because Zomar
was under investigation for a
terrorist act in Greece. He was
accused of planning an attack
on a Jordanian airliner at
Athens airport.
The government did not
explain how he could have
been involved, since Zomar
was in jail at the time and was
not allowed visitors.
Indeed, a grand jury subse-
quently refused to indict him.
By then it was March 1986.
With the extradition order yet
to be carried out, the govern-
ment had Zomar re-arrested.
He was charged this time with
carrying an illegal weapon in
jail, resisting a guard and plan-
ning to escape.
He was sentenced to two
years and was due to be
released, after serving 20
months.
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Please Save the Date
On Sunday, April 2, 1989
THE ALBERT EINSTEIN
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
of Yeshiva University
will honor
NORMAN BRAMAN
prominent business
and community leader
at a dinner-dance
at the Castle Hotel
in Miami Beach
Sidney L. Olson, Chairperson
Florida Friends of the
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Harry Gampel, Chairperson
South Florida Region, Yeshiva University
For information and reservations:
sE
(305) 538-5558


Friday, December 16, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 9
Area Deaths-
GOLDMAN
Sylvia, a Hollywood resident, died
Dec. 1. She is survived by her husband,
Harry; children, Dr. Donald (Ardele)
Goldman and Marilyn Childress;
brothers, William Sentner, Rob Sent-
ner; sisters, Rose Franklin and Fay
Nadel, both of No. Miami Beach, and
Selma Tannenbaum; and five grand-
children and one great-grandchild.
Mrs. Goldman was the organizer and
fund raising chairperson of the River-
dale Cancer Care chapter. Services
were held at Levitt Weinstein, with
interment at Beth David Memorial
Gardens.
SIEGEL
Bill, of Pembroke Pines, was the hus-
band of Lenore; the father of Ellen
(Ted) Bayer; the son of Bertha and the
late Jacob; the brother of Ethel (Peter)
Miller; and the grandfather of Joanne
and Shari. Funeral services were held
at Menorah Chapels.
PERLROTH
Lillian, a resident of Hollywood, died
Sunday, Dec. 4, at the age of 75. She
was the mother of Rennay Zemon of
No. Miami Beach and Joyce Rothstein
of Hollywood; the sister of Seymour
Tull of Floral Park, NY, and Anita
Goldstein of Sunrise; and the grand-
mother of Gayle, Michael, Stacey and
Jennifer. Funeral services were held
at Levitt-Weinstein, with interment at
Mount Nebo Cemetery.
WARREN
Samuel, a resident of Hallandale, was
the father of Richard (Joan) Warren
and Joan (Edward) Mahler; grand-
father of Debi and Kim Mahler and
Alyson and Mandy Warren; and
brother of Gloria (Larry) Katz and
Jean (David) Schechet. Funeral ser-
vices were held at Menorah Chapels.
BRAND
Anna, a resident of Hollywood, died
Wednesday, Dec. 7, at the age of 96.
She was the mother of Betty (Melvin)
Borstein of North Miami Beach and
Irwin (Alice) Brand of Margate.
Graveside services were held at Mt.
Nebo-Kendall Memorial Gardens, with
arrangements handled by Levitt-
Weinstein.
SHAPIRO
Leo a 17-year resident of Hallandale,
died Tuesday, Dec. 6, at the age of 96.
He is survived by his wife, Miriam;
son, David; daughter-in-law, Kay;
grandchildren, Jeffrey Ellis, Stepha-
nie Renee and Gregory Brian of Pine
Bluff, Arkansas. Shapiro was a vet-
Lower.

lo long diKanc* caMt wrthm your caHmg ton*
eran of World War I and a 32nd
Degree Mason. Services were held at
Levitt-Weinstein, Hollywood.
SOLOMON
Ann R., a resident of Hallandale, died
of cancer Dec. 7, in San Francisco, at
the age of 84.
The widow of Allen Solomon, she is
survived by daughters, Ellen Rhoda
(Marshall) Siegel, and Lynne Levi;
grandchildren, Cindy, Lee, Rebecca,
Jacqueline and Rachel; and great-
grand-children, Zachary and Kim-
berly; sisters Elizabeth (Sidney) Fein-
berg, Rose Levin, Dorothy (David)
Glickson; and brothers, William, John
and Morris Hoffman. Services were
held in St. Paul, Minn.
STEINBERG
Lillian (nee Gelbaum), of Hallandale,
died on Dec. 11. She was formerly a
New Jersey resident.
Wife of the late Mark Steinberg, she
is survived by her daughter Ellyn
Dennison, three grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren. Graveside
services were held in New Jersey.
Lecture Series
Temple Anshei Shalom is
sponsoring the Herzl Lecture
Series scheduled for Dec. 27
through March 28.
On Tuesday, Dec. 27, Drs. A.
and J. Liebman will present
"Hester St. To Hollywood."
The rest of the series con-
sists of "The Sephardic Differ-
ence," given by Joseph Elias
on Tuesday, Jan. 24; "From
the Melting Pot," Leo Stern,
Tuesday, Feb. 28; and "World
Jewry Looks at Israel," Jac-
ques Torczyner on Tuesday,
Mar. 28.
For information: 495-1300.
Free Federal Connumcr
Information Catalog.
I h-pi OF, Pueblo, Colorado 81009
A memorial to the Jewish children who perished in the Holocaust,
at Yad Vashem, Jerusalem. The effect is made by using candles
and mirrors which create an infinite number of points of light
signifying all the children lost in the Holocaust. WZPS photo.
&
GALA NEW YEAR WEEKEND
185
Any 5 Days
"Nights ZZ^C
Any 4 Days
& 3 Nights
145
pet person
double occ
Pius Tax & Tips INCLUDING MEALS
2 Delicious Meals Daily and 3 Meals on the Sabbath Spectacular
New Year s Party. Featuring a Star Studded Show Full Program ol Daily
Activities and Nightly Entertainment Heated Pool Live Orchestra
Complimentary Tea Room Free Chaise Lounges Free Parking
m
Miami Beach's Most Luxurious
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Your Host
THE
BERKOWITZ
FAMILY
On Tne Ocean at 32nd St., Miami Beach
Phone: 1-538-6811
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Deauville
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5749
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ON THE OCEAN AT 67th STREET MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
On Miami Batch's
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ana OevPrtmlsos
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Entertainment A
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STRICTLY GLATT KOSHER
Religious A Cultural Programs Conducted
SEDUR1M 4 SERVICES
WIU BE CONDUCTED
BY CANTOR
ASHEP^ARF
at*
by Rabble Jerome) Herech Mstrfcowtti
State Funds To "Mosaic
For Information A Reservations Call I "531"3446
or Economy Travel 1-531-3447
or writs Passover 89 Oeauville P.O. Box 402868
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
A $50,000 check, issued by The
Florida State Legislature in
support of "Mosaic: Jewish
Life in Florida," was recently
presented by Florida's Secret-
ary of State Jim Smith to
University of Miami President
Edward T. Foote II.
"Mosaic: Jewish Life in Flor-
ida" is a traveling multi-media
exhibition of photographs,
artifacts, dioramas and oral
histories, designed to trace the
roots and achieements of the
Jewish community of the State
of Florida. The display pro-
vides a portrait of the accultur-
ation and ethnic distinctive-
ness that has characterized the
Jewish experience in Florida.
The exhibition will be deisp-
layed in various Florida cities
beginning in 1990 and running
through the Columbus Quin-
centenary Jubilee in 1992. A
preview of selected aspects as
already been exhibited in the
Senate Chambers of the Old
Capitol Building in Tallahassee
and in the rotunda of the Rus-
sell Senate Building in Wash-
ington, D.C.
Sponsored by the Judaic
Studies Program of the Univ-
ersity of Miami (UM), the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish educa-
tion in Miami, and the Soref
Jewish Community Center in
Fort Lauderdale, the project is
under the direction of Dr.
Henry Green of UM.
Night For Israel

Parker Tower and Avante
Garde condominiums will hold
a Night For Israel Wednesday,
Dec. 21, 7:30 p.m., at the Par-
ker Tower Social Hall, South
Ocean Drive, Hallandale.
Entertainment will provided
by humorist Larry Dorn.
Special guest will be Hallan-
dale Vice Mayor Art Canon
and refreshments will be
served.
The event is sponsored by
the Parker Tower and Avante
Garde Israel Bond Committee.
The chairman is Seymour
Fendell; Charles Sumin and
Sol Cohen are co-chairmen.
Yeshiva's Convocation
Walter H. Annenberg, former U.S. Ambassador to the
United Kingdon and a founding trustee and Benefactor of
the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM), and
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. C. Everett Koop will be
awarded honorary degrees at Yeshiva University's 64th
annual Chanukah Convocation and dinner Dec. 18 in New
York City.
FREE DESSERT
LUNCHEON
Wednesday January 4, 1989
1:30 p.m.
HILTON HOTEL
(A1A) S. Ocean Dr. & Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale
Topic:
How To Secure
A
High, Lifetime Income
Guest Speakers
Dr. Morton Malavsky Chairman
Steven B. Dolchin Tax Attorney
Carol L Sharp Trust Development Officer
Sponsored by
Sun Bank and United Charities
Please call for reservations Limited Seating
(Broward) 921-1921 (Dade) 949-1921


. \
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian v,f South Broward-HollywoodFriday, December 16, 1988
WOMEN FOR PEACE a gathering ofjewiwsh women
feminists who call for peace approached the Western Wall in
Jerusalem, where Francine Klagfbrun of New York, Ortho-
dox belief is blasphemy. Other women wore skullcaps and
prayer shawls traditionally worn only by Jewish men.
(APIWide World Photo.)
Feminists Harrassed At Western Wall
By CATHRINE GERSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
About 100 Diaspora Jewish
women, many of them Ameri-
cans, were called "pigs" and
otherwise harassed by reli-
gious extremists when they
held a prayer service at the
Western Wall in Jerusalem's
Old City.
The worshipers, who were
among 500 women from 25
countries attending the first
International Conference on
the Empowerment of Jewish
Women, were the targets of
insults and curses by ultra-
Orthodox men and women who
pray regularly at the holy site.
A Reform rabbi from
Toronto, Debra Brin, con-
ducted the service, which
marked the final day of the
conference.
As the feminists, many
wearing skullcaps and prayer-
shawls, prayed and read from
the Torah, black-garbed men
shouted and pounded on the
wooden barricades that sep-
arate male and female wor-
shipers at the Wall.
Said one pious Jew, "The
spectacle of a woman carrying
the Torah is as scandalous as
bringing pigs to the Kotel," as
the Western Wall is known in
Hebrew.
"In the name of God, I prot-
est," shouted another. "This is
a holy place for all of Israel and
they are defiling it."
An elderly Orthodox woman
pushed and shoved the foreign
women, screaming that they
were desecrating the Torah.
"Disgraceful," snorted
Rabbi Yehuda Getz, the func-
tionary in charge of the West-
ern Wall. He was referring to
the foreign women, not the
behavior of his ultra-Orthodox
colleagues.
He conceded to reporters
that the prayer session did not
itself violate halacha (religious
law). But the Wall "is a holy
place, not a place for demon-
strations," he said.
The targets of the attack
seemed to accept it with
equanimity. Helene Ferris, a
Reform rabbi from New York,
told reporters, "We came here
to pray. That's all."
But author Blu Greenberg,
also of New York, said it was
"unfortunate that something
like this turns their world
upside down. They should real-
ize that prayer isn't only for
men. It would be nice if they
could accept reality," said
Greenberg, who is Orthodox.
Neo-Nazis Recruiting the Swiss
GENEVA (JTA) A group of German neo-Nazis is
trying to recruit like-minded persons in Switzerland.
According to a Swiss radio report, their initial target is
Germans living in Switzerland. Letters have been sent to
hundreds, asking them to join the movement.
No Jamming
On Israel Radio
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Soviet Union has stopped jam-
ming radio broadcasts from
Israel.
Israel Radio confirmed these
facts in a telephone interview
with long-time refusenik Yuli
Kosharovsky, who has been
denied an exit visa since 1971
because he had knowledge of
"state secrets."
Kosharovsky was asked to
tune in his radio to the Israeli
broadcasting band. The Jeru-
salem broadcast was heard
loud and clear in the Soviet
capital, with no interference.
The Soviets also reportedly.
have ceased jamming broad-
casts from the United States
and Western Europe. British
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher was credited with
having influenced Soviet Pres-
ident Mikhail Gorbachev, with
whom she has good relations.
* H ? ? ? ?
Candlelighting
Dec. 16
Dec. 23
Dec. 30
Jan. 6
5:14 p.m.
5:17 p.m.
5:22 p.m.
5:27 p.m.
Benediction upon Kindling
the Sabbath Lights
BORUCH ATTO AD-ONAI
ELO-HEINU MELECH HO-
OLOM ASHER KID-
SHONU BEMITZ-VOSOV
VETZI-VONU LE-HAD-
LIK NEYR SHEL
SHABBOS.
Blessed art Thou, 0 Lord our
G-d, King of the universe who
hast sanctified us by thy com-
mandments and commanded
us to kindle the Sabbath light.
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Friday, December 16,1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11
From Rabat to Algiers
Peace or Piecemeal Territorial Gains
By ALON BEN-MEIR
Twenty-four years ago in
Rabat, Morocco, the Arab
League passed the celebrated
"three nos" resolution: no
peace, no recognition, no nego-
tiations with Israel.
Despite the ambiguities in
the declaration issued recently
in Algiers by the Palestine
National Council, it is widely
believed that the Palestine
Liberation Organization may
have finally come to the una-
voidable conclusion that the
only way to realize the national
aspirations of the Palestinian
people is to recognize Israel's
right to exist.
In that sense, the PLO has
indeed come a long way from
Rabat to Algiers.
Since the PLO's inception in
1964, political fragmentation
and ideological divisions have
prevented it from forming a
cohesive, unambiguous policy
toward Israel.
Unfortunately, that same
divisiveness and equivocation
was very much reflected in the
Algiers declaration.
The dissenting voices of Dr.
George Habash, head of the
Marxist-oriented Popular
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine, and Nayef Hawat-
meh, leader of the Democratic
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine, echoed throughout
the conference rooms.
Thus, even acceptance of
UN Security Council Resolu-
tion 242, which implicitly rec-
ognizes Israel's right to exist
and constitutes the corner-
stone for any future negotia-
tions, was made in the context
of a demand for an interna-
tional peace conference and
not on its own merits.
Yet, these ambiguities must
not overshadow the positive
step taken in Algiers. As Brit-
ish Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher told President Rea-
gan recently, "When people do
things we like, we should wel-
come them."
Her spokesman, Bernard
Ingham, describing the
Algiers move, added, "Here is
something she would argue to
build on.'?
PLO moderation must be
further encouraged. The mod-
erates' victory in Algiers over
the hardliners cannot be sus-
tained for long unless the PLO
An Alternative to
Who is a Jew
By RABBI MARK C. HORN
The "Who is a Jew?" contro-
versy is causing great division
amongst the Jewish people. I
wish to propose a solution.
Before I do, the circumstances
surrounding this issue should
be examined in a rational man-
ner.
To ammend the Law of
Return to identify as Jewish all
who are "born to a Jewish
mother or converted according
to Halacha" will not mean that
Jewish people who drive a car
on the Shabbat or who eat
un-kosher will not be able to
become citizens of the State of
Israel. Once a Jew always a
Jew; whether Conservative,
Reform or non-observant. The
only effect the amendment will
have will be related to Gentiles
who were not converted
according to the guidelines of
Jewish Law. These 'converts'
would not be able to apply for
citizenship if the amendment
were passed into law. Why is it
so important to the Orthodox
in Israel that these 'converts'
not become Israeli citizens?
Even if it is important, why
impose the view of the minor-
ity on a majority of Israelis
who do not want the law
changed? Furthermore, isn't it
unfair not to allow these 'con-
verts' to become Israeli citi-
zens?
As noted, the amendment is
not an attack on religious prac-
tice; its focus is on religious
identity. Contrary to popular
belief, a "Jew" is not a socio-
logical classification; it is an
inherent religious affiliation.
According to Jewish doctrine
such affiliation is achieved
maternally or by a 'conversion'
process as defined within the
Jewish legal code.
To those who respect Jewish
doctrine it is irrelevant what
sociological criteria the Knes-
set or non-Orthodox religious
bodies may legislate in defin-
ing a Jew. For 3,300 years
there was no problem in defin-
ing a Jew. Why create un-
necessary problems now?
The Israeli Jewish commun-
ity wishes to have a stable
society where all can inter-
relate without doubting Jewish
affinity. It is for this reason
that there is a move to adopt
the universally accepted hala-
chic standards defining Jewish
identity into Israeli law if
Israel will continue to issue
identity cards to immigrants
identifying them as Jews.
This important issue was a
major platform adopted by the
Orthodox religious parties in
the election. If we parallel
their political process to ours it
seems quite democratic that
the religious parties place the
"Who is a Jew" amendment as
a prerequisite to joining a gov-
ernment. They are merely rep-
resenting the interests of their
constituents. It is just like
minority delegates to a politi-
cal convention in our country.
We can see how they influence
the party heads to adopt into
the party platform resolutions
beneficial to the people they
represent.
Therefore, we should not
condemn the Israeli religious
parties for representing the
views of their constituents
with respect to Israelis bear-
ing a unified Jewish identity
within the Israeli Jewish com-
munity.
Aside from communal inter-
ests, we must also protect the
interest of a non-halachic con-
vert. He may come to reside in
Israel hoping to assimilate
among his fellow Jewish breth-
ren after being wrongly re-
assured of his identity by the
Israeli government issuing to
him a passport bearing a Jew-
receives some positive, albeit
cautious feedback, especially
from the United States.
However, as an aide to presi-
dent-elect Bush stated, "The
only way the U.S. can take
senously the PLO documents
is if it is followed by concrete
action."
The PLO should move to
translate the political agenda
adopted in Algiers into con-
crete action that includes:
The total cessation of ter-
rorist activities in and outside
the administered territories.
Encouraging the leaders of
the uprising in the West Bank
and Gaza to resort to political
demonstrations rather than
stone throwing, which precipi-
tates violence.
Opposing efforts by PLO
extremists bent on undermin-
ing reconciliation.
Moving from generalities
and ambiguities to explicit rec-
ognition of Israel's right to
exist.
Removing from the PLO
Charter any reference that
calls for the destruction of
Israel.
Moreover, Egypt, Jordan,
Iraq and Saudi Arabia, which
supported the Algiers declara-
tion, must put continuous pres-
sure on PLO Chairman Yasir
Arafat to stay the course of
moderation.
The paradox of Middle East
politics is that when one side
shows flexibility, the other
hardens its position.
The PLO has made what
may be judged a historic move
toward peace, while Israel is
about to form a new coalition
government that leans dis-
tinctly further to the right.
Even though the leadership
of both major parties, Likud
and Labor, rejected the
Algiers declaration, it must be
remembered that 58 percent of
Israel's electorate backed par-
ties that either favor oi would
consider giving up part of the
administered territories for
peace.
The Israelis, however, will
not respond in kind to the
PLO's overtures unless they
are absolutely convinced that
the Palestinians want peace
and not piecemeal territorial
gains.
It would be the ultimate folly
for the PLO or anyone else to
assume that the United States
can force Israel to make con-
cessions that Israelis consider
detrimental to their national
security.
The international political
climate is conducive to the
peaceful resolution of regional
conflicts; and both the Soviet
Union and the United States
can play pivotal roles in
advancing the course of peace
in the Middle East.
It took 24 years to change
the Rabat "three nos" to an
ambiguous "three yeses"in
Algiers. It would be tragic if
either Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir or Arafat con-
demns another generation of
young Israelis and Palestini-
ans to live with fear, mutual
hatred and bloodshed.
In the firiaT analysis, neither
Israelis nor Palestinians will
disappear from the map of the
Middle East. They are
destined to live together, side
by side. Only peaceful coexist-
ence under separate political
authority can make peace pos-
sible and lasting.
Dr. Alon Ben-Meir has recently com-
pleted hie fourth book on the Middle
East, "Israelis and Palestinians: Real-
ism and the Option for Peace."
AMERICAN JEWS MEET WITH ARAFAT. Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO)
leader Yasir Arafat, left, shakes hands with Rita Hauser, leader of a visiting, five-person
American Jewish delegation, as Swedish Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson looks on during a
dinner in Stockholm. (AP/Wide World Photo)
ish identification. The convert
will become traumatized by
the Israeli Jewish community's
inability to recognize him as a
Jew. We must be honest with
him and let him realize where
he stands relative to the people
around him.
There still remains a grave
injustice to be addressed.
A person who feels strongly
connected to Israel and could
contribute much to the country
will be denied the right to live
there because his religious
affiliation is not a Jewish one.
There is a viable solution to
this problem. A new amend-
ment should be introduced
which would provide that
aside from being Jewish
citizenship may also be
granted on the basis of an
individual's potential contri-
bution and dedication to the
State of Israel.
Such an enlightened provi-
sion will truly be heralded as
democratic and open-minded.
After all, why should one have
to be Jewish to live in Israel if
his heart is with the country?
It makes perfect sense. Rest
assured there are many-Gen-
tiles who are more worthy of
becoming Israeli citizens then
many Arabs currently enjoy-
ing that status today.
The Orthodox would be
happy because the government
would no longer issue invalid
identities to immigrants, but
would only classify them as
Israelis. The secularists would
be happy because Israel would
be obtaining citizens who
would be able to contribute to
Israel's vital resources. In this
manner the nationalism of
Israel would be preserved,
Jewish identity protected, and
the Jewish population could
peacefully coexist together as
one.
Rabbi Mark C. Horn, of Miami
Beach, is affiliated with the Landow
Yeshiva.
The prospect that recent
Israeli elections may result in a
coalition with the ultra-
Orthodox religious parties has
become the cause of concern
among most American Jews.
The right-wing Orthodox
groups, some of which have
been reluctant to recognize the
existence of the State of Israel
before the Messiah comes, are
now positioning themselves to
Political Leverage
impose their theocratic views
through the naked use of polit-
ical leverage.
The crucial deal they are
demanding is that the Law of
Return be amended in a way
that will deny the legitimacy of
Conservative and Reform
Jews as authentic Jews.
Clearly, the "Who Is a Jew;'
question is reviving the cleri-
calism versus anti-clericalism
struggle within Israel itself,
threatening the unity of that
fragile society.
Yasir Arafat and the Pales-
tine National Council met last
month and took a tough anti-
Israel line. If this blind strug-
gle mounted by Jews against
Jews continues, these political
parties may do more damage
to Israel's security than Arafat
has ever been able to manage.
RABBI MARK H. TANENBAUM




Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, December 16, 1988


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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollywoodFriday, December 2, 1988
Temples Can Join In Fundraising Cruise
Synagogue News
Temple Beth Ahm of Pem-
broke Pines is inviting all
South Florida temples to join
in a fundraising cruise aboard
the Discovery I Saturday
night, Dec. 24.
The temple, which has made
special arrangements with the
cruise line, is offering other
congregations an opportunity
to also schedule a fundraising
Baseball
In conjunction with Allard
Baird, former American
League hitting instructor and
current scout of the Kansas
City Royals, the JCC will hold
a one week, intensive baseball
school for youths, ages nine
through 15, from Monday,
Dec. 26 Friday, Dec. 30, 9
a.m. 2 p.m. daily.
Instructors will include
Area Deaths
FRIEDMAN
Ruth Salaway of Hollywood was a
former Boston resident and the sister
of Gertrude Salaway of Brook line,
Mass. Services and interment were in
Sharon, Mass.
EPSTEIN
Sylvia, of Davie, died Nov. 15, at the
age of 75. She is survived by her sons,
Neal (Adele) of Davie and Robert
(Nikki) of N.J.; her mother, Lena
Ku trier; and four grandchildren. Ser-
vices were at Levitt-Weinstein, fol-
lowed by interment at Beth David
Cemetery.
GSEENBERG
Joseph, a resident of Hallandale, died
Nov. 15 in North Miami Beach follow-
ing heart surgery. He was 70 years
old. Born in Brooklyn, Greenberg was
sales representative for many years
for U.S. Vitamin Co. in N.Y. After his
retirement in 1980, he moved to Flor-
ida, first to No. Miami Beach, later to
Hallandale. He is survived by a sister,
Flora M. Beckley of No. Miami Beach
and a nephew, Jeffrey B. Suasman.
Services were held at Riverside.
KARPF
Pauline, a resident of Hollywood, died
Nov. 15 at the age of 76. She is
survived by her husband, Nathan; son,
Ronald (Arlene) of Miami Lakes;
daughter, Gale (John) Auner of Hol-
lywood; sisters, Vera Vermont and
Sylvia Fletcher; four grandchildren,
Mitchell, Kathy, Debbie and Ricky;
and two great-grandchildren, Brian
and Melissa. Services were held at
Levitt-Weinstein, with interment at
Mount Sinai Cemetery.
LEFKOW1TZ
Morris, a resident of Hollywood, was
the husband of Sadie; the father of
Claire Workman and Irwin (Roseann)
Lefkowitz; and the brother of Lillian
Rothleder. He is also sur.ived by
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren. Services were held at
Menorah Chapels.
HAAS-SHERRY
Barbara, a resident of Davie, died
Nov. 20. She is survived by her sons,
Lee I. and Paul M. Sherry; a daughter,
Mildred Sue Rosales; and a sister,
Marilyn Schwartzman. Cryptside ser-
vices were conducted at Beth David
Memorial Gardens, Hollywood, under
the direction of Levitt-Weinstein.
MANN
Jeane K., a resident of Hallandale,
died Nov. 21. She is survived by her
daughters, Charlotte Shapiro of Hal-
landale, Dorothy (Herbert) Stem and
Rose Sokolove; eight grandchildren
and 10 great-grandchildren. Graveside
services were held at Menorah Gar-
dens, under the direction of Levitt-
Weinstein.
MANN
Betty, of Hallandale, died Friday,
Nov. 25. A former resident of Philadel-
phia, she and her husband, Joseph,
were the owners of Mann and Mann
Interiors, formerly of Philadelphia.
They established the Florida business
in the late 1950s. Mrs. Mann is also
survived by her children, Marilyn
(Edward) Hoffman, Arlene Myers and
Earl (Sally) Mann; her grandchildren,
Caren, Joan, Keith, Cathy, Kimberly,
Craig, Samuel and Jessica; and her
sisters, Rose Ballen, Eve Steckel and
Irene (Gene) Malkin. Funeral services
were held at Menorah Chapels.
REICHER
Mildred, a resident of Hollywood, died
Nov. 28 at the age of 88. She was a life
event.
A special 7:15 p.m. depar-
ture time has been set and a
late seating, dairy dinner buf-
fet added. The cruise will also
feature live entertainment,
dancing and a full casino.
Discovery I departs from
Port Everglades.
For information: 431-5100.
Camp
Stanley Tukes, a minor league
pitcher with the San Diego
Padres organization; Bill Dro-
han, minor league pitcher with
the Kansas City Royals; Brent
Reno, an Illinois college
pitcher, and Albert Gonzales
from the Broward Community
College team.
For further information
about any JCC program: 434-
0499.
member of Hadassah, the wife of the
late Sol and mother of the late Natalie
Sherman. She is survived by her son,
Stanley (Edith) Reicher; her grandchil-
dren Laurel, Joan and Linda; great-
grandchildren Shawn, Kara, Christi-
anna and Nicholas; sisters Gail, Jean
and Annette; and brother, Ernie. Fun-
eral services were held at Menorah
Chapels.
Continued from Page 11
and Mrs. Mark Drobiarz,
Laurie Cohen, Mr. and Mrs.
Yoram Maimone, Mr. and Mrs.
Scott Gans, Arnold Stern, Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Morganstein
and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Wise-
man. During the service, there
will be a dedication of leaves
for the Tree of Life which were
donated during the Pre-
Chanukah leaf special.
On Saturday, Dec. 3, Junior
Congregation services with
Rabbi Friedman are from 8:30
to 9:15 a.m.
Sabbath Morning Services
will begin at 9 a.m. with Rabbi
Friedman and Cantor Wiche-
lewski officiating.
On Sunday, Dec. 4, 9:30 a.m.
Sisterhood and Men's Club will
hold a joint meeting on "What
Price Ethics."
Students at the Hyman
Drooker Religious School will
have a Chanukah party Tues-
day, Dec. 6, 4-6 p.m.
On Friday, Dec. 9, services
will begin at 8 p.m. with Rabbi
Friedman conducting and Can-
tor Wichelewski chanting the
liturgy. This Chanukah/Religi-
ous School Shabbat will fea-
ture a special Chanukah with
the participation of the stu-
dents of the Hyman Drooker
Religious School. The Aleph
Class students Brad Gans,
David Kopet and Karen
Schneider will be conse-
crated.
On Saturday, Dec. 10, Junior
Congregation meets with
Rabbi Friedman 8:15-9:30 a.m.
Sabbath morning services will
begin at 9 a.m. with Rabbi
Friedman and Cantor Wiche-
lewski officiating.
Minyan meets daily at 8:30
a.m.
Temple Israel of Miramar is
located at 6920 SW 35 St. For
information: 961-1700.
Bar Mitzvah
DANIEL WEISBERG
Daniel Philip Weisberg, son
of Dr. Steven and Ilene Weis-
berg, was called to the Torah
at Temple Beth Sholom of Hol-
lywood Thursday, Nov. 24, as
a Bar Mitzvah.
Daniel, who attends Nova
Middle School, was graduated
from Beth Shalom Hebrew
School. He is involved with
acting in school plays and
sports.
Among those attending the
celebration were his grandpar-
ents, Irving and Jean Ross of
Tamarac, Florida and Maurycy
Weisberg of Hollis Hills, NY.
A kiddish reception was
sponsored by the celebrant's
parents in his honor.
AIPACHead Lauds Congress
NEW ORLEANS (JTA) -
Israel can be confident it will
be treated well by the new
American administration and
U.S. Congress elected two
weeks ago, according to one of
the most respected Jewish
Solitical lobbyists on Capitol
[ill.
"We expect the 101st Con-
gress to be the most pro-Israel
ever," Thomas Dine told thou-
sands of delegates attending
the General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations
here.
YM-YWHA COUNTRY CAMP
Sponsored by Montreal's Jewish Community Centre
Information & Video Presentation at 3401 N. 32 Terrace, Hollywood
1:00 P.M. Sunday, January 15, 1989
7:00 P.M. Monday, January 16, 1989
Come meet the Director, Harvey Finkelberg,
and find out more about this exciting resident camp for ages 8-16 year olds.
Y Country Camp has over 650 acres, bounded by 3 private pollution free lakes and our own mountain.
Children participate in a well-balanced creative program that keeps them active from morning until
night.
Campers in each bunk map out a balanced weekly program together with their counsellor. The
emphasis is on fun in a safe, supervised environment that provides opportunity for learning and
personal development. Activities include: %i
Tennis and Canadian Tennis Association certified
instruction
Recreational and Red Cross certified instructional
swimming
Sailing, Windsurfing, Kayaking
Boating, Canoeing, Pedalboating
Canoe excursions
Overnights, Hikes, Cookouts
Multi-day Backpacking and Canoe Trips in the
Laurentians and Vermont
Baseball, Soccer, Football
Archery
Floor Hockey
Basketball, Volleyball, Tetherball
Sports Clinics
Aerobics, Dance and Fitness
Horseback riding excursions
Badminton
Arts & Crafts
Oneg Shabbat and Creative Cultural Programming
Discussion Groups and Educational Programming
Theatre, Music and major monthly Drama Productions
Movies, Video Filmmaking and Photo
Bonfires, Singsongs, Hayrides and Storytelling
A complete Nature Farm, an Ecology Program, Animal
Care and Gardening
Rocketry Program
Fishing
Intercamp Activities
Field Trips
Colour War and Theme Days
Waterslide outings
Elective programming and much, much more.
DATES AND FEES (ALL IN CANADIAN FUNDS)
Fee
Session 1: June 29 July 23/89 $1395
Session 2: July 24 August 17/89 $1295
Both: June 29 August 17/89 $2495
$50 Sibling discount
FOR MORE INFORMATION: CALL MERLE FISHER (305) 962-4221
OR HARVEY FINKELBERG, DIRECTOR, (514) 737-6551.


Volume 18 Number 26
Hollywood, Florida Friday, December 16. 1988
Price. 35 Cents
Rose To Head JNF
Campaign Committee
Jules Rose, past president of
the Food Industry Alliance,
has been appointed chairman
of the Jewish National Fund's
national campaign advisory
committee.
Rose will review and
upgrade JNF's established
fund-raising methods while
developing new, innovative
strategies. He states that he
hopes to help build a wider
public support base and send
JNF's message to more fami-
lies. The 87-year-old agency is
responsible for afforestation
and land reclamation in Israel.
A member and past presi-
dent of B'nai Harvest Lodge
he is a trustee of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews. Recently, he received
JNF's Tree of Life Award.
Jules Rose
Barnett Named NCCJ
Dinner Chairman
Elliott B. Barnett, senior
partner at Ruden, Barnett,
McClosky, Smith, Schuster &
Russell, will chair the Broward
County's National Conference
of Christian and Jews (NCCJ)
Brotherhood Awards dinner.
George E. Barbar. CEO of
the Barbar Group of Boca
Raton, will be the Palm Beach
County chair.
The dinner, which marks the
tenth anniversary of the Brow-
ard NCCJ Region, will be held
Saturday, Feb. 4, at Pier 66,
Fort Lauderdale. At the affair,
several citizens of Broward
and Palm Beach Counties will
be presented the NCCJ Silver
Medallion awards for "their
leadership and personal exam-
ple in promoting understand-
ing and good will among all
groups and for their participa-
tion in civic and philanthropic
causes benefiting the people in
our communities."
The Brotherhood Awards
Dinner is the one-time-only
fundraising event that enables
NCCJ to carry out its educa-
tional programs and services
to help bring about better
understanding and coopera-
tion among the diverse racial,
religious and ethnic groups in
the area. For information, call
the NCCJ office at 749-4454.
Americam Surgeons Help
Colombian Kids
A team of plastic surgeons
were sent recently to Bogota,
Colombia by the American
Jewish World Service to op-
erate on children suffering
from congenital defects, burns
and other accidents.
The international relief and
development organization of
the American Jewish com-
munity assists people in the
developing world regardless of
religious or ethnic back-
ground.
The four surgeon team per-
formed approximately 70 oper-
ations in a one-week period.
In cooperation with AJWS,
then Colombian Jewish com-
munity selected a hopital in
Bogota and financed the trans-
formation of an exisitng ward
into a surgical clinic.
In addition to his surgical
duties, Dr. John Grossman,
assistant professor at Brown
Univeristy and leader of the
team, lectured to physicians,
students and health practition-
ers. The surgical team will
return to Bogota every six
months to perform additional
operations and provide follow-
up treatment.
REAGAN AND RABBIS President Reagan receives a Chanukah gift, and menorah
from Hasidic Rabbi Abraham Schemtov of Philadelphia, second from right, and
"other rabbis during a pre-holiday risit to the White House. (APIWide World Photo.)

International Workshops
At Ben-Gurion U.
A five day workshop on
amino acids, held at Ben Gur-
ion University of the Negev,
was funded by the US-Israel
Binational Science Foundation
and the E.I. Du Pont de
Nemours and Company.
The workshop was conceived
and organized by Prof. David
Chipman and Dr. Ze'ev Barak
of Ben-Gurion and Dr. John
Schloss of Du Pont.
Participating in the discus-
sions on "Biosynthesis of
Branched-Chain Amino Acids"
were 66 scientists from the
U.S., Great Britain, France,
Denmark, Italy, Germany,
Switzerland, Japan and Israel.
The recent discovery of the
ability to delay the production
of branched-chain amino acids
in plants and repress their
growth, without causing dam-
age to man or other living
Reunion
Graduates of Brooklyn Jew-
ish Hospital School of Nursing
are asked to contact Estelle
Corman, 584-3042, if they are
interested in a reunion.
organisms, has led to the pro-
duction of groups of new her-
bicides (weedkillers) by such
American companies as Dow
Chemicals, Du Pont and Amer-
ican Cyanamid.
By-products of the research
also interests food, wine and
plastic industry representa-
tives.
Another international
conference drew 50 doctors
and students from Canada,
Holland, Sweden, the U.S.,
and Zambia, along with medi-
cal students from Beersheva
and Jerusalem.
The conference on health
education covered areas of the
school, education for the pre-
vention of risk factors in heart
and circulatory diseases, first-
aid in the community, legal
medicine, the relationships
between smoking and lung
cancer and Sex Education.
The university's health edu-
cation project modifies health
behavior patterns of youth to
advance the cause of prevent-
ive medicine.
The university was also
the site of the fifth Inter-
national Conference of the
Euro-Asia Management Stu-
dies Association. Organized by
the Humphrey Institute for
Social Ecology, the two day
conference focused on employ-
er/employee relations. Partici-
pants came from England,
Germany, Holland. Hungary,
Japan and Scandinavia.
B'nai B'rith Award To Floridian
B'nai B'rith International's
Colonel Elliott A. Niles Award
for the Community Volunteer
Services (CVS) Volunteer of
the Year has been awarded to
Dr. William Zenvener of Col-
ony Point Unit No. 5291 in
District 5.
Since 1959, B'nai B'rith has
honored the memory of the
late Col. Elliott A. Niles, foun-
der of the Service Committee
for Armed Forces and Veter-
ans (SCAFV). Niles Awards
are presented annually to the
one man and one woman who
have been judged to have per-
formed the most outstanding
personal volunteer service on
behalf of the program of the
B'nai B'rith Commission on
Community Volunteer Ser-
vices.
Dr. Zenvener, a retired
physician, is CVS Chairman of
both the B'nai B'rith South
Florida Council and Florida
State Association.
Landmark First
Sentencing
JERUSALEM For the first time since
the Arab uprising in the territories began a
year ago, a Jewish settler has been convic-
ted and sentenced in an Israeli court for
killing or injuring a Palestinian.
Ysiarel Zeev, 38, an American-born set-
tler, drew a five-year prison term for
killing an Arab shepherd who had brought
his sheep to graze on land near the settle-
ment of Shiloh last May 5. Judge Zvi Cohen
suspended two years of the sentence, and
credited Zeev with seven months already
served while awaiting the trial.
A second Arab shepherd, wounded in
Zeev's action, was awarded $18,600 in
damages.
I


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