The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00105

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Volume 17 Number 28
Hollywood, Florida Friday, December 18, 1987
fn4 SIMM





Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1987
The Chanukah Legend And Modern Miracle
By DVORA WAYSMAN
(WZPS) Chanukah, known as the Festival of
Lights, or more correctly the Festival of
Dedication, is the only important Jewish festival
that is not mentioned in the Bible. The story is re-
counted in the First and Second Books of the Mac-
cabees, which form part of the Apocrypha. It oc-
curs each year on the Hebrew date of 25th Kislev,
with candles being lit each night for eight days as a
symbol of the miracle which occurred in 165 BCE.
The story is well-known: Chanukah com-
memorates the victory of Judah the Maccabee and
his tiny band of loyal followers over the forces of
the Syrian king Antiochus, who tried to subdue
Palestine by wiping out the Jewish religion. The
Greek language, gods and customs were introduc-
ed and giant sports stadiums built; the temple was
defiled and a giant statue of the Greek god Zeus
was placed there, with the Jews ordered to worship
it. When Judah the Maccabee's army triumphed
and he re-established an independent Jewish
government, his first priority was to purify the
Temple.
The miracle of Chanukah is acknowledged as be-
ing that of the cruse of oil. There was just once
cruse of pure oil left in the Temple, but instead of
burning for just one day, as it was meant to do, it
burnt for eight days until the Jews had time to ac-
quire more. It was also something of a miracle for
such a small army to have been victorious against
great battalions, but we are not told that it was due
to any supernatural phenomena. It was not a
miracle in the sense of other Biblical miracles ...
the partin gof the sea in the crucial moment after
the Exodus from Egypt; the staying of the sun in
the days of Joshua; or when the great walls of
Jericho came tumbling down at the blast of a
trumpet. The Jewish victory in the Chanukah story
was evidently due (as in the modern Six-Day War)
to superior military tactics and strategy, and a
strong motivation on the part of the Jews that their
ancestral faith should survive.
Nevertheless, the victory of the Maccabees ap-
pears to be the visible and perceptible enactment of
Goda will. The festival possesses human
significance and is far more than a Jewish national
celebration it is a festival of liberty which
glorifies the right of freedom of worship for all
peoples.
This fight for the right to practice Judaism did
not vanish with King Antiochus. The Jews of the
Soviet Union are still denied this right, and
"refuseniks" continue to dwell in the darkness of
oppression. Similarly, Syrian and Ethiopian Jews
long for the right to worship without fear of
reprisal and the right to make aliya to Israel.
The true relevance of the Festival of Lights can
be felt in Israel, particularly in Jerusalem where
the events of the Chanukah story took place more
than 2,000 years ago. In Israel, one's loyalty is not
divided, and there is nothing to compete with our
own national and religious holidays. Almost every
Jerusalem home is bedecked with a Chanukah
menorah during the eight days of the festival, and
each evening the little candles are a beacon of light
as voices all over the city sing Maoz Tsur.
The miracle we are proclaiming is not an act of
supernatural grace. Our miracle is that the Jewish
people and the State of Israel continue to survive,
and that our Light will never be extinguished.
On the Rock:
Gibraltar Jewish Piety And Secular Worldliness
By DAVID LANDAU
As in most synagogues, the
gossip in Nefutsot Yehudah
centers on whether the man
sitting in the front row will run
for office yet again.
But in Nefutsot Yehudah.
the office in question is not
gabbai (or parnas,(as it is call-
ed there), but of chief minister
of the government.
An Israeli reporter recently
visiting was reluctant to
trespass on the special Sab-
bath ambience by asking Sir
Joshua Hassan straight out
about his plans. Next morning,
however, at the delectable
Jewish patisserie around the
corner, the reporter seemed to
have his answer.
The chief minister, dapper in
Sunday cravatte and tweeds,
amiably kissed each of the
shop girls as they wrapped his
bread and cakes. A boc yguard.
dour and discreet, followed
him out.
But Gibraltar's politics are
apparently not so easily
deciphered. The shop girls,
quite unflustered, made it
clear to the newsman that they
expect the weekly kisses to
continue whether or not Sir
Joshua decides to prolong his
30-year rule over this rock.
They simply like him.
Everybody seems to like
everybody in Gibraltar, which
makes it such a pleasant place
to visit and to live on. too.
despite it tininess. 2.1 miles in
area and 1,396 feet high.
On Shabbat morning, after
services have ended at the four
synagogues and the youth mi-
nyan at the Jewish school, the
entire Jewish community
(about 600 souls) seem to be
out on Main Street, strolling
and exchanging smiles and
small talk with their non-
Jewish friends. About 30.000
people live on the rock.
At the Convent, the official
residence of the British gover-
nor, they may pause to inspect
the solitary guard, marching
up and down in his mirror-
polished boots. Rachel
Benisso. whose husband
Abraham is a cantor famous
throughout the Sephardi
world, remembers when her
son Isaac was in the army (the
Gibraltar Regiment) and took
his turn to stand guard there.
She would bring him a pot of
steaming hamxm (cholent) to
the guard room across the
street.
Gibraltar is unique in many
ways. A last bastion, literally
and metaphorically, of the
British Empire, the British
fleet and army still stand
guard there over the entrace
to the Mediterranean Sea. On
Main Street, Marks and
Spencer and British Home
Store ensure that this corner
of the continent shall be
forever England.
This doesn't stop housewives
from hopping across the
border to La Linea. Spain for
shopping, and rich men's
yachts ply casually from
Gibraltar's fine marina to the
jet-set playground of Marbella.
on Spain's southern coast. But
political relations are still
sometimes tense, and the
Gibraltarians are fierce in
their allegiance to London.
For the Jewish traveler min-
ing the famous cities of
southern Spain in search of the
Golden Age. Gibraltar's uni-
queness lies in the special at-
mosphere of coexistence of
which the Jewish community is
so proud, and in which it has
flourished for centuries.
A visit to Cordoba, bir-
thplace of Maimonides; to
Seville, with its massive
cathedral; and to the Alham-
bra in Granada is a feast for
the eye, but a strain on the im-
agination. The remarkable
rivalry and interplay of the
Moorish and Catholic cultures
in Spain are clear to see in
the architecture, in the
gardens and museums. But of
the great flowering of Jewish
life, so fully reported in extant
literature, almost nothing
tangible remains.
The great Alhambra itself,
the guidebook tells us. was
originally built by a Jewish
minister as his own place. Cen-
turies later. King Ferdinand
and Queen Isabella, the
Catholic monarchs who drove
.out the Moslem Moors, sat in
the breathtakingiy beautiful
building and turned a deaf ear
to Don Isac Abardanel's pleas.
He and his whole Jewish
community were banished
from the laand and the society
in which they and their
forbearers had been totally in-
tegrated culturally,
economically, politically. Yet,
they had totally preserved
their own identity as Jews.
This fusion was probably uni-
que in the Diaspora ex-
perience. Even in America to-
day it is arguably not yet
matched.
Wandering through the
Juderia (Jewish section) of
Seville or the single surviving
and unused synagogue in Cor-
doba, it is hard to conjure up
those centuries of Jewish
vitality and mutually enriching
coexistence with the wider
world.
Gibraltar, in its own tiny
way, can help. Not just
because the popular chief
minister happens to be Jewish,
or the mayor, or the head of
the bar, or the chairman of the
chamber of commerce.
But also because the Jewish
shops on Main Street are all
closed on the Sabbath and
festivals, and that seems
perfectly natural to everyone.
Because the Israel flag flies
from the honorary consul's of-
fice from sunset Friday to
nightfall Saturday. Because
the Catholic archbishop at-
tends a brit milah and the
governor attends synagogue
on Hanukkah.
Because in order to ascer-
tain the extend of the erui
(area in which it is permissible
to carry during the Sabbath),
the visitor need only ask In-
spector Moses Benggio of the
Gibraltar Police, whom he will
encounter in the kosher goods
shop, just opposite the
cathedral.
Because a leader of the local
British Legion is Capt. (Ret.)
Solomon Levy, whose booming
bass rings out at services at his
synagogue.
Levy, until his recent retire-
ment from the local ter-
ritorials, commanded the
massive naval guns that look
out over the straits. They were
fired on the Queen's birthday
until Sir Joshua persuaded
Levy that the cost in broken
window panes was too high.
The captain had asked for a
Jewish legal ruling about fir-
ing on the Sabbath.
Continued on Page 5

Who Needs It?
We Do!
ouglas Gardens
Thrift Shops
HOUSEWARES CLOTHING FURNITURE APPLIANCES
Helping the Jewish community of South Florida
for more than 40 years.
A not-for-profit organization
Call for free pick-up of your fully tax deductible donation:
Dade: 751-3988 Broward: 981 -8245
Shop at two convenient locations:
5713 N.W. 27th Avenue, Miami
5829 Hallandale Beach Boulevard, Hallandale
A division of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens
!


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
Curacao Charm and Jewish Community
*! m .TpWiah TTootilral mill i\-u
The Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue in Willemstad
Curacao, the oldest
continually-operated house of
worship in the Western
Hemisphere, will be the focal
point of January's Curacao
Caribbean Jewish Festival, a
unique program honoring
Curacao's 300-year-old Jewish PSng
community as a haven offering
religious freedom.
Dedicated in 1732, the tem-
ple is one of Curacao's most
popular attractions. The struc-
ture has an exterior reminis-
cent of Amsterdam's Por-
tuguese Synagogue and an in-
terior rich with mahogany
wood, brass candeliers, and a
sand-carpeted floor.
Interesting legends and
theories account for the use of
the sand:
Symbolically, the sand
represents the Sinai Desert in
which the Jews sojourned
enroute to the Promised Land.
The interior of the Synagogue
is patterned after an ancient
Israeli encampment with the
Tabernacle in the center and
the Israelites encamped on the
perimeter.
Some prefer to think the
sand represents a blessing to
the patriarchs which declared
that their descendants would
be as numerous "as sand
which is upon the seashore."
A historical version of the
sands' use follows the premise
that the ancestors of its
original members fled to the
Curacao temple from Spain
and Portugal, placing sand on
the floors of their secret
synagogues to muffle the
sounds of prayer.
From a more practical stand-
point, the thick layer of sand
served as a carpet to cover the
hollow, woodenplank floor to
minimize the sounds of
footsteps during the service.
Those footsteps resound
nonetheless, "Today, when
religious intolerance and
fanaticism dominate so much
of the news, we felt it was im-
portant to honor the people of
Curacao and the Netherlands
who have made such historic
contributions to upholding
respect for all peoples, and, in
particular, the Jewish people,"
says Rabbi Marc Tannnebaum,
director of International Rela-
tions, American Jewish Com-
mittee, on the meaning of the
Curacao Jewish Festival.
The Curacao Jewish Carib-
bean Festival, running from
January 3 to 21, centers
around the origins of the
Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue and offers visitors
the opportunity to participate
in a cultural experience while
vacationing in Caribbean
resort.
According to Tannenbaum,
the reason that Curacao's
Jews have thrived both
materially and spiritually was
that in 1652 Curacao adopted
the earliest known charter
guaranteeing religious liberty
for Jews and other minorities
in the New World.
He adds that the Dutch
leaders on this Caribbean
island were simply following
the precedent of the
Netherlands motherland,
which, in 1579, became the
first country in Europe to
establish religious tolerance as
a way of life.
Visitors to the Curacao
Jewish Festival will ex-
perience cultural and spiritual
enrichment as well as the
island's beautiful vacation
facilities and amenities
Because it is just 20 miles off
the coat of South America,
Curacao enjoys a sun-drenched
climate tempered by the
tradewinds, white
and warm, tranquil
fishing
waters for swimming,
and scuba diving.
Curacao is the largest of the
Netherland Antilles, a 38-mile
tropical resort reflecting the
traditions of its Dutch origins,
offering the vacationer diverse
culture, restaurants, enter-
tainment, water and land
sports, and shopping.
Curacao's Caribbean Jewish
Festival, a series of events
centered around the origins of
Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue, taking place bet-
ween Jan. 3-21,1988, has been
organized by the Curacao
Tourist Board in cooperation
with the island's Jewish com-
munity, the philanthropic Bnai
Zion organization and
American Airlines.
Immaculate streets lined with colorful
narrow-gabled, Dutch-style structures add to
the unique storybook texture of Willemstad,
capital of Curacao, home of the Curacao
Caribbean Jewish Festival, which celebrates
one of the oldest Jewish communities in the
Western Hemisphere the first three weeks in
January, 1988.
Come to the Party...
but Stay for the Bargains!
Join Us for the Grand Opening of the
one & only original
Douglas Gardens
Miami Jewish Home & Hospital
Thrift Shoos
Our NEW Hallandale Store is
NOW OPEN
3194 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
4 Blocks West of I-95
Early Bird Special
Free Danish & Coffee
8 AM-10 AM
all week long
Drop this off at the Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
to win a free weekend in Nassau, Bahamas.
Round-trip tickets Ft. Lauderdale-Nassau
courtesy of Midway Airlines. Weekend includes
round-trip airfare, 2 nights hotel accommodations.
A division of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
lor the Aged at Douglas Gardens
Serving the Elderly ot South Florida for More than
40 Years
Name
Address
Telephone_____________________________
Drawing to be held Dec. 22 at noon. Winner need
notoepresent. M/dwgy
Airlines


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1987
Rededication to Freedom
Chanukah the Festival of Rededication
the Festival of Lights.
As we prepared to kindle the first light of
Chanukah Tuesday night, the story of the
victory of the ancient Maccabees had never
been more relevant.
The ongoing plight of Soviet, Ethiopian,
Syrian, Iraqi and other Jews reminds us that
we must redouble our efforts on their behalf.
At the same time, we note with pride that
this is the 40th year in which Chanukah
lights are kindled in a free State of Israel.
And it is the 21st year in which the
Chanukah Menorah at the Kotel, the
Western Wall, is lit in a reunited Jerusalem.
Therefore we rejoice in the freedoms that
we enjoy in this country, in Israel and in
many nations, but vow to either extend
those freedoms to those lands in which Jews
are second- or even third-class citizens, or to
see that they are permitted to leave.
Chag Sameiach!
Terrorism in Gaza
The sudden upsurge in violence in the
Gaza Strip warrants an immediate review of
Israeli policy towards the narrow piece of
territory along the Mediterranean which has
been the scene of warfare for the past 3,500
years.
Unlike Judea and Samaria or the West
Bank, Gaza has no demonstrable link to
Jewish sovereignty. Part of the British man-
date over Palestine for 31 years, Gaza was
occupied by Egypt in 1948. During 29 years
of Egyptian occupation, interrupted for a
few months by the Sinai Campaign when
Israel seized the territory, Cairo made no
move to incorporate Gaza into its
boundaries.
It has been more than 20 years since Israel
won the 26-mile long strip in the Six Day
War, and Gaza has done little to make its oc-
cupation worthwhile during the two
decades. Hundreds of thousands of Palesti-
nians, ignored and neglected by their Arab
neighbors, make Gaza more of a tinder box
than Israel needs.
While there is ambivalence toward
American Jewry dictating resolutions and
while the solution may not be as simple as
simply moving out and erecting a 50-foot
high wall to separate Gaza from Israel, it is
hard to present a case for the drain on both
Israeli manpower and reputation which the
fighting between rebellious youths, tough
troops and border police brings about.
Certainly the 3,000 Jewish settlers in the
Gaza strip can be relocated in nearby parts
of Israel which literally beg for additional
inhabitants.
It may be time to transfer the problems of
Gaza to an Arab state, and to do so quickly.
OTA
^H
TheJcwisVl
ol South Broward
''-> frtd Shark*t
FHEO SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
Published Weekly January through March Bi Weakly April through August
HOLLYWOOD FORT LAUDERDALE OFFICE. 8386 W Oakland Park Blvd
Fort Lauderdale FL 33321 Phone 748-8400
JOAN C TEGLAS. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING 1 373-4805 COLLECT
Main Oltice i Plant 120 N.E. 6th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 1 373-4805
MtMbrr JTA. S*vni Arti. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA.
HE WARMEST OF
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT
THE COURT
AT PALM-AIRE
The mood is festive and the excitement is growing
as Pompano's premier retirement community
celebrates the holidays! Share in the spirit of the
season and join us for a
Friday, December 18, li*87
Volume 17

27KISLEV5748
Numbta-^8
HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1987
1 to 4 p.m.
Refreshments Entertainment Tours
RSVP by December 19
m___________Call (305) 975-8900___________
The Court at Palm-Aire
2701 N. Course Drive
Pompano Beach, FL 33069
CAA-IIS
%c(burt?
lit 'IhitinMv
i.-. .-...


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 6
Award Dinner In Association
With Israel Bonds
The Third Annual Remem-
brance Award Dinner will be
held at the Fontainebleau
Hilton in Miami Beach on Sun-
day, Dec. 20, in association
with State of Israel Bonds.
Several thousand Holocaust
survivors from all parts of the
United States and Canada are
expected to attend the dinner
where the 1987 International
Elie Wiesel Remembrance
Award will be presented to
Benjamin Meed, president of
the American Gathering and
Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors. The
award is in recognition of
Meed's efforts to insure that
the Holocaust will be
remembered by all future
generations of Jews and non-
Jews.
David Sklar, chairman of
South Broward Israel Bond
Campaign, will serve as South
Broward's chairman of the
evening. Henry Kissinger,
former U.S. Secretary of State
and Zubin Mehta, conductor of
the New York and Israel
Philharmonic Orchestras, will
serve as honorary co-chairmen
of the tribute to Meed.
"
Croat* Land From Sand

Gibraltar Worldliness
Continued from p,^ 2
"What's your job?" the rabbi
asked.
"I shout, 'fire!'"
"No problem then," was the
reply.
But the guns at the top of
the rock, and Levy, in his dress
uniform, had to march up
there on foot for a firing dur-
ing the Sabbath. His troop,
gentiles all, could have driven,
but they insisted on marching
up with him.
Levy's brother James is
president of the Gibraltar
Jewish community. He is a
senior partner in Sir Joshua
Hassan s law office. He is also
active with accountant Moses
Garson and other businessmen
in Gibraltar's flourishing new
enterprises as an "offshore"
financial center. People say
James Levy is tempted to run
for political office, and that he
could one day become chief
minister, too.
Like his brother, James
loves Gibraltar with a passion.
But he is torn, he says, and
may soon move away
because there is no Jewish
high school.
He himself went to a local
monastery-school where the
monks, he recalls, would cut
down branches for the Jewish
children to take home for the
sukkahs. His education imbued
him with the fusion of Jewish
piety and secular worldliness
that is the hallmark of
Gibraltar's Jewry. Yet he feels
he can no longer sustain it and
transmit it to his growing
children. He has sent his eldest
daughter off to an Orthodox
grammar school in London.
The community would be
truly sorry to see him go. Part-
ly to keep him and others like
him from leaving, they are con-
sidering the founding of a
Jewish school in Gibraltar, so
that learned young men would
come and live on the rock, and
teach the younger generation.
"But they would have to be
men with a smile," Levy
warns. "No extremism can
succeed here."
He says the children today
are somehow less confortable
with the non-Jews than he and
his generation are. He be-
moans it yet he recognizes
that it is a manifestation of
that certain xenophobia in
modern Orthodoxy that has
been reincarnated from the
ashes of Eastern Europe and
now sets the tone among Or-
thodox Ashkenazim and
Sephardim the world over, in-
cluding in Israel.
It is the antithesis of the
Golden Age of Spain, and it
threatens to dull the special
brilliance of the gem that is
Jewish Gibraltar.
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $ '_________
Name
Address
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone: 538-6464
Three Varieties of Fruit?
APPLE and ORANGE and BUCKWHEAT
Yes, you know apples and oranges are fruit, but did you know that Kasha
is made from buckwheat, and that buckwheat is a member of the rhubarb family
(pink stalks and all!)
Buckwheat is the best source of high biological protein in the entire plant
kingdom very close to the protein level of whole milk solids. Kasha,
the 100% pure roasted buckwheat kernel, is rich in potassium,
phosphorous, fiber and vitamin B, and NO CHOLESTEROL. Thus, it is
an economical food high in balanced protein and it's delicious, too!
For a FREE recipe leaflet, write to:
The Birkett Mills, Venn Yon, NY 14527
and discover the world of the UNSUNG FRUIT!
KAIHA.
because...
Your Heritage is Forever!
15c OFF
STORE COUPON
15C OFF
15c OFF
STORE COUPON
I
on any one package of Wolffs KASHA I
ROASTED BUCKWHEAT KERNELS I
I
TO THE DEALER Thle II
will b h ptui to to* Hill Win. V>\M
to miNrt ton c.i
JI
Oil
l|llllll Coupon* w. nm-
trilwirtli tstol M m to prontoHto, t i* Itoam. to rn>f. CwUnn S
Hid pay >ny mm* Ul. Ch m I
nii.piln Mto. inttto. pop I
MKMPTKM. PP.ESENT TOn
OU SALESMAN OH MAN. TO
TMC MMITT UHLIS, PENN
YAN. MW YORK 14*27 Of Ff P.
OOOO ONLY IN U.S.A. UMTT _
ONLY ONE COUPON MAY IE _
REDEEMED PiP. UNIT OF
PRODUCTS PURCHASED.
i
Hi
15c OFF
The Bilked Mills. IVnn Yin Now York 14S27
Limit one coupon per purchase. This coupon expii s I 31, 1968
store coupon 15c OFF
I
I
.4


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1987
Urgency Spurs Search For Donor
Bj ALISA KWITNEY
JewiaK Floridian Staff Writer
NORMA WEINSTEIN
says that she is "not a teary
person," even though she is
crying as she speaks of her
daughter, Ann Koch.
Koch, 31, has lived her life
for the past seven years under
the threatening shadow of
disease; diagnosed in 1980
with chronic myelogenous
leukemia, she nonetheless
married, (Dr. Howard Koch, a
Miami Beach physician) had a
child, and led an active life.
"For the seven years, she
would have her down
moments, but on the whole she
led her life as if there were
nothing wrong," her mother
recalls. "She and her husband
traveled she and I would go
to a par 3 golf course together
and she cooked, iogged,
went to aerobics. She has
always been a wonderful wife
and mother."
All of this changed drastical-
ly when Koch's disease ac-
celerated recently. Now, only
a bone marrow transplant
from a suitable donor could
prolong Koch's life.
"Unfortunately, her siblings
are not matches," says Weins-
tein, whose other daughter,
Andrea Siassipmour, has been
trying to help locate a person
whose bone marrow would
match Ann's.
THE WAY WATER IS
SUPPOSED TO TASTE.
Imagine water that tastes fresh and clear as a spring
Water without sodium, pollutants, or carbonation. Water
with nothing added, nothing taken away That s water the
way it should taste. That s fresh, pure Mountain valley
Water from a natural spnng in Hot Springs, Arkansas
Taste it. You'll be tasting water tor the very first time
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS, ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114
for F*EE recipe book send serf-#ddreed stomped envelop*
to Golds, Ocpt f, 90S McDonald Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11218
"(Andrea) has uncovered
numerous registries
throughout the country to see
if they can find a donor for
Ann, but so far we have been
unable to find a perfect
match," Weinstein reveals.
Since the chances of finding
a suitable bone marrow match
from a non-relative are "bet-
ween 1 out of 16,000 to 1 out of
20,000," the odds are against
Ann Koch. The local general
and Jewish communities,
however, are supportive of
her.
SYNAGOGUES and
Hebrew schools have been sen-
ding their prayers, donations
and blood samples to be tissue-
typed in an effort to help Koch.
The cost of the blood tests,
normally $500 each, was
reduced to $50 by Roche
Laboratories.
The Second Generation
Deed Club has been covering
the still considerable cost of
the testing, aided by
donations.
"People have really rallied
behind my daughter," says
Weinstein. "I'm not surprised.
I've always had great faith in
Miami, after living here for 44
years. The community has
been absolutely wonderful,
especially the Jewish
community."
Weinstein says that her
synagogue, Temple Menorah,
has been a great support for
her, along with other area
synagogues. High school girls
from Mesivta have even gone
to have blood tests, as has
newscaster Jim Brosemer
from Channel 4.
The blood tests, drawn for
tissue typing, are the first step
in determining whether or not
a person is a potential donor. If
a person's tissue type matches
Koch's, the next step would be
another two tests, to discover
whether other blood factors
match.
ALL THREE tests reveal
that there is a match, the
donor would be admitted to
the hospital in the evening,
and the next morning, under
light general or local
anesthesia, the procedure
would take place.
A bone marrow transplant,
Weinstein points out, is a non-
surgical process. A needle is
inserted into each of the
donor's hips, bone marrow is
withdrawn and given to the pa-
tient intravenously. The donor
returns home that evening or
the next morning.
"The donor may be a little
sore in the hip area for a few
CAMP MOSHAVA
^un^TflJ^
ANNOUNCES
THE OPENING OF
REGISTRATION
FORTHE
1988 CAMPING SEASON
For Boys
and Girls
Grades 3-10
Indian Orchard
Pennsylvania
Th atmosphere of Modem Israel
An advrn ture is RsMsjo Zkwist liviag
Jewish atadies program
Experiential Learning
Highest Caliber Dedicated Staff
Complete Sporu Program
Now Pool A Complete Waterfront
Register Now!
before January 15th
for Special Discount
Natare, Camping. Muaic. Dance, Drama 4 Much More
SERVING JEWISH YOUTH FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS
Alan Silverman
25 West 26th Street, New York, N.Y. 10010 (212) 683-4484 (212) 889-5260
Sponaorod by Bnol Akhra ol North Amortca and Rsllglou. ZlonliU of Amorlca
days," Weinstein admits. "But
they may save a life without
giving a life."
Potential donors sign con-
sent forms at each stage of the
process; they may back out at
anytime, and the entire pro-
cedure is explained to them
carefully beforehand.
It is also Ann Koch's only
chance for life: With the
transplant, her odds for sur-
vival become 30 percent in-
stead of zero.
Norma Weinstein is tired.
She has just returned from
visiting her daughter at the
Continued on Page 7-
RECOMMENDED HARBOR ISLAND SPA PACKAGE
RESERVE FOR CHRISTMAS OR NEW YEARS "SPAUDAY"!
GREAT HOLIDAY RATE: 5 DAYS 4 NITES
GALA NEW YEARS EVE PARTY
Champagne Party Spa Orchestra
Wing Victory Singers Dinner Dancing
Complete Mid-Nite Breakfast! Party Favors
ROOM RATE INCLUDES SPA PROGRAM
3 Balanced Meals Daily Massages
Facial or Herbal Wrap Free Tennis
Exercise & Yoga Classes Sauna/Steam
Nilely Dinner Dancing & Entertainment!
'** Call for Information & Reservations
1-800 SPA-SLIM
ON BISCAYNE BAY BETWEEN
MIAMI & MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
AMERICA'S PLUMPEST PITTED PRUNES
AMERICA'S FAVORITE FIGS
AMERICA'S RAISIN CHOKE
They're Americo's favorite noshes. When you nosh
one. you'll know why. Sunsweef" Prunes. Blue Ribbon* Figs
and Sun-Maid* Raisins each hove a fresh, naturally
sweet taste you won't find anywhere else. Add rhem to
your holiday recipes for more flavor and nutrition.
Or nosh them whenever you have the notion. They're
certified kosher!
. Sun-Diamond Qrowara of Calltomla. 1M4
____________ _,_/____


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Waldheim Denies New Charges
By RICHARD ENGEL
And SUSAN BIRNBAUM
(JTA) Austrian President
Kurt Waldheim has denied
new allegations about his per-
sonal involvement in atrocities
committed against Yugoslav
risans during World War
though he has admitted
knowing of them.
He has also moved to sue an
Austrian periodical for
publishing a story about his
reputed acceptance of bribes in
exchange for sparing the lives
of hostages in Yugoslavia in
1943 and 1944.
The new allegations surfac-
ed as an international commis-
sion meeting in Vienna, which
Waldheim himself convened,
broadened the scope of its in-
vestigation against him after
receiving testimony from his
wartime colleagues.
Articles alleging Waldheim's
Nazi activities in Yugoslavia
were published in two German-
language magazines, the West
German Stern and the
Austrian Wiener magazine.
Donor
Continued from Page 6-
hospital, where she sleeps in a
cot overnight. Her husband
"takes over during the day
hours."
STILL, THERE is just
enough energy left in her for
one more interview, one more
plea for assistance.
"We are totally consumed
with helping my daughter, but
we desperately need people,
we need money," says
Weinstein.
"Annie doesn't have that
much time what we are try-
ing to do is buy more time for
her."
But time is relentless, and
for Ann Koch, it may be runn-
ing out too fast.
To inquire about taking a
blood test, or to make a dona-
tion, call the Second Genera-
tion Deed Club, 751-9035.
Trade
Accord
Calling the document
historic, M. Ronald Krongold,
general chairman of the
reater Miami Israel Bonds
campaign, credits Jeb Bush,
Secretary of Commerce of
Florida, with being a "guiding
light" in helping make the
trade accord Florida-Israel
Cooperative Venture between
the State of Florida and Israel
a reality.
FICV which was signed by
officers representing both
governments on Oct. 28 at the
Omni International Hotel prior
to the Israel Bonds' Israel 40th
Anniversary Dinner honoring
Leland C. "Bud" Hunter,
senior vice president of the
Florida Power and Light Com-
pany. Florida is the second
state, after Massachusetts, to
sign a trade agreement with
the Jewish nation..
The Stern article contended
that the German army unit in
which Waldheim was serving
as a lieutenant was directly in-
volved in massacres and depor-
tations in the area of Kozara,
Yugoslavia, during the sum-
mer of 1942.
A spokesman for Waldheim
denied reports in Stern linking
the Austrian president per-
sonally to the Kozara
atrocities, in which some 4,000
Yugoslavs were killed and
10,000 others were sent to
forced labor camps, where
thousands died.
Waldheim initiated legal
proceedings against Wiener
for an article, written by
American journalist Chuck
Ashman, which charged that
Waldheim, as an intelligence
officer in the Wehrmacht dur-
ing World War II, accepted
gifts of coins and gold jewelry
in exchange for sparing the
lives of hostages in Yugoslavia
in 1943 and 1944.
The Austrian Press Agency
was quoted as saying that the
Wiener article was intended to
incite "feelings against the
Austrian head of state ""by un-
qualified and untrue allega-
tions. In view of the publica-
tion and the recognizable in-
tention of defamation, the
president has decided to em-
power the Vienna public pro-
secutor to begin criminal
proceedings."
The Chicago Tribune
reported that Waldheim ad-
mitted in an interview with
that paper that he knew of
Nazi reprisals against
Yugoslav partisans, but insists
he was not involved in carry-
ing them out.
"Orders to carry out
reprisals existed," he told the
Tribune, but "They came from
the highest war office in
Berlin. That was well known
by everyone. Only I was not in-
volved in it."
Waldheim said in the inter-
view that he was a victim of "a
defamation campaign."
Standing, left to right, David Sklar, Chairman South Broward
Israel Bonds Campaign; Ben Schwab; Abe Gerstel; Sam Staff;
Phil Albert and Sidney Jacobs. Seated, Arthur Marcus, Ex-
ecutive Director; Esther Schwab; Dan Levenson and Louis Appel.
Sunday, Nov. 22, community leaders of South Broward Israel
Bond Campaign gathered for a telephone conference meeting at
the Bond Office, 1747 Van Buren Street, Hollywood, participated
in by 54 Israel Bond offices throughout the United States.
Distinguished speakers were Prime Minister Yitzak Shamir and
Israel Bonds Chief Executive Officer General Yehudah Halevy,
whose reports included information about the new VRI and IVRI
Bonds that are specially designed for investors seeking larger
returns. For information, call 920-9820.
The next time you want to make something
special, try this delicious recipe for Fish Fillet
Creole. Its made with Fleischmanns*.
Margarine so it not only tastes great, it's tow in
cholesterol. Fleischmann's Margarine is made
from 100% com oil, has 0% cholesterol and is
tow in saturated fat.
One bite and you'll agree: There's never
been a better time for the great taste of
Fleischmann's.
^
FLEISCHMANN'S GIVES EVERY MEAL
A HOLIDAY FLAVOR.
SAVE15<
When you buy any package of
Fleischmann's Margarine
fiBbfilb

Hf. lAllf R One coupon pel puichase ol piod
ucl indicated AnyoltW use constitutes liaud
Conwmet lo pay salts Ui Von) >l copied
liansfcnid ptofcMt* tamd of resulted
Good only rn U S A A POs andfPOs V*
nK trimbuise you to' Ihe lace value plus BC
handling provided you and trie consumer
nave complied ntn me otter lei mt Cash value
I ?0C NABISCO BRANDS INC Of PI 59?1
. f I PASO IFXAS Z9966
I'lTIVIITIIITIH'i'l't I I'l'l-l'l'lV. ,'WVl I'H'.tVl
i^HMw^i'iVi
MVWMMW


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1987
Violence in Territories As Murders Mount
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
One Arab was killed and nine
were wounded as violence con-
tinued in the Gaza Strip and
West Bank. But Israeli
authorities said the situation in
the administered territories
was relatively calm and under
control after a week of rioting
that some officials described as
a civil revolt.
The disturbances of the past
week are acknowledged to
1EWEH iwnonAL WHD
/-.^K-h lebrael
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, Jewish National Fund executive vice presi-
dent, addressed 75 JNF lay leaders at a recent Conference of
Presidents and Key Lay Leadership at the Fort Lauderdale Mar-
riott Cypress Creek Hotel in Fort Lauderdale. Sharing the dais
are Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein, left, JNF president, and Jay
Yoskowitz, right, JNF national field director, who conducted a
seminar on strengthening regional fund-raising campaigns. JNF
is the agency responsible for afforestation and land reclamation
in Israel.
Montreal Campaign Tops $30M
MONTREAL Montreal's Combined Jewish Appeal at-
tained $30,237,192 last month, becoming the first Jewish
community outside of the United Stated to raise more than
$30 million in its annual campaign.
The figure represented an increase of more than $2
million over the 1986 Campaign on a gift-for-gift basis. The
Women's Division also attained a record total of
$3,599,538.
have been the worst in recent
years and politicians of the
Labor Party and Likud are
each accusing the other of
responsibility for allowing con-
ditions to deteriorate so
precipitously.
In Washington, the U.S.
State Department expressed
"serious concern" over the
situation and blamed the trou-
ble on the lack of a peace
agreement in the region and
Israel's "occupation of the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
At the United Nations,
meanwhile, the Security Coun-
cil prepared to meet for the se-
cond time in four days, to
discuss the situation.
While Israeli authorities
sought to ease tensions, Arabs
rioted in the northern Gaza
Strip town of Khan Yunis. An
unidentified Arab of about 25
was shot to death after he at-
tacked an Israel Defense
Force patrol with a gasoline
bomb. Four other rioters were
wounded.
The IDF has been under
orders since late last week to
exercise maximum restraint.
An investigation into the Khan
Yunis incident was promptly
held and the soldiers were
found to have "acted proper-
ly" in the circumstances.
In a bizarre aftermath, the
dead man's body was snatched
from the hospital morgue,
displayed in the streets by
demonstrators and returned to
the morgue.
Elsewhere in the Gaza strip,
soldiers at a roadblock wound-
ed four young Arabs who at-
tacked them with rocks.
One Arab was slightly
wounded in a clash with the
IDF in the West Bank. Youths
hurled rocks at army patrols in
the narrow alleys of the
Nablus casbah. They were
dispersed by tear gas. Mean-
while, a curfew was lifted at
the Balata refugee camp near
Nablus, only to be reimposed
later when rioting broke out in
the camp.
Officials of Israel's civil ad-
ministration in the territories
met with local Arab leaders to
try to calm the unrest. But
Arab municipality officials ap-
parently have little control
over what happens in the
refugee camps where pro-
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion activists are said to be the
source of unrest.
The authorities are hoping to
convince merchants in the ter-
ritories to reopen their shops,
which have been closed for
several days, and to prevail
upon Arab workers in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to
return to their jobs in Israel.
About 60,000 Arabs from
the territories have failed to
show up for work in Israel, ac-
cording to a report in Al
Hamishmar. The paper said
the effects of the strike are felt
mainly at construction sites
and in municipal services, such
as street cleaning and garbage
removal, in which many Arabs
are employed.
Meanwhile, the coalition
partners continued to clash
over short-term and long-term
policy in the territories.
Leaders of Likud's Herat fac-
Bagels and Lox and
Maxwell House Coffee.
Itcouldntbe
anything but
Sunday
morning.
tion accused the Labor Party
of aggravating the ferment in
the West Bank and Gaza by its
"low profile," "know-nothing"
policies.
They claimed that "quiet
and security will be restored
only when it is made clear that
Likud policy will be the one to
determine the future of
Judaea, Samaria and Gaza."
Laborites responded sharp-
ly, charging that Likud policies
were hindering any advance
toward negotiations for peace.
But Premier Yitzhak Shamir
got in the last word. He at-
tributed the unrest to the
"defeatist reaction of certain
circles" and charged that
"there are those among us
who believe that if we return
to the 1967 borders, the Arab
world will embrace us with
love." The premier spoke at a
meeting of Rafi, a dissident
faction that split from the
Labor Party long ago when it
was headed by Premier David
Ben-Gurion.
A dispute arose on another
front. According to a report in
Haaretz, Uri Porat, director
general of the Israel Broad-
casting Authority, charged
that television coverage of
disturbances in the territories
was abettng Arab propaganda.
Porat spoke at a meeting
with senior TV news depart-
ment personnel. He criticized a
segment of newscast in which
an Arab interviewee claimed
that "the army is to blame for
everything" and an army of-
ficer was asked repeatedly by
the reporter, "if it was not
possible to prevent incidents,"
Haaretz reported.
The paper also said there
was wide agreement at a
Cabinet meeting that the news
media were "inflating" the
situation in the territories.
At last there's time for a leisurely breakfast,
unhurried conversation and the chance
to enjoy a second (or even a third) cup of
rich, delicious Maxwell House* Coffee. It
couldn't be anything but Sunday morning.
K KOSHER
GENERAL
FOODS
C IM6 (jnfal food* CorpofUKXi
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE!
^B......... <
Isn't there sc
you'd li
A10-MINUTE CALL
Ft. Lauderdal
Boca Baton
Miami
Ft. Pierce
Call on weekends or afii
Rales listed above are m
Southern Ball pwndes
and a connecwn to 01
Dl Station (1.) charge* apply. Thaaa chargaa do not apply lo parion-lo-p<><&


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 9
MOVING SALE
THE DOUGLAS GARDENS THRIFT SHOP IS MOVING
Catch the lowest prices ever on the high quality merchandise you've
come to expect from Douglas Gardens.
EVERYTHING IS ON SALE AT OUR TEMPORARY LOCATION
5829 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Furniture, appliances, clothing, jewelry, stereos, televisions.
WATCH FOR THE GRAND OPENING AT OUR NEW LOCATION
3196 HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD.
4 Blocks West off 1-95
We're the One, the Only, the Original Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
Serving the elderly of South Florida for more than 40 years
All proceeds benefit the elderly residents of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged.
FOR FREE PICK-UP OF YOUR FULLY TAX-DEDUCTIBLE DONATIONS,
CALL: DADE: 625-0620 BROWARD: 981 -8245
Free appraisals on donated items valued at $5,000 or more.
Ho, Everyone
ere someone special
m'd like to call?
rE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
.auderdale $1.90
a Raton $1.90
$2.50
'ierce $190
kendsor alter 11 p.m. and save even more,
jbove are in effect 5-11 p.m.. Sunday -Friday.
S>
Southern Bell
A BBXSOUTH Company
Ball provides services wilhin your calling zone
jnnecwn to other tang distance companies
>ersori-l*pers<>n coin, hoi* guest. ca*ng(^.coe^ Rales subject to change Daytime raws an> higher Rales do not reflect applicable federal, stale and local taxes Apples to Irsra-LATA long
This Is Southern Bell!
only


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1987
So. Florida Skinheads-Racist Style
And Anti-Semitic Substance
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
POLICE AGENCIES and
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith are monitoring
the appearance in South
Florida of a neo-Nazi youth
gang that is anti-Semitic, anti-
black and has been associated
with violence in other parts of
the country.
The group calls itself
"skinheads," and one Miami
gslice officer who detained
ve youths about a month ago
in Coconut Grove, described
what he saw to The Jewish
Floridian
"They had German
swastikas on their shirt, heads
shaved, combat boots and they
spoke with a very radical at-
titude like, 'Why are you pick-
ing on us,' said Sgt. Joe
Rimondi, supervisor of the
Youth Gang Detail for the
Miami Police Department.
Rimondi was among a
special police detail monitoring
youth activity in Coconut
Grove where, on any weekend,
an estimated 300 to 400
members of various youth
gangs congregate.
"We heard about the
skinheads and they were the
first we ever saw," Rimondi
said. "We asked them why
they were there and they said
they were just hanging out.
They said they weren't with
the skinheads and that it's a
free country. We told them,
'Just don't start trouble.' "
Although the police report
no arrests of skinheads in
South Florida in association
with any crimes, there have
been several incidents of pro-
perty defacement in which the
damage was signed-off by
"Skins."
"EXTERMINATE the
Jewish religion," and "United
and strong white pride"
were among the sayings that
accompanied the scrawlings of
a swastika on the walls of
Sunset Senior High School in
April.
There were also recent
reports of skinhead graffiti
along 1-95 at Ives Dairy Road
on a cement barrier. There
were logos and phrases saying
that South Florida skinheads
are not neo-Nazis.
At Miami-Dade Community
College, south campus,
business cards were found on
kiosks which had "skinheads"
written on them and a
miniaturized map of
Tennessee.
Joan Peppard, assistant
southern counsel for the ADL,
and other agency staff are
working with police depart-
ments around South Florida as
well as the Dade County Public
Schools Special Investigations
Unit, sharing information
about the skinhead gang.
"We're also attempting to
reach school administrators
and classroom teachers to in-
form them that this is a pro-
blematic group that has the
potential to cause inter-ethnic
problems on the school cam-
puses," Peppard said.
"I don't think there's any
cause for alarm," Peppard ad-.
ded, "but I think there's
reason to be vigilant about the
situation especially with a view
toward the violent tendancies
of the group,"
There is also the potential,
Peppard said, of the ability of
established hate groups such
as the Ku Klux Klan and
Aryan Nations to turn the
tides of declining membership
by recruiting potential
members from groups like the
skinheads.
PEPPARD cautions that
not all graffiti and incidents
that appear to be done at the
hands of skinheads are indeed
directly attributable to the
group.
' 'There's a lot of
copycatism," she said. "And
there are probably kids who
dress up with typical skinhead
uniform who would not profess
to be anti-Semitic or racist,"
she said. "But that observa-
tion cannot detract from the
fact that there is a core group
of bonafide skinheads who
tend to act out the philosophy
by engaging in acts of
violence."
There have not been any
reports of violent activity
associated with skinheads in
Dade County. In Tampa, at
least 100 individuals are af-
filiated with skinheads and
some have been associated
with beatings of black youths
in the Ybor section, Peppard
said.
The flurry of activity pro-
| ^ fml Glott Kosher
,, Passover
Deauville
AT
THE
1988
5748
HOTEL
BEACH &
TENNIS
CLUB
ON THE OCEAN AT 67th STREET MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
8-9*10
NIGHT PACKAGES
649
INCLUDING
3 MEALS
DAILY
per person doubts occ
Plus Tax ft Tips
STRICTLY GLATT KOSHER
Under Supervision of National Koshruth
Headed bv RABBI YACOV UPSCHUTZ
SEDURIM ft SERVICES
WILL BE CONDUCTED
BY CANTOR
ASHER5CNARF
0m of Miami Beach's
largest ond Most
Luxurious Hotels
New Healed
Pool-Side Jacuzzi
Aerobic Classes
600 Kino-Size
Accommodations
Wide Oceon Beach
2 Pools Children's
Recreation Room On
Premises Tennis
Dancing Enter-
tainment ft Shows
Delicious Cuisine
Complimentary Tea
Room
QH
GtcmKosner o*,*
For Information & Reservations Call | -OOl "3446
or write Pissover'88 Deauville P.O. Box 402868
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
a**


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Ploridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11
mpted the ADL last month to
release a special report entitl-
ed: "Shaved for Battle,
Skinheads Target America's
Youth."
According to the report, the
most active of these "white
supremacist skinhead groups"
operates in the Chicago area
and goes by the name
"Romantic Violence."
The number of skinhead ac-
tivists is small no more than
several hundred across the
country the report said.
"But they are growing," it
continues. "And their
glorification of violence and
potential for attracting
alienated youngsters merits
the attention of community
leaders as well as law enforce-
ment officials."
Not all people who adopt
skinhead styles of haircuts or
dress are racists or neo-Nazis,
the report says: "They are
youth who think of themselves
as skinheads who attach no
particular ideology to the
term. The style signifies little
more to them than an affinity
for the music and a gesture of
defiance of their elders."
NEITHER are "punk
rockers" to be confused with
skinheads: "The punkers," the
report said, "are young people
with their own special brand of
rock music and dress, many of
whom dye their hair unusual
colors. A skinhead leaflet
distributed in Cincinnati
states: 'We are not idiotic
punk rockers ... we are the
exact opposite in ideals.''
Skinheads have been ar-
rested for criminal acts grow-
ing out of their gang activities
in Ann Arbor, Chicago, Cincin-
nati, Dallas and the Tampa
Bay area, the ADL reports.
The skinhead phenomenon
originated in England, where
the style was meant to sym-
bolize tough, patriotic, anti-
immigrant, working class at-
titudes in contrast to the sup-
posedly sissyish, pacifist,
liberal, middle-class views of
the longhairs, according to the
report. Yet, in America, the
skinhead doctrine is openly
more anti-Semitic, the ADL
report states.
Leaflets associated with
skinheads contain comments
such as: "We oppose the
capitalist and communist scum
that are destroying our Aryan
race the parasitic Jewish
race is at the heart of our pro-
blem Our heads are shaved
for battle."
THE SKINHEAD groups
have a fondness for rock
groups, particularly British.
The ADL report said the
leading British skinhead band
is "Skrewdriver," and is led by
Ian Stuart, a National Front
organizer who was once
sentenced to a year in prison
for racist violence.
? mm 4 4
Among the group's recor-
dings are singles with titles
such as "White Power," "Nig-
ger, Nigger," and "Prisoner of
Peace (Rudolph Hess)," the
ADL report said.
Skinheads have also been
linked to functioning neo-Nazi
groups including the American
Nazi Party, White Aryan
Resistance and the National
Democratic Front.
The skinheads have gone
beyond being anti-Semitic, ac-
cording to Peppard, because
they have adopted Nazi sym-
bolism and use the German
language to express much of
the virulence of their anti-
Semitism.
In Miami, the activity of
skinheads is being monitored
by Barbara Wade, gang detail
coordinator for the Miami
Police Department. Wade has
been working with gangs since
she lived in Chicago in the
1960s and, in Dade County,
she works with all varieties of
gangs.
"I would think, unless there
was some civil unrest in which
they were involved, they don't
pose any kind of threat,"
Wade said.
WADE SAID the gangs she
works with "do not mess with
the skinheads because they are
'Big Time.' That's quote-
unquote what they other
gangs say to me.
"The regular gangs," she
added, "are integrated.
They're like a flower garden.
And I think that's why they
stay away from the
skinheads."
Wade said that her contacts

Skinhead graffiti at Sunset Senior High School.
what other gangs are doing,"
tell her that the skinheads
have been seen in the Miami
Beach area for some time.
"I think they may be doing
Wade said. "The membership
is probably low and they're
just chilling out until they can
boost it."
No one
mothers pasta
like Chef Boyardee
The way Chef Boyardee prepares cheese ravioli and
macaroni shells, you'd think he was a Jewish mother. He
uses only the finest ingredients: rich, ripe tomatoes,
aged cheese and enriched wheat flour. So his pasta is not
only delicious, its also 95% fat-free, contains complex
carbohydrates and has no preservatives.
So for cheese ravioli and macaroni shells with all the
good things your mother would use, you can thank good-
ness for Chef Boyardee
CHOCOLATE
So Smooth...
So Creamy...
So Delicious!
MANUFACTURERS COUPON EXPIRES JUNE 30,1988
ON ANY SOZ.
CADBURY'S
CHOCOLATE
SAVE 20<
CONSUMER: Offer good only in U.S.A. and on product and size indicated. You pay
any sales tax Limit one coupon per item purchased RetaHer: Failure to provide on
request evidence of purchase of sufficient stock to cover coupons submitted voids
all such coupons General: Void where prohibited, taxed or restricted. Coupon may
not be transferred, assigned or reproduced. Cash value 1/20C Mail coupon to:
Cadbury U.S.A.. Inc., P.O. Box 1346. Clinton, IA 52734. Offer limited to one coupon
per package. 1987 Cadbury Schweppes Inc.
IbbDO 3032E2


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1987
.*
Local Rabbi Does National Survey
Just two years after Reform
Judaism endorsed the concept
of full-time Jewish education,
Reform day schools are
flourishing from coast to coast
throughout North America,
according to a survey released
this week.
The survey was conducted
by Rabbi Julian I. Cook of
Temple Sinai, who presented
his findings to the Commission
on Jewish Education of
Reform Judaism, meeting in
New York. It offers a
demographic profile of the
2,146 elementary school
students in 10 Reform day
schools in the following com-
munities: Beverly Hills, Cal.,
Los Angeles, Cal., San Diego,
Cal., Miami, Fla., North
Miami, Fla., Newton, Mass.,
New York, N.Y., West Hemp-
stead, N.Y., Willowdale, Ont.
and Houston, Texas.
The growth of these schools
reflects a dramatic reversal in
Reform policy, which had
historically opposed full-time
Jewish education. At its bien-
nial convention in Los Angeles
in 1985, the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions reversed this long-
standing policy, voting to sup-
port the development of
Reform day schools. This sup-
port in no way however
diminished Reform Judaism's
support of public education
and its commitment to the
separation of church and state.
Noting that day school
education is increasingly
becoming a recognized option
for Reform families, despite
the significant costs to these
families and institutions, the
survey notes:
"Less than two years after
the UAHC's endorsement,
American and Canadian
Jewish communities are now
SS Guard Faces
Denaturalization
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
U.S. Justice Department has
initiated denaturalization pro-
ceedings against Stefan
Reger, 65, an alleged SS guard
at the Auschwitz-Birkenau
concentration/death camp dur-
ing World War n.
The Justice Department ac-
cuses Reger, a resident of
Yardville, N.J., of lying about
his alleged SS past to immigra-
tion officials when he entered
the United States in 1952. He
became a citizen in 1957.
According to the Justice
Department, Reger, a native
of Filipovo, Yugoslavia, was
an SS guard at Auschwitz-
Birkenau between March 1943
and January 1945. Reger had
said he served in the 91st
Grenadier Regiment of the
German Army between 1943
and March 5, 1945, and from
then until April 29, 1945 as a
private in the Waffen SS, the
combat arm of the SS.
Reger reportedly told an
agent of the U.S. Army
Counter Intelligence Corps in
1952 that he received the
blood-typing tattoo given by
the SS. These tattoos were
generally placed under the
arm.
pupils. These teachers earn a
mean starting salary of
$17,260, somewhat below the
$20,980 mean starting salary
of public school teachers in
their respective communities.
On the other end of the spec-
trum, however, the mean high
salary of $26,791 compared
favorably with that of their
public school counterparts,
who averaged $25,300.
Almost all of the schools
studied require that teachers
of "secular" subjects be cer-
tified by the state department
of education; but only half in-
sist that teachers of Judaic
studies be licensed by the local
bureau of Jewish education.
Mean tuition at the 10
schools under review ranged
from $3,053 to $3,958 per year
and represented 79.8 percent
of the institution's total in-
come. The balance came from
other charges to parents (1.2
percent); government funds (.2
percent); Jewish communal
funds (2.4 percent); school-
based fundraising (13.6 per-
cent), and synagogue subsidies
(1.9 percent).
Most of the schools studied
offer some form of financial
assistance, with an average of
12.2 percent of the students
receiving some form of aid.
H^pyHanukkah
Rabbi Julian Cook
spending almost $9 million on
such schools, which employ
over 300 educational
professionals."
Cook's study analyzed the
demographics of students in
grades kindergarten through
six, covering the 1986-87
school year. These 2,146
students represent 2.2 percent
of all students in Jewish day
schools and 1.6 percent of all
Reform students.
Of these youngsters, 68 per-
cent are affiliated with the
school's sponsoring Reform
synagogue; 2.6 percent with
other Reform congregations;
16 percent with Conservative
or Orthodox synagogues, and
13.4 percent have no
synagogue affiliation.
A low student-teacher ratio
is maintained, with the schools
surveyed reporting an average
of one teacher for each 10.9
*fcnfcn
From the Delta
family to your family,
here's wishing you a
joyous holiday. And if
you're gathering together
during the Festival
of Lights, remember
that Delta and The Delta
Connection'' serve over
230 cities worldwide.
DELTA
VikLovebFlyAndltShows:
1 NH7 IVIuAir l.im-v IrK
*sa2SBSSU
J*jlWUNtf<
f/**$>'
M.

Debug f-ruto.
a8S


Community Dateline
Bnai Zion
Singles and Couples are
more than welcome to see the
"Sheik of Avenue B" which is
a hilarious song and dance
musical which the Maimonides
Chapter of Bnai Zion is spon-
soring as a membership drive
in their new chapter. This
below cost musical is for the
opportunity for people to meet
people in friendship and
warmth and to get to know one
another and the many projects
of which Bnai Zion is involved
in the State of Israel. No lec-
tures, no speeches but just a
chance to make new friends
and a good time for the
unbelievable price of $10.
Afterwards, we can meet next
door at the restaurant for a
dairy meal and have a chance
to meet in chavarshaft. Won't
you join us on Sunday, Dec. 20.
For tickets, call 484-3446
456-1999.
or
Maimonides Chapter of Bnai
Zion is sponsoring a Fun in
Fundraising to Las Vegas on
Jan. 11-15. Any and all funds
go for the retarded childrens'
home of Roch Ha'avim in
Israel and the Haifa Medical
Hospital. This new chapter has
made tremendous strides in
new membership, new friends
and hopes to start the New
Year right by increasing our
membership and our fundrais-
ing and would love to have
both singles and couples join
us at the Flamingo Hilton. For
only $379 with everything in-
cluded. Lee 484-3446
Broward; or 456-1999 Dade.
Memorial Hospital
Diana Wasserman Elected
Chairperson of the Board of
Commissioners of the South
Broward Hospital District
Wasserman was recently
elected Chairperson of the
Board of Commissioners of the
South Broward Hospital
District (SBHD). Mrs.
Wasserman is the first woman
Chairperson of the Board of
the SBHD. The board governs
the operations of Memorial
Hospital and possesses taxing
powers for this special hospital
taxing district in Broward
County.
Mrs. Wasserman, 40, of
Pembroke Pines, was ap-
pointed to the SBHD Board by
Governor Bob Graham in 1984,
and she was elected to serve as
its Vice Chairperson from
1985-1986.
Active in several other com-
munity and clubs and organiza-
tions, Mrs. Wasserman is a
member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Red
Cross, President of Hispanic
Unity of Florida, an active
member of the Scholarshii
ramp
ood,
Foundation in Hollyw
founding/associate member of
Broward's Performing Arts
Center (PACERS), and Vice
President of Public Affairs for
the Lakes/Cooper City Section
of the NCJW. She is involved
in civic organizations as a
member of the Broward Coun-
ty League of Women's Voters
and she was appointed to the
County Commission on the
Status of Women in May,
1987.
Mrs. Wasserman is active in
education as well. She has
served as Chairperson of the
Broward County Schools
District Advisory Committee
from 1985-87, and she has
served as Chairperson of the
Instructional Programs Task
Force of Broward Compact
(established by the Broward
County School Board to in-
volve industry and corpora-
tions in planning the course of
education for the next five
years), a member of the Board
of Counselors (which oversees
the implementation of the
goals of Broward Compact),
and she has been appointed to
the Facilities Task Force and
Prevention Programs Task
Force of the Broward County
Public Schools. She is a
member of the Florida Educa-
tion Council, a member of the
State Instructional Materials
Council, and a member of the
Coalition of Essential Schools
Steering Committee.
Memorial Hospital is a
737-bed community, non-
Erofit, full service hospital,
>cated at 3501 Johnson Street
in Hollywood.
Friday, December 18,1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 18
David Chase, Chairman of Benjamin Meed Tribute,
Remembers His Promise After Fleeing Auschwitz
Survivor, Benjamin Meed of
New York, on Dec. 20 in Miami
Beach.
Prominent Hartford
business leader David T.
Chase, who is serving as Chair-
man of the 1987 National Elie
Wiesel Holocaust Remem-
brance Award Dinner, has
never forgotten the promise he
made to himself after fleeing
Auschwitz guards in the tur-
moil of the last days of World
War II.
In a U.S. military hospital in
Austria, where he was brought
barely conscious by American
troops, he resolved he would
never forget to help others.
"I made a promise to myself
that if I had any success in my
life, I would do all I could for
others in need. I felt that was
perhaps the reason I surviv-
ed," he says.
It is a promise he has kept on
a generous scale from his busy
offices at Chase Enterprises, a
large stately office complex in
Hartford. It is a promise he is
keeping as a leader of the
Remembrance Award Dinner
which will honor his good
friend and fellow Holocaust
For their care, concern and response to the needs of Israel,
Jeanette, left, and Lewis Broth, right, are presented with the
prestigious State of Israel Bonds 40th Anniversary Award, at a
Salute to Israel Breakfast, held at the Haliandale Jewish Center.
RaMn Dr. Carl Klein (center) presented the award.
The
Fiscal Fitness Plan
or over.
Our Ameri Plus S^account
helps you get fiscally fit.
Free Checking With AmeriPlus 55. it's easy
to get free checking, with free personalizea
checks. Free overdraft protection is avail-
able, too.
Free Services Save money with our
package of free services... travelers cheques,
cashier's checks, and more. And you can
get special discounts on credit cards and
available safe deposit boxes.
Higher CD rates For a limited time.
AmeriPlus 55 members can open
a new CD of $5,000 or more and
earn 1/4% higher interest than our
normal competitive rate, for die
full term of the CD.
Open Your Account Now Our AmeriPlus 55
"fiscal fitness plan" saves you money on
important banking services and lets you
earn more on CDs. And it's "no sweat" to
open your account. Just visit any AmeriFirst
Banking Center
mgneri
/ImeriFirst
Join the Big Switch. Bank at AmeriFirst.
AmeriFirst Federal one of Florida's largest financial institutions
For more details, call us at 382-7145 in Dade County, or call our Florida toll-free number l SOO-BANKING.
An AmeriFirst checking account is required for AmeriPlus 55 membership
ESK


I!
-
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1937
Temple Update
Friday, Dec. 25 at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek and
Hazzan Eric Lindenbaum
chanting the Liturgy.
Services begin at 8:45 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 26. During ser-
vices we will celebrate the Bar
Mitzvah of Adam Sabety, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Steve (Ellen)
Sabety. Special guests will in-
clude his grandmother Fay
Schwartz of Lauderdale Lakes
and his grandparents Bernard
and Edith Sabety of Ocean-
side, N.Y. and his brother
Scott. Adam is a student at
Pioneer Middle School and his
hobbies are singing, dancing
and acting.
Executive Board will have a
meeting on Wednesday, Dec.
30 at 7:30 p.m.
ECP and Religious School
classes will resume on Mon-
day, Jan. 4.
Education Committee will
meet on Monday, Jan. 4 at 7:30
p.m.
Ways and Means Committee
will meet on Tuesday, Jan. 5 at
7:30 p.m.
Temple Board meeting will
meet on Wednesday, Jan. 6 at
7:30 p.m.
Daily minyan meet at 8 a.m.
and Evening minyan is
Monday-Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth El
Reform
Friday evening, Dec. 18
Temple Beth El will have their
annual Chanukah Cantata and
Candlelighting Ceremony at 8
p.m.
Geri Newburge, daughter of
Lawrence and Idelle
Newburge, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, Dec.
19 at 11 a.m. in the Chapel.
Geri attends the Lear School
and is Valedictorian of her 9th
Grade Middle School Class.
She is Vice President of the
National Junior Honor Society
and is on the Honor Roll.
She is on the basketball team
at Lear and her hobbies are
fashion designing cooking
and cars.
Shabbat Services will begin Geri has one brother, Scott.
Hallandale Jewish
Center
Beth Tefilah
Friday, Dec. 18, 8 p.m., the
Hallandale Jewish Center's
late Friday evening^ services
on Shabbat Chanukah has been
designated Sisterhood Sab-
bath. Sisterhood members will
participate in the services, and
Sisterhood will sponsor and
prepare the Oneg Shabbat.
Monday, Jan. 4 The se-
cond semester of Hallandale
Jewish Center's Adult Educa-
tion Program begins with a
continuation of the first
semester's classes as well as
two new classes on Tuesday
evenings "Great Kings of
Israel, Their Life and Times"
at 7 p.m. and "Problems of
American Jewish Life" at 8
p.m.,; Rabbi Jehuda Melber,
instructor. These two classes
will begin Jan. 12. Call
454-9100.
Temple Beth Ahm
Shabbat Services will begin
Friday, Dec. 18 at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek of-
ficiating and Hazzan Eric
Lindenbaum chanting the
Liturgy.
Services Saturday, Dec. 19
begin at 8:45 a.m.
Temple will have their Con-
gregational Meeting on Sun-
day, Dec. 13 at 7:30 p.m.
Membership Committee will
meet on Monday, Dec. 14 at
7:30 p.m.
Education Committee will
meet on Monday, Dec. 14 at
7:30 p.m.
Daily Minyan meet at 8 a.m.
and Monday-Thursday at 7:30
p.m.
Religious School classes will
have their Chanukah
Assemblies on Wednesday,
Dec. 16 and Thursday, Dec. 17.
Winter Break begins on Sun-
day Dec. 20 and classes
resume on Monday, Jan. 4.
MINI CAMP will be Dec.
21-31. For more information
call Ellin Heilig at 431-5100.
The Flowers on the Bima
and the Oneg Shabbat is being
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs.
Newburge in honor of their
daughter's Bat Mitzvah.
Special Rummage and White
Elephant Sale Just in Time for
the Holidays!!! Being held at
Temple Beth El, 1351 South
14th Ave., Hollywood (Rear
Entrance), Sunday, Dec. 20
from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sponsored
by the Sisterhood of Temple
Beth El. BARGAINS
GALORE!
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
On Monday, Dec. 21 Rabbi
Jaffe will conduct his Bible
Study Class at 10 a.m. in the
Chapel. Anyone wishing to at-
tend these classes who is not a
member of Temple Beth El
may do so for a fee of $25 for
the season.
Friday evening, Dec. 25 Ser-
vices will be conducted by Rab-
bi Samuel Z. Jaffe at 8 p.m. in
the Sanctuary. His topic will
be: "Judaism and Christianity:
Where We Part."
The Liturgy will be sung by
our Adult Temple Choral
Group under the direction of
Lydia King.
Saturday morning, Dec. 26
the Torah Study will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Jaffe at 10:15
a.m., followed by Shabbat Ser-
vice at 11 a.m. in the Chapel.
The flowers on the Bima are
being presented by Mrs.
Frances Littman in honor of
her "Special" Birthday. Mrs.
Littman is also sponsoring the
Oneg Shabbat following ser-
vice on Friday evening.
Dr. Leon Weissberg will con-
duct his "Jewish History"
How do you find out
about advance
funeral planning?
Turn to us, turn to
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Guardian Chapel. Inc/Funeral Directors
Dade 53; 1151 Broward: 523 5801 Palm Beach: 663-6676
FOR GENERATIONS A SYMBOL Of JEWISH TRADITION
Kenneth J lassmon. F D. General Manager Douglas Lazarus. F D. VP
AHan G Brestm. F D Edward M Dobin. FD leo Hock. Executive VP, Religious Advisor
William F Sen ilson. VP Family Consultant
We endorse The GUARDIAN PL AN" insurance tunded prearranged funeral program
Religious directory
CONGREGATION BAIS TEFFILAH Orthodox
3418 Handy Road No. 103 Rabbi Yossi Dubrowski 960-1490 Service* Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION BETH AM (formerly North Tampa Reform Jewiah
Congregation)
C/o Joseph Kerstein, 1448 W. Busch Boulevard, Tampa, Fla. 33612, 949-0115. Con
greganU officiating, Vikki Silverman, Cantor Services at 8 p.m., first and third Fri
day of each month, Masonic Community Lodge, 402 W. Waters Ave. (at Ola).
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Conservative
3919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H. David Rose. Cantor Sam Isaak Services:
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Conservative
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837 1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger. hazzan William
Hauben Services: Friday. 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Richard .1. Birnholz. Services: Friday. 8
p.m.
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251 4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:30 a.m., 5:45 p.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF TAMPA Orthodox
President Alfred Wasserberger, 254-2907, 839-5980 Services Friday 7:30 p.m.;
Saturday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday night classes 8 p.m.; High Holiday Services Call
254-1907 or 839-5980 for location of services.
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
13156-A North Dale Mabry. Rabbi Yossie Dubrowski, Executive Director. 963-2317.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
5202 Seneca Ave. Rabbi Dovid Mockin, Program Coordinator. 980-0942. Friday
night Services one half hour after sunset. Tuesday night classes at 8 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION at U.S.F./U.T./H.C.C.
U.S.F.-CTR 2382 Tampa 33620 972-4433. Services and Oneg Shabbat Friday
evening 7 p.m. Sunday Bagel Brunches. 11:30 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
634-9162, United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Street. Sun City Center. Ser
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST COMMUNITY CHWI.K All
Reconstructionist Cambririrr<- Wools 9i 2-4433 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly
study discussioii cattions, "Shabbat Experience," monthly services and dinner.
class on Monday, Dec. 28 in
the Chapel Lounge of Temple
Beth El from 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. This class is free to Tem-
ple Members. Non-Members
may join this class for a fee of
$25 per person for the
season. This is a brown-bag
session and a beverage will be
served.
On the occasion of Israel's
40th Anniversary Rabbi
Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth El in
Hollywood, will be leading his
annual tour to the Jewish
State this May.
The 15 day trip is a deluxe
adventure with stop-overs in
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Tiberias
and Eilat. From past ex-
perience it has always been a
personalized tour with a very
personable, experienced
English-speaking guide. The
trip includes not alone historic
sites, but points of interest and
recent discoveries not included
The
V ''
Jewish Thrift
Shop
Ho
Hours 8 A.M. 6 P.M.-7 Days A Week
PLEASE HELP!!
OUR THRIFT SHOP INVENTORY HAS
BEEN DRASTICALLY DEPLETED!
CALL T0DAY1I WE NEED...
FURNITURE CLOTHING BRIC-A-BRAC
ESTATES GOLF CLUBS ETC-ETC VI
HELP THOSE IN NEED AND HELP YOURSELF TO
A TAX DEDUCTION AT THE SAME TIME
ALL MERCHANDISE OWNED BY A NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANIZATION
' '

CAUFOtFttE
TAX DEDUCTAJLE PICK UPS
NO WAIT FOR FURNITURE PICKUPS
_ a. i t 314t W" "'* B--ch Blvd. -
^^ 6758 N. Military Trail ,, hkvka Waal rrf IM V"Q'
\tmk 962-6046
r.


in a regular tourist itinerary.
Dr. Jaffe has been leading
Israel tours for the past
quarter century. Many of
those who are already enrolled
are second and third time
travellers to the State who are
joining Rabbi Jaffe once again.
This Israel odyssey for season-
ed visitors, as well as new
tourists, will be leaving Miami
on May 30, returning June 13,
and promises to be one of the
more exciting visits.
Temple Sinai
On Friday Evening, Dec. 18,
the 3rd Annual Temple Sinai
Family Chanukah Dinner will
take place at 6 p.m. in the
Haber Karp Hall. Following
the Dinner, prizes to the win-
ners of the annual Original
Hanukkiyah Contest, open to
all students in the Paul B. An-
ton Religious School, will be
awarded.
Friday Evening Shabbat
Services on Dec. 18 will begin
at 8 p.m. in the Sanctuary of
Temple Sinai with Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis and Can-
tor Misha Alexandrovich
officiating.
On Saturday Morning, Dec.
19, Sabbath Services will begin
at 8:45 a.m. due to the Holiday
of Chanukah.
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles (ages 20-35) will hold a
Picnic at 11 a.m. on Dec. 20 at
West Lake Park, West
Pavilion, 1200 Sheridan St.
Hollywood. A Barbecue will be
served, softball, volleyball and
other activities are planned.
The admission is $5. For fur-
ther information please call
the Temple office.
On Friday Evening, Dec. 25,
Services will begin at 8 p.m. in
the Sanctuary of Temple Sinai
with Rabbi Margolis and Can-
tor Alexandrovich officiating.
On Saturday Morning, Dec.
26, Molly Beth Rich, daughter
of Stephan and Laura Rich,
will become a Bat Mitzvah dur-
ing the Shabbat Service. Molly
Beth is an 8th grade advanced
student at Nova Middle School
and she enjoys music, arts and
crafts and horror books and
movies. She is a member of the
Temple Sinai United
Synagogue Youth.
Molly Beth will become a Bat
Mitzvah with Irina Fussimov
of Kharkov, USSR. Irina is the
daughter of Russian
Refuseniks, and because she
cannot become a Bat Mitzvah
in the Soviet Union, she will
share this day, in absentia,
with Molly Beth. The concept
of "winning" helps to raise the
consciousness regarding the
plight of our fellow Jews in the
Soviet Union.
The pulpit flowers for this
Sabbath are sponsored by Joan
Wiezenthal and Saul Wiezen-
thal, aunt and uncle of Molly
Beth. The Oneg Shabbat on
Friday Evening, Dec. 25 will
be sponsored by her maternal
grandmother, Shirley Weizen-
thal, and the Kiddush Satur-
day Morning by her aunt and
uncle, Sonny and David
Fisher.
The Winter Vacation for the
Paul B. Anton Religious
School will begin Sunday, Dec.
20. School will resume on Sun-
day, Jan. 3.
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles will held a Dance on
Saturday, Jan. 2 at 8 p.m. at
Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson
St. The admission of $7 in-
cludes snacks and one free
drink. For more information,
please call the Temple office
920-1577.
The Institute of Adult
Jewish Studies will continue
the First Tuesday Dinner
benes on Tuesday, Jan. 5 with
guest speaker, Miriam
Schmerler, Jewish Educator.
Mrs. Schmerler will discuss
"What is meant by Reconcilia-
tion between the Catholic
Church and the Jewish Com-
munity?" Reservations are
necessary for this popular
series chaired by Rhoda Mar-
cus. The admission is $15 per
person. To reserve your place,
please call the Temple office.
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 15
Dr. Howard Braverman Is President
Elect of Florida Optometric Association
HALLANDALE Howard
Braverman, OD, has recently
assumed the office of presi-
dent of the Florida Optometric
Association (FOA). Dr.
Howard Braverman has been
practicing optometry in
Hallandale since 1973.
Braverman has held several
offices in the FOA including
vice president. He is past
president of the Broward Op-
tometric Association and a Ow direction in 1988 is
member of the American Op- toward more in-depth educa-
tometnc Association Braver- tion in occular pathology and
man received his BS degree differential diagnosis of oc-
from the University of Miami
and his OD from the Universi-
ty of Houston College of Op-
tometry. He is a member of
Beta Sigma Kappa National
Optometric Honor Society.
Elected Pre-Need Counselors' Director
Irvin Schwartz has been
selected as the Florida Direc-
tor of Pre-need counselors by
Blasberg Parkside Funeral
Chapels, Inc., a group of eight
Funeral Chapels located in
New York and Florida.
Schwartz assists customers
in the selection of pre-
Florida.
A World War II veteran
Schwartz attended the Univer-
sity of Ohio, and then joined
ITT in management. He mov-
ed to South Florida in 1969
and has been associated with
other Funeral Homes organiz-
ing and assisting in their
arranged funerals through The marketing programs for the
Assured Plan, a program past 10 years. He and his wife
supervised by the State of reside in Broward County.
cular disease," Dr. Braverman
said. "Our educational ses-
sions will be conducted by ad-
junct professors of profes-
sional colleges of optometry,
ophthalmologists and other
persons with doctorate
Braverman will head^ "the de*^ wJMte*ch in the8e
state organization of approx- "* fie,dB-
imately 850 professional op-
As president of the FOA,
tometrists. The association
promotes visual well-being by
conducting three educational,
hands-on seminars a year, in-
cluding the annual convention.
"The Florida Optometric
Association offers educational
experience in occular phar-
macology, pathology, contact
lenses, low vision, diagnosis
and treatment of eye diseases
and the latest techniques in
differential diagnosis.
In 1981, Howard Braverman
and his brother, Stanley
Braverman, MD, FACS,
established the Braverman
Eye Center, 1401 A East
Hallandale Beach Boulevard.
They offer comprehensive
ophthalmologic and op-
tometric eyecare services, in-
cluding laser and surgical pro-
cedures. For information on
the Braverman Eye Center,
call 458-2112.
The original
Declaration of Independence.
Chanukah is The Jewish Festival of Lights. It is a yearly recurring declaration of mankind's
independence, a memorable reassertion of the God-given right of human beings to live and worship
in freedom. The Chanukah candles illuminates justice. They are pure light of freedom that glows in
the heart of Man. They are what makes us Jews.
Kenneth J. Lassman, F.D., General Manager Douglas Lazarus. F.D., V.P.
Allan G. Bresiin. FD. Edward M. Dobin. F.D.
Leo Hack. Executive V.P.. Religious Advisor William F. Saulson. V.P. Family Consultant
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Guardian Chapels




.- '
*
Pagejg- The Jewish Floridian of 8 'Simcha' Tax Feeds The Hungry
Mazon, the organization that
provides food for the hungry
by asking American Jews for a
self-imposed three percent
'tax" on the cost of weddings,
bar- and bat-mitvahs, anniver-
saries and other happy occa-
sions, says the idea has caught
on so quickly that contribu-
tions have tripled in a single
year.
To date, Mazon the
Hebrew word for food has
distributed a total of 44 grants
to established community
agencies, both Jewish and non-
Jewish, that feed poor people
in this country and broad.
Founded two yeais ago by
Leonard Fein, forme editor of
Moment magazine, Mazon
reported total contributions of
$163,000 during its first year,
which ended November 1986.
Donations for the second year,
which has just ended, showed a
dramatic jump to $650,000. In
addition, the number of gifts
has more than doubled clim-
bing from 3,850 for 1985-86 to
9,975 for 1986-87.
Theodore R. Mann, chair-
man of Mazon and president of
the American Jewish Con-
gress, says the organization
will make a stepped-up appeal
during the current holiday
season "because the need
keeps growing and Mazon is
one of the most direct and ef-
fective ways to help the
hungry and the homeless."
Among the agencies that
have received grants from
Mazon are Project Ezra, which
conducts a food kitchen for
elderly Jews on New York's
Lower East Side; the
American Jewish World Ser-
vice of Boston, which trains
local volunteers for an'
agricultural development pro-
gram in Sri Lanka; and the
Wilkinson Emergency Service
Center in East Dallas, Texas,
which stocks a food pantry for
recent immigrants from Asia.
The Mazon concept of asking
Jewish families celebrating
happy events, or simchas, to
add a voluntary "tax" to the
cost of the function has proved
to be particularly appealing,
says Mann, because it adds to
the joy of the occasion.
"Giving three percent of the
cost of a party or other
celebration makes it more
meaningful and reflective of
the ancient Jewish imperative
to love one's neighbor and feed
the hungry," he notes.
According to Mazon's
founders, every gift is signifi-
cant, whether it is a $90 dona-
tion based on a $3,000 bar
mitzvah or a $600 gift pro-
mpted by a $20,000 wedding.
"The gifts are not onlv im-
portant for the food they buy,
but for the meaning they pro-
vide, both to the giver and the
receiver," Mann says. Hardly
a check arrives in the Mazon
office in Los Angeles that does
not include a note of thanks
from the donor for the oppor-
tunity to "make a difference,"
he points out.
Mazon has received the en-
dorsement of the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis,
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, the
Rabbinical Assembly, the
United Synagogue of America,
the Federation of Reconstruc-
tionist Congregations and
Havurot, the North American
Theodore R. Mann
Federation of Temple Youth.
Mazon's board is made up of
Orthodox, Conservative,
Reform and Reconstructionist
rabbis and laymen.
Hundreds of synagogues
throughout the United States
have established relations with
Mazon, and more than 1,000
rabbis are now urging their
congregants to adopt the prac-
tice of imposing a "Mazon tax"
on themselves and their
families when celebrating hap-
py occasions.
Irving Cramer, executive
director of Mazon, expects the
organization to become an
even more potent force in the
future by helping bring food
and life to additional
thousands of needy people and
by spreading the concept of
taxing oneself to help the poor.
Mazons' office is located at
2940 Westwood, Blvd. Los
Angeles, CA 90064; (213)
470-7769.
Israel Has NATO Status
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin and Defense
Secretary Frank Carlucci sign-
ed a memorandum of
understanding that boosts
Israel's status to the
equivalent of a NATO ally of
the United States.
The agreement, signed at
the Pentagon at the beginning
of Rabin's three-day visit here,
provides for the United States
and Israel to carry out joint
military research and develop-
ment programs. It also allows
Israel to bid on military sales
to the Pentagon on the same
basis as NATO members.
Israel joins a select group of
five maior non-NATO allies of
the United States that also
comprises Australia, Egypt,
Japan and South Korea.
The memorandum takes on
new importance in the wake of
Israel's agreement, under
ressure from the United
tates, to cancel development
of the Lavi jet fighter. The
new pact is expected to help
save many of the Israel Air-
craft Industry jobs lost by the
cancellation.
Pentagon sources noted that
the memorandum is the latest
in a series of cooperating
agreements with Israel since
the 1970s, including the four-
year-old memorandum on
strategic cooperation.
anu
r whole family
from thepeopk at Publix.
_ May the spirit of the season bless
"~ you with peace, joy and love.
Publix


Full Text
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 18, 1987
. >
Rededication to Freedom
Chanukah the Festival of Rededication
the Festival of Lights.
As we prepared to kindle the first light of
Chanukah Tuesday night, the story of the
victory of the ancient Maccabees had never
been more relevant.
The ongoing plight of Soviet, Ethiopian,
Syrian, Irani and other Jews reminds us that
we must redouble our efforts on their behalf.
At the same time, we note with pride that
this is the 40th year in which Chanukah
lights are kindled in a free State of Israel.
And it is the 21st year in which the
Chanukah Menorah at the Kotel, the
Western Wall, is lit in a reunited Jerusalem.
Therefore we rejoice in the freedoms that
we enjoy in this country, in Israel and in
many nations, but vow to either extend
those freedoms to those lands in which Jews
are second- or even third-class citizens, or to
see that they are permitted to leave.
Chag Sameiach!
Terrorism in Gaza
The sudden upsurge in violence in the
Gaza Strip warrants an immediate review of
Israeli policy towards the narrow piece of
territory along the Mediterranean which has
been the scene of warfare for the past 3,500
years.
Unlike Judea and Samaria or the West
Bank, Gaza has no demonstrable link to
Jewish sovereignty. Part of the British man-
date over Palestine for 31 years, Gaza was
occupied by Egypt in 1948. During 29 years
of Egyptian occupation, interrupted for a
few months by the Sinai Campaign when
Israel seized the territory, Cairo made no
move to incorporate Gaza into its
boundaries.
It has been more than 20 years since Israel
won the 26-mile long strip in the Six Day
War, and Gaza has done little to make its oc-
cupation worthwhile during the two
decades. Hundreds of thousands of Palesti-
nians, ignored and neglected by their Arab
neighbors, make Gaza more of a tinder box
than Israel needs.
While there is ambivalence toward
American Jewry dictating resolutions and
while the solution may not be as simple as
simply moving out and erecting a 50-foot
high wall to separate Gaza from Israel, it is
hard to present a case for the drain on both
Israeli manpower and reputation which the
fighting between rebellious youths, tough
troops and border police brings about.
Certainly the 3,000 Jewish settlers in the
Gaza strip can be relocated in nearby parts
of Israel which literally beg for additional
inhabitants.
It may be time to transfer the problems of
Gaza to an Arab state, and to do so quickly.
OTA
TheJcwisVt
of South Broward
,-, Y>W StlMChet
FHEDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCMET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
Published Weekly Jsnuery through March Bi Weekly April through August
HOLLYWOOD FORT LAUDEHDALE OFFICE 8368 W Oakland Park Blvd
Fort Lauderdale. FL 33321 Phone 7484400
JOAN C TEGLAS. DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING 1-373-4605 COLLECT
Mam Office & Plant 120 N E 6th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 1-373-4605
Me-brr JTA. S*n Art*. WNS. NBA. AJPA. and FPA.
Friday, December 18, lt87
Volume 17

27KISLEV5748
Number 28
&Y\E WARMEST OF
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT
THE COURT
AT PALM-AIRE
The mood is festive and the excitement is growing
as Pompano's premier retirement community
celebrates the holidays! Share in the spirit of the
season and join us for a
HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 1987
1 to 4 p.m.
Refreshments Entertainment Tours
RSVP by December 19
m___________Call (305) 975-8900___________
The Court at Palm-Aire
2701 N. Course Drive
Pompano Beach, FL 33069
Tfe&urf^
LAAI1S
ill 'I\ibu-:7liiv


Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
Award Dinner In Association
With Israel Bonds
>oooooooo
The Third Annual Remem-
brance Award Dinner will be
held at the Fontainebleau
Hilton in Miami Beach on Sun-
day, Dec. 20, in association
with State of Israel Bonds.
Several thousand Holocaust
survivors from all parts of the
United States and Canada are
expected to attend the dinner
where the 1987 International
Elie Wiesel Remembrance
Award will be presented to
Benjamin Meed, president of
the American Gathering and
Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors. The
award is in recognition of
Meed's efforts to insure that
the Holocaust will be
remembered by all future
generations of Jews and non-
Jews.
David Sklar, chairman of
South Broward Israel Bond
Campaign, will serve as South
Broward's chairman of the
evening. Henry Kissinger,
former U.S. Secretary of State
and Zubin Mehta, conductor of
the New York and Israel
Philharmonic Orchestras, will
serve as honorary co-chairmen
of the tribute to Meed.
'Create Land From Sand*
Gibraltar Worldliness
Continued from P.^ 2
"What's your job?" the rabbi
asked.
"I shout, 'fire!'"
"No problem then," was the
reply.
But the guns at the top of
the rock, and Levy, in his dress
uniform, had to march up
there on foot for a firing dur-
ing the Sabbath. His troop,
gentiles all, could have driven,
but they insisted on marching
up with him.
Levy's brother James is
president of the Gibraltar
Jewish community. He is a
senior partner in Sir Joshua
Hassan s law office. He is also
active with accountant Moses
Garson and other businessmen
in Gibraltar's flourishing new
enterprises as an "offshore"
financial center. People say
James Levy is tempted to run
for political office, and that he
could one day become chief
minister, too.
Like his brother, James
loves Gibraltar with a passion.
But he is torn, he says, and
may soon move away
because there is no Jewish
high school.
He himself went to a local
monastery-school where the
monks, he recalls, would cut
down branches for the Jewish
children to take home for the
sukkahs. His education imbued
him with the fusion of Jewish
piety and secular worldliness
that is the hallmark of
Gibraltar's Jewry. Yet he feels
he can no longer sustain it and
transmit it to his growing
children. He has sent his eldest
daughter off to an Orthodox
grammar school in London.
The community would be
truly sorry to see him go. Part-
ly to keep him and others like
him from leaving, they are con-
sidering the founding of a
Jewish school in Gibraltar, so
that learned young men would
come and live on the rock, and
teach the younger generation.
"But they would have to be
men with a smile," Levy
warns. "No extremism can
succeed here."
He says the children today
are somehow less confortable
with the non-Jews than he and
his generation are. He be-
moans it yet he recognizes
that it is a manifestation of
that certain xenophobia in
modern Orthodoxy that has
been reincarnated from the
ashes of Eastern Europe and
now sets the tone among Or-
thodox Ashkenazim and
Sephardim the world over, in-
cluding in Israel.
It is the antithesis of the
Golden Age of Spain, and it
threatens to dull the special
brilliance of the gem that is
Jewish Gibraltar.


DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $ '_________
Name
.Phone
Address^
Apt. No..
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone: 5384464
oooooooo
Three Varieties of Fruit?
APPLE and ORANGE and BUCKWHEAT
Yes, you know apples and oranges are fruit, but did you know that Kasha
is made from buckwheat, and that buckwheat is a member of the rhubarb family
(pink stalks and all!)
Buckwheat is the best source of high biological protein in the entire plant
kingdom very close to the protein level of whole milk solids. Kasha,
the 100% pure roasted buckwheat kernel, is rich in potassium,
phosphorous, fiber and vitamin B, and NO CHOLESTEROL. Thus, it is
an economical food high in balanced protein and it's delicious, too!
For a FREE recipe leaflet, write to:
The Birkett Mills, Perm Yan, NY 14527
and discover the world of the UNSUNG FRUIT!
KASHA,
because...
Your Heritage is Forever!
15* OFF
STORE COUPON
15t OFF
15* OFF
STORE COUPON i
on any one package of Wolffs KASHA I
ROASTED BUCKWHEAT KERNELS I
I
I
1
TO THE DEALER: TM
will ri f*M*j*a Nwa ciM- mmM pay aay H
pr9IMMI#Vi 1HK, f#Mftof#d 9t I
IICMM I. mull!*. ClMtMWf .g
taa. CaakK
raaaaattaa VMM- EON _
REDEMPTION, PRESENT TO LJ _
OUR SALESMAN OR MAM. TO I
THE DtRKETT MM.LS. PENN |
YAM, NEW YORK 14*27. OFFER ,
MOO ONLY IN USA LIMIT [^
ONLY OMf COUPON MAY M *
REDEEMED PER UNIT OF
PRODUCTS PURCHASED
15* OFF
Limit one coupon pr purchase.
The Biikett Mills. Renn Yan N
Thkt coupon expires I (
STORE COUPON
York 14527
31. 1988
15* OFF
ii
I
I
I
J


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E7QTGVD62_95PUDL INGEST_TIME 2013-06-20T00:30:15Z PACKAGE AA00014306_00105
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES