The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00104

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Jewish Floridian
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Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
Volume 17 Number 27
Hollywood, Florida Friday, December 4, 1987
Rally and Summit March To Mobilize 100,000
A soldier points to a place where at host one Arab guerrilla land- Kiryat Shenuma killing six soldiers and wounding seven other
ea after having sailed across Israel s northern border on this people. AP/Wide World Photo
hang glider and attacked a military outpost near the city of
NEW YORK (JTA) No
one is giving exact figures, but
if current travel plans pan out,
as many as 100,000
demonstrators will descend on
Washington Dec. 6 for
"Freedom Sunday for Soviet
Jews."
That figure includes Jews ar-
riving on some 60 airline
flights, many of them
chartered for the day;
thousands of buses; and from
parts of the country as far
away as Seattle, Wash, and
with Jewish communities as
small as that of Duluth, Minn.
Organizers of the mobiliza-
tion, who include members
from most of the major na-
tional Jewish organizations in
North America, are already
saying it will be the largest
demonstration for Jewish
causes ever held in the nation's
capital.
It is certainly this year's
most galvanizing event in
organized, North American
Jewish life, with communities
canceling and rescheduling
events planned months ago for
Sunday.
The United Jewish Appeal
Continued on Page 8-
Recriminations Follow...
Carlucci Sees No Breakthrough
Hang Glider To Terrorist Attack
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin told the Knesset Mon-
day that the Israel Defense
Force high command has
issued strict orders to all units
aimed at preventing a recur-
rence of the events on the
night of Nov. 25, when a single
glider-borne terrorist killed six
soldiers and wounded seven at
an IDF encampment near
Kiryat Shemona in upper
Galilee.
He assured the lawmakers
that the matter would not be
dropped "until the proper
lessons of that unfortunate in-
cident are fully learned."
Chief of Staff Gen. Dan
Shomron, meanwhile, assured
settlers in northern Israel that
the IDF is correcting the
security failures that allowed
the attack to succeed.
He said the IDF has the ap-
propriate means to deal with
future terrorist attempts to in-
filtrate Israel by air and that
the military high command will
take the proper disciplinary
measures. He stressed
however that the IDF will not
act hastily to "make heads
roll."
The incident, which has
severely shaken Israelis' con-
fidence in their northern
defense system, was the sub-
ject of sometimes heated
debate in the Cabinet at its
Continued on Page 5
WASHINGTON -
Secretary of Defense Frank C.
Carlucci says that "no early
breakthroughs" toward a Mid-
dle East peace conference
should be expected, given "the
lack of consensus in Israel"
and "Arab insistence that an
international conference be
structured in a particular way
that hampers free, direct
bilateral negotiations."
In a briefing to represen-
tatives of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, the new
Defense Secretary said
American policy must find a
way to reconcile "King Hus-
sein's need for international
sanction of his negotiations
with our own conviction that
only bilateral, direct negotia-
Continued on Page 6
Witnesses Attest To
Schwammberger Brutality
By ANDREW SILOW CARROL
NEW YORK (JTA) Ac-
counts by eyewitnesses to the
brutality of a suspected Nazi
war criminal arrested in
Argentina are being forward-
ed to Argentine authorities,
according to officials of the
Simon Wiesenthal Center in
Los Angeles and the World
Jewish Congress in New York. The groups hope to speed ex-
Both groups are continuing tradition proceedings against
the search for survivors of Schwammberger. They expect
labor camps in Przemysl and
Rozwadow, and the concentra-
tion camp in Mielce, all in
Poland, where Josef Schwam-
mberger, 75, is said to have
been responsible, as comman-
dant, for the executions and
torture of hundreds of Jews.
a full trial for Schwammberger
to be held in West Germany,
where he will be charged with
mass murder and torture.
According to Austrian police
files obtained by The New York
Continued on Page 9-
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
MM IAN DM. I. FIOUKU
PERMIT NO. 324
A Young Josef Schwanunberger



Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 4, 1987
Conversion and Compromise
An Intra-Faith Solution
NEW YORK Differing ap-
proaches to the conversion of
non-Jews to Judaism con-
stitute a "serious barrier to
cooperation and good rela-
tions" between the various
Jewish religious movements,
according to a new study just
published by the American
Jewish Committee.
Written by Lawrence
Grossman, formerly a pro-
gram specialist in the agency's
Jewish Communal Affairs
Dept. who becomes AJC's
director of publications
January 1, 1988, the booklet is
titled "Conversion to Judaism:
A Background Analysis."
Dr. Grossman points to the
increase in the number of con-
verts to Judaism in the U.S.
resulting from the high ratesa
of marriage between Jews and
Christians, then adds:
"Since the great majority of
such conversions do not meet
prevalent Orthodox standards,
there are now thousands of
people who think of
themselves as Jews but whose
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Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Jewish credentials will be
challenged should they wish to
marry in an Orthodox
ceremony." In Israel, he adds,
"the Orthodox monopoly", on
government recognition has
"politicized and inflamed the
issue."
While it is true that the
Jewish community has often
been wracked by sharp
ideological controversy, he
continues, some observers feel
that the conversion debate
might well lead to outright
schism* According to the
scenario of the pessimists, Or-
thodox Jews might refuse to
marry other Jews for fear that
many of them, converts or
descendants of converts,
might not be Jewish by tradi-
tional standards. "The result
would be two separate Jewish
peoples," he cautions.
Grossman addresses the
question of what can be done
to prevent the division of the
Jewish people, then answers:
"Traditional Jewish conver-
sion procedure entails circum-
cision (for men), immersion in
a ritual bath, and acceptance
of the commandments of
Jewish law. Reform Jews did
away with these requirements
in the 19th century, and the
Conservative and Reconstruc-
tionist movements generally
do not carry them out in a way
acceptable to the Orthodox.
Compounding the problem,
even were non-Orthodox rab-
bis to follow the traditional
procedure, the Orthodox
would invalidate their conver-
sions because they are not
'rabbis' in the traditional
sense."
To be sure, he writes in his
booklet, there is room for flex-
ibility on all sides. Within Or-
thodoxy, he asserts, there is a
long rabbinic tradition of inter-
pretation that validates, under
certain conditions, conversions
that are not likely to lead to
Refuseniks
To Testify
WASHINGTON Five
former Soviet refuseniks will
discuss the Soviet Jewry
struggle at a hearing before
the Commission on Security
and Cooperation in Europe.
The Commission has invited
Natan Sharansky, Ida Nudel,
Vladimir Slepak, Yuli Edelsh-
tein and Lev Elbert to testify
on the many human rights
issues confronting Soviet
Jews.
The hearing is to take place
on Friday, Dec. 4 at the
Rayburn House Office
Building. The hearing comes
on the eve of the major rally on
behalf of Soviet Jews prior to
the Reagan-Gorbachev
summit.
Among the issues the
witnesses will discuss are the
denial of emigration based on
"state secrets;" anti-Semitism
in the Soviet Union; and what
the Reagan-Gorbachev summit
may hold for the continuing
struggle of Soviet Jews. The
witnesses, all recently released
from the Soviet Union, will
also offer their observations on
General Secretary Gor-
bachev's reform program.
observance of the command-
ments so long as circumcision
and/or immersion takes place,
and Orthodox rabbis officiate.
For their part, a good number
of Reform and other non-
Orthodox rabbis are prepared
to demand of their converts
circumcision and/or immersion
if that could secure Orthodox
recognition for these conver-
sions, he adds.
There have been a number of
attempts to organize joint rab-
binic boards, consisting of
members of all the denomina-
tions, which would handle con-
versions in a manner accep-
table across the Jewish spec-
trum, Grossman reports. So
far, they have all run into dif-
ficulties. The best known, a
joint rabbinic board in Denver,
Colorado, lasted from 1978 till
1983, and broke up amid con-
siderable recrimination.
In some communities,
Grossman writes, the divisive
potential of diverse conversion
standards is addressed by in-
formal arrangements between
rabbis: The non-Orthodox rab-
bis have their candidates go
through circumcision and/or
immersion, and the Orthodox
rabbis sign the conversion cer-
tificates without inquiring too
deeply into the convert's ex-
pected pattern of Jewish
observance. He adds:
"Despite the angry rhetoric
that has been generated by the
conversion controversy, there
are rabbis of good will in all the
movements who are eager to
reach a consensus that would
preserve Jewish unity. The
Jewish community should en-
courage such efforts."
Iron Curtain Air Rights
TEL AVIV (JTA) Poland and Czechoslovakia have
given permission to Israeli commercial planes to fly through
their airspace, lifting a ban imposed when those countries broke
diplomatic relations with Israel during the 1967 Six-Day War.
One result will be to shorten El Al's flights between Tel Aviv
and Copenhagen by 20 minutes, the airline announced. El Al will
soon introduce new Boeing 757 aircraft on this and other routes.
The new planes, which can seat 191 passengers, will replace the
Boeing 707s now in use.
Israel and Poland took the first steps toward re-establishing
diplomatic ties last summer, when Israel opened an interest sec-
tion in Warsaw and Poland opened one in Tel Aviv. Interest sec-
tions are the lowest level of diplomatic representation.
There has been no such move to date between Israel and
Czechoslovakia.
Rabbi Rothenberg
Honored Upon Retirement
Rabbi Emanuel D. Rothenberg was recently honored at a
reception at JNF headquarters in New York City, upon his
retirement as director of the Religious Department of the
Jewish National Fund.
Rothenberg's tenure has been widely credited for pro-
moting tremendous growth in the involvement of Orthodox
Jewish institutions with JNF's afforestation and land
reclamation program in Israel.
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Friday, December 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
Schwammberger Witness Recalls Memories For Testimony
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jnoiak Floridian Staff Writer
SAM NUSSBAUM, a Kan-
sas plumber who said his plum-
bing skills saved him from
death in the Polish ghetto of
Przemysl, said there is one
final job he'd like to do af-
filiated with the Holocaust.
Nussbaum, 67, said he would
like to see Josef Schwamm-
berger, the commandant of
Nussbaum's ghetto who was
recently arrested in Argentina
and accused of Nazi murders,
hung.
"I'd like to hang him myself.
I never hung anybody,"
Nussbaum said, but if they
told me to hang him, I would. I
wouldn't hang him from the
neck. I'd hang him from other
places."
Nussbaum is one of six
Holocaust survivors who have
come forward since Schwam-
mberger's arrest last month to
say they will testify against
him.
Schwammberger's arrest on
an Argentinian ranch came
shortly after the Simon
Wiesenthal Center released an
unprecedented list of the 10
most wanted Nazi war
criminals. Schwammberger,
number five on the list, is be-
ing held in an Argentinian
hospital-prison ward, while ar-
rangements for his extradition
to West Germany for trial are
being made.
Nussbaum said, in a
telephone interview, that he
first learned about Schwamm-
berger when he read a story in
a Kansas Jewish newspaper
saying the front entrance of a
synagogue in Buenos Aires
was blown up and it was
thought to be related to the
Schwammberger arrest.
"I SAW that and it lit up my
ears," Nussbaum said. "I'm
coming forward. I'm risking
my life. My mind went back 40
years when I saw the article.
My memory went back like I
would be coming out of the
ghetto right now. And I'm
very depressed. I don't sleep
at night. I can hardly wait for
the day to bring him to
justice.'
Nussbaum is the only
member of his family to sur-
vive the ghetto killings. His
mother, father, brother and
four sisters were shipped to
their deaths. He is not certain
to where, but he believes
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Auschwitz.
There were two ghettos,
divided into "A" and "B,"
Nussbaum recalls: "A" was
supposed to be for the working
people; "B," which was for the
non-workers, was liquidated,
he said. "The train was across
the street and everyone in the
"B" was loaded up to the train
like cattle."
Nussbaum said Schwamm-
berger came to the ghetto in
1943 after liquidating the ghet-
to in Rozwadeva. By the time
Schwammberger had arrived,
Nussbaum said he was already
established as the plumber of
the former ghetto gestapo.
"First, Schwammberger oc-
cupied a house outside the
ghetto," Nussbaum said. "I
remodeled the plumbing in his
house. He knew me well. He
came to the ghetto and picked
me up. He gave me a pass to
get out of the ghetto. Only a
few had passes to get out of
the ghetto."
Nussbaum said he and
Schwammberger frequently
engaged in conversation but it
had nothing to do with Jews or
the ghetto.
"We talked about what to do
with this leak, how to make the
pipe. He asked me how to
make vodka. I set up a still for
him on the edge of the
Przemysl ghetto."
Other memories are not so
trivial or frivolous. "Several
times I looked out and saw him
Schwammberger executing
Jewish men and women with
his revolver. Everybody had to
get undressed and he shot
everyone of them. I looked a
couple times and I saw what
was going on and I didn't have
to look any more."
ONE DAY, Nussbaum said,
he was walking with Schwam-
mberger and his wife when
they stopped by a man who
had been snot and was begging
for water.
"He Schwammberger pulled
his gun and turned him on his
back and shot him in the back
of the head ...
"He could take a ride in the
morning on his horse around
the fence of the ghetto and he
Alf Erlandsson, the chief archivist of the
United Nations, opens a box of files in the
UN's archives signifying a release from
would pick up his rifle and pick
his prey."
Asked if he won any favor
with Schwammberger because
of his own service to him,
Nussbaum said, "He never
gave me any food. But one
time the toilet was dirty in the
main building from the office
and Schwammberger told
them to give me 25 lashes on
my back because the toilet was
dirty. I couldn't sit for a week.
"And the German Shepherd
with the name Prince
Schwammberger's dog ... if
that dog got a hold of you he
didn't just tear your pants, he
took a piece of meat with it."
There came a point when
Nussbaum's services were no
longer wanted by
Schwammberger.
"THERE WAS a little
graveyard in an open field.
And I built a fence around it.
He caught me sitting and not
working one day and he told
me, 'You lazy bum. On the
next transport you're going to
be gone.'
"He kept his word. When I
left, there were probably a
hundred Jews left.
secrecy of the UN War Crimes Commission
files. The files chronicling atrocities and other
war crimes numbers 8,500. AP/Wide World Photo
Nussbaum said he was ship-
ped to Shebna and then to
Auschwitz at the end of 1943.
From Auschwitz he said he
was sent to about a half-dozen
concentration camps. In two of
the camps, he said his plumb-
ing skills were used and when
there was use for a person, a
life was spared or at least
prolonged.
"The other times, I just sur-
vived by luck."
Nussbaum now urges, "If
there are some other people
who know Schwammberger,
they should come out and
testify."
More Soviet to U.S. Visits
The number of Soviet
citizens allowed to visit
relatives in the United States
has risen substantially in the
last few months, indicating
new moves by the Soviet
Government to ease restric-
tions on travel, according to
the Commission on Security
and Cooperation in Europe.
From June through August
1987, 1,250 Soviet citizens
received private travel and
tourism visas to visit the U.S.,
compared to 550 for the same
period in 1986 and an annual
average of only 1,600
throughout most of the 1980's.
The vast majority of these
visas are for family visits.
Last July, Rudolf Kuznet-
sov, head of the Visas and
Registration Department
(OVIR) of the USSR Ministry
of Internal Affairs, stated that
restrictions on travel have
beon eased under the emigra-
tion and travel law that went
into effect on January 1. He
stated that within the limits of
the rules, there is now no ceil-
ing on the number of times a
Soviet citizen can travel
abroad, except to the extent
that the Ministry of Finance
limits conversion of the
necessary hard currency.
In the past, obtaining per-
mission to visit relatives in the
U.S. has been a lengthy, cost-
ly, burdensome and arbitrary
process.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 4,1987
40th Anniversary Missions Raise $13.4
Million For UJA/Federation Campaign
NEW YORK In celebra-
tion of Israel's 40th Anniver-
sary, three United Jewish Ap-
peal Maior Gifts Missions rais-
ed nearly $11 million in Sept.
and Oct. to help set a fast early
pace for the 1988 UJA/Federa-
tion Campaign. This
represented an overall 31.3
percent increase over pledges
made by the same donors last
year.
In addition, the participants
jointly pledged $610,800 to
Project Renewal, the partner-
ship program of American and
Israeli Jews to help
rehabilitate distressed Israeli
neighborhoods.
UJA National Chairman
Martin F. Stein was en-
thusiastic about the results.
"These missions celebrated
Israel's 40th Anniversary with
an exemplary display of
American Jews' ongoing
pledge to Israel's future." He
said, "They raised vital funds
and enhanced the solidification
of ties between our two
countries."
National Vice Chairmen who
led the three missions were
respectively: Richard
Pearlstone of Baltimore; Alan
Crawford of Milwaukee; Dr.
Saul Singer of Hollywood,
Florida and Francine Loeb of
Seattle.
During an intensively pro-
grammed schedule par-
ticipants were briefed by
Israel Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres and Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and
also had an opportunity to
meet Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir; Shlomo Gazit,
Director-General of the Jewish
Agency, and Avraham Sharir,
Minister of Tourism and
Justice.
Participants saw their funds
in action at Youth Aliyah
villages for disadvantaged
teenagers, an American
Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee (JDC) facility for
the mentally retarded, rural
settlements and Project
Renewal neighborhoods.
Participants also visited
high-tech industries and Yad
Vashem, explored problems of
Israel's secuntv, held
memorial services for fallen
soldiers at Mt. Herzl Military
Cemetery and met with recent
immigrants from the Soviet
Union. Mission III members
also participated in the first
non-stop El Al flight from
Warsaw to Tel Aviv in over 40
years.
Many mission members took
part in pre-missions to Poland,
Czechoslovakia and Romania,
visiting remnant Jewish com-
munities and observing social
programs of the JDC funded
by the UJA/Federation
Campaign.
A number of National Vice
Chairmen actively contributed
to the excellent results. They
included Bobi Klotz of New
York City, National Chairman
of- UJA's Women's Division;
Judith A. Levy of Boston,
President of UJA Women's
Division; Jane Sherman of
Detroit, National Proiect
Renewal Chairman, as well as
Stanley Ruskin of Pittsburgh,
Alan Ades of New Bedford and
Alan Casnoff and Bennett
Aaron of Philadelphia. Ber-
nard Borine of Philadelphia,
an honorary National Vice
Chairman and veteran of many
missions, also played a pivotal
role.
JBI Reading
A new program offering free
audiocassettes of concerts, lec-
tures and poetry readings for
blind and visually-impaired
persons has been launched by
the Jewish Braille Institute of
America, it was announced
this week by Dr. Jane Evans,
JBI president.
Blind and visually-impaired
persons who wish to obtain
these tapes should contact the
Jewish Braille Institute, 110
East 30th Street, New York,
NY 10016; telephone (212)
889-2525.
ThejcwisVi
of South Broward
g>' Fn4 Skmekrt
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor nd Publisher Executivt Editor
Published Weekly Jinuety Ihiough Mitch Biweekly April through August
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Member JTA. Seven Artt. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA.
Friday, December 4, 1987
Volume 17
13 KISLEV 5748
Number 27
Reagan Backs Rally
WASHINGTON (JTA) The massive rally in support
of Soviet Jewry scheduled Sunday for the National Mall is
an "impressive" way to demonstrate to the Soviet Union
the concern of Americans for this issue, a senior Reagan
administration official said Monday.
"These people are demonstrating on behalf of a cause
with which this administration, this country... are deeply
committed," the official said in briefing reporters on next
week's summit meeting here between President Reagan
and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
Rejecting a suggestion that the demonstration might put
a "cloud" over the summit, the official said that instead he
expected "it to put a spotlight on this issue."
Jews from all over the country are planning to come here
for the Washington mobilization. The official said he ex-
pects the demonstration to be "dignified, orderly, but a
very impressive demonstration of concern" which is how it
will be explained to the Soviets.
"Human rights is going to figure prominently during the
summit," a second official at the White House briefing
stressed. "It is something the president of the United
States cares very deeply about."
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Friday, December 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
Terror By Hang Glider
Continued from Page 1-
regular weekly session.
The ministers were briefed
by Rabin. But Rabin was at-
tacked by Commerce and In-
dustry Minister Ariel Sharon,
a Likud hardliner, who main-
tained that the problem was
not a lack of alertness at the
encampment but the absence
of "clear directives from the
political echelon to the defense
forces to wipe out terror."
Deputy Premier David Levy,
another Likud minister,
defended the defense
establishment. He said that
because of one mistake it has
been forgotten that the nor-
thern border has been sealed
and secure since Israel
withdrew its forces from
Lebanon in 1984.
Rabin himself pointed to the
relative calm on the northern
border for the past two-and-a-
half years. But he admitted it
was achieved at a high cost
21 soldiers killed, 103 wound-
ed, two kidnapped and one air
force navigator taken prisoner
after his Phantom jet crashed,
or was shot down. Rabin noted
that some 10,000 terrorists
belonging to dozens of dif-
ferent terrorist groups are
presently active in Lebanon.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir told
the Cabinet that the IDF
would soon draw the ap-
propriate conclusions from the
attack. Addressing the annual
luncheon meeting of
newspaper editors Monday,
Shamir was asked if he blamed
Syria for the attack. He
replied that Syria identified
with "this kind of terrorism,"
but would not elaborate.
Shamir complained,
however, that "even in Egypt,
voices are heard praising last
Wednesday's terror attack in
Galilee."
It was learned, meanwhile,
that army units and set-
tlements in the area of the at-
tack had a 20- to 30-minute ad-
vance warning that an in-
filtrator was approaching by
air.
The first report of a "moped
overhead" in the dark,
moonless sky, was verified by
a second source. A moped is a
motorized bicycle. The hang-
glider used by the terrorist
was powered by a bicycle
motor.
The unit that suffered the
casualties was part of Nahal,
the IDF section that combines
military training with
agricultural work. Shomron
said Nahal was a first-class
fighting unit and the errors
made at the upper Galilee en-
campment were not typical.
The sentry on duty at the
gate reportedly fled when the
terrorist threw a grenade at
him. The soldier was from a
family that had lost one son in
combat.
It is IDF policy not to recruit
members of bereaved families
for front-line or forward-area
duty in order to spare such
families the risk of losing other
members. In this case, ap-
parently, that policy was not
followed.
Shomron disclosed that a
third hang-glider may have
been launched on last week's
assault but either crashed or
turned back before it reached
Abul Fida Omran, leader of the south Lebanese forces of the
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Com-
mand, smiles during a news conference he held at his office in the
Ein El-Hiluieh refugee camp near the southern port of Sidon.
Omran said his group was responsible for the airborne attack on
an Israeli army camp in Kiryat Shemona. AP/Wide World Photo
the Israeli-controlled security
zone in southern Lebanon.
A second glider landed in the
security zone about 1,500 feet
short of the Israel-Lebanon
border. Its pilot was killed by
an IDF patrol.
Reports from Lebanon Mon-
day indicated that Palestinian
terrorists in southern Lebanon
are girding for massive retalia-
tion bv Israel. Officers of the
United Nations peace-keeping
force in southern Lebanon
were quoted by Haaretz Mon-
day as reporting the flight of
civilian residents of refugee
camps in the area where the
terrorists have their bases.
Hadashot reported that the
terrorists themselves have for-
tified their bases and are on
high alert for an IDF reprisal.
Reports from the Sidon area
said there was fear that
"Israel is likely to undertake a
joint military action by land
and sea at any moment."
A report from the Ein Hilwe
refugee camp said the ter-
rorists strengthened their
coastal defenses after Israel
navy patrol boats were sighted
close offshore. They have also
mobilized their anti-aircraft
defenses, which consist
primarily of Soviet-made
SAM-7 ground-to-air missiles.
The Christian radio station
"Voice of Lebanon" was
quoted by Hadashot as saying
that an IDF tank column was
seen moving along the coastal
highway north of Nakura in
the direction of Tyre. The
report was not confirmed.
(Tel Aviv correspondent
Hugh Orgel also contributed to
this story.)
Business Note
Thomas F. Fraser, DDS, a
graduate of the Northwestern
School of Dentistry, has
recently joined the dental
Eractice of Paul G. Fleisher,
OS. Dr. Fraser, a native New
Yorker, is board certified in
Florida. He has a special in-
terest in pedodontics, which is
the practice of pediatric
dentistry.
The doctors have offices in
Hollywood, Pembroke Pines
and Weston.
Israelis End Strike
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two seven-week strikes that in-
convenienced the public ended Friday. Journalists of the
Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA) agreed to return to
work, capping 51 days of radio silence and television-screen
blackout. And the physicians at Kupat Holim sick-fund
hospitals are back in full force, allowing the hospitals to
return to normal after seven weeks of reduced Sabbath
schedules.
The journalists' decision was apparently spurred by the
fmblic's desire for information about the terrorist attack
ast Wednesday in the Galilee.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 4, 1987
New Defense Secretary Briefs Peace 'Breakthrough'
Continued front Page 1
tions can lead anywhere."
He added: "We must also try
to reconcile the king's desire
to know where the negotia-
tions are headed with the
Israeli concern that no Israeli
government be required to
commit itself in advance of
negotiations to a particular
outcome."
Secretary Carlucci observed:
"We may not achieve anything
more, in the time left this ad-
ministration, than a more solid
foundation on which to make
peace over time but I can
assure you we will accept
nothing less."
The Pentagon chief also
drew a sharply critical picture
of the Soviet role in the Middle
East, asserting:
"We see stylistic changes
that reveal greater tactical
agility, but we do not see
serious or substantive
changes.
"We see the Soviets pushing
the international conference,
but remaining vague or am-
biguous on critical details. Not-
withstanding what Shevard-
nadze told Peres and Voront-
sov told the Egyptians and
Jordanians, the Soviets are
now saying publicly that the
PLO must have independent,
equal standing at an interna-
tional Middle East peace
conference.
_ "That hardly inspires con-
fidence, and it can hardly
reflect a serious commitment
on their part to making
progress^
"We're looking for signs
that the Soviets are committed
to peace and prepared to con-
tribute to producing it. What
we've seen is a commitment to
being part of a process, not a
commitment to taking prac-
tical steps in that process that
will make peace more likely
and achievable."
'Khomeini Fundamentalism a
Greater Challenge than the
USSR*
But while warning of Soviet
"activism," which he said
represents "a new challenge in
the Middle East," the new
defense secretary said that
"the most severe challenge we
face in the area" was posed by
the Khomeini revolution and
its brand of "politico-religious
fundamentalism"
To counter Iranian subver-
sion and military action, he
said, the U.S. has received
"quiet but effective and un-
precedented support" from
several Gulf states, "especially
Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and
Kuwait.
"All three," he said, "allow
greater use of their facilities
than is generally known." Con-
tinuing, Secretary Carlucci
said:
"The best way to counter the
fundamentalist challenge in
the region and in the ter-
ritories is to show that
moderates can succeed and
deliver.
"That helps to explain why
we've squeezed $30 million out
of this year's budget for West
Bank development. Palesti-
nians in the territories must
have hope that political and
economic conditions will get
better and that those commit-
ted to cooperation are best
able to offer the pathway to a
better future.
"That better furture," he
said, "must include the pro-
spect of a real political settle-
ment. Our approach to the
peace-seeking process has
been characterized by two
tracks: (a) To build de facto
Palestinian-Israeli cooperation
on the West Bank and Gaza,
and (b) To explore actively the
possibility of getting a broader
negotiating process started."
Other speakers at the brief-
ing included Max M.
Kampelman, chief U.S.
negotiator on nuclear arms
with the Soviet Union;
Undersecretary of State
Richard Murphy, U.S. Am-
bassador to Israel Thomas
Pickering; and Robert Oakley,
a member of the National
Security Council.
Nicaraguan
Synagogue
'Returned'
The Nicaraguan Jewish com-
munity in exile has accepted an
offer by the Sandinista govern-
ment to return the nation's on-
ly synagogue which it con-
fiscated shortly after taking
power in 1979, according to
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith.
Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal,
director of the League's Latin
American Affairs Depart-
ment, said the Nicaraguan
government claims that the
building has been restored to
"good condition." The
synagogue was attacked and
firebombed by Sandinistas in
1978 while members of the
Congregation Israelita de
Nicaragua prayed inside. Un-
til recently, it has been used b
a Sandinista
organization.
ised by
o u t h

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Friday, December 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Arizona Governor Now Angers Jews
PHOENIX (JTA) Arizona
Gov. Evan Mecham recently
added two logs to the political
fire burning around him, ac-
cording to the Greater
Phoenix Jewish News.
The newspaper took the
Republican governor to task
last week in an editorial for
comments denying the separa-
tion of state he reportedly
made during a celebration of
the bicentennial of the U.S.
Constitution.
"(T)his is a great Christian
nation that recognizes Jesus
Christ as God of the land," the
governor recently told the Na-
tional Center for Constitu-
tional Studies conventior in
Salt Lake City. "It is the best
place in the world for Jews,
Hindus and atheists ... and
everybody else because ...
(the Constitution) is human
rights and freedom to all."
The Jewish News noted that
"Mecham obliterated the Con-
stitutional mandate for separa-
tion of church and state,
established an official 'God of
the land' ... and gave the en-
tire country a paternalistic pat
on the head for being so ac-
commodating to "Jews, Hin-
dus and atheists ..."
The constitutional studies
center is headed by his political
Vice President George Bush meets with Israeli President Chaim
Herzog at a breakfast hosted for Herzog at the Vice President's
residence in Washington.
crony, W. Cleon Skousen, who
wrote a textbook in which
black children are described as
"pickaninnies."
That speech closely followed
a Sept. 26 presentation by
Mecham to the Constitution
Awareness Conference in
Richardson, Texas. Elaine
DeRose of the Jewish News
reports that other speakers
there espoused views blaming
Jews for the nation's pro-
blems, and that anti-Semitic
materials were distributed.
Mecham denied he knew of
the anti-Semitism.
The conference was spon-
sored by the American Liberty
Association, whose list of
books reportedly includes
writing by Eustace Mullins,
described by Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith staffer
Joel Breshin as a writer and
speaker against Jews since the
1950s.
The list also includes an arti-
cle published by the Lord's
Covenant Church of Phoenix
in which Jews were blamed for
foisting the 1976 Swine Flu
epidemic upon non-Jews.
Mecham's press secretary,
Ken Smith, said the governor
denied "guilt by association"
and that his talk, on the Con-
stitution, is one he regularly
gives.
He said the governor ac-
cepted the invitation to speak
from George Hansen, a former
U.S. representative from
Idaho, and that Mecham did
not attend any other talks at
the conference. Mecham con-
firmed that in a letter to the
Jewish News.
"Please rest assured," the
governor wrote, "that in no
way do I personally support,
condone or tolerate such anti-
Semitic materials."
Mecham's term has been
marked by controversy for his
cancellation of the state
celebration of Martin Luther
King Day and his political
alliances with alleged
criminals and ultra-
rightwingers. A citizens'
group has mounted a
statewide petition drive to
begin impeachment pro-
ceedings against him.
Now the community has something good to celebrate.
The Fontainebleau Hilton has invested $2 million in
an all-new Kosher Banquet Facility. We now offer:
Completely separate facilities dedicated
strictly to Kosher food.
Capability to serve up to 10,000 Kosher
meals at a sitting.
All food preparation under strict rabbinical
supervision.
For great weddings or bar mitzvahs, the Fontainebleau is
just the beginning. Contact our catering department at
538-2000, extension 3521.
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e $1.90
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This Is Southern Bell!


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 4, 1987
March to Summit Mobilizes
rally: Yuli Edelshtein, Ida
uy:
idel,
conscience will appear at the
Isht
leps
Sharansky, and Mikhail Khol-
Nudel, Vladimir Slepak, Natan
Continued from Page 1
I
for instance, has moved its Na-
tional Campaign Cabinet
meeting from New York to
Washington so that UJA
leaders can participate in the
demonstration.
And in Boston, the Jewish
community has canceled its
Super Sunday fund-raising
event and plans to turn out at
least 1,000 people for the
Washington rally.
Demonstrators will travel by
train, aboard two chartered
planes and on at least 20
buses. Hillel groups on area
campuses are busy signing up
students for the trip. The
event has "really struck at
young people's hearts," said
Philip Perlmutter, executive
director of the JCRC of
Greater Boston.
In Kansas City, Mo., 300
people are already signed up
for spots on three chartered
planes. On Monday, Natan
Sharansky spoke at a rally
there that kicked off a week of
activity, including noon-hour
vigils and a Soviet Jewry Shab-
bat. According to Judy
Hellman, associate director of
Kansas City's Campaign to the
Summit committee, Jewish
delegates will be joined by non-
Jewish students from Corning,
Iowa; two student represen-
tatives elected by the William
Jewel Baptist College in Liber-
ty, Mo.; and leaders of three
farming associations in
Missouri and Kansas.
San Francisco is also plann-
ing a week of activities, in ad-
dition to sending a delegation
to the rally. The first will be a
vigil in Union Square on Dec.
6, according to Ruthellen Har-
ris and Dan Hoffman, co-
chairs of the Bay Area Summit
Task Force.
Twenty people will travel
the 3,000 miles from
Washington state to
Washington, D.C., according
to July Balint, chairperson of
the Seattle Action for Soviet
Jewry. And the Duluth delega-
tion will number 11, according
to Gloria Vipullo, ad-
ministrator of the Jewish
Federation and Community
Council there.
Foreign participants are ex-
pected from Israel, the
Netherlands, Mexico, Great
Britain, France and other
countries. Chartered flights
will leave Montreal and Toron-
to for Washington, and seats
have already been reserved by
people in Winnipeg, Van-
couver and Saskatchewan. The
Canadian Jewish Congress
estimates that 500 Canadians
will make the trip.
But while the representation
of small and distant com-
munities attests to the excite-
ment generated by the event,
mobilization organizers are
depending on the Northeast
corridor for sheer numbers.
The UJA-Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies of New
York has allocated $1 million
to produce attendance. At
least four planes will be
chartered and hundreds of
seats have been reserved on
commercial flights. Five-
hundred buses will make the
trip. The Coalition to Free
Jews has set up a special hot
line for bus information in the
New York area.
New Jersey's Jewish com-
munities will send at least 200
buses, and a freedom Train
will leave Newark with 1,500
people, including New Jersey
Gov. Thomas Kean and U.S.
Sen. Frank Lautenberg.
Baltimore has chartered 135
buses, and Philadelphia has
reserved at least that many.
Philadelphia Mayor W. Wilson
Goode has declared Dec. 6
"Summit Sunday" in the city.
"We hope to get 10,000 peo-
ple,' said Marian Levine, direc-
tor for Soviet Jewry at the
Jewish Community Relations
Council of Greater
Philadelphia.
In Washington, the Board of
Rabbis has announced a goal of
turning out 50 percent of its
congregational membership,
which could yield as many as
15,000 people.
It also falls on the
Washington community to ac-
commodate the day's
thousands of visitors. Accor-
ding to Jerry Strober,
spokesman for the Campaign
to the Summit committee,
shuttle buses will serve
Washington's three airports
and Amtrak's Union Station.
The committee is also creating
the battle plan that will enable
hundreds of arriving buses to
discharge passengers at the
Ellipse Sunday morning, and
pick them up again near the
Mall late that afternoon.
If all goes according to
plans, a one-mile march will
begin at the Ellipse at 1 p.m.
and proceed down Constitu-
tion Avenue. At 2 p.m., a rally
will begin in the area of the
Mall.
Five former prisoners of
miansky. Joining them will be
Vice President George Bush,
Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel,
Israel Ambassador Moshe
Arad, and Helen Jackson,
widow of the late Sen. Henry
"Scoop" Jackson and a
founder of Congressional
Wives for Soviet Jewry.
Also speaking will be Morris
Abram, chairman of the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry; Rev. Arie Brouwer,
general secretary of the Na-
tional Council of Churches;
and Bishop William Keeler,
representing the National
Conference of Catholic
Bishops.
The organizing committee
has declined to estimate how
many will attend. But it is cer-
tain it will surpass the crowd
of 12,000 who gathered in
Washington for the June 1973
visit of Soviet leader Leonid
Brezhnev, while falling
somewhat short of the 300,000
who attended last year's
Solidarity Sunday for Soviet
Jewry in New York and heard
an address by the recently-
freed Sharansky.
The Union of Orthodox Rab-
bis of the United States and
Canada is urging Jews not to
take part in the demonstration
or support it, quoting the late
Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, who
felt mass demonstration could
only arouse the anger of the
Soviet authorities.
2.7 Million
Jews In USSR
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
Foreign Ministry official has
estimated there are 2.7 million
Jews living in the Soviet
Union, a figure at variance
with the 1.5 million claimed by
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres a month ago.
The report, submitted to the
Cabinet Sunday (Nov. 22), by
ministry staffer David Bartov.
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Friday, December 4, 1987/The Jewish Horidian of South Broward-HoUyw
Schwammberger
Continued from Page 1
Times, Schwammberger ad-
mitted shooting 35 Jews and
plundering from Jewish slave
laborers sacks of gold and dia-
mond jewelry found in his
possession when he was ar-
rested by Austrian police in
1945.
Testimony by witnesses in
those same files depict
Schwammberger as a bestial
executioner who yanked gold
teeth from the mouths of
prisoners, set his dog upon
others and shot Jews at point-
blank range, the Times said.
Meeting with Argentinean
officials, Wisenthal Center
dean, Rabbi Marvin Hier,
presented a dossier on
Schwammberger and a list of
living witnesses.
Case Involving 'Living
People'
"I wanted to impress upon
them that this is not a matter
of historical research, but a
case involving living people,"
Hier told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency this week.
The witnesses include Sam
Nussbaum, a Kansas City
plumbing contractor who serv-
ed as Schwammberger's
plumber in the Przemysl ghet-
to, and Arnold Susskind and
Joseph Wellner, both of Forest
Hills, N.Y., who lived in
Przemysl when Schwamm-
berger was the ghetto's com-
mandant in 1942-43.
The World Jewish Congress
has also forwarded to Argen-
tine authorities the testimony
of Ignaz Horowitz of Brooklyn,
also a survivor of Przemysl.
Horowitz told JTA that he
was 21-years-old when
Schwammberger ordered the
executions of nis entire family
in the nearby village of
Stalowa-Wola. "I was lucky to
escape," said Horowitz, who
was asked to testify against
Schwammberger during an
earlier extradition attempt by
West Germany, and who con-
tacted the WJC when he heard
of Schwammberger's arrest.
Susskink told Hier that he
was one of seven men caught
by Schwammberger as they
baked matzoh for Passover.
Schwammberger personally
executed one of the men, and
his guards emptied their rifles
into a second man as the
others, including Susskind, fl-
ed the bakery.
Said To Have Executed
3-Year-Old
Susskind said that Schwam-
mberger also ordered the ex-
ecution of Susskind's 3-year-
old son, according to Hier.
"It makes me sick
remembering all these
things," Susskind said in a
telephone interview. "But I
have no problem testifying."
As Schwammberger's
plumber, Nussbaum was pro-
bably the closest eyewitness to
Schwammberger, according to
Hier. Nussbaum not only
witnessed murders, said Hier,
but also Schwammberger's
wife pleading with the com-
mandant to put an end to the
atrocities.
Wellner is one of two living
witnesses to the 1942 execu-
tion of a Rabbi Frenkel of
Wieliczka. "Wellner wasn't
standing more than 20 feet
away from the gallows" when
Frenkel was hanged in Rodz-
wadow for refusing to work on
Yom Kippur, said Hier.
About his meeting with
Argentine officials, Hier said
that he thanked them for their
role in arresting Schwamm-
berger, while voicing skep-
ticism about the state of
Schwammberger's health.
Schwammberger was moved
to a prison infirmary in La
Plata fast week after he said he
was having chest pains.
According to Hier, Schwam-
mberger appeared fit at his
first hearing.
"I told them to be careful
that it was not a defense ploy"
to prevent him from being sent
out of the country, said Hier.
Refuseniks
Encounter
Violence
By MARK JOFFE
NEW YORK (JTA) A
group of Jewish activists
demonstrating Tuesday near
the Moscow emigration office,
as well as several Western
journalists covering their pro-
test, were beaten up by a
group of bystanders with the
apparent complicity of Soviet
security agents.
Four of the Jewish activists
were arrested by police and
given prison sentences rang-
ing from seven to 15 days,
while other were fined up to
$65, according to reports
reaching Soviet Jewry
organizations here.
The protest lasted no more
than three or four minutes and
ended after some 50 in-
dividuals, reportedly bused to
the scene by Soviet police,
rushed the Jewish
demonstrators, ripping
posters from their hands. The
mob also assaulted camera
crews from the ABC, CBS,
CNN and NBC television net-
works, cutting camera wires
and throwing snow on camera
lenses.
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In General Admission
Price of $6.00
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(Toll Free In Florida)
or 305-394-3795


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 4, 1987
Temple Update
Hallandale Jewish
Center
Beth Tefilah
Tuesday, Dec. 8, at noon,
the Hallandale Jewish Center
Sisterhood will hold their last
meeting for 1987.
Refreshments will be served.
The afternoon's entertainment
will be "The Kol Golan Duo "
. Israel and Edna Rosen, an
Israel/American couple who
sing, dance and perform on
several instruments while
beautiful background slides of
Israel are projected. Their
talent has been widely acclaim-
ed through radio, television,
cabaret and concert perfor-
mances, and they are well-
known throughout the New
York metropolitan area. The
entertainment portion of the
meeting is open to the public at
1 p.m. at no charge. Prospec-
tive members may join the
meeting at noon, (416 NE 8
Ave., Hallandale.)
On Wednesday, Dec. 16, at
6 p.m., the Hallandale Jewish
Center will hold its annual
Chanukah Party with dancing,
latkes and dessert, (416 NE 8
Ave. Hallandale.) Call
454-9100 for tickets at $5 per
person.
On Sunday, Dec. 27, 7:15
p.m., the Hallandale Jewish
Center will present the show,
"Salute to America" featuring
Norman Atkins with his
talented entertainers in a pro-
gram of great songs and
moments spanning 60 years of
Broadway and Hollywood. All
seats are reserved $10 per
person. Tickets are also on sale
for the "Paul Zim Concert"
with the Klezmer Band
scheduled Sunday evening,
Feb. 21, all seats reserved, $10
per person. Call 454-9100.
On Monday, Jan. 4, the se-
cond semester of Hallandale
Jewish Center's Adult Educa-
tion Program begins with a
continuation of the first
semester's classes as well as
two new classes on Tuesday
evenings "Great Kings of
Israel, Their Life and Times"
at 7 p.m. and "Problems of
American Jewish Life" at 8
p.m.; Rabbi Jehuda Melber, in-
structor. These two classes
will begin Jan. 12. Call
454-9100 for registration
information.
The Hallandale Jewish
Center is accepting ad copy for
its Dinner Journal to be
published in conjunction with
its Jan. 27, 1988 Testimonial
Dinner/Dance honoring Rabbi
Carl Klein, President Myer
Pritsker and Board Chairman
Alex Rubin. Call 454-9100 for
ad rates.
Temple Beth Ahm
Family Services will begin
Friday, Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek of-
ficiating and Hazzan Eric
Lindenbaum chanting the
Liturgy.
Services Saturday, Dec. 5
will begin at 8:45 a.m.
Sisterhood is having a
Brunch on Sunday, Dec. 6 at
the home of our Sisterhood
President, Mrs. Diane
Salamon. For more informa-
tion call the Temple office.
Youth Committee will meet
on Monday, Dec. 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Religious Committee will
meet on Wednesday, Dec. 9 at
7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 10 at 8 p.m.
we will have a meeting for the
parents of Bar/Bat Mitzvah
candidates for the year 1988.
Daily minyan meets at 8 a.m.
and Monday-Thursday at 7:30
p.m.
Shabbat Services will begin
Friday, Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek of-
ficiating and Hazzan Eric
Lindenbaum chanting the
Liturgy.
Services Saturday, Dec. 12
will begin at 8:45 a..n. when
we celebrate the Bat Mitzvah
of Heather Leah Fink
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Stephen (Judy) Fink of Sun-
shine Ranches. Heather is a
student at Pioneer Middle
School and her hobbies are
bicycling and soccer. Special
guests will include her grand-
parents, Mary Presler and Jim
Sinclaire and Vivian Fink of
Hollywood and her sister
Danielle.
Temple will have their Con-
gregational Meeting with the
Election of officers on Sunday,
Dec. 13 at 7:30 p.m.
The students on Wednesday,
Dec. 16 and on Thursday, Dec.
17 will have their Chanukah
Assembly.
Membership Committee and
Education Committee will
meet on Monday, Dec. 14 at
7:30 p.m.
Junior Congregation will be
on Saturday, Dec. 12 at 10
a.m.
Daily minyan meet at 8 a.m.
Evening minyan meet
Monday-Thursday 7:30 p.m.
Sabbath Services will be held
on Friday, Dec. 4, at 8 p.m. in
the Hirsch Sanctuary, con-
ducted by Rabbi Paul Plotkin
and Hazzan Irving Grossman.
The Temple Beth Am Choir
under the direction of Esther
Federoff, will participate in
the services. An Oneg Shabbat
will follow services in the
Lustig Social Hall.
This Friday evening has
been designated as USY Shab-
bot. Members of our United
Synagogue Youth Group will
participate in services.
On Saturday Dec. 5, Sabbath
services are at 9 a.m., con-
ducted by Rabbi Paul Plotkin
and Hazzan Irving Grossman.
The congregation is invited to
a Kiddush following services in
the Lustig Social Hall.
The Bat Mitzvah of Karina
Silber, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Nestor Silber of Coral
Springs was celebrated at
Temple Beth Am on Nov. 20.
The Bar Mitzvah of Adam
Firestein, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Firestein of Coral Spr-
ings was celebrated at Temple
Beth Am on Nov. 28.
The Bat Mitzvah of Lisa
Weisberg, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert Weisberg of
Tamarac was celebrated at
Temple Beth Am on Nov. 28.
Temple Beth Am is proud to
announce its Annual Book Fair
and Chanukah Boutique on
Sunday, Dec. 6 at 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. and on Dec. 7 and 8 from
4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
A varied assortment of
books and gifts for the holiday
season will be available for
your perusal and purchase.
For further details please call
the Temple office at 974-8650.
Temple Beth El
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth El will have their
Breakfast/Program on Sun-
day, Dec. 13 at 9:30 a.m. in the
Auditorium for a contribution
of $2 per person. This event is
open to the public and will
feature Mr. Herbert Goldfeld,
Attorney-at-Law who is
designated by the Florida Bar
as qualified in the field of
Wills, Estates and Estate
Planning. He will be speaking
on "What Every Florida
Resident Should Know About
Wills." Come and be prepared
to ask questions.
Dr. Leon Weissberg will con-
duct his "Jewish History"
class on Monday, Dec. 14 in
the Chapel Lounge of Temple
Beth El from 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. This class is free to Tem-
ple Members. Non-Members
may join this class for a fee of
$25 per person for the
season. This is a brown-bag
session a beverage will be
served.
Friday evening, Dec. 11 Ser-
vices will be conducted by Rab-
bi Norman Lipson in the Sanc-
tuary at 8 p.m.
On Saturday morning, Dec.
12, the Torah study will be
conducted by Mr. Adolph
Steinhauer at 10:15 a.m.,
followed by Shabbat Service
conducted by Dr. Bernard
Rosenn at 11 a.m.
The flowers on the Bima and
the Oneg Shabbat are being
sponsored by the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth El.
On Monday, Dec. 7 Rabbi
Jaffe will conduct his Bible
Study Class on "Second
Kings" at 10 a.m. in the
Chapel. Anyone wishing to at-
tend these classes who is not a
member of Temple Beth El
may do so for a fee of $25 for
the season.
Friday evening, Dec. 4 Ser-
vices will be conducted by Rab-
bi Samuel Z. Jaffe in the Sanc-
tuary at 8 p.m. At this service
new Temple members will be
welcomed and consecration
services will be observed. Also
Temple Beth El Sisterhood is
being recognized this evening
for their overall programs in
support of the Temple.
On Saturday morning, Dec.
5, the Torah Study will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Jaffe at 10:15
a.m., followed by Shabbat Ser-
vice at 11 a.m.
The flowers on the Bima and
the Oneg Shabbat are being
sponsored by the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth El.
Temple Beth Shalom
Dr. Morton Malavsky, rabbi,
will conduct services this
weekend at Temple Beth
Shalom, 1400 North 46 Ave.
Hollywood, assisted by Cantor
Irving Gold. Service will begin
at 6:15 p.m., Friday, Dec. 4, in
the mam sanctuary, followed
by a dinner in the reception
area for all who have reserved
for the Friday Night Shabbat
Dinner Series. This tradi-
tional, kosher dinner appeals
to all age groups and is open to
non-members as well as
members. For information,
please call Sylvia S. Senick, ex-
ecutive director, 981-6111,
Temple office.
Service will begin on Satur-
day, Dec.5, at 9 a.m. The Bar
Mitzvah will be celebrated of
Elliot Seth Newman, son of
Edith and Joel Newman. Elliot
is enrolled in the Beth Shalom
Academy, attending the 8th
grade. Grandparents atten-
ding are: Ruth Newman of
Miami Beach and Noel and
Elsa Shapiro of Hollywood;
also, great grandmothers Ber-
tha Shapiro of Hallandale and
Michla Fishman of Miami
Beach. Pulpit flowers and con-
gregational kiddush will be
sponsored by Elliot's parents,
in his honor. During the ser-
vice, baby naming will be held
for Joslyn Fara Gober,
daughter of Debra and
Franklyn Gober. Joslyn's
grandparents are Mr. and Mrs.
Jerome Friedman, members of
Beth Shalom.
The new radio program,
"Timely Topics," hosted by
Dr. Malavsky, will be aired
every Sunday morning at 7:30
a.m. on WQAM, 560 on the
AM dial. A portion of the pro-
gram will be devoted to a com-
munity calendar and an-
nouncements will be made
regarding educational
programs.
On Sunday, Dec. 6, from
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., a Learn-A-
Thon will take place in the
school building of Beth
Shalom, headed by Hebrew
school principal, Bruce
Richman. This is an intensive,
six hour course in the basics of
Hebrew reading and the
registration fee of $20 includes
text book and lunch. For addi-
tional information, please call
school office, 966-2200.
Services are held weekdays
in the Jack Shapiro Chapel:
7:30 a.m. and mincha-maariv
at 5 p.m. All worshippers
welcome.
Temple Sinai
During the Sabbath Service
on Saturday, Dec. 5, a Stained
Glass Window donated by Dan
Levenson, in memory of his
wife, Ethel, will be dedicated
by Rabbi Margolis.
On Saturday, Dec. 12, Mr.
and Mrs. Hyman Reiter will
sponsor the Kiddush following
the Sabbath Services, in honor
of their 45th Wedding
Anniversary.
The Paul B. Anton Religious
School will sponsor their an-
nual "Make Your Own
Chanukiyah" Contest. The
students of the school will par-
ticipate and prizes will be
awarded at the Temple Sinai
Annual Chanukah dinner on
Friday, Dec. 18. All entries
must be in by Monday, Dec. 7.
The Institute of Adult
Jewish Studies will begin the
series "Sundays At Seven" on
Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. in the Lip-
man Youth Wing. This infor-
mal media series will feature
outstanding films of Jewish in-
terest. Each movie will be
shown and discussed over
dessert and coffee. The first
film, for Dec. 13 is "The
American Matchmaker." This
comedy is filled with songs set
in the early 1940's. The movie
is in English, liberally salted
with Yiddish slang expres-
sions. Admission is $4 per per-
son per session. Reservations
are necessary and for more in-
formation, please call the Tem-
ple office 920-1577.
The Parents Education Pro-
gram continues on Sunday,
Dec. 13 at 9:30 a.m. with Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis discussing
"What Does Judaism Say
About ...?" Parents of all
ages are invited to attend.
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles (ages 20-35) will hold a
Dance on Saturday, Dec. 12, at
8 p.m. at the Temple. The ad-
mission of $7 includes snacks
and one free drink with music
provided by a disc jockey.
On Sunday, Dec. 20 the Tem-
ple Sinai Young Singles (ages
20-35) will have a Picnic at
West Lake Park, West
Pavilion, 1200 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, beginning at 11
a.m. The admission of $5 in-
cludes a barbecue. For further
information, please call the
Temple office 920-1577.
On Friday, Dec. 4, Temple
Sinai will present a Family
Shabbat Eve Service in the
Sanctuary at 6 p.m., with Rab-
bi Richard J. Margolis and
Cantor Misha Alexandrovich
officiating. This Shabbat Eve
Service will be held at 6 p.m. in
order to encourage the atten-
dance of families with younger
children. There wUl be no 8
p.m. Service on Friday, Dec. 4.
On Saturday Morning, Dec.
5, the Shabbat Service will
take place in the Sanctuary at
9 a.m. During the Service, a
Stained Glass Window
donated by Dan Levenson, in
memory of his late wife, Ethel,
will be dedicated by Rabbi
Margolis. Following the Ser-
vice, the Kiddush will be spon-
sored by Mr. Levenson in
honor of the dedication.
On Friday, Dec. 11, Sabbath
Services will take place at 8
p.m. in the Sanctuary with
Rabbi Richard J. Margolis and
Cantor Misha Alexandrovich.
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles will participate in the
Service and will sponsor the
Oneg Shabbat following.
On Saturday Morning, Dec.
12, Services will take place in
the Sanctuary at 9 a.m.
Following the Service, the
Kiddush will be sponsored by
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Reiter, in
honor of their 45th Wedding
Anniversary.
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles (ages 20-35) will par-
ticipate in the Friday evening
Sabbath Service on Friday,
Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. at Temple
Sinai, 1201 Johnson St.,
Hollywood. The Oneg Shabbat
following the services will be
sponsored by the Young
Singles.
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles (ages 20-35) will hold a
dance on Saturday, Dec. 12 at
8 p.m. at the Temple, 1201
Johnson St., Hollywood. The
admission of $7 includes
snacks and one free drink with
music provided by a disc
jockey.
The Temple Sinai Young
Singles (ages 20-35) will have a
picnic on Sunday, Dec. 20 at
West Lake Park, West
Pavilion, 1200 Sheridan St.,
Hollywood, beginning at 11
a.m. There will be a barbecue,
softball, volleyball and other
activities to enjoy for the ad-
mission of $5.
For further information on
any of the above, please call
the Temple office 920-1577.
i


.?:* v*-- -'.*. "te
.' .' Friday, December 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11
Israel Bonds News
David Sklar, Campaign
Chairman of South Broward
Israel Bonds, announces an in-
tensive month-long campaign
to achieve record sales of the
new Variable Rate Issue (VRI)
of State of Israel Bonds will be
launched in South Broward.
The new Bond, which cur-
rently pays 7.875 percent an-
nual interest, is now available
to individuals. Minimum pur-
chase is $25,000. Previously,
the Variable Rate Issue Bond
was available only to employee
benefit funds, foundations and
public endownment funds. The
interest rate will never fall
before 7% percent.
"In the recent period of
volatile and fluctuating
equities markets, State of
Israel VRI Bonds, with the 7Vz
percent 'floor' in their annual
interest rate, have been con-
sidered a very desirable invest-
ment," said Mr. Sklar. "The
objective of our campaign," he
continued, "is to secure a
record number of members in
Sout Broward for the Prime
Minister's Club, the interna-
tional honor society of leading
supporters of Israel, who help
strengthen its economy by
purchasing $25,000 or more in
Israel Bonds annually."
To launch this special Prime
Minister's Club effort, a series
of VRI sales meetings will be
conducted beginning on Sun-
day, Nov. 22. The new VRI
Bond enables individual
friends of Israel to make a
substantial investment
its Clubhouse, 900 Hollybrook
Drive, Pembroke Pines at 8
p.m. Mary Jaffe Epstin, will be
honored for her concern,
understanding and response to
Israel's needs, and will be
presented with the coveted
Israel Bonds Scroll of Honor.
Mickey Freeman, popular
humorist, will entertain. The
event is sponsored by
Israel's economy while obtain- H0l,yobrrk B *$** ?'*th Lodge
ing an attractive rate of return
on their investment. The Bond
pays a minimum rate of 7%
percent, plus one-half the dif-
ference to the average prime
rate as determined twice each
year. The VRI Bond can be
submitted" for redemption
after five years by individuals
and after three years by
qualified employee benefit
funds.
Since the first issue of Israel
Variable Rate Bonds in 1981,
more than $600 million of
these financial instruments
have been sold.
Hollybrook holds a Night for
Israel, celebrating its 40th an-
niversary Sunday, Dec. 20
in
Bar Mitzvah
JOEL NEMES
The Bar Mitzvah of Joel
Richard Nemes will be
celebrated on Saturday,
December 12, 1987 at Temple
Beth Shalom of Hollywood,
Florida. Joel is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Jay Nemes of Pem-
broke Pines. Joel is an eighth
grade student at Pines Middle
School and is a member of Na-
tional Junior Honor Society,
Student Council Represen-
tative, and serves on the
1987-1988 Yearbook Staff.
The past two years, Joel
played in the school band and
performed in the South Coun-
ty Band Ensemble. In
February 1987, Joel won first
place in his division at his
school's Science Fair and went
on to win fourth place in his
division at the Broward Coun-
ty Science Fair.
Joel graduated in May from
Temple Beth Shalom Religious
School where he attended five
years of Hebrew School. He
plans to continue his religious
studies and to learn the
language for future use and
travel.
Attending the weekend
celebration for Joel's Bar Mitz-
vah are, parents Jay and Janis
(Levy) Nemes, 11-year-old
sister Jody, grandparents Mr.
and Mrs. David Nemes from
Hollywood, Dr. and Mrs.
Meyer Yanowitz from
Hollywood, and Mr. Lester
Levy from New Orleans. Also
attending will be many local
friends and relatives, as well
as out of town guests.
Joel's special interests in-
clude computers,
photography, music, sports,
stamps, coins, baseball cards,
football cards, and recrea-
tional activities with friends.
WELCOME TO A
NEW EXPERIENCE
in sophisticated Retirement Living
M A NO S ,x?l
>------Where Caring Conies naturally'
3335 S.W. 32nd Avenue Pembroke Tark, Florida 33023
A COMPLETE LIFESTYLE
in A 'KOSHER ENVIRONMENT
Tastefully Decorated
nursing Supervision 24 hrs.
Physicians on call 24 hrs.
3 meals daily and snacks
Daily activities, arts & crafts
Social activities
Transportation provided
Swimming Pool ft Jacuzzi
Beauty Shop
Religious services daily
Easily accessible
WE WELCOME ENQUIRIES TLEASE CALL 961-8111
No. 2970, and chairman Joe
Rose invites everyone to at-
tend. Refreshments will be
served.
Israel Amitai will be guest
speaker at the Aquarius
Salute-To-Israel Bond
Breakfast, celebrating Israel's
40th Anniversary on Sunday
morning, Dec. 13, 10 a.m. in
the Cascade Room, 2751 S.
Ocean Drive, Hollywood.
Co-chairmen Bernard J.
Goldberger, Eleanor Shuman
and Dan Levenson state that
Mr. Amitai is considered one
of the outstanding per-
sonalities among Israel's
younger generation intellec-
tuals. He served in the
Haganah, prior to the
establishment of the State oi
Israel, and served in the
regiments organized by the
Jewish Agation with the
Britich Government in World
War II. He is a television pro-
ducer, director and writer,
widely recognized as an expert
in practically every medium of
communication. He was one of
the first editors, directors and
writers for the radio network
of Israel's Defense Army. A
stimulating morning is an-
ticipated. A door prize of $250
Israel Bond Certificate will be
given away, donated by the
Golda Meir Chapter of
Hadassah and the David Ben
Gurion B'nai B'rith Unit, who
sponsor the event. Everyone is
invited.
Religious directory
ORTHODOX
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Luhavitrh. 12U.r> E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Dalian
dale; 458-1877. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services 7:55 a.m., 6:30 p.m.: Friday
evening. 6:30 p.m.; Saturday morning, 9 a.m.. Saturday evening, 7:30 p.m., Sunday
8:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Religious school: Grades 1-8. Nursery school Monday
through Friday.
Young Iirael of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877, Rabbi Edward Davis.
Daily services, 7:30 a.m., sundown; Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sab-
bath morning, 9 o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
CONSERVATIVE
Hallandale Jewish Center (Beth Tefilah) 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi Carl
Klein. Cantor Joseph Gross. Sabbath Services: Fridays. 8 p.m.; Saturdays, 8:45 a.m.
Daily services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. in the Chapel.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave.. Hollywood: 981-6111 Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Daily services. 7:45 a.m., sundown; Sabbath evening. 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock. Religious school: Kindergarten 8
Temple Beth Ahn 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood: 431-5100. Rabbi Avraham
Kapnek. Services daily 8 a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning 8:45 a.m. Religious
School: Nursery. Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High School.
Temple Israel of Miramar 6920 SW 35th St.. 961-1700. Rabbi Raphael Adler.
Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbnlh, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m. Religious
School: pre kindergarten-8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St.. Hollywood: 9201577. Rabbi Richard J. Margolis,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 9 a.m. Religious school: Pre-kindergarten-Judaica High
School.
REFORM
Temple Beth El 1351 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 920-8225. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe.
Sabbath evening 8 p.m. Sabbath morning 11 a.m. Religious school: Grades K-10.
Temple Beth Emet 10801 Pembroke Road. Pembroke Pines. 431 3638. Rabbi
Bennett Greenspon. Sabbath services. 8:15 p.m. First Friday of the month we meet
at 7:30 p.m. Religious school: Pre-kindergarten-IO
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St.. Hollywood: 989-0205. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Sabbath services. 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath morning. 10:30 a.m. Religious school: Pre-
school-12.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
Ramat Shalom 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation: 472-3600. Rabbi Elliot
Skidell. Sabbath services. 8:15 p.m. Religious school: Pre-kindergartiTv8.
HELP ISRAEL SURVIVE DEDICATE TREES
Buy TreesBy Phone
Call The Jewish National Fund
Honor your name, a friend or remember a loved one.
The gift of Trees is perfect for weddings, births, Bar Mitzvahs
The permanent gift for any social or business occasion.
A ring of 5 trees is only $25 ... A circle of 10 trees only $50
Larger sponsorships available ... AU gifts are Tax Deductible.
A custom certificate will be sent immediately
'? JEWISH Call to Order or For Information
Mvm (305) 561-4812
-3 800 W Oakland Pk Blvd Suite 303 Ft Laudprdale Honda-33311
wa^rt'awi'oxaBW
I* Ml
The
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UR THRIFT SHOP INVENTORY HI
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1-800-992-9903
3149 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.,
(2 blocks Watt of 195
on Hallandale Beach Blvd.)
iT^untti


\i
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, December 4, 1987
I
MORE THAN BAGELS & LOK .
MORE THAN A TRADE SHOW
DEC 4-7
THE BIGGEST KOSHER BARTY
EVER HELD AJNTYWHERE IN THE WORLD. .WORTH COMING
FROM EVERYWHERE TO ENJOY .
SCHEDULE OF SPECIAL EVENTS:
Free with admission ticket
SATURDAY EVENING. Decembar S
An Evcvnq ol Je*i%h Soul Muvc
JAIME BHONS7TEIN ana me Hie/me. Band
Performance* 830PM 030PM 10 30PM
SUNDAY December t
MAM Lecture Hearm Nutrition an DB KENNETH' STOBCH Depl o! Intemal Mecfcone
Harvard U"ivers4y Meo-cai School
Food & NutMon Deal MIT
A PRESENTATION Of THE GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION ON ITS 50TH
ANNIVERSAR<
AARON POOHURST Piesdenl
MVHONJ BRODlE Eiecutiv* Vic Presflenl
RABBi SOI SCMIFF Cwecior ot ChaoUncy
12 30 PM Everything You Want To Know About Kosher CeiMcation
RABBI MOSHE BERNSTEIN Adm Coord Onhodoi U~on
RABBi HARVE SENTER RaHWKal Adm Hot K Kosher Sueervison Agency
I PM HIllEL COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOl CHOlR
50 young voces w* serenade Eipo .isi'ms with a *oe varv/ty ot irae. Hebrew and
Jewish music
1 PM Lecture Ou> Be*.* Mothers
LESLIE J KLEIN one ot Florida* most notaMe artists descioe her imagi*aiive i>j
depetmg the heroines ot me Be* and me nierccmnection Between ancent wo/nen and trr
latter day listen Ms Meal) oa^i,nqS .,n oe on cHoujy (I me Epo An GaWry
3 PM Lecture How Kasrutn Helped fc W n The American Revolution
MALVINALIEBMAN aumoio'Tayfa-d Tales a cor*boo replete w*i wondrous stones about
oods m Jewish history Ms L*oman autograph cooes ot hei Doc* atte- me piesentawm
* PM Lecture Landscapes and Flora Ot Israel
JOYCE GLASER tiper artist witi discuss her unique artK cmehons uMwrmcj i*ers and yams
Id achcve a sculptural third dimension Ms Glasers ler arl w* Be on display n me Eipo Art
Gaaery
5 PM The Eicihng New Jewish Rod* Sound
MAGAIN MIAMI GROUP lealunng a polpoui concert lor young and old ot '0C must Waved
with loyous Jewish e.hdaiabon
Performances '5 PM 5 45 PM 6 PM 8PM
8 PM Jewish Humor Past and Present
EDDIE BARTON one ot me legendary tamed Barton Brothers who has oeriormeo to
stand**) oom audences throughout the worw wilt share sonteothis most humorous eipernces
with Eipo visitors
MONOAY, December 7
r am Lecture Landscapes and Flora Ot isiaei (REPEAT PRESENTATION!
JOYCE GLASER 'iber artist w* discuss her unique artistic creations uMujmq toers and yams
to achieve sculptural third dimension
<1 NOON The GoUen Thread ot Jewish Tiaditcn {REPEAT PRESENTAriONi
A PRESENTATION OF THE GREATER MIAMI IEWISH FEDERATION ON ITS SOTH
ANNIVERSARY
AARON POOHURST Piesdenl
MYRON I BRODlE Executive Vice Presoem
RABBI SOL SCHiFF Director ot Chaplaincy
2 PM Lecture Our B**cai McMhers iREPEAT PRESENTATlONl
LESLIE J KLEtN describing her imaginative paintings depicting the hen>nes ol the Bajle She
* de*cr*e the mterconnecwn between ancnt women and their latter day sisters
3 PM Pile Diawmgs
fSSSht
&<
J0&&
*3&0'
ADMISSION
$6.00
Children under 6 tree
FRI.. DEC. 4 9 AM-3 PM TRADE ONLY
SAT. EVE.. DEC. 5 7 PM-MIDNIGHT
SUN. DEC. 6 10 AM-10 PM (TRADE 0NLY9 AM)
M0N.. DEC. 7 10 AM- 5 PM (TRADE ONLY9AM)
For rio/maton contact
International Kosher Foods 4 Jewish Life Expo
4400 North Federal Highway Suite 210-13
3oca Raton Florida 33431
(800) 356-4404 rationFion*)
(305) 394-37951**"
TASTE hundreds of new and traditional kosher delights
SEE and buy hundreds of distinctive Jewish life products
ENJOY entertainment, celebrities, lectures
WIN free valuable prizes, including round trips to Israel
FREE ADMISSION FOR BUYERS ON TRADE DAY DEC. 4
We cordially invite you to attend the Expo as our guest if you are a
supermarket operator food retailer, distributor, caterer, restauranteur. hotel
or institutional buyer of Kosher food products Or. if you are a retailer or
wholesaler of Judaica. art. Jewish books, religious articles, giftware. crafts,
tewelry. tableware, boutique items or other Jewish life products.
Present your business card for complimentary admission.
FREE SEMINARS FRI., DEC. 4
8:30 AM: Understanding the Kosher Market.
Speakers win be Murray D Kale Presde"tCE0 Empire
Kosher Poultry Inc. Morns Levitt PresidentCEO
Hygrade Food Menacnem lufrnsky President CEO
Lubinsky Cornrnunications
Continental Breakfast wii oe se-veo
12:00 NOON: "Why Our Products Are Certified
Kosher.'
Panelists win be 6enera> Foods Product Managers
Israel
^/*ry
/
Official Airline or the International
Koehe. Foodt 4 Jeeieh Lite Eipo
CLIP
THESE
DISCOUNT
COUPONS
leeSS"*

Wgs*
XZ*&
W
Present this
Discount Coupon
tor $1.00 reduction
In General Admission
Price ol $6.00
Dec. 4-7, 1987
Miami Beach
Convention Center
Miami Beech, FL
SHOW DATES A HOURS
Saturday. Oac 5 7 PM Midnight
Sunday. Oac 6 10 AM 10 PM
Monday. Dae 7 10*AM 4 PM
For Information, caM
INTL KOSHER FOODS
A JEWISH LIFE EXPO
1-*0O-356^4404
(Tc* Frew In Florida)
or 305-394-3798____________
Jteg&gg*
t
Present this >
Discount Coupon
tor $1.00 reduction
In General Admission
Price of $6.00
Dmc. 4-7, 1987
MlmmlBch
Convention Cent*
Mlmml Botch, FL
SHOW DATES 4 HOURS
Saturday Dae 5 7 PM Midnight
Sunday Dae 8 to AM to PM
Monday Dae 7 10 AM 4 PM
For InlorrrwjNon, col
INTL KOSHER FOOOS
A JEWISH LIFE EXPO
1-S00-36S-44HM
(Toll Fro* In Florid.)
or 30S-394-379S______________

Present this
Discount Coupon
tor $1.00 reduction
In General Admission
Price ol $6.00
Owe. 4-7, 1987
Miami Bch
Convention Canter
Miami Beech, FL
SHOW DATES a) HOURS
Saturday. Dae 5 7 PM Midnight
Sunday. Oac 6 10 AM- 10 PM
Monday. Dae 7 10 AM 4 PM
For InforrnaHon, caM
INTL KOSHER FOOOS
* JEWISH LIFE EXPO
1-O00- 356-4404
(ToN Pro* In Florida)
or 305-394-3798_____________


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