The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00108

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Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
Volume 18 Number 3
Hollywood, Florida Friday, January 29, 1988
Mubarak Launches Peace Initiative
By DAVID LANDAU
and HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM, (JTA) -
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt has launched a peace in-
itiative aimed at restoring
calm in the administered ter-
ritories while advancing
negotiations for a peace
settlement.
According to commentators
here, the plan appears to have
gained broad support in princi-
ple, but sharp differences re-
main over specifics.
A major issue of contention
is whether the peace process
should take the form of an in-
ternational conference, which
Jordan insists on but is
vigorously opposed by Israeli
Premier Yitzhak Shamir of the
Likud.
Shamir told the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee on Monday that
the international conference
idea is a "trap" and vowed
that Israel would not "fall into
it."
He also lashed out at his
political rival and coalition
partner, Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres of the Labor
Party, who he said had become
an "obstacle" to peace pro-
spects by backing the interna-
tional conference option, in-
stead of Shamir's plan for
direct talks with Jordan and
Egypt on Palestinian
autonomy.
Peres, responding in what
appears to be an increasingly
acerbic series of exchanges
between the two leaders, said
he has no objections to
Shamir's plan, but pointed out
that the Arab parties have re-
jected it.
Shamir's remarks were trig-
gered by a direct appeal from
Mubarak, urging the Israeli

An Israeli army officer orders the driver of an army jeep to take a ing curfew. 7V woman
Palestinian woman, left, to the El Dureij refugee camp clinic dur- medical treatment. AP/Wkk World Photo.
tote
U.S. Anti-Semitic Crimes Up;
premier to drop his objec-
tions to the internation-
al peace conference. The
Egyptian president called _^ .
c^m-p*.* Vandalism Down in Florida
Rabin Responds to
Tactical Criticism
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM, (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin defended bis controver-
sial policy of beatings and
curfews to counter unrest in
the administered territories.
He told military cor-
respondents here Monday that
they have brought relative
calm to the
Rabin said the reduction, in
the number of shootings is a
significant achievement and
stressed that any beatings oc-
curred "while violence was
taking place, not before' it and
not after."
The defense minister admit-
ted there were several cases
where excessive force was us-
ed, but on the whole the
soldiers behaved properly. He
promised that all cases where
they allegedly exceeded their
orders would be investigated.
Rabin has come under fire in
Israel and abroad since he an-
nounced last week that the
Israel Defense Force is under
orders to pursue and vigorous-
ly beat Palestinian
demonstrators, while cutting
back on the use of live
ammunition.
On Sunday, Rabbi Alexander
Scbindler, president of the
Reform movement's Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, condemned "the in-
discriminate beatings of
Ceatiaaed oa Pair* t
Anti-Semitic vandalism was down in Florida in 1987, while the number of
such incidents across the nation climbed dramatically, according to the annual
audit conducted by the Anti-Defamation League of B nai B'rith (ADL). The rise
largely reflected a 121 percent increase in California, where such acts soared
from 62 reported in 1986 to 137 last year.
The audit revealed a total of 694 reported incidents of vandalism and
desecration, ranging from swastika daubings to arson, against Jewish institu-
tions and property a 17 percent increase over the 594 episodes reported in
1986. Ten of the 1987 vandalisms involved arson or bombings.
In Florida the number of incidents of anti-Semitic vandalism declined from
79 in 1986 to 64 last year a 19 percent decrease.
Arthur Teitelbeum, ADL's Southern Area Director, said "there is small com-
fort in these statistics, despite the welcome decrease in the number of reported
vandalisms this past year.
"First," said Teitelbaum, "the total for 1987 (64) is virtually the same as that
for 1986 (67), meaning that over three years there is no trend in Florida pointing
to an overall decrease in such incidents. Second, with over 60 anti-Jewish van-
dalisms in the state plus a significant number of serious personal assaults against
Jews, there is absolutely no reason for complacency about such crimes."
The highest number of vandalism incidents occurred in New York with 207,
up 21 from 1966; followed by California, then Florida; New Jersey with 43, down
5, and Illinois with 86, up 22. The survey found episodes in 34 states and the
District of Columbia.
In annnunrmg the results of the national audit, Abraham H. Foxman, ADL's
National Director, called the 1967 report "disturbing'' and cited the following
among the findings:
a PageS
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
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/


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, January 29, 1988
Little Hope For
Vatican Recognition
Soviets Again Denying Visas
If No Close Relative In Israel
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Vatican recognition of the
State of Israel cannot be ex-
pected soon, according to Car-
dinal Johannes Willebrands,
president of the Vatican's
Commission for Religious
Relations with the Jews.
The Dutch-born Willebrands
conveyed that message to
Dutch Catholic bishops visiting
Rome last week, according to
reports reaching here.
Willebrands had been asked
about the prospects of
Catholic-Jewish dialogue. He
replied that a sharp distinction
must be made between
religious and political dialogue.
A religious dialogue must
take priority. But a political
dialogue is not to be expected
soon, nor is Vatican recogni-
tion of Israel, the cardinal said.
He added that by no means do
all Jews in the world identify
with the State of Israel.
Greek Leader Calls
For Recognition Of Israel
NEW YORK, Jan. 13 (JTA)
Soviet authorities are deny-
ing exit visas to Jews without
first-degree relatives in Israel
an official Soviet policy that
had been relaxed in recent
months the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry
reported.
Vyacheslav Uspensky, son of
firominent refuseniks Igor and
nna Ioffe Uspensky, was
denied a Soviet exit visa Jan. 5
because of the lack of the first-
degree relative in Israel. His
refusal followed those of a
number of Leningrad Jews.
Soviet authorities announc-
ed last January they would ac-
cept applications for emigra-
tion only if they contained in-
vitations sent by first-degree
relatives in Israel. In recent
months, however, the Soviets
have allowed some Jews
without close relatives in
Israel to leave the country.
In a statement issued here,
Morris Abram, chairman of
the NCSJ. demanded to know
whether the denials were
"random, or do they suggest a
renewed Soviet intransigence
on the emigration issue?"
If they are random, he said
"then we call upon Soviet
authorities to reverse their
decisions and grant visas im-
mediately to all those
refused."
The 18-year-old Uspensky
applied for an exit visa in-
dependently of his parents
after they were again refused
permission to emigrate several
weeks ago on the grounds that
they possess "state secrets"
through Slava's grandmother,
Irina Voronkevich, and his
maternal uncle, the
mathematician Aleksander
Ioffe.
By JEAN COHEN
- (JTA) The leader of
Greece's largest opposition
party called on the govern-
ment to extend full diplomatic
recognition to Israel im-
mediately, or certainly before
Greece assumes the rotating
gresidency of the European
conomic Community on July
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Konstantinos Mitsotakis,
head of the New Democratic
Party, said if the government
fails to do this, his party would
recognize Israel the moment it
comes to power.
Konstantinos spoke at a
meeting with Israel's
diplomatic representative in
Greece, Moshe Gilboa. Gilboa
holds the rank of ambassador,
but Greek relations with Israel
are only on the consular level.
According to informed
sources, the Foreign Ministry
is unhappy with the television
coverage and has protested to
the television authorities.
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U.S. Abstains
Friday, January 29, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoUywood Page 3
UN Vote Urges Return
Of Deported Palestinians
Auschwitz Convent
To Be Relocated
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The United States
abstained Thursday (Jan. 14)
on a Security Council resolu-
tion calling on Israel "to en-
sure the safe and immediate
return" of four Palestinians it
expelled Wednesday from the
West Bank and to "desist"
from further deportations of
Palestinian civilians.
The resolution, adopted by a
vote of 14-0, was the third anti-
Israel resolution passed by the
Security Council in less than a
month and the second in which
the United States abstained.
The United States voted in
favor of a resolution on Jan. 5
demanding that Israel rescind
deportation orders it had
issued on Jan. 3 against nine
Palestinian activists from the
West Bank and Gaza Strip. It
abstained from voting on a
Dec. 22 resolution that con-
demned Israel for the
measures it was taking to sub-
due rioters in the territories.
The U.S. ambassador to the
United Nations, Vernon
Walters, criticized the Securi-
ty Council's preoccupation
with the situation in the ter-
ritories. In a brief statement
after the vote Thursdav, be
said the United States abstain-
ed, because it believes that the
continued Security Council
meetings on the subject do not
assist in bringing tranquility to
the area.
Walters stressed that the
United States has made it
clear that it is opposed to
deportations and that it "deep-
ly regrets" the expulsion
Wednesday of the four Palesti-
nians. But the U.S. envoy
noted that the four had declin-
ed to use their right of appeal
to Israel's Supreme Court
against the deportation
orders.
He declared that the Securi-
ty Council's "selective atten-
tion" to the unrest in the ter-
ritories will not restore peace
and quiet to the West Bank
and the Gaza Strip.
Israel's ambassador to the
United Nations, Benjamin
Netanyahu, speaking before
the vote, said Israel would not
accept the resolution.
Afterward, he expressed
"appreciation" for the U.S.
abstention. Noting U.S. sup-
port for the Jan. 5 resolution,
he said, "We are pleased that
the American vote is now shif-
ting in the other direction."
The resolution was spon-
sored by Algeria, Argentina,
Nepal, Senegal, Yugoslavia
and Zambia. Its operative
paragraphs stated:
"The Security Council (1)
calls upon Israel to rescind the
order to deport Palestinian
civilians and to ensure the safe
and immediate return to the
occupied Palestinian ter-
ritories of those already
deported; (2) requests that
Israel desist forthwith from
deportation of any other
Palestinian civilians from the
occupied territories; (3)
decides to keep the situation in
the Palestinian and other Arab
territories occupied by Israel
since 1967, including
Jerusalem, under review."
The Security Council also
reaffirmed its resolution of
Jan. 5 and expressed "deep
regret that Israel, the occupy-
ing power, has, in defiance of
that resolution, deported
Palestinian civilians."
Netanyahu, in his statement
before the vote, denounced the
resolution as grossly one-
sided. He said it contained not
one word about Palestinian
violence against Israeli Jews
and Israeli Arabs. He said it
lacks even "an appeal for
restraint on all sides.
Netanyahu declared that the
anti-Israel resolution would
only contribute to inflaming
passions and increasing
violence in the territories.
By expelling the four
Palestinians, Israel acted "as
our right under international
law to secure law and order in
the territories," the Israeli en-
voy said. He accused the
Security Council of condoning
acts of violence against Israel
and of condemning Israel's
counter-measures. 'Tn face of
violence, it pushes peace fur-
ther away," he said.
He added, "Even if we
threw rose petals at the stone-
throwers, Israel would be con-
demned by the Security
Council."
GENEVA (JTA) The
Polish government has given
written assurances that a
Carmelite convent built on the
grounds of the former
Auschwitz-Birkenau death
camp will be removed, in com-
pliance with an agreement
reached here last Feb. 22 bet-
ween high-level delegations
representing Jewish organiza-
tions and the Catholic Church.
Church officials in Poland
apparently stalled on im-
plementing the agreement.
Visitors returning from
Auschwitz have reported that
no steps have been taken to
remove the convent and that,
in fact, the number of nuns in
residence has increased.
The World Jewish Congress,
which played a key part in
reaching the agreement, was
concerned, Gerhart Riegner,
co-chairman of the WJC's
governing board, visited the
Polish minister of religious af-
fairs, Dr. Wladyslaw Loranc,
in Warsaw last November to
raise the issue.
Last week Riegner made
public a letter he received from
Loranc, promising that the
nearly year-old agreement will
be implemented without fur-
ther delay.
Riegner told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that
church representatives in
Poland claimed they could not
act as long as they had no per-
mission from the government.
Loranc promised to make
things move and, in fact, kept
his promise, Riegner said.
The Geneva meeting last
year followed longstanding ex-
pressions of deep distress by
Jewish groups that a convent
was located at a place where
hundreds of thousands of Jews
died in the Holocaust.

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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, January 29, 1988
Blacks and Jews At Odds
But Seeking Common Ground
By
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jews and blacks may be unable
to restore the spirit of in-
tergroup harmony they
developed, in the 1960s, say
black and Jewish leaders, but
the groups can avoid the con-
flicts that often have
dominated their interactions in
the 1980s.
According to analysts of the
black-Jewish relationship, that
may mean bypassing divisive
issues and concentrating on
the local communal concerns
they share as members of
historically oppressed
minorities. Whether that is
possible in an election year and
in the light of events in Israel
remains to be seen, they say.
"The relationship between
blacks and Jews is rather
tense, but both groups come
out of a commonality that's
still there," said Albert
Vorspan, director of social ac-
tion at the Union of American
Hebrew Coogregations, the
Reform Jewish congregational
organization.
Tension peaked in 1984,
when Jewish groups, still reel-
ing from the Rev. Jesse
Jackson's "Hymietown"
remarks and what they con-
sidered his inadequate
apology, demanded that the
presidential candidate ad other
black leaders repudiate Nation
of Islam leader Louis Far-
rakhan for rhetoric Jewish
leaders cosidered anti-Semitic.
So far, Jackson's 1988
presidetial campaign has not
inflamed the same passions.
But disagreement over
Jackson is often perceived not
as a cause of tension between
the groups, but as a symptom.
The cause of the tension may
be that Jews and blacks have
diverged in economic status
and thus in political and social
conviction.
Said Phil Baum, associate
executive director of the
American Jewish Congress,
"Both groups believe in the
better distribution of oppor-
tunity and advantage than ex-
ists at the present time.
However, we disagree on the
means of how to achieve that
distribution."
A continuing conflict has
been over quotas in hiring,
which black leaders believe
would help speed economic
growth, but which many
Jewish groups feel serve to
limit individual achievement.
Analysts agree that discus-
sion of quotas does not create
the rifts it once did, but deep
misunderstandings remain.
According to Cherie Brown,
executive director of the Na-
tional Coalition-Building In-
stitute, those misuderstadings
became apparent when she
conducted, as part of the
group's activities, intergroup
dialogue in the months follow-
ing the Farrakhan controversy
in 1984 and 1985.
Ironically, Farrakhan's
notoriety led to the formation
of black-Jewish coalition in a
number of cities. Some, such
as the New York Black-Jewish
Coalition, have since become
dormant.
Wilbert Tatum, a founder of
the New York coalition and
editor-in-chief of the Amster-
dam News, the country's
largest black newspaper, said
the coalition foundered
because "both sides are afraid
to speak out, lest they be called
racist or anti-Semitic."
In other cases, the coalitions
have avoided areas of major
conflict such as Israel's
trade with South Africa, affir-
mative action and black sup-
port for Palestinians and in-
stead seek common ground in
local social and economic
concerns.
Boston's Black-Jewish Coali-
tion, for example, was formed
in 1979 to diffuse tensions that
arose when Andrew Young, a
black who was dismissed as
U.S. ambassador to the United
Nations after holding
unauthorized meetings with
members of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Blacks accused Jews of forcing
the ouster.
The coalition has since
changed its mission to tackle
urban issues such a s housing,
education and crime preven-
tion, according to Sol Kolack
of Boston, national community
service director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Such coalition-building im-
plies that Jews and blacks still
share an agenda. "Both
groups still have a strong
sense of being outsiders," said
Murray Fnedman, Middle
Atlantic States director of the
American Jewish Committee
and vice chairman of the U.S.
Civil Rights Commission.
In addition, said Martin
Lapan executive director of
the Jewish Labor Committee,
"Of all white ethnic groups,
the Jewish community is still
in its voting patterns far closer
to the interests of the black
community."
Blacks and Jews were the
only two groups to vote in ma-
jority for Democratic presiden-
tial candidate Walter Mondale
in 1984.
But Friedman and others
are concerned about underly-
ing tensions. "Polls are show-
ing more hostility towards
Jews in the young and better-
educated level of the black
community than among older
blacks who are knowledgeable
about the civil rights move-
ment," said Friedman.
On the other side, blacks say
the traditionally liberal Jewish
community has absorbed the
negative values of the larger
society. "There is a new kind
of racism," said Norman Hill,
president of the A. Philip Ran-
dolph Institute, a labor coali-
tion founded by the late civil
rights leader Bayard Rustin.
"Although less predominant
among Jews, there's a feeling
that there's something in-
herently wrong with blacks,
that they are incapable of mak-
ing it after all that was done,
that following the civil rights
legislation of the '60's, there is
still crime, drug abuse, single
parent families, teenage
pregnancy," said Hill.
Said Tatum of the Amster-
dam News: "There has been a
real pulling apart on the part
of blacks and Jews. There is
nothing to be done. A staunch
ally appears to be like all
others. They have failed us,
and we them."
Yet despite pessimism on
both sides, coalition-building
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Editor and Publither Executive Ediloi
Published Weekly January through March Bi-Weekly April through August
HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUOERDALE OFFICE. 8368 W Oakland Par* Blvd
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JOAN C TEGLAS. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING 1-3734805 COLLECT
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Friday, January 29,1988
Volume 18
goes on, according to Diana
Aviv, director of domestic con-
cerns at the National Jewish
Community Relations Ad-
visory Council.
She said a survey being con-
ducted among 113 local Jewish
community relations agencies
nationwide shows that all of
their communities are involved
either in ongoing dialogues,
jointly issued statements, joint
cultural programing or com-
memorations of the birthday of
Martin Luther King Jr. Iden-
tification with the King holi-
10SHEVAT5748
Number 3
day is especially strong, she
said.
Part of that identification is
bound to be nostalgia for "the
good fight" the battle for
lustice waged alongside black
leaders in the 1960s.
But according to Brown,
"There is a romanticization of
the civil rights movement."
Not only are Jews and blacks
meeting in greater numbers
than they ever did, but "in
fact, there is greater honesty
between the communities."
Sroge Appointed NCJW Director
of Section Services
New York, NY Marian Sroge has been named Director
of Section Services for National Council of Jewish Women.
In this capacity, Sroge will be responsible for the servicing
of 200 NCJW Sections nationwide, and will oversee field
service, membership, leadership training, expansion and
volunteer training functions.
Dutch School May Exclude Boy
AMSTERDAM, (JTA) The Supreme Court ruled last
Friday that a Jewish religious school here need not admit a
student whose mother is not Jewish.
The high court's decision in favor of the Maimonides
Lyceum ended more than a year and a half of litigation that
ng-zagged through the lower courts, attracting much
media attention.
Ohwbh Jewish National Fund
Ppuro1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)
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Friday, January 29,1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Browgrd-Hollywood Page 5
U.S. Anti-Semitic Crimes Up;
Vandalism Down in Florida
Continued from Page 1
Some of the more serious
vandalism incidents were
perpetrated by members of a
hate group, the neo-Nazi
Skinheads, in several cities, in-
cluding Chicago, San Diego,
Los Angeles and Miami.
There were 78 arrests con-
nected with 58 of the anti-
Semitic incidents, a sharp in-
crease in arrests over the 1986
total of 57 in connection with
33 incidents.
While the majority of
perpetrators remained
teenagers, a fifth (17) of the 78
individuals arrested were 21
years of age or older, the
highest proportion in that age
group ever recorded.
The increase in anti-Semitic
incidents paradoxically came
during a period of vigorous
local law enforcement and
statutory efforts against bias
crimes and the recent federal
crackdown against hate
groups.
The report pointed out that
while vandalism involving hate
groups had accounted for no
more than one or two incidents
over the past several years,
the number jumped to about
20 in 1987 because of anti-
Semitic episodes attributed to
Skinhead extremists.
One of the more serious
episodes cited in the audit oc-
curred on Nov. 9 when 11
separate Jewish targets were
vandalized in the Chicago
area. A Skinhead gang
member was arrested in con-
nection with one of the at-
tacks. (Nov. 9 is the anniver-
sary of Kristallnacht, the
"Night of the Broken Glass" in
1988 when Nazi mobs attacked
synagogues and Jewish stores
across Germany.)
Foxman said the sharp in-
crease in the total of California
incidents may have been due,
in part, to the involvement of
Skinhead gang members in at-
tacks on Jewish property. For
example, in the San Fernando
Valley area alone, of several
episodes of vandalism and
U.S. Deplores
Tactics
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman deplored
Israel's beatings of Palesti-
nians in the West Bank and
the Gaza Strip.
"We are disturbed by the
adoption of a policy by the
government of Israel that calls
for beatings as a means to
restore or maintain order,"
Redman said.
Redman apparently was
referring to orders given to
Israel Defense Force soldiers
patrolling the West Bank to
take the offensive against
demonstrators and to beat
them vigorously when they are
caught.
desecration which took place
during a three-month period in
early 1987, some were believed
to have been carried out by
Skinheads, one of whom was
arrested and charged.
The audit showed that two
synagogues one in
Massachusetts and the other in
California were arson
targets and sustained major
damage. Arsonists also attack-
ed a home in Maryland. In ad-
dition, Jewish homes in
Georgia and Ohio were struck
by pipe bombs.
The audit, which was based
on reports gathered by ADL's
31 regional offices from in-
dividuals and law enforcement
authorities, included a
separate calculation on threats
and harassments directed
against Jews or Jewish institu-
tions, usually through the mail
or by telephone. Of the 324
such incidents reported in
1987, 16 involved physical
assaults on Jews which were
clearly motivated by bigotry
and 244 individual Jews were
harassed by mail, telephone or
through verbal confrontations.
In 1986, the total was 312,
with 11 physical attacks.
Eighty of the total 1987 in-
cidents in this category were
directed against Jewish in-
stitutions in the form of hate
mail and telephoned threats.
In 1986 there were 71 such
episodes.
In another area examined in
the survey which was
prepared by the Research
Department of the agency's
Civil Rights Division in-
cidents of anti-Semitism on
college campuses showed a
decline, from 19 in 1986 to 14
last year. Four of the 1987 in-
cidents involved the targeting
of Jewish property or institu-
tions such as fraternity nouses
or Hillel organization
buildings.
Foxman said the audit
figures for 1987 reinforce the
need for stricter law enforce-
ment to apprehend
perpetrators of bias crimes,
strengthened security
measures for Jewish institu-
tions and educational efforts
both in the community and in
schools to sensitize public con-
cern to racially or religiously
motivated crimes.
In the past several years, he
pointed out, 31 state
legislatures have adopted
stricter laws aimed at curbing
religious or ethnic vandalism,
12 of which have enacted
statutes based on or similar to
a model bill drafted by ADL in
1981. In addition, ADL
monitoring activities have pro-
vided law enforcement
authorities with information
on hate groups and their
leaders and the agency has
cooperated with local law en-
forcement authorities in com-
batting bias crimes.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, January 29, 1988
Heidi Howard Is 'On Air'
I
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewiak Ftoruha* Staff Writer
HEIDI Howard, just turned
17. insists that she is not suf-
fering from career burn-out.
"For me. it's exciting to be
right on the ball." she says.
"It's exciting to be reading the
AP (Associated Press) wires
and knowing the Howard
Beach verdict before it was
broadcast. And I love having
the opportunity to tell people
about it."
Howard, a Miami Beach
senior, who attends Ransom
Everglades School, loves the
news. She fell in love at the
age of 14. when she decided
she wanted to be a journalist
after reading Linda Ellerbee's
book. "And So It Goes."
Before Howard was 15. she
was working as an intern at
"Teen Scene," a cable televi-
sion show on JFTV. Jewish
Federation Television.
By the age of 16, Howard
was producing the show, which
featured four teenage guests,
one expert, and the show's
host, and dealt with topics
ranging from High School in
Israel to divorce to drug addic-
tion and AIDS.
"I helped out with graphics.
I was occasionally stage
manager, and I would
sometimes help the hosts with
compiling the questions, if I
wanted a topic to go in a cer-
tain direction." says Howard
of her duties.
"Occasionally we had some
catastrophes where people
would cancel on me at 10 a.m..
right before taping then I
would run around school look-
ing for someone. I had one or
two friends always willing to
fill in for me at the last
minute." recalls Howard,
herself a guest on two episodes
of the show.
"TEEN Scene" aired locally
and in Philadelphia. Los
Angeles. Boston. New York,
as well as in other selected
Jewish markets, according to
Howard.
"I was at Tufts University
for summer school, and on the
first day we were all telling
about ourselves, what we had
done," Howard recounts.
When she mentioned produc-
ing 'Teen Scene," "two kids
from totally different parts of
the country said. "Oh. that's
that show where kids sit
around and talk about really
neat subjects.'
"It feh really strange but
really good," Howard admits,
"not to be recognized for
myself but for something I had
done that they enjoyed."
These days. Howard, who is
no longer with "Teen Scene."
has a radio show, "Young
Ones," along with three other
teenagers.
The show, which broadcasts
Saturday nights at 6 p.m. on
Public Community Radio,
WDNA 88.9 FM. includes
reviews of television shows
and movies, musk, and inter-
views with guests such as
Brett Easton Ellis, young
author of Let* Than Zero.
recently released as a motion
picture.
"On Halloween, I interview-
ed a witch," says Howard.
"That was wonderful, not the
usual thing we do on radio."
Every month. Howard does
"It didn't matter that no one knew that I
wrote it because I knev? I wrote it, and I
knew that it was good enough that they
used it."
writing about Nicaragua, and
how they were going to have a
ceasefire for Christmas."
Late-breaking information
on the Nicaraguan cease-fire
meant that Howard's story
had to be re-worked, but
Howard went on to write two
more stories that, she says.
"were used almost exactly as I
had written them."
At an age when many kids
do not even bother to turn on
the evening news at all,
Howard was "listening to Sal-
ly Fitz, and she was reading
what I had written.
"It felt so good it didn't
matter that no one knew that I
wrote it. because I knew I
Heidi Howard
a college report, including tips
on how to apply to prospective
universities, and a profile of a
selected school.
"I'm not a reporter for this
show." Howard asserts. "I
can't be a reporter because we
don't have news services or
UPI (United Press Interna-
tional). We do a thing called
the calander. (but) we get
everything out of the
newspaper."
If Howard is not a reporter
for her radio show, then she is
"almost" a reporter for
WSVN-Channel 7. where she
handles anchorwoman Sally
Fitz' fan mail, goes along on
stories with other reporters,
and even, on occasion, writes
the news.
"She's terrific," says Fitz.
"She's a great help and has
made order out of chaos as far
as my fan mail goes."
Fitz says she gets about five
letters a day. some of them
asking her for a date. She and
Heidi discuss what the
response will be.
Fitz says the news depart-
ment does not take interns as
young as Howard and it was
Fitz who created the helper's
position for her.
"I think it helps her to learn
more about the business,"
notes Fitz. "She gets to see it
first-hand, to know what the
upsides and downsides are."
The arrangement seems to
be beneficial to both Fitz and
Howard.
"I like to help young women
out and in this case I'm getting
help too," says Fitz.
"I'VE been on six shoots
with three different
reporters." says Howard, who
met Sally Fitz when she came
to dinner as a family friend.
"I've written practice
stories," Howard recounts,
"and I have a (video) tape with
my own voice-overs." compos-
ed of the out-takes of another
reporter's story.
But Howard's greatest op-
portunity came when she was
scheduled to go out on a story
with a reporter, but did not.
"Michael (Wflhams) had to
go out on a breaking story and
be hadn't time to stop and get
me in the van with them, so I
was just sitting there waiting
for the news to start," Howard
recalls.
"Then the producer asked
me if I wanted to try roy band
wrote it, and I knew that it
was good enough that they us-
ed it-
Howard plans to attend the
University of Pennsylvania,
where she will probably major
in political science, and even-
tually go on to law school, to
augment her journalistic
ambitions.
"THEY like you to have a
specialty now," explains
Howard of her decision not to
attend a communications
school. "You can't just learn
how to write in complete
sentences and tell the who,
what, where, why and that's
it, anymore."
Howard says that her in-
terest in the law stems from
two main sources; the first is
her father, an attorney, who
told Howard about legal cases
as she was growing up.
The second, perhaps, is
ambition.
"I just think that the law and
knowing how the law works
can be very helpful to a
Continued on Page 8
Italians Demonstrate On
Palestinians' Behalf
By RUTH E. GRUBER
ROME (JTA) Some
5,000 people marched through
the streets of Rome on Satur-
day (Jan. 16) in a demonstra-
tion in support of Palestinians
in the Gaza Strip and West
Bank.
The march was organized by
student groups and left-wing
political parties. The pro-
testors, many of them wearing
the Rab Kaffiyeh scarf, carried
a banner reading, "Is our
civilization founded on the
massacre and oppression of
peoples? Free Palestine."
They chanted slogans accus-
ing the Israeli government of
being a "band of assassins"
that has engaged in the
"slaughter of children."
Another said, "Forty years of
occupation won't stop the fight
for liberation," calling into
question not only Israel's ad-
ministration of the West Bank
and Gaza Strip, but also its
very right to exist.
There were moments of ten-
sions at the end of the march,
when about 250 demonstrators
broke off from the main group
and headed toward Rome's
main synagogue, in- the Old
Ghetto on the banks of the
Tiber, still a largely Jewish
neighborhood. Security forces
blocked off the synagogue,
however, aided by dozens o(
members of the Jewish com-
munity who rushed to the
scene.
On Sunday, the Vatican
newspaper Osservatore
Romano condemned what it
called the Israeli assaults at
the Al Aksa and Al Amari mos-
ques, branding the moves
another very serious sign of
the deterioration of the situa-
tion in East Jerusalem and the
territories.
"It is feared, with good
reason, that the situation could
produce an upsurge of infamy,
of barbarism and also anti-
Semitism/' the Vatican
newspaper said, adding, "It is
urgent that there prevail a
supreme sense of self-control,
of moderation, of tolerance."
Indeed, anti-Semitic van-
dalism has been on the rise
here in recent weeks. Graffiti
have appeared in Rome, Milan
and Bologna with such slogans
as "Israelis kill Palestinians
Jews will pay."
Israel Extends Visas
Of Soviet Delegation
TEL AVTV (JTA) Israel
has extended for one month
the visas of the Soviet consular
delegation here.
A further extension awaits
an expected favorable
response from Moscow to
Israel's request to send a
similar delegation to the
Soviet Union, Maariv
reported.
Israel has been urging such
reciprocity ever since the
Soviet delegation arrived here
last June. The visas for the
Soviet personnel were to ex-
pire on Jan. 31.
Yossi Beilin. political direc-
tor general of the Foreign
Ministry, on Sunday told the
new head of the Soviet delega
tkm. Georgi MartirdsoTy that
Israel is prepared to
significantly extend the visas
on a reciprocal basis.
The delegation, which came
here six months ago to inspect
Soviet property in Israel and
examine the status of Soviet
nationals living in the country,
is the first Soviet diplomatic
presence in Israel in more than
20 years.
Moscow broke relations with
Israel during the 1967 Six-Day
War. But a thaw seems to have
set in of late.
Observers in Jerusalem
predict the Soviet delegation is
preparing for an extended stay
in Israel, which may mean that
an Israeli delegation will soon
go to Moscow.
You've W
special Carib
ih here. Our
7*ySW
donomy|0'*>or


Friday, January 29, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, January 29, 1988
Israel Bond News
Paying tribute to Holocaust
Survivors who provide
substantial financial support
for the State of Israel, Israel
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, in the principal address
at the 1987 Israel Bonds Na-
tional Holocaust Survivors
Dinner in honor of Benjamin
Meed of New York, declared:
"In all of Jewish history, no
generation had experienced
the threat to the Jewish people
that existed during the
Holocaust. Not to minimize
what some Jews face today,
but how can one compare the
dangers faced in that period to
.uiything now?"
The dinner in honor of Mr.
Meed, President of the
American Gathering of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors, led to
Israel Bond subscriptions of
more than $25 million. Held in
the Fontainebleau Hilton in
Miami Beach on Sunday even-
ing, Dec. 20, it was attended
by 1,400 Survivors and their
families from all over the
United States and Canada.
The dais included 80 Sur-
vivors who had purchased
$100,000 or more in Israel
Bonds.
Meed was preiented with
the 1987 Elie wi.d Remem-
brance Award "in recognition
of his lifetime of efforts to
assure that the Holocaust will
never be forgotter by future
generations."
After accepting the award
from Minister Rabin, Mr.
Meed said: "It has been a long
journey for all of us to come
together here. Tonight we also
remember those whom we
have lost on our way. Over the
past 40 years we have remain-
ed faithful to the command of
our Kedoshim: remember, and
do not let the world forget.
What we have chosen is to
remember. We have said no to
those who wanted to end
Jewish history. We recreated
Jewish life in Israel and our
collective lives as Jews in
America."
Miles Lerman of Vineland.
New Jersey, General Dinner
Chairman, recalling Jewish
suffering in the Nazi camps,
said: "Think back and
remember the days when, in
our deep despair, we clung to
hope in spite of hopelessness,
the days when we dreamt
without believing that our
dreams would ever come true.
You and I know, as no one else
will ever be able to know, the
difference between a world
with a Jewish state and a
world without it."
President Reagan, in a
message to Meed read at the
dinner, said: "May you be
blessed for honoring the
memory of those who perished
in the Holocaust, and for work-
ing to inscribe over that terri-
ble chapter a new chapter of
brotherhood and unshakable
respect for the dignity of all
human life."
Israel Prime Minister
Shamir's cable to Meed stated:
"By your devotion and com-
mitment to the sacred duty of
Remembrance, you are fulfill-
ing a mission of the utmost
importance."
Also speaking at the dinner
were Brig. Gen. (Res.)
Yehudah Haievy, President
and Chief Executive Officer of
the Israel Bond Organization;
David B. Hermelin of Detroit,
International Campaign Chair-
man; David Chase of Hartford,
Connecticut, the Dinner Chair-
man; and Sam Halpern of
Hillside, New Jersey, the
Tribute Chairman.
Born in Warsaw, Meed
became an active member of
the Underground fighting the
Nazi occupiers, and together
with his wife, Vladka, ran
many perilous missions on
both sides of the Ghetto wall.
After the war and their im-
migration to the United
States, Meed build up the War-
saw Ghetto Resistance
Organization (WAGRO) as a
focus for Remembrance
gatherings. His plan to bring
together all Survivor groups
under one national umbrella
was realized with the founding
of the American Gathering
and Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors.
Meed was one of the prin-
cipal organizers of four major
Survivor family events: the
Gathering in Israel in 1981, at-
tended by 10,000 people from
14 countries; the Gathering in
Washington, D.C. in 1983, at-
tended by 20,000 people from
every state; the Inaugural
Assembly of the American
Gathering in Philadelphia in
1985, where he became Presi-
dent of the Gathering upon its
establishment as a permanent
national organization of Sur-
vivors; and the historic New
Life event at the Statue of
Liberty in New York in
September, 1986.
Rose and Jack Orloff
Honored at Clifton-Parker
Dorado Salute to Israel
Breakfast
Held in high esteem in the
community, Rose and Jack
Orloff will be honored and
presented with the prestigious
State of Israel Bonds 40th An-
niversary Award at a Salute to
Israel Breakfast Sunday, Jan.
31, 10 a.m. in Clifton Con-
dominium Recreation Hall,
3161 S. Ocean Drive, Hallan-
dale. Clifton Condominium and
Parker Dorado Israel Bond
Committees sponsor the
event. Emil Cohen, popular
humorist will entertain.
Couvert is $2 per person. Co-
chairpersons are Sylvan
Solomon, Mary Liebman and
Norman Lappin, and they
welcome everyone to attend
and celebrate the 40th an-
niversary of the State of Israel
through an investment of
Israel Bonds.
Eddie Schaffer Performed at
Galahad Court 40th Anniver-
sary of the State of Israel
Celebration
Eddie Schaffer, long-time
resident of Miami Beach, and
popular Humorist entertained
at Galahad Court's Social Hall,
in Hollywood, Jan. 20. The
Night for Israel was in celebra-
tion of the State of Israel's
40th Anniversary. The event
was sponsored by the Galahad
Court Israel Bond Committee.
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Heidi Howard On Air
It felt really strange but really good, not
to be recognized for myself, but for
something I have done."
Continued from Page 6
reporter especially if I go
national," Howard admits.
Calling her early success at
journalism "an accident, being
in the right place at the right
time," Howard contends that
she is not "a whiz kid. I think
I've been very lucky to have
these jobs and I make the most
of my opportunities.
"I know why I'm working so
hard at it, too," Howard con-
fides. "I've always loved
knowing what is going on right
when it happens. When there
was a fatal accident on the
turnpike, I was in the
newsroom when they were
sending the helicopter out."
Howard, who subscribes to
"eight or nine news magazines
from America, Canada, and
England," and watches all the
news stations, says that jour-
nalism "just seems to be right
in the middle of everything, I
guess."
Someday soon, maybe
Howard will be right in the
middle of everything, too. Ask-
ed where she wants to be ten
years from now, she promptly
replies:
"I hope I'm going to be on
the air/'
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Friday, January 29, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoUywood Page 9
Mubarak Launches Peace Initiative
Continued from Pag* 1
Shamir's rejection of the con-
ference "an unnecessary hur-
dle on the road to peace."
At the same time, an Mohammad
American Jewish Congress
delegation visiting the Middle
East has urged Mubarak and
Jordan's King Hussein to con-
sider Shamir's objections to
the peace conference and to
see if they could modify their
positions to keep the peace
momentum going.
position.
Mubarak's new peace plan
was conveyed to both Shamir
and Peres over the weekend by
Bassiouny, the
Egyptian ambassador in Tel
Aviv.
It apparently calls for a six-
month cessation of distur-
bances in the administered ter-
ritories and a concurrent
freeze on
activity.
Israeli settlement
Rabin Responds
The delegation, led by
Theodore Mann, AJCongress
national president, and Henry
Siegman, the group's
ex-
Continued from Page 1
Arab*" as "an offense to the
Jewish spirit" that "violates
every principle of human
decency*' and "betrays the
Zionist dream."
In a cable to President
Chaim Herzog, he warned that
ecutive director, met with the ** policy would serve only to
two leaders last week before "shift the responsibility for the
arriving in Israel over the neglect and abuse of the
weekend. Palestinians from the Arab
(countries) to the shoulders of
Reporting their findings at a Israel."
news conference in Tel Aviv Last Friday, Theodore
on Monday, the delegation said EUenoff, national president of
Mubarak believed that alter- the American Jewish Commit-
natives to the peace con- tee, cabled Israeli leaders, say-
ference were worth pursuing, ing the use of "physical
but Hussein's response was violence" is undercutting
"unclear."
The delegation met Sunday
night with Shamir and, accor-
ding to Seigman, the premier
showed no flexibility in his
) positive image in the
States. He urged them
Israel's
United
to be "more imaginative" in
finding a solution to Palesti-
nian unrest in the ad-
ministered territories. x
Beth David Memorial Gardens To
Break Ground For New Mausoleum
Hollywood, FL, Beth David
Memorial Gardens will break
ground for South Florida's
newest mausoleum on Friday,
Feb. 19, at 1:30 p.m. In mak-
ing the annoucement, Alfred
Golden, president, said "the
new facility at Beth David
Memorial Gardens is
magnificently crafted of im-
ported Italian marble and of-
fers a memorable and lasting
tribute that will span the
ages."
Robert Burstein, Beth David
vice president, noted that "the
new structure represents
state-of-the-art in mausoleum
design and construction." Mr.
Burstein also indicated that
special introductory prices are
now in effect.
The following Rabbis have
been invited to participate in
the mausoleum ground break-
ing ceremony at Beth David
Memorial Gardens: Stanley
Burstein, Robert Frazin, Ben-
nett Greenspon, Israel Jacobs,
Samuel Jane, Ralph Kingsley,
Carl Klein, Avram Krupnick,
Max Lipschitz, Morton Malav-
sky, Richard Margolis, Ber-
nhard Pressler, Harold
Richter and David Saltzman.
Beth David Memorial
Gardens is a service of Levitt-
Weinstein Memorial Gardens
and is located at 3201 North
72nd Ave., Hollywood, just
north of Sheridan Street.
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Joining in the critical discus-
sion of Israeli tactics were
Theodore Mann, national
J resident of the American
ewish Congress, Hyman
Bookbinder, special
Washington representative of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee and Morris Abram, presi-
dent of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations.
Mann, in remarks from Tel
Aviv, called the beatings
"inhumane and simply unac-
ceptable." Bookbinder called
the tactics a "mistake" and
said his group was awaiting
explanations a n d
modifications.
Abram, who called a closed-
door meeting of the
?residents' conference in New
ork, was to further issue a
statement at a planned press
conference later in the week.
In Israel, Felicia Langer, an
Israeli lawyer who has long
defended Palestinians charged
with security offenses, lodged
a complaint with Attorney
General Yoaef Harish on Mon-
day against "the torture of
residents of the Gaza Strip by
the illegal use of force, in line
with the policy of Defense
Minister Rabin/'
She demanded an immediate
investigation of the parties
who gave the "illegal orders"
and those who carried them
out.
It is based on two principles:
The first is that until negotia-
tions for a settlement have
begun, the political process
will concentrate on drawing
plans for a transition period in
the territories.
Second, the idea of an inter-
national conference would be
shelved for the time being and
the focus would be on the
preparatory process.
The plan also would
guarantee that if an interna-
tional conference is convened,
"no outside power will have
the right to dictate to the par-
ties or to veto whatever they
agree upon."
That provision is similar to
wording contained in the so-
called "London document"
that Hussein and Peres ham-
mered out last April during a
secret meeting in the British
capital.
While the Mubarak plan has
gained broad acceptance in
principle, there are a number
of differences on both sides.
Egypt, the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and the
Soviet Union want the ter-
ritories to be put under inter-
national supervision or ad-
ministration during the in-
terim period.
Israel and Jordan prefer that
they be put under Jordanian-
Palestinian administration.
But the two disagree over the
extent of Israeli presence in
the territories during the tran-
sition interval.
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, January 29, 1988
Temple Update
Hallandale Jewish
Center
Beth Tefilah
On Tuesday, Feb. 2, the
Hallandale Jewish Center will
hold the fourth lecture of its
series at 7:30 p.m. by Dr. Jay
Neufeld, -Rabbi and Principal
of Hillel Day Schol in North
Miami, speaking on "Jewish
Day Schools in the U.S. Are
They Fulfilling Their Mis-
sion?" This lecture will be held
in the HJC Chapel (416 NE 8
Ave., Hallandale) and a $1
donation will be requested at
the door.
On Tuesday, Feb. 9, the
Hallandale Jewish Center
Sisterhood will hold its annual
Membership Luncheon at noon
in the Temple's Social Hall
(416 NE 8 Ave., Hallandale.)
This deluxe catered luncheon
is one of Sisterhood's most im-
portant events. The entertain-
ment will be the Rorv Stevens
Orchestra. Members spouses,
friends and prospective new
members are cordially invited.
The ticket donation is $6 and
must be purchased in advance
at the Temple Office. No
tickets will be sold at the door.
Tables of 10 or 12 may be
reserved. Call 454-9100. "
will meet on Feb. 8 at 7:30
p.m.
Sisterhood will have a
meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 9 at
7:30 p.m.
Religious Commitee will
meet on Wednesday, Feb. 10
at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Committee will meet
on Thursday, Feb. 11 at 7:30
p.m.
Temple Beth Am
Services will be held on Fri-
day, Jan. 29 at 8 p.m. in the
Hirsch Sanctuary, conducted
by Rabbi Paul Plotkin and Haz-
zan Irving Grossman. The
Temple Beth Am choir under
the direction of Esther
Federoff, will participate in
the services. Hazzan Irving
Grossman and the Choir under
will render a special musical
presentation on Soviet Jewry.
An Oneg Shabbat will follow
services in the Lustig Social
Hall.
This Sabbath is designated
"Scholar In Residence" and
Rabbi Plotkin will be joined by
Rabbi Leonid Feldman, a
Soviet Refusenik, who will be
speaking on "From Marx to
Moses A Personal Odyssey
of a Refusenik."
Rabbi Leonid Feldman,
CLAL Associate, was ordain-
ed in May, 1987 at the Jewish
Thological seminary as the
first Soviet born Conservative
Rabbi. Rabbi Feldman's varied
and unusual life and educa-
tional experiences and
background m a Marxist Socie-
ty enables him to teach and lec-
ture on Judaism with a passion
and perspective that is unique
and exhilarating. He is a
dynamic and exciting speaker
and is well on his way to
becoming a new and important
figure in American Jewish life.
On Saturday, Jan. 30, Sab-
bath Services are at 9 a.m.,
conducted by Rabbi Paul
Plotkin and Hazzan Irving
Grossman. Rabbi Leonid
Feldman will present the
"Dvar Torah" on the portion
of the week. A luncheon
following services will be by
RESERVATION ONLY. Rab-
bi Feldman will speak on
"Jewish Education Why I'm

Against Bar Mitzvah."
On Saturday evening, Jan.
30 at 6 p.m., Rabbi Feldman
will meet with United
Synagogue Youth, at which
time he will discuss Soviet
Jewry.
The Bat Mitzvah of Jodi
Shapanka, daughter of Ed-
ward and Marsha of Coral Spr-
ings was celebrated at Temple
Beth Am on Jan. 23.
Sabbath Services will be held
on Friday, Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. in
the Hirsch Sanctuary, con-
ducted by Rabbi Paul Plotkin
and Hazzan Irving Grossman.
The Temple Beth Am Choir
under the direction of Esther
Federoffs, will participate in
the services. An Oneg Shabbat
will follow services in the
Lustig Social Hall.
Friday, Feb. 5 has been
designated JNF Shabbot. We
are delighted and priviledged
to have as our guest speaker
Congressman Larry Smith.
Our distinguished guest
speaker, Congressman Smith,
will be speaking about his re-
cent trip to Israel as well as an
updated Middle East report
about the current needs and
accomplishments of the JNF.
This Shabbot has also been
designated Gimmel Class
Shabbot. The Gimel class of
the Solomon Geld Religious
School will participate in the
service.
On Saturday, Feb. 6, Sab-
bath Services are at 9 a.m.
conducted by Rabbi Paul
Plotkin and Hazzan Irving
Grossman. The congregation
is invited to a Kiddush follow-
ing services in the Lustig
Social Hall.
Temple Beth Am of Margate
Inc., proudly announced the
groundbreaking ceremony for
the new building of the Rabbi
Solomon Geld Religious School
that took place on Sunday,
Jan. 24 at 11 a.m.
In order to accommodate the
burgeoning school enrollment
which has grown from the ear-
ly 1980's of 30 students to over
400 presently, the new 15,000
square foot building will house
15 classrooms, a nursery day
care facility, youth lounge,
muti-purpo8e room and the
Synagogue's complete library.
Many local dignitaries joined
with us to mark this milestone.



*-
On Sunday, Feb. 21, at 7:15
&m., the Hallandale Jewish
mer will present Paul Zim in
concert with his Klezmer band
in a performance of cantorial
composition and Yiddish
classics. The donation is $10
and all seats are reserved. Call
the Temple Office, 454-9100,
or stop bv, 416 NE 8 Ave.,
Hall., for best seats.
Temple Beth Ahm
Aleph Consecration will be
Friday, Jan. 29 at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek of-
ficiating and Cantor Eric
Lindenbaum chanting the
Liturgy.
Saturday morning services
will be at 8:45 a.m.
Monday, Feb. 1 the Youth
Committee will meet at 7:30
p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 2 the Way and
Means Committee will meet at
7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 3 the Tem-
ple Board will meet at 7:30
p.m.
Daily minyan meet at 8 a.m.
and Monday-Thursday at 7:30
p.m.
Shabbat Services will begin
Friday, Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek of-
ficiating and Hazzan Eric
Lindenbaum chanting the
Liturgy.
Saturday morning services
will begin at 8:45 a.m. with the
Bar Mitzvah of Daniel Joshua
Zeller son of Guillermo and
Shirley Zeller of Pembroke
Pines, Daniel is a student at
Pines Middle School and his
hobbies are skateboard, foot-
ball, and baseball. Special
guests will include his brother
Jonathan and grandparents
Jakob and Giselle Reinstein of
Miami Beach and Leo and Ana
Zeller of Miami Beach.
Sunday, Feb. 7 we will have
a Picnic at C.B. Smith Park
beginning at 11 a.m.
The Education Committee
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The event, chaired by Mrs.
Anne Berman, took place on
the school grounds at 7205
Royal Palm Blvd., Margate.
Temple Beth-El
Reform
Friday evening, Jan. 29 Ser-
vices will be conducted by Rab-
bi Samuel Z. Jaffe at 8 p.m. in
the Auditorium.
The flowers on the Bima are
being presented by Mrs.
Dorothy Epstein in memory of
her husband Philip Epstein.
The Oneg Shabbat is being
sponsoredby the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth El.
Saturday morning, Jan. 30,
the Torah Study will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Jaffe at 10:15
a.m. in the Chapel, followed by
Shabbat Service at 11 a.m.
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth El is having a
Breakfast/Entertainment Pro-
gram on Sunday, Jan. 31 at
9:30 a.m.
The entertainment portion
of the program features Ber-
nie Knee, song stylist,
guitarist, piano player and
amusing story teller. Mr.
Knee's rich baritone voice is
equally at home with Broad-
way show tunes, Standards,
Hebrew, Yiddish, Italian songs
and Cantorial selections. As a
recording artist, he has been
heard on Columbia and RCA
records and has appeared on
the Broadway stage, as well as
being currently featured in
several films. This
Breakfast/Program is open to
both men and women for a
donation of $2 per person.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe will
conduct his Bible Class on
Monday morning, Feb. 1 in the
Chapel Lounge at 10 a.m.
Friday evening, Feb. 5 Ser-
vices will be conducted by Rab-
bi Rachel Hertzman at 8 p.m.
in the Auditorium.
The flowers on the Bima are
being presented by Mrs.
Marion Sternfels in memory of
the Yahrzeit of her husband,
Lester Sternfels. The Oneg
Shabbat is being sponsored by
the Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El.
Saturday morning, Feb. 6,
the Torah Study will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Samuel Z.
Jaffe at 10:15 a.m. in the
Chapel, followed by Shabbat
Service at 11 a.m.
On Monday, Feb. 8,' Dr.
Leon Weissberg will conduct
his "Jewish History" class in
the Chapel Lounge of Temple
Beth El from 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. This class is free to Tem-
ple Members, and is a brown-
Wed., Feb. 10, 1988
Important Date To Remember
Dinner Featuring
The Future Prime Minister
Of The State Of Israel
Rabbi MeirKahane
Biscay** BV
Marriott Hotmt
U33 M. My***" D*W
(Oppo** OMMI)

Fr*+0,KocHO,S~*n~+
bag session with a beverage
being served by the Temple.
Temple Beth Shalom
Weekend services will be
held at Temple Beth Shalom,
1400 North 46 Ave.,
Hollywood, conducted by Dr.
Morton Malavsky, assisted by
Cantor Irving Gold, chanting
the liturgical portions. Service
will begin at 8:15 p.m. Friday,
Jan. 22, and will be dedicated
to the Bat Mitzvah of Chavi
Frankl, daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Frankl. Chavi will also
represent her Russian
"Twin," Eugenia Galperina,
daughter of Lev and Sonia
Galperin, residents of Moscow,
USSR. Chavi attends Attucks
Middle School, grade 8 honors
and is class I competitive gym-
nast. She is a member of Teen
Connection of Jewish Com-
munity Center. Pulpit flowers
will be tendered by Esther,
Steven and Warren Frankl
and oneg shabbat following the
service will be sponsord by
Chavi's parents, in her honor.
At 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 23,
Martin Frankl will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah during ser-
vice. Martin is the son of Dr.
and Mrs. Robert Frankl and
attends 7 honors grade at At-
tucks Middle School, is a
member of Teen Connection of
Jewish Community Center,
and is interested in computers
and building model rockets.
Pulpit flowers will be spon-
sored by Esther, Steven and
Warren Frankl, in honor of
their brother, and kiddush
reception following service
will be tendered by Martin's
parents, in honor of the occa-
sion. Attending the celebra-
tions Friday night and Satur-
day morning will be grand-
mother, Rose Gauer, of Toron-
to, Canada. Martin's "twin"
being Bar Mitzvahed in absen-
tia will be Ilya Leites, son of
Boris and Inna Leites, living in
Leningrad, USSR.
'FOOD FOR THOUGHT"
will meet Monday, Jan. 25,
6:15 p.m., in the reception
area, Temple building. Rabbi
Malavsky will introduce the
surprise guest speaker follow-
ing a buffet supper served to
all who have joined this adult
education series. Non-
members are welcome as well
as members, and must make
reservations by calling Tem-
ple, 981-6111, Sylvia S.
Senick, executive director.
"A CELEBRATION IN
SONG" starring Hazzan
Mizrahi in concert will be held
at Temple Beth Shalom,
Wednesday evening, Feb. 3,
7:45 p.m., featuring Barbara
Garner, lyric soprano, and Lin-
da Hall, piano accompanist.
Hazzan Mizrahi has performed
with major symphonies and
opera companies. He will offer
Friday, January 29, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11
FRIENDS OF KACH
PO Box 403547
a program ot Hebrew, Yiddish
and Ladino songs, cantorial
masterpieces, Neopolitan
songs and operatic arias. For
tickets, please call Judy Koch,
989-3429; Darlene Oklin,
966-4787, Joan Esterson,
983-3573, or Temple office.
Tickets for patrons are $25
and include a "Meet the Stars"
dessert reception. General ad-
mission reserved tickets are
$12.50.
Tune in every Sunday morn-
ing at 7:30 a.m. and hear Dr.
Malavsky host program
"TIMELY TOPICS,^ on radio
am dial 560, WQAM.
Services will be conducted
by Dr. Morton Malavsky, rab-
bi, assisted by Cantor Irving
Gold, at Temple Beth Shalom,
1400 N 46 Ave., Hollywood,
FL, this weekend in the main
sanctuary. Friday night, Jan.
29, service will begin at 8:15
p.m. and well be dedicated to
the Bat Mitzvah of Erica Lynn
Schwartz, daughter of Dr.
Stephen and Kaye Schwartz.
Erica is an 8th grade student
at University school and pre-
confirmation student at Beth
Shalom religious school. Pulpit
flowers and oneg shabbat will
be sponsored by Erica's
parents and sister Melanie, in
her honor. Attending the
celebration will be grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Kluglose of Little Rock,
Arkansas and Mr. and Mrs.
Ben Schwartz, North Miami
Beach, FL. Erica will repre-
sent her Russian "twin," Ren-
na Fulmacht daughter of
Viktor and Maya Fulmacht,
residents of Moscow, USSR.
Service will begin at 9 a.m.,
Saturday, Jan. 30. All
members and guests are
welcome. Weekday service
held in the Jack Shapiro
Chapel: 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
for mincha-maariv. For addi-
tional daily service informa-
tion, please call Rabbi Alberto
Cohen, 981-6113.
On Thursday, Jan. 28, dur-
ing the 7:30 a.m. service in the
Chapel, the Bar Mitzvah will
be held of David Ray Halpern,
son of Chaim and Rebecca
Halpern. David attends Beth
Shalom Academy, 6th grade.
Attending the celebration will
be grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Ben Halpern of Miami Beach,
FL and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond
Shamah of Brooklyn, N.Y.
Temple Sinai
Students in the Adelph
class of the Paul B. Anton
Religious School of Temple
Sinai will be consecrated dur-
ing the Shabbat Service on Fri-
day Evening, Jan. 29. Prior to
the Service, a Dinner will take
place for the Consecrants and
their families, beginning at 6
p.m. in the Lipman Youth
Wing. The Service begins at 8
p.m. in the Sanctuary with
Rabbi Richard J. Margolis and
Cantor Misha Alexandrovich
officiating. The following
Aleph students will be con-
secrated: Darin Admati, Liz-
zah Charlap, Corine Erez,
Zachery Fuerst, Kate
Gorenberg, Amy Hubschman,
Daniel Lack, Joshua Mantis,
Siobhan Montag, Joshua Rich,
Greg Rubinstein and Erica
Weissman.
The Sabbath Service on
Saturday Morning, Jan. 30 will
begin at 9 a.m. in the
Santuary.
The Institute of Adult
Jewish Studies Spring
Semester continues with
courses in "An Introduction to
the World of the Talmud,"
Beginning Hebrew for the Sid-
dur, Conversational Hebrew
"Ulpan," and "The Classical
Period in Jewish Philosophy.
On Monday Evening, Feb. 1,
at 8 p.m., the Mini-Series
"Mosaic: Jewish Life in
Florida" will continue with Dr.
Henry Green, Director of
Jewish Studies at the Universi-
ty of Miami. For information
on tnese and other courses
available to the congregation
and the community, please call
the Temple office 920-1577.
On Tuesday, Feb. 2, tht In-
stitute of Adult Jewish Studies
will continue with the popular
Dinner Program "First Tues-
day." The guest speaker will
be Meral Ehrenstein, a
Hollywood resident and native
of Turkey, who will discuss
"500 Years of Turkish Jewry."
Dinner will be served at 6:30
p.m. Admission is $15 per per-
son and reservations are
necessary. Please call the
Temple office for more
information.
On Friday Evening, Feb. 5,
the Shabbat Service will begin
at 8 p.m. in the Sanctuary of
Temple Sinai with Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis and Can-
tor Misha Alexandrovich
officiating.
On Saturday Morning, Feb.
6, the Service will begin at 9
a.m. in the Sanctuary.
Temple Sinai will present a
Pops Concert at the Temple on
Saturday Evening, Feb. 6 at 8
p.m. Members of the South
Florida Symphony Orchestra
will perform, under the direc-
tion of Charles W. Noble and
soloist Anita Knight Admis-
sion is $10 per person and
tickets are available at the
Temple office.
On Sunday Morning, Feb. 7,
a special program dealing with
Jewish Families of Today will
take place at 9:30 a.m. in the
Lipman Youth Wing. Dr. Ron
Wolfson of the University of
Judaism in Los Angeles will
speak on the subject with em-
phasis on raising a Jewish
child in today's society. The
program is open to the con-
gregation and community at
no charge,, however, reserva-
tions are requested.
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tT
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, January 29, 1988

I


*
Ask him how
his grades
were last term.
Call Israel.
See if your brother really
spends his free time in the li-
brary. With AT&T International
Long Distance Service, it costs
less than you'd think to stay
close. So go ahead Reach out
and touch someone.
ISRAEL
Economy Discount Standard
3pm-9pm 9pm-8am 8am-3pm
$ .89 $ 111 % 148
AVERAGE COST PER MINUTE
FOR A10 MINUTE CALL*
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totm*tWta<*m*troinmrfiitm*toto<>a*km&US. tht hour* hmd Add 3% Moral tax and applicable mm
auitfmMa. CM tor information or you'd DM to mewl** an *OT
BW7AIT
:
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art
The right choice.


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