The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00061

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
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Volume 16 Number 34
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 11, 1986
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Price 35 Cents
.
Jewish High School
Mixing Judaism and Hi-Tech
I


By Andrew Polio
Editor for the Jewish Federation of South Broward
(Editor's Note: The Jewish High School of South Florida on Wednesday
evening, April 16 mil hold a fundraising event featuring author Dennis
Prager at the Sans Souci Hotel on Miami Beach. For more information about
the Jewish High School, call 935-5620.)
When David graduated from the Jewish High School of South Florida
college lay before him.
With diploma in tow, he went off to a Big Mid-West university -
prepared for college life.
But college officials at David's college believed that freshmen of different
ethnic and religious brackgrounds should live together. A noble, lofty goal.
And this is how David came to live with two fundamentalist Christian
students.
Thus, David would come home to find posters of "JC" on the walls in his
apartment and tracts from the New Testament on his desk.
Then the roommates began the religious inquisition.
"Why don't you believe in the Lord, JC?" they would ask David.
David unlike many of his Jewish peers who enter college without a solid
knowledge of their roots responded.
"He was able to answer their questions and the ones he could not answer
he went to the Hillel rabbi who helped him," David's father said. "And he
began asking his roommates questions which dumbfounded them."
"My son didn't care to re-fight the crusades," the father said "But his
education at the Jewish High School gave him the ammunition he needed It
gave him a base from which to work.
"When he attended the Jewish High School, he was kicking and scream-
ing because he was working so hard on his secular courses," the father said.
"But it was a good thing he had the Jewish education courses and he now
agrees."
Other students many of David's classmates also have graduated
from the Jewish High School of South Florida in North Miami Beach with a
solid education in Judaica and college-level academics.
"We are trying to stem assimilation and at the same time we are offering
high-quality secular education," Rabbi Louis Herring, principal at the Jewish
High School, told the Floridian.
"Our early graduates are already proving the value of attending the
Jewish High School. They are becoming active in campus Hillel programs,
fighting anti-Semitism on campus, organizing Holocaust memorial services
and signing up for Jewish studies on the campus," Rabbi Herring said.
"Meanwhile, our students are making Dean's lists in colleges throughout the
country."
In 1980, the Jewish Federations of South Broward, Greater Miami and
Greater Fort Lauderdale established the Jewish High School, which is the on-
ly high school in the United States that ORT has supported in the school's
Computer and Technology Department.
Ellie Katz, president of the Jewish High School, said Jewish community
leaders in 1980 realized "that our children couldn't just have an elementary
day school education" and be prepared for college life as a Jew.
"You had to give the student a strong self-image at the high school level
that would carry them through college," she said.
Rabbi Herring added: "In order to make a significant impact on the pro-
blem of assimilation, we needed more than a superficial access to our
teenagers.
"We wanted to create for them an environment where they would be ex-
posed to teachers for an extended period of time who would teach Jewish
values," Rabbi Herring said. "Not only a sense of Zionism, rituals or festivals,
but also a Jewish tone in human values, a Jewish sense of justice rather than a
Continued on Page 3-
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Big News About Federation Missions .. Page 2




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Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian of South Broward^Hollywpod/Friday, April 11, 1986
Zvika Gerstel to Speak April 17
Everything You Wanted to Know About Missions
For everyone who's been on a
mission ... or who's hoping to go
soon, or someday .. .
A very special meeting on "The
Missions of South Broward"
scheduled for April 17 is for you!
Zvika Gerstel, director of the
UJA Missions Desk in Israel and
one of today's most
knowledgeable experts on Israel,
will discuss the highlights of the
1986 missions planned by the
Federation.
Gerstel, who has been an in-
tegral part of many of South
Broward's successful missions,
will speak about the Israel mission
and the experiences that par-
ticipants will share.
For 1986, the Federation is
planning the following missions:
Heart of Israel Community
Mission, Sept. 21-Oct. 1
On sale, this community-wide
Heart of Israel Mission is just
$1,049. A 10-day mission, all in-
clusive featuring, five-star hotels,
the best guides, land plans, round-
trip air fare and meetings with top
Israeli officials as just part of this
fantastic bargain.
Family Mission, July 7-21. A
consciousness-raising, inspira-
tional and deeply moving family
event that will make history come
alive, kindle a greater fervor, and
turn folklore into fact.
The Family Mission features a
visit to a kibbutz, home hospitality
with Israelis, a visit to an absorp-
tion center, a tour of the Negev,
floating down the Jordan River,
Bar and Bat Mitzvah ceremonies,
a visit to Hod Hasharon, and a
shehecheyanu ceremony upon
entering Jerusalem.
When you share the beauty and
significance of a Family Mission to
Israel with your children, you will
strengthen your ties with them
and to your Judaism.
The entire Family Mission pro-
gram, complete with meals,
flights, tours and land ar-
rangements costs $2,750 per adult
(based on uouble-occupancy) and
$2,275 per child (under 12 and
based on three children per room).
Germany/Israel Mission, Sept.
14-25. This extraordinary mission
allows you to explore the Ger-
many of today, as you hear the
echoes of its past, you'll gain in-
sight into what it can mean for our
future.
Highlights of the Ger-
many/Israel Mission include
meeting the mayor of Munich and
members of the White Rose Socie-
ty, whose members fought against
the Nazis. Visits to Frankfurt,
Berlin and Munich are planned.
In Israel, you will meet with the
Prime Minister and President of
Israel and participate in the Open-
ing Conference of the United
Jewish Appeal.
Mark E. Talisman, director of
the Washington Action Office of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, will be the scholar-in-
residence. Talisman was the
scholar-in-residence for South
Broward's Prague-Budapest-
Israel Mission in 1985.
Singles Mission, July 13-23. A
national mission that includes
visits to Tel Aviv, the Jordan
River, Tiberiao and Jerusalem.
The cost of this mission is
$1,850 plus local airfare.
The Missions Meeting will be
held Thursday, April 17, at 7:30
p.m. at Emerald Hills Country
Club. 4100 North Hills Drive. Cof-
lee and Dessert will be served.
Please call Donna Frankel by
April 14 at 921-8810 if you plan to
attend this special Mission
meeting.
Minimum family contributions
are required for the missions.
For more about missions, call
Donna Frankel and Debbie
Stevens at 921-8810.
The Greatest Jewish Problem Why Survive?
$
By Dennis Prager
(Editor'* Note: The author will
be the guest speaker at afundrais-
ing event Wednesday evening,
April 16, at the Sans Souci Hotel
in Miami Beach. Proceeds will go
to the scholarship fund of the
Jewish High School of South
Florida.
In my essay on Jesse Jackson
(Ultimate Issues, Vol. 1 No. 1), I
noted that one reason why he is a
tragedy for black Americans is
that he focuses blacks' attention
onto external problems such as
white racism, rather than on the
far more serious internal pro-
blems that afflict American
blacks. It is easier for leaders to
tell their people since it is easier
for people to hear that their
groblems emanate from outside,
ut when leaders do this, they are
not leading. Indeed they are hur-
ting their group because they are
not addressing its greatest pro-
blems, which are so often internal.
This applies equally to Jewish
life in the free world. While Jews
certainly have external enemies
who must be fought, the greatest
Jewish problem the rapidly
dwindling number of committed
or even identifying Jews is in-
ternal. It is not caused by neo-
Nazis, Arafat, the Soviets, Jesse
Jackson, school prayer, the arms
race, or any of the other external
Jroblems concentrated upon by
ews and their organizations. The
greatest Jewish problem is caus-
ed, and can only be solved, by the
Jews themselves.
The problem is not
survival
Before addressing the problem,
its causes and possible solutions,
let me put it into perspective.
Those of us who hold that the
greatest Jewish problem is the
disappearing Jew are often
criticized as doomsayers. Hasn't
every generation of Jews had its
predictors of the end of Jewry?
Aren't we, as one Jewish
philosopher put it, "the ever-
dying people?"
In light of this obejction, I want
to make my position very clear. I
do not for one moment fear the
end of the Jewish people. So long
as there are human beings, I have
no doubt that some of them will be
Jewish. Should other planets ever
be colonized, I am certain that
some Jews will be there asking
passersby whether they had put
on Tefillin that morning.
Nor am I a survivalist. The pur-
pose of Jewish life is not that Jews
survive. The purpose of Jewish
life is that Jews lead Jewish lives,
be "a light unto the nations," and
"repair the world under G-d's
rule." Therefore, when I say that
the greatest Jewish problem is the
diminishing number of Jews, it is
not because I am worried about
Jewish survival. We will survive.
The problem
I am concerned not that Jews
will die out, but that they will
become irrelevant. I am concern-
ed that fewer Jews means that
Judaism will have less of an im-
pact upon the world. There will
always be Jews. The questions are
what type of Jews? What quality
of Jewish life? What impact will
Judaism have on a world increas-
ingly devoid of enduring values?
And, of course, how many? As the
dean of Jewish historians, Salo
Baron, writes in A Social and
Religious History of the Jews,
"Whether the total number of
Jews amounts to thousands or to
millions makes a calculable dif-
ference in their social and hence in
their religious life Quantity
here becomes quality ..."
Once one understands, to use
Herman Wouk's description, that
the Jews are an army, one does
not ask whether all its soldiers will
survive. One asks whether the ar-
my is getting stronger or weaker,
whether its struggle is nearer to
or further from success.
Or, to cite Rabbi Abraham
Joshua Heschel's equally accurate
description, the modern Jew is "a
messenger who forgot his
message." Here, too, one does not
ask whether the messenger will
die a messenger who forgets his
message may very well live, but if
he forgot his message, his survival
is meaningless. As a messenger he
is dead.
When Jews understand that
they are an army, a messenger,
they will recognize that their
greatest problem is not Jewish
survival but that fewer Jews are
fighting, fewer Jews know that
they have a message.
The cause
In other words, fewer and
fewer Jews know why to be
Jewish. This is the cause of the
greatest Jewish problem. Jews
may know how to survive but they
do not why to survive. This is the
overwhelming reason why Jews
are assimilating.
This is a relatively new develop-
ment. In the past, it was often
enough to be born a Jew. You
knew you were a Jew, that you
would marry a Jew, live as a Jew,
and die as a Jew. The greatest
Jewish problem, has often been
how to survive in the face of
anti-Semitism, terrible economic
conditions, and other problems
caused by outside forces. The pro-
blem is that Jews continue to act
as if this is still their greatest pro-
blem. Thus Jewish life concen-
trates on how to fight anti-
Semitism, how to rescue
persecuted Jews, how to feed and
clothe the Jewish poor, how to
gain political support for Israel.
And this emphasis is not only
true of secular Jewish life.
Religious Jewish life, too, general-
ly ignores the why and focuses
almost exclusively on the hows. In
my 13 years of study in three dif-
ferent Yeshivas, I learned well
how to daven, how to keep kosher,
how to study Jewish sources, how
to keep the Shabbat, and in-
numerable other hows of Judaism.
What I rarely learned was why I
should do any of these things. And
despite the fact that the only real
answer to why be Jewish is a
religious one, in all my years of
religious Jewish education, the
issue was, for all intents and pur-
poses, ignored.
Jewish life, therefore, has been
devoting its energies largely to
dealing with the problem of the
past, not the problem of the pre-
sent. Without a Jewish why, a
Jewish how strikes most Jews to-
day as irrelevant. As Nietzsche
put it, "He who has a why to live
can bear with any how." Jews to-
day lack the why. Give them that
why, and they will find the how to
survive. If Jewish life wants
another generation of Jews to
fight Israel's enemies or to raise
funds for Jewish causes, it had
better teach Jews why, in the first
place, they ought to lead a Jewish
life.
Jews need reasons to
be Jewish
In open societies, relatively free
of anti-Semitism, Jews need
reasons to stay Jewish. Intermar-
riage provides a perfect example.
There have always been two types
of arguments against it positive
Jewish ones (why it is so impor-
tant to perpetuate Judaism), and
negative ones (about non-Jews).
In the past, even non-practicing
Jews could, if nothing else, often
count on the validity of negative
arguments: "non-Jews are dif-
ferent," "they don't make good
husbands," "they drink too
much," "in an argument, they'll
revert to anti-Semitism."
But these arguments no longer
hold water. And the differences
between irreligious Jews and ir-
religious non-Jews of the same
socioeconomic and educational
backgrounds are virtually non-
existent. Young Jews therefore
now regard those arguments as
racist, since they are based on
preserving the purity of Jewish
ethnicity rather than the purity of
Jewish values.
Only if Jewish values are
distinctive is there a positive and
non-racial reason for Jews not to
intermarry or in any other way to
maintain a distinct Jewish identi-
ty. But Jews have been raised in-
creasingly to believe that Jewish
values are not distinctive, that
they are essentially identical to
liberal, secular humanistic ones.
Consequently, many Jews, both in
their behavior and their values,
have become indis':nguj8hable
from the many non-Je. who also
have been raised without a distinc-
tive religious value system and
who hold the same liberal, secular
humanistic values.
None of this should come as a
surprise. Haven't a great many
Jews been raised to regard most
differences among groups
especially in the area of religion
as a reactionary notion to be
discarded. Haven't they ben
taught to be "universalist" by not
being "too Jewish?" Haven't they
been taught that religion is either
irrelevant to ethical values or an
actual impediment to them? And
once Judaism is no longer a Jew's
source of values, does he have a
single distinctive Jewish value?
Given such an upbringing, why
should an American Jew identify
as a Jew, lead a Jewish life, or
marry a Jew, or raise Jewish
children," or support Israel,
or .?
The solution
Once the greatest Jewish pro-
blem and its cause are recognized,
the solution is overwhelmingly
clear. Jews must be taught why to
be Jewish. Jewish life must rem-
bark on a campaign ot teach this
to Jews with the same commit-
ment, resources and sense of life
or death as it has in creating and
supporting Israel. Even Jews
whose dominant Jewish concern is
Israel alone should recognize that
without such a campaign to fight
assimilation, there will be few
Jews left in the Diaspora to sup-
port Israel.
Why be Jewish? Because the
Jewish people has a
religious/moral/holy mission to
"repair the world under G-d's
rule." Because the Jews are bid-
den by G-d to be a "light unto the
nations." Because Judaism fills
one's life with a holiness, meaning
and joy that is not attainable to
the uncommitted Jews. And
because Judaism has distinctive
values which if communicated to
the world, will reduce human suf-
fering, help to extinguish evil, and
prevent holocausts (which are tak-
Continued on Page 6
MMB


Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3-A
Jewish High School Mixing Judaism & High-Tech

Continued from Page 1
universal sense of justice and a strong interest in community service." The
Jewish High School cuts across the spectrum of orthodox, conservative and
reform Judaism.
Mrs. Katz is quick to emphasize that the school is not a "yeshiva." Fifty
percent of the students attending the Jewish High Scool come from day-
school backgrounds while the remaining 50 percent come from public schools
with varying degrees of Judiac education.
Judaica, however, is just one aspect of the Jewish High School. Students
here are exposed to a two-tier curriculum Judaica and secular studies which
Rabbi Herring points out are so important for success after high school.
Mrs. Katz said the emphasis is on a "college preparatory curriculum."
"Our graduation requirements are consistently above the requirements of
the state," Rabbi Herring said. "We offer college-level courses such as FOR-
TRAN (computer language), Physics I and II, History, Algebra, Calculus and
Hebrew (students regularly earn college credit for their foreign language
requirements).
Jewish High School graduates now attend major universities throughout
the country Ohio State, Clark University, Boston University, University of
Florida, University of South Florida, University of Miami, Arizona State,
University of Pennsylvania. And they are applying to such schools as Harvard
and Northwestern. One hundred percent of all Jewish High School graduates
have gone on to college.
An evaluation of the Jewish High School by University of Miami Pro-
fessor John H. Croghan "commended (the faculty) for the high quality of
education."
Croghan was impressed with the outstanding faculty and the close rela-
tionship between the teachers and the students.
He called the Jewish High School "the best kept secret" in South Florida.
For more information about the Jewish High School of South Florida,
please call 935-5620.


Jewish High School The Best Kept Secret
By Dr. Stuart R. Grant
Assistant Principal
Jewish High School
of South Florida
It is lunch time at the Jewish
High School of South Florida. I
walk into the teacher's lounge for
someone with whom I can eat. The
lounge is deserted: not a teacher
in sight. Where is everyone? I
already know the answer. Our
English teacher is comforting a
young lady whose father has just
entered the hospital. Our biology
teacher is helping a student in his
presentation of a prize winning
science project. Our math teacher
is tutoring a young man in College
Algebra. Our social studies
teacher is talking to five students
about their upcoming trip to
Washington as part of the Na-
tional Young Leaders Conference.
Our Judaic studies teacher is help-
ing a student understand a dif-
ficult Biblical passage for the Na-
tional Bible Contest and I am feel-
ing very guilty about eating my
lunch sans student.
Earlier this year the University
of Miami conducted a study of the
Jewish High School of South
Florida. The evaluating team, led
by Or. John Croghan, called our
school "the best kept secret in
South Florida." The team lauded
the quality of our curriculum, and
Dr. Croghan answered with an
unequivocal "yes" whether he
would send his own child to our
school. The reason for his affir-
mative response was neither cur-
riculum nor administration, but
teachers. Dr. Croghan and his
team were deeply moved by the
close relationship between
students and faculty.
Five years ago the Jewish High
School of South Florida began. I
came to the school at that time as
head of Judaic Studies and as a
Judaic Studies teacher. Since then
I have filled the position of
disciplinarian, school counselor
and assistant principal. I
therefore have the unique
perspective of many roles, and I
have seen a remarkable relation-
ship grow. Quite simply, the
teachers care about the students
and the students care about the
teachers; but this relationship of
care did not develop in a vacuum.
It was nurtured and can perhaps
serve as a model for other schools.
I would like to examine the roots
of this relationship.
Several years before the school
began, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation concluded that a com-
munity day high school was need-
ed. The majority of students
graduating elementary day
schools were not continuing their
high school education in existing
Jewish high schools. In a paper en-
titled "Framework for the Com-
munity Day High School" publish-
ed April 17,1980, the need for the
Jewish High School was
presented in the name of the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education.
It was felt that since the high
school and early college years
were crucial in the development of
a person's identity and value
system, a school should be
developed to attract both day
school and public school teens.
This could be done if the Day High
School program was "academical-
ly outstanding and Jewishly
meaningful."
The Jewish Federation of South
Broward, the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale,
American ORT Federation and
Women's American ORT agreed
with the analysis of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, and
joined the high school venture.
The initial founders, therefore,
wanted a new type of school
because they cared about Jewish
children and Jewish education.
This does not fully answer,
however, from where the close
teacher-student relationship
developed.
Rabbi Louis Herring, the prin-
cipal of the school, took on the
task developing the Jewish High
School. He began looking for
teachers with high academic
credentials. However, he was
looking for something extra. He
wanted people who cared about
teenagers. While looking for his
Judaic studies' staff he tried to
find people who had been involved
with youth in settings of care such
as retreats and seminars. He look-
ed for secular teachers who exud-
ed expertise, but, more important-
ly, who liked and cared about
teenagers.
I remember during that first
year of the school sitting with
Rabbi Herring Shabbat after-
noons on his patio discussing what
we could do to better care for our
students. I remember faculty
meetings filled with confidence
and concern as to how we could
help our students grow. Soon
what we were after became clear.
We were not striving to develop
only a school. We were striving to
develop a caring community, and
each teacher felt the need of each
student.
The students pushed us to our
limits and humbled us with their
potential. We encouraged them to
do increasingly better. We learn-
ed how to care more than we knew
we could, because our pupils
taught us a lesson. They taught us
that teachers make a difference in
the life of every teenager.
This June the Jewish High
School will graduate its fourth
senior class. We are pround of our
college acceptance record.
Members of our present senior
class, as in past senior classes,
have been accepted to excellent
schools, and some are anxiously
awaiting their official acceptance
to Ivy League institutions.
However, we have not forgotten
how to care. The public schools
with their overcrowded facilities
have become impersonal factories.
Students coming to us from public
school, good students, tell us they
are afraid to ask questions in their
old school. Teachers seem too
hassled to care, too overburdened.
These students tell us that our
school is different. They tell
Continued on Page 6-
)
:


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Opinions
The Herut Revolt
The collapse of the Herut con-
vention has dramatically increas-
ed Israel's political instability.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir's failure to establish un-
disputed leadership of the party
which dominates the Likud bloc
has cast doubt about his replacing
Shimon Peres in the prime
minister's office next October.
The convention was disfigured
and ultimately disrupted by
ugly clashes between supporters
of the "establishment" faction
headed by Shamir and Minister-
Without-Portfolio Moshe Arens
and supporters of the dissident
factions led by Deputy Prime
Minister David Levy and Minister
of Commerce and Industry Ariel
Sharon.
Billed as a fight for the "real
Herut" or for "party democracy"
depending on one's position
party newcomers dealt a heavy
blow to the old party elites. This
was made possible by the pre-
convention decision of Levy and
Sharon to pool their forces against
the Shamir-Arens faction. The
convention ended indecisively,
with the Levy-Sharon insurgents
ahead on points and positioned to
create a post-convention majority
in new party decision-making
forums.
What happened to Herut wasn't
simply a generational conflict.
The Shamir-Arens faction
represents Herut (and Likud) as a
conservative party, hardline in
foreign and defense policy,
moderate and cautious in tone,
committed to civil discourse and
to recognized rules of the Israeli
democratic game.
The Levy faction represents
Herut as a populist party, a vehi-
cle for the middle and lower
classes, and especially for Jews
from Arab lands and their descen-
dants, relatively moderate in
foreign and defense policy, stri-
dent in tone and playing by
whatever rules serve the drive to
power.
The Sharon faction represents
Herut as a party of the radical
right, populist and pro-business
(at the same time) in economics,
extreme in matters of foreign
policy, and quick to urge military
solutions to foreign policy
problems.
The new Herut majority is
largely, although not exclusively,
a working class and lower middle
class "ethnic" (that is, Sephardic)
bloc of voters. These voters iden-
tify strongly with Levy and with
Sharon, who in turn play heavily
on the anti-establishment themes
which served Likud so well in run-
ning against Labor. The genie of
ethnic tensions that Menachem
Begin coaxed out of the political
lamp has now turned against the
veteran Herut leadership.
By convention's end, the verbal
clash reached a level of intensity
that left most observers unsure
how the rival leaders would suc-
ceed in putting the party back
together again.
Shamir's strongest card is the
rotation no one wants to be tag-
ged as having forced the party in-
to opposition. Shamir has made
clear that he "will not be the
leader without a majority; I will
not be leader if my party does not
choose me."
Of the major options facing
Continued on Page 8-
Letters to the Editor
Thejewish
.rlorftfAHi
of South Broward
Publication No (USPS M4-S00) (ISSN 0746-7737)
fotfSftM**
FRD BHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
Published Weekly January through March Bi-Weekly April through August
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Jewish Federation of Sooth Broward officers President Saul Singer. MO Vice Presidents Howard
Barron. MO.. Elite Katz. Eather Gordon. Secretary Elaine PittaU. Treasurer Nelson Demos E.ecutive
Director Sumner G Kaye Submit malarial lor publication to Andrew Potin. editor lor the Jewish
Federation ol South Broward. 2719 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood, Florida 33020
-________ M-ajsm JTA. 8 Am. WWt, NBA. AJPA, and FPA
SUBSCRIPTION RATES local Area S3 SO Annual (2 Year Minimum 7), or by membership Jewish
Federation ol South Broward 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Fla 33020 Phone 921JJ810
Out ol Town Upon Request
Friday, April 11,1986
Volume 16
2 NISAN 5746
Number 14
Dear Editor,
A "Promise for World Peace" was
presented to President Reagan on "Human
Rights Day" late last year. According to an
article in Jerusalem Post this "21 -page docu-
ment issued by the supreme body of the
Bahai, the Universal House of Justice is be-
ing presented to President Chaim Herzog to-
day" and "has gone to secretary-general of
the UN, Javier Perez de Cuellar, among
others.
This is a "Call to the World's leaders" and
people to "renounce war and discrimination
and unify mankind."
The Universal House of Justice, the world
center of the religion, was established in
1963, and it's "seat is in the magnificient
white marble edifice on Mt. Carmel," Haifa.
Bahai Faith was founded in Iran in 1844,
but the prophet founder Baha Ullah (Glory of
G-d) was banished and kept as prisoner in
Akka, where He designed Mt. Carmel to be
the resting place for the remainees of His
forrunner, the Bab, who was martyred in
Iran.
The peace message that has been
presented, sofar, to more than 75 leaders of
the world, indicates that "world peace is not
only possible, but inevitable. Whether it is to
be reached only after unimaginable horrors
precipitated by humanity's clinging to old
patterns of behaviour, or is to be embraced
now by an act of consultative will, is the
choice before all who inhabit the earth."
According to this promise "banning
nuclear weapons, prohibitng the use of
poison gas oi outlawing germ warfare will
not remove the root cause of war." The
message strongly condemns racism and
"inordinate disparity between rich and poor,
the source of acute suffering that keeps the
world in a state of instability virtually on the
brink of war."
The world peace message calls for "eman-
cipation of women," and denouncing "un-
bridled nationalism as a distinguished form
of a sane and legitimate patriotism" which
"must give way to a wider loyalty, to the
love of humanity as a whole."
Universal education has been emphasized
in this message, with the belief that "a fun-
damental lack of communication efforts
towards "world peace" and urge the adop-
tion of an international language to help
resolve the problem. It has been expressed
that "world order can be founded only on an
unshakeable consciousness of the oneness of
mankind."
In South Florida, the Bohai community
has been active in presenting the same
message to Congressmen, Senators, Mayors
and other thought leaders.
Late last year the mayor of Hollywood
presented Bahai's of .this city with a pro-
clamation and joined the President and other
officials in supporting the Baha'is in Iran for
their humanitarian efforts to achieve peace
for all peoples of the word.
Nosrat Solhjooo Scott
Hollywood
Dear Editor:
We are writing to invite your participation
in a project of special importance to both *he
Jewish and Christian communities.
During the annual "National Days of
Remembrance of the Victims of the
Holocaust" commemoration, the Public
Broadcasting Service (PBS) will be broad-
casting on May 6, at 10 p.m., the half-hour
documentary film, THE COURAGE TO
CARE. It is being offered to your local PBS
station, as well as to other PBS stations
across the nation.
THE COURAGE TO CARE, made possi-
ble by a grant from Mutual of America, New
York, N.Y. and nominated for a 1986
Academy Award for best short documen-
tary, tells the extraordinary story of a few
non-Jews who risked their lives to rescue
and protect Jews during the Holocaust. The
film is built on interviews with rescuers and
survivors whose stories speak to the basic
issue of individual responsibility, the notion
that one person can act and those actions
can make a difference. The rescuers in the
film are true heroes, but modest ones. View-
ing the film, one cannot help but ask, "Why
were there so few who were willing to help
Jews during the Holocaust?"
Elie Wiesel, author, teacher and chairman
of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, pro-
vides the commentary in THE COURAGE
TO CARE. He reminds us that every person
is responsible for his or her action, that "It is
possible for a human being alone, often
alone, to say no to death."
The management of your Public Television
station has received an "early feed" of the
Drojrram and will decide whether or not to
broadcast THE COURAGE TO CARE.
Because of the film's high artistic quality as
well as its singular theme, we invite you to
contact your PBS affiliate, to tell its
management and the station's community
leadership of your interest in the broadcast.
In our view, THE COURAGE TO CARE
broadcast can be an important focus for in-
terfaith and community activities during the
Days of Remembrance initiated by Jewish
Federations and Community Relations
Councils in cities and towns across the
country.
Please join us in encouraging the PBS
broadcast in your community of THE
COURAGE TO CARE and in helping to
create the kinds of collective action that can
bring its important message to citizens
everywhere*
Dr. Carol Rittner, RSM
Executive Producer
"The Courage to Care"
Sondra Myers
Executive Producer
'The Courage to Care"
Dear Editor:
The story that I tell here is not meant to
attenuate tie triumph of the most successful
Super Sunday ever in South Broward
Federation history. But I believe that I real-
ly must tell it. I experienced it first-hand
along with many of the other 500 Jewish
volunteers on Super Sunday.
There are new areas in the western parts
of our county where senior Jews have begun
to live. They did not move there because they
were poor but because of the style and digni-
ty of these neighborhoods.
Op Super Sunday many of the cards which
I wj^giyeiUo solicit for pledgesWonged to
Senior Jews all of them married, no
widows, who live in these attractive
neighborhoods.
My requests for pledges from these people
were met by absolute refusal to donate
anything. I begged and pleaded and cajoled
them but I was treated with rudeness, lies,
and refusal to pledge even $25 per year in
EVERY instance.
These people were mature adults at the
time of the Holocaust. They probably wrung
their hands with grief and frustration four
decades ago when the lucky Jews of the
world began to learn the terrible truth. For-
ty years ago they may have said, "If only we
could have helped we would have."
It's not 1941. There are no working ovens
at Buchenwald and Auschwitz.
It's 1986. In front of hundreds of
American synagogues are signs. The signs
tell of the plight of 3,000,000 Soviet Jews
locked up in Russia. Those very signs are so
old that the paint is peeling off them.
It's 1986. Farmers in our country are los-
ing their farms due to economic bad times
and they are blaming Jewish bankers.
It's 1986 and in the new dignified residen-
tial communities of West Broward senior
Jews are not pledging $10 or $25 a year to
UJA, they are primping and getting ready to
go to eat early bird dinners.
It's 1986 and I'm hurt and sad to say that
we are still not one.
Leonard P. Keuler
Hollywood
Dear Editor:
Last month, the House of Represen-
tatives, with my support, paaaed an omnibus
anti-terrorism bill designed to upgrade the
security of U.S. embassies worldwide. The
Diplomatic Security Act of 1986 authorizes
$4.4 billion over the next five years to con-
struct and/or refurbish more than 200
American missions abroad to protect them
from terrorist attacks.
Included in the package are two provi-
sions, which I authored, focusing on im-
provements in perimeter security and securi-
ty at entrances of United States missions
abroad. My language calls for more effective
training of local guards in front of embassies
and consulates, including anti-terrorist exer-
Continued an Page 15


1
Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5-A
Assad More Than Rhetoric
By M.J. Rosenberg
Editor
Near East Report
Remember the promo for the
film Jaws 2. It read: "Just when
you thought it was safe to go back
into the water. .." It was a
reminder that there are still
sharks out there and still horror
films about them.
The line could apply, although
without any humor whatsoever, to
the growing threat emanating
from the shark on Israel's nor-
thern border, Hafez Assad.
Israel's security situation has not
appeared especially perilous late-
ly. The security zone in south
Lebanon has held up better than
many expected. Jordan is not per-
mitting terrorists to use the
Hashemite kingdom as a base for
attacks on Israel. The peace trea-
ty with Egypt remains the cor-
nerstone of Israel's foreign policy.
In short, all's quiet on the
western, southern, and eastern
fronts.
That leaves the Syrian front,
where the situation appears to be
deteriorating. In a speech
delivered on March 8 and broad-
cast on Syrian television, Assad
called on the Syrian people to
prepare themselves for "martyr-
dom" in the battle against
"rapacious, aggressive" Israel.
He then cited the examples of four
Syrian suicide bombers as "ex-
amples for every young girl and
boy." In a particularly bizarre
passage, Assad referred to a
young girl who had blown herself
up as attending "a wedding which
(was) different from any other
wedding and to a ceremony which
is different from any other
ceremony." Interesting. In the
United States the White House is
concerned about the wave of
teenage suicides. In Syria, the
President calls on kids to realize
that "life is meaningless without
martyrdom."
Unfortunately, there is more
brewing on the Syrian front than
mere rhetoric. In an analysis in
the Jerusalem Pott (March 15 in-
ternational edition), defense cor-
respondent Hirsh Goodman
writes that "the assumption of im-
pending conflict is not based on
words alone. For the past three
years Assad has been building up
his army systematically,
thoroughly, and relentlessly
despite Syria's dire economic
situation and the pressures of its
continued debilitating military in-
volvement in Lebanon."
Goodman believes
that Syria may be
preparing for a
limited assault on
Israel a "land
grab on the Golan
Heights and the
injection of enough
forces into the area to
preserve it from
Israeli counterattack
until a ceasefire has
been imposed by a
nervous world."
* ......
; He says that Israel might be
forced to accept such a ceasefire
"given Syria's ability to unleash
volleys of SS-21" rockets against
Israeli military emplacements
"and its ability to reach major
Israeli... civilian targets by
means of artillery, rocketry, and
aircraft.. ."
It is an ugly scenario but, as
Goodman points out, it is one that
might not play out on Syria's
terms. "Syria would not be allow-
ed to dictate the dimensions of the
conflict." Israel could respond
"with disproportionate means to
even a limited provocation ..
Damascus could be threatened."
Moreover, Goodman writes, "in
no circumstances will Israel be
taken by surprise. Even the
slightest hint of war could spark a
preemptive response."
Another Israeli reporter, Moshe
Zak of Ma'ariv, would agree with
Goodman that the best way to
avert war with Syria is for Israel
to make Assad understand that
there is no way that he will score
any gains in a limited (or
unlimited) war with Israel. He
argues that de facto peace on the
Syrian border only exists because
"Syria is sure that Israel is
strategically superior. As soon as
Assad reaches the conclusion that
he has achieved strategic pari-
ty .. the danger of war would
grow." He believes that Assad is
threatening war to divert
domestic attention from the
economic austerity program
which he is trying to impose in
Syria. "There is no reason what-
soever for Jerusalem to serve as
Damascus' national loudspeaker."
In other words, Israel should ig-
nore Assad's threats while wat-
ching his military moves very,
very carefully.
Shimon Peres agrees. Speaking
in Ashdod on March 11, he said
that Israel "is prepared to sit
down and discuss peace with the
Syrians." As for Assad's threats,
"we will not counter them with
our own threats. However, if so-
meone threatens to harm us, we
will fight back. Our tone may be
restrained but our might is
great." Let's hope that Assad is
paying attention and that he
recalls that the soft-spoken Peres
was the architect of both the
modern Israeli air force and the
stunning Entebbe rescue. He is
not one to be trifled with.
(The above column appeared in
the March 4 edition of the Near
East Report.)
Ii
I

YOUNG LEADERSHIP MISSION REUNION From left,
David Brown, Fran Finkel, Ellen Cache, Sharon Molot, Deb-
bie Stevens, Charon Wiseman, Laurie Brown, Jessica Brown
are seen here at a recent Mission reunion. From left standing,
Marshall Krupnick, Lenny Kessler, Ellen Platt, Andy Molot,
Beth Spiegle, Glenn Tupler and Charle Finkel. If you are in-
terested in attending the Heart of Israel Mission, come to a
special meeting at Emerald Hills Country Club on April 17.
For more information, call Debbie Stevens at 921-8810 (See
mission story on Page 2).

YOUNG LEADERSHIP From left, Sumner G. Kaye, ex-
ecutive director of the Federation, Mark Talisman, guest
speaker, Sondra Schneider, chairperson, and Debbie Stevens
are seen at a briefing about last month's National UJA Young
Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. At the con-
ference, South Broward's delegation heard Sena. Robert
Dole, Ted Kennedy and Gary Hart and five other senators
speak on current issues vital to the Jewish community and
Israel. Congressman Larry Smith met privately with the
members of the South Broward delegation.
ETHIOPIAN OLEH AT TECHNION Wassihum Malko, the
first Ethiopian Jew to become a student at the Technion-
Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, was admitted to the
Faculty of Civil Engineering this autumn. Born in Gondar,
Ethiopia, Malko studied electronics in Addis Ababa. He ar-
rived in Israel in 1983 at the age of 20, learned Hebrew in an
intensive ulpan, and became a student at Technion's Center
for Pre-Academic Studie, where there are currently eight
Ethiopian olim seven men and one woman preparing for
studies at the university. The Center for Pre-Academic
Studies provides students with the opportunity to prepare
themselves for university studies in mathematics and the
sciences.
We wish to express our deep appreciation
for your many expressions of consolation
on tha passing of our beloved
Rabbi Arnold Rlchter
Mrs. Marlene Rlchter and Family
Rabbi Harold Rlchter and Family
"fouVe never had
it so good!
Hot Sunsweet* is a delicious
new way to enjoy the taste of America's
favorite prune juice. Rich and
Sunsweet is made from 100%
fruit juice.
Hot Sunsweet is also*, very
ring alternative to that extra cup of
B. In the morning or evening,you ve
never had it so good.
ieWfiW 'ttatoHR^'krfteri*

fu> be used with dtlr* pf^duetMndtof meat
3.---------.-:>....-.-.____--''
::*: ';.*
;5i;:


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Super Synagogue Week
m~ Jewish
Congregation Levi-Yitzchok Lubavitch Rabbi Raphael
Tennennaus makes a phone call during Super Synagogue
Week while Michael Goodman reaches for another phone
number to call.
Temple Beth Shalom Darlene Oklin, Toni and Leon
Weissberg, Jerry Koch, Lynda Levin, Dr. Sheldon Levin,
chairperson, Barbara and Jeffrey Rosenberg and Ron and
Sheri Rothschild took time to make calls during Super
Synagogue Week.
I
Hallandale Jewish Center Myer Pritsker, Rabbi Carl
Klein, Janet Treehuboff, Rose Azerrad, chairperson, Sarah
Danziger, Cantor Jacob Danziger, Fredel Levy, Helene
Glickman and Laura Bolasny make phone calls during Super Temple Israel of Miramax Ethel Jacobs, Dan Pearlman,
Synagogue Week. South Broward's 10 synagogues raised ap- Seymour and Caryl Berzofsky, chairpeople, Joyce Binstock,
proximately $75,000 for the 1986 UJA/Federation Campaign. Arthur Siegel and Eleanor Kleinman came out for Super
Synagogue Week.
Temple Beth Ahm Sam Aboulafia, Mollie Aboulafia, Philip -,
Strom, Caryl Kanas, Nancy Marlis, Roz Kanas, and Cantor SSBumT .Kare"f^t^b'chwn>ewon, Rabbi Richard
Staart.ehafniian.heliiednnt during Wr S^ome WMk. Margohs, Elaine Plttell, Bruce Gottlieb, Mildred
Stuart, chairman, helped out during Super Synagogue Week.
Unterberger and Marvin Carrel supported Super Synagogue
and BUI Schwartz make calls. ^ rrussacz r. chairperson, Barbara Gellman, Sam Mandel and Judy
Hankm worked Super Synagogue Week for the 1986
UJA/Federation Campaign.
Young Israel Rabbi Edward Davis, Dr. Sylvio Soerber
Temple Beth Emet Janet Kan, chairperson, called South chairman, Joe Rubenfeld and Dr. Gary Magid came out for
Broward Jewish families during Super Synagogue Week. their synagogue during Super Synagogue Week.
Problem
Continued from Page 2
ing place with greater frequency
and more apathy).
When Jews understand these
reasons, they will lead Jewish
lives. But they must have the
reasons. In an open and free socie-
ty, Jews need powerful, positive
reasons to remain Jewish. They
need to know why they should be
different when non-Jews are
equally well educated and fine,
and why Judaism has better moral
and personal answers than secular
humanism.
And Jews need to learn the
answer to a question once posed
to me by a Holocaust survivor who
has completely rejected his Jewish
identity, "Why should I bequeath
to my child the possibility of
another holocaust?"
Jews need reasons intellec-
tual, personal, moral to b;
Jewish. Ethnic feelings will no
longer suffice to keep Jews
Jewish.
(The above essay was reprinted
by permission of "Ultimate
Issues," a quarterly report by
Dennis Prager, the co-author of
"The Nine Questions People Ask
About Judaism. Subscriptions for
"Ultimate Issues" cost $15 a year
and can be obtained by writing to
"UltimateIssues, "it65 Westwood
Blvd., Suite 508, Los Angeles, CA
9006i.
High
School
Continued from Page 3
parents, visitors and evaluators
that they truly like being at the
Jewish High School. They say that
their Jewishness is important
now, and that they want to attend
colleges with Hillels and large
Jewish populations. Best of all
they know that we care. They like
being asked in the corridors by
teachers how they are doing, or
feeling or getting along. They like
being complimented for their suc-
cesses and "A's." They even like
someone noticing that they receiv-
ed a "C" on their report card in-
stead of an "A." They may feel
uncomfortable being questioned
about the "C," but they know so-
meone cares. They are people and
they like being liked.
The Jewish High School of
South Florida will soon begin its
sixth year of existence. We are op-
timistic. We have excellent
academic and Judaic studies. We
have lunches, busses, sports pro-
grams, science labs, computers
and advance placement and
honors courses. What we do not
have are teachers in the faculty
lounge during lunch, because they
are using their well deserved
break to help their students grow.
We may be the "best kept secret
of South Florida," but we are no
secret to our students. We care
about them and want the oppor-
tunity to care about as many
students as our building can
possibly hold.


M
fc
y .." ".;
Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South BrowardHollywood Page 7-A
|4*i
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838 HCH.LYWOGO BLVD HOUYWOOO flOBIDA UO/O
921-6511
LOCATION
Aotivities scheduled at the
JCC or the Southeast Florida
Focal Point Senior Center are
located at 2838 Hollywood,
Blvd. unless otherwise
indicated.
BRUNCH BUNCH
Brunch Bunch II will be holding
its April enrichment workshop for
women entitled "A General In-
troduction to Psychic
Phenomenon," on April 16 from
7:30-10 p.m.
Join the Brunch Bunch series
for coffee, Danish and enriching
conversation.
For exact location, please call
Dene at 921-6511. Babysitting
services are available for the mor-
ning sessions only.
K'ton Ton
(Preschool Camp
K'Ton Ton is a dynamic in-
dividualized program designed to
meet the needs of the young
children ages 2-5 years of our
community. Under the guidance
of certified teachers and ex-
perienced assistants, your
children will be encourged to
learn, share and participate in a
program in which many fun-filled
hours of recreational, educational
and social activities may be en-
joyed. Hours: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Location:
JCC Preschool Bldg., 1890-96 NW
122 Terrace, Pembroke Pines,
431-3558.
The Early Bird schedule and
costs is as follows:
Half day, 4 weeks $150; Half
day, 8 weeks $230; Full day, 4
weeks $230; Full day, 8 weeks
$400.
The Regular schedule and costs
is as follows:
Half day, 4 weeks $185; Half
day, 8 weeks $290; Full day, 4
weeks $250; Full day, 8 weeks
$460.
Yeladim Unit
The Yeladim Unit, which is
named after the Hebrew word for
"children," is for boys and girls
entering kindergarten to third
grade. Yeladim provides campers
with a well-rounded program to
learn new skills. Jewish cultural
activities are included through
daily programs, weekly themes
and shabbat celebrations.
Campers participate in cookouts,
optional late-night programs, unit
day fied trips and weekly special
events.
Our goal is to provide a safe and
supervised setting so that a
camper recognizes the exciting
camper years ahead.
Na'arim Unit
Na'arim Unit, which is named
after the Hebrew word for
"youth," is for boys and girls
entering fourth and fifth grades.
The Na'arim campers will par-
ticipate in an action-packed daily
program that will provide oppor-
tunities to sharpen individual
athletic skills, use creative art
skills and receive instruction in
Jewish customs, dance and songs.
Every summer day will be filled
with excitement and activity
everything that makes summer a
special time of the year.
Sponsor a JCC
Camper
The Summer of '85 was a happy
time for campers who attended
the JCC'8 Summer Camp,
especially for 20 children who
were able to attend the camp only
through the generous donations of
individuals and organizations such
as National Council of Jewish
Women, ORT, Rotary Club, and
B'nai B'rith. More than $4,000
was received and distributed by
the JCC.
Any contributions toward the
JCC Camp Scholarship Fund will
be greatly appreciated. ORT and
National Council of Jewish
Women have already made their
commitments to sponsor children
for a full summer program.
Call 921-6511 or send your tax
deductible contribution payable to
the JCC of South Broward, 2838
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, FL
33020, Attn: Mark Sherman,
assistant executive director.
Counselor-in-
Training Program
A special camp for teenagers
entering ninth and tenth grades
who aspire to learn, develop and
enhance their good leadership
qualities to become future
members of the JCC camp staff.
They will train with experienced
staff to better understand
themselves, their Jewishness,
their growth and development.
CIT's will acquire program skills
while gaining valuable on the job
experience as a group aide while
assisting counselors. But there's
no such thing as all work and no
play at camp. The CIT's will enjoy
participating in special projects
and field trips, while also enjoying
instruction in tennis, boating, folk
dancing and much more. $225 full
summer fee.
The fees for camp is as follows:
Early Bird: 4 weeks $345; 8
weeks, $640.
Regular: 4 weeks $420; 8
weeks, $715.
Transportation: $55 per 4 week
session. Registration fee: $25 non-
refundable.
Early Bird discount is allowed
only if all fees, JCC membership
dues and camp, are paid in full by
May 15.
The JCC camps are entering
their fourth year of service to the
South Broward Jewish
Community.
HILLCREST Joseph Raymond, Hillcrest chairman, is seen
here celebrating the 1986 campaign with co-chairwomen Gert
Kronovet, left, and Eleanor Lerner, right.
Rabbi David H. Chanofsky/Monsey Jewish Center
Louis lacucci / Noted wine authority
THE ONLY WINE
BOTH THESE CRITICS
HAVE FAITH IN.
Some wines are praised by authorities on wine. Some are praised by authorities on
Kosher law (Kashruth). But it seems that Carmel wines have managed to please
demanding critics of both persuasions.
Which is no surprise, considering Carmel's great viti-|
cultural heritage dates back to biblicaltimes. A heritage
that's resulted in some truly notable wines, such as
our Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon Blanc and our new
Cabernet Blanc. All with truly superb fragrance and
depth. As well as with a truly superb Kosher upbringing.
So whether you prefer vintage varietals or the tradi-
tional richness of sacramental wines, this holiday, why not
celebrate with Israel's finest wines?
After all, they've been getting rave
reviews for more than 5,000 years.
CARMEL
Imported oy The Seagram Classics Wine Co New York. N Y U Kosher lor Passover


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Super Officials
j
Hollywood's new mayor, Mara Gialianti, came out for Super
Sunday to help support the 1986 UJA/Federation Campaign.
Hollywood's new city commissioner, Guy Roper, talks to Sam
Meline abut a pledge to the 1986 UJA/Federation Campaign.
*
2
Congressman Larry Smith listens while on the phone with a
supporter of the 1986 UJA/Federation Campaign.
Mayor to Speak at BEF, B&P Meet
Hollywood's new mayor, Mara
Giulianti, will be the guest
speaker at a joint meeting of the
Business Executive Forum and
the Business and Professional
Women's Network on Thursday,
April 17.
Mayor Giulianti became
Hollywood's first women mayor
when she upset long-time incum-
bent David Keating in the city
elections earlier this year.
Mayor Giulianti has served on
the national and local executive
boards of various Jewish organiza-
tions, including the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, the
National Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council and the
National Council of Jewish
Women. In 1982, she received the
Hannah G. Solomon Award from
the National Council of Jewish
Women.
She has served on the Broward
County Commission on the Status
of Women and the Governor's
Commission on Drug and Alcohol
Concerns.
Jewish Theater
Program Set for
State Rep. Irma Rochlin is happy here while talking to a
South Broward Jewish family on Super Sunday.
PYLD Meet
The Professional Young
Leadership Division's April
brunch will feature Sally Fox and
her "Jewish Involvement
Theater" A Confrontation With
Modern Day Dilemmas That Face
American Jews.
The PYLD brunch will be held
10:30 a.m. Sunday, April 20, at
Hemingway Restaurant, 219
North 21 St. in Hollywood.
Sally Fox has the remarkable
ability to captivate audiences of all
ages. Her unique characters por-
tray roles which are familiar to all
of us and she provides a setting
which keeps us entranced and
immersed.
At the same time, her Jewish In-
volvement Theater is not merely
entertainment; rather, it is a con-
frontation with real life and it
forces us to face Jewish issues
squarely.
There is a cover charge of $10
for the PYLD brunch. For more
information, contact Debbie
Brodie Stevens at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
921-8810.
The Herat Revolt
Continued from Page 4
them, a party break-up is the least
likely. It is also highly unlikely
that one side will capitulate and
surrender control of the party.
The most likely outcome will be a
temporary compromise, which
will postpone the inevitable
showdown.
Labor has been very reluctant
to respond. Peres, for his part, has
told his people to speak, if at all,
with restraint. Labor Party
leaders postponed an internal
discussion on breaking up the na-
tional unity government until
after the Herat convention. "Why
steal the show from Herat?" one
party leader asked rhetorically.
While Herat factions were busy
slugging it out in public, Labor
was exploring other political op-
tions. If Herat cannot close ranks
and agree on a planned merger
with their Likud partners the
Liberals some of the latter
might look for other ways to en-
sure their parliamentary future.
(The above column by David
Tweraky, NER's correspondent in
Israel, appeared in the March 21,
edititon of Near East Report.)
The joint BEF and B&P
meeting will be held Thursday,
April 17, at 5:15 p.m. in the
Emerald Hills Country Club, 4100
North Hills Drive in Hollywood.
The meeting is sponsored bv
The Car People, Jet Printing
House, and the Jewish Federation
of South Broward.
For more information, plase
contact Debbie Stevens at
921-8810.
JEWISH GUILT The Professional Young Leadership Divi-
sion had a most successful breakfast program at Hemm-
ingway Restaurant with Dr. Toby Berman, who spoke about
"Jewish Guilt Understanding Your Mother." Seated at her
table was the three generations of daughter, mother and
grandmother.
The Professional Young Leadership Division's next and
last breakfast program of it's series is Sunday, April 20, with
Sally Fox, who's specialty is Jewish Involvement Theatre.
SUPER SATURDAY NIGHT Israeli *Sabra' dancers enter-
tained at Super Saturday Night last month. Radio personality
Barry Farber and Israeli singer Danny Tadmore and his band
were featured at the pep rally for Super Sunday. Several hun-
dred people attended the event at the HaUandale Jewish
Center.
57 REASONS
TO CALL
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Mortgage Backed Secunlie:
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Real Estate
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Risk Arbitrage
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Yankee bonds
Zero Coupon Bonds
Zero Coupon Bond Trusts
Drexel Burnham
Drew) Bumlwm Umoni IncorpoulM
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MM
Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoUywood Page 9-A
Super Sunday-Super Week Raises $580,000
Jud^A^Rt^'whn^^K- 5"m4,eft'iF*33 *F*Z Sher7l Hoffman, SUPER SUNDAY From left, Lila Zedeck, Super Sunday Beneficiary
UrLl^dRnSn.n^S^^^u f "i*** for High School in Agencies chairperson; Audrey Meline, Super Sunday trainef of trainee.;
fimUies^n SanerSuiuiaT 8e*" g SUth Broward Jewih State Rep. IrmiRochlin; Shane Wolf, Super Sunday co-chairperson; Edith
Frost and Terrie Durden are seen here on Super Sunday.

rjtiofl

Jj" MTJON CAMPAIGN
SUPER SUNDAY L'CHAIM From left seated, Tracy Gotkin, Bobbi
botkin. Super co-chairperson, Les Stevens and Debbie Stevens, Super Sun-
day coordinator, and Sharon Molot (standing), a Super Sunday trainer are
seen here in a festive mood on Super Sunday.
RECORD-BREAKING TOTAL Les Stevens changes the Super Sunday
total as it breaks the $500,000 mark. Super Sunday eventually tallied
$515,000 plus $65,000 generated from Super Synagogue Week.
IQOOQQOOQOQflBOOQOai
>jewbh Jewish National Fund
fam^1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael);
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORT THE JNF
YOUNG LEADERSHIP SUPER SUNDAY Jill Elkins, right, is seen here
talking to a South Broward Jewish family on Super Sunday. To her left is Dr.
Laurie Brown.
Coming Events ...
APRIL
Apr. 13 Thank You Celebration for
1986 Campaign workers and volunteers,
Hillcrest Playdium, 7:30 p.m.
Apr. 17 Business Executive Forum
and Business and Professional Women's
Network, Emerald Hills Country Club,
5:15 p.m.
Apr. 19 Young Couples of South
Broward, 7:30 p.m.
Apr. 20 Professional Young Leader-
ship Development brunch, Hemm-
ingway's, 10:30 a.m.
Apr. 20 Venetian Park B'nai B'rith
breakfast, 10 a.m.
Apr. 21 Hillcrest JCC Bus Tour,
Hillcrest Playdium, 9:30 a.m.
Apr. 22 Leadership Expansion
meeting, Federation building, 6 p.m.
Apr. 22 JFSB Board of Directors
meeting, Federation building, 7:30 p.m.
MAY
May 4 Yom Hashoah, Temple Beth El,
evening.
June 1 Formal ground-breaking
ceremonies for Federation Manor and
Joseph Meyerhoff Senior Activities
Center, 3060 Taft Street, Hollywood.
DATES TO REMEMBER:
July 7-21 Family Mission
July 13-23 Singles Mission
Sept. 14-25 Leadership Mission
Sept. 21-Oct. 1 Community Develop-
ment Mission.
INFORMATION: For more details con-
cerning the above events, please call
921-8810.
PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Plant as Many Trees as You Wish
($5 Per Tree!
18Trees-
25 Trees -
36 Trees -
50Trees-
75 Trees-
100 Trees -
300 Trees-
1000 Trees-
Chai
Cluster
Double Chai
-Jubilee
-Arbor
-Garden
-Orchard
-Grove*
Dedication Ceremony in Israel and a
Special I'laque in the Forest is Included
IJ Holiday Greetings
Birthdays
D Anniversary
D BarTBat Mitzvah
n Wedding
I I Graduation
n In Honor
G In Memory
O Get Well
Good Wishes
IJ New Baby
G New Year
? Special Occasion
? In Gratitude
II_______
Kstahlish an Annuity with the JNF
RememiHT the .1N K in your Will
Link your Name Kternally with
the Land <>t Israel
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln ltd Suite .'153. Miami Beach. FL 33139
Phone 53N4i4tt4
1
I


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hdllywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Common Cause or 'Common Curse'
By Morris J. Amitay
Common Cause, or "common
curse" according to some of its
detractors here in Washington,
has missed the mark in its report
criticizing pro-Israel political ac-
tion committees (PACs). This so-
called "citizens lobby," whose ob-
jective is to protect the
democratic process from the
special interests that seek to
subvert it, described the growth
of pro-Israel PACs as a "classic
case study of the PAC problem in
our political system." Given Com-
mon Cause's liberal agenda, not to
mention the strong backing this
organization receives from
American Jews, its decision to
single out pro-Israel PACs for in-
depth study is puzzling.
The activities of pro-Israel
PACs certainly do not harm the
environment, promote the spread
of nuclear weapons, or are
motivated by a desire to reap ex-
cessive profits or deprive the
poor. Supporters of these PACs
seek only to gain support from the
Congress for Israel as the only
stable democracy in the Middle
East and America's only reliable
ally there. Americans of all
political stripes agree that a
secure Israel serves U.S. interests
in the region and obviates the
need for greater U.S. involve-
ment. Most would also
acknowledge the shared values
and goals of the two nations. In
this light, Common Cause's selec-
tive assault on pro-Israel PACs
becomes "curiouser and
curiouser."
One possible explanation could
be a syndrome that afflicts some
American Jews serving not only
in a "citizens' lobby," but in the
media and in government as well.
This syndrome, for lack of a con-
venient term, can be described as
"bending over backwards to show
that despite one's (nominal?)
Jewishness, one can still criticize
Israel." In this case, the syndrome
has apparently been carried a step
further to criticism of pro-Israel
PACs, not only of Israel.
Fred Wertheimer, president of
Common Cause, and David
Cohen, immediate past president,
may feel more at ease knowing a
Jesse Jackson or a George
McGovern will appreciate this sort
of "even-handedness." But Com-
mon Cause's members should be
more than a bit dismayed that
their lobby has not focussed on the
millions of PAC dollars going to
members of the two Congres-
sional tax-writing committees
from hundreds of PACs in order o
influence pending tax legislation.
In fact, the insurance, energy, and
banking PACs to name but three
industries, each far outnumber
the 65 pro-Israel PACs which
Common Cause singled out. Com-
mon Causes's anguish over the ac-
tivities of these PACs can actually
be seen as a tribute to those in the
Jewish community who have
become involved at an increasing
rate on behalf of a worthwhile
cause. Common Causes's detailed
study of pro-Israel PAC contribu-
tions from 1981 through 1985 is
also useful to Jewish political ac-
tivists in measuring their success.
As far as Common Cause is con-
cerned, it has undoubtedly
weakened its own base of support
by this ill-directed exercise. It is
really too bad support of Israel is
not one of this organizations'
causes. But who knows, with new
leadership with fewer hang-ups,
Common Cause may yet see the
light.
THANK YOU CELEBRATION The Jewish Federation of
South Broward will be hosting a "Thank You Celebration"
for all of its campaign workers. The innovative musical group
SAFAM will petorm at the celebration. For more information
call Judy Nemeth or Adnrew Polin at 921-8810.
Spring Break
Our Price includes
port charges, three generous meals,
and roundtrip motorcoach from selected locations
in Broward. Dade and Palm Beach Counties.
The regular Seniors fare, 55 years and older
is $83.00. BUT FOR THE MONTHS OF
APRIL. MAY AND JUNE, WERE CIVINC
SENIOR CITIZENS A SPRING BREAK BY
REDUCING THIS PRICETOALOW $63.00.
Every departure, seven days a week, subject
to space availability.
Depart Miami at 8:30 a.m.. spend the
afternoon in Freeport/Lucaya and return to
Miami at 11:00 p.m. All the magic of a
longer cruise in just one day. Dine and
Dance. Relax by the pool. Play bingo.
Take in the SeaEscape Revue. Big Band
V
every Monday. You can do as much or as little
as you like.
And when your club or homeowners
association books a group of 40 or more,
we'll take $4.00 more off each fare and
provide a special motorcoach to/from any
point of your choice in Broward. Dade or
Palm Beach Counties.
So don't miss our special Senior Citizen's
Spring Break. See your travel agent today
or call SeaEscape at 1 -800-432-0900 or in
Dade County. 379-0000. Proof of age may
be requested. Cabins optional.
South Florida's only One Day Cruises to the Bahamas
B'NAI B'RITH EMERALD HILLS LODGE Arnold Golds-
tein, Nat Jacobson. Hy Jacobs, Jerry Homer, David
Glassman, Don Gustin, Hy Solomon, Charles Moses, David
Peskin, Mai Feldman, Ben Rosenberg, George Friedwald,
Mitchell Appleman and Charles Noveck at a recent meeting of
the Emerald Hills Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
AMERICA'S PLUMPEST PITTED PRUNES
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AMERICA'S RAISIN CHOICE
C1986 SeaEscape Ltd.
Ships Registry: Bahamas
CerM^Kosh.rParv.cP.ssOverbyRabb.J H Ratoag
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\
Dr. Menachem Wiener, a computer expert at the Technion,
who is one of the leading researchers in a new study of the
Bible.
Who Wrote The Bible?
Computer Technology Adding
Jew Dimension To Bible Studies
By MARY S. KROSNEY
And
ELLEN M. SHMUELOFF
JERUSALEM Scientist
in Israel, who are using com
puters to analyze the Bible, are
uncovering evidence which is
leading them to conclude that
the holy text was written by
one hand and not by a pro-
liferation of authors. The two
experts who used a letter-
skipping method of decoding
the Old Testament and other
holy writings say their
evidence strongly suggests
that the Bible couldn't have
been written by a mortal.
Biblical scholar Dr. Moshe
Katz and computer expert Dr.
Menachem Wiener of the
Technion, Israel's Institute of
Technology, have conducted
research based on the notion
that significant words are con-
cealed in the Hebrew text of
I the first five books of the Bible
spelled by letters separated at
I fixed intervals, a system allud-
ed to in Rabbinic literature
much later. Using this ap-
proach, words and concepts
were uncovered that do not ap-
pear explicitly in the text.
Dr. Katz, who explained his
theories to journalists at a
press briefing here, said that
the researchers' evidence
dispells the belief that the Bi-
ble is a collection of documents
written and edited by different
persons at different times. The
patterns of letters repeated
throughout all the texts
dismiss this theory, he said,
because the statistical pro-
bability of the patterns of in-
formation appearing at set in-
tervals by chance is extremely
low sometimes 1:3 million.
Giving examples of signifi-
cant words revealed in the
text, he pointed to the repeti-
tion of the Hebrew word
"Tora" (Bible) which appears
in the Book of Genesis
repeatedly every 50 characters
and the word "Elohim" (G-d)
which appears in the same
Book when skipping 26 letters.
The numbers 50 and 26 have
great significance in Jewish
tradition, he stressed.
The remarkable aspect of
the research is not that words
are being found in the text by
stringing together letters at
regular intervals. "That," Dr.
Wiener pointed out in an inter-
view in nis office at the Tech-
nion, "can be done by applying
the method to a telephone
directory" but that in every
instance, the revealed words
bear direct relevance to the
text in which they were
concealed.
For instance, the burial site
of Adam and Eve, is never
mentioned in the text of the
Bible, but by the letter-
skipping method, the names
"Adam and "Eve" appear in
the text where the burial place
of Abraham and Sarah the
Patriarch's Tomb is
described.
The project came about
when Dr. Katz, out of curiousi-
ty, decided to try analyzing the
Bible using the known Rab-
binical method of letter-
skipping. He approached Dr.
Wiener to design the
necessary computer program
to begin research into the
Book of Genesis.
Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11-A
Dr. Wiener explained how
the two scientists worked:
"We use two basic methods oi
investigation. One approach
entails having the text printed
out in a specified number ol
letters to the line and then run-
ning one's eye down the page
to ascertain whether any
words emerge from the new
arrangement of letters. The
number is entirely arbitrary
and we constantly experiment
with different arrangements.
"The second method is to
give the computer a key word
'Adam' for example and
command it to find whether
the letters A, D, A, M, are con-
cealed in a defined body of
text, again at arbitrary but
regular intervals."
Another extraordinary
aspect to emerge from the
research is the prophetic
nature of many words revealed
in the texts, which gives am-
munition to Dr. Katz's convic-
tion that the Old Testament
and certain holy writings
which came later were not
written by a human hand.
For instance, Dr. Katz
pointed to the Book of Esther
which is read during the
Jewish Holiday of Purim to
commemorate the saving of
the Persian Jews during the
reign of King Ahasuerus
(Xerxes).
After Haman, one of the
king's ministers, received per-
mission from him to effectively
exterminate the Jewish
population, Queen Esther, a
Jewess, succeded in per-
suading the king to revoke the
permission; this action
resulted in great rejoicing
which is today celebrated as
the Feast of Purim. As a con-
sequence, Hainan's ten sons
were hanged and their names
are listed in the Book of
Esther. After the hangings
were carried out, and Esther
was asked by the king what
more could he do for her and
her people, she requested:
"And let Hainan's ten sons be
Continued on Page 13
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Community Education Vice President
Leadership Development Vice President
In-Service Vice President
Parliamentarian
Nominating Committee Chairwoman
Goodwill and Grievance Chairwoman
Secretary Bertha
Merle Orlove
Sylvia Kalin
Naomi Prever
Sandi Gelfand
Penny Warner
Janie Berman
FranHaskin
Avis Sachs
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1986-87
Hannah Adel
Sis Altman
Karen Baer
Cynthia Baron
Edythe Barron
Judee Barron
Libby Behar
Janie Berman
Frances Briefer
Anne Conn
Jaye Daniel
Barbara Desky
Meral Ehrenstein
Bertha Goldberg Fass
Judy Feldman
Mina Finkelstein *
Mildred Friedman
Edith Frost
Sandi Gelfand
Selma Gersten
Esther Gordon
Brenda Greenman
Joan Gross
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Jackie Kan
Carol Karten
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Anne Lowe *
Merle Lundy
Merle Orlove
Elaine Pittell
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Naomi Prever
Arlene Ray
Jean Rosenberg
Avis Sachs
Eleanor Sacknoff
Lee Schatzberg
Joanne Schoenbaum
Fredda Schwartz
Beverly Shapiro
Evelyn Stieber
Penny Warner
Edna Warren
Dodie Weinstein
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Lynda Wilentz
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4
[
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoUywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Rabbis Arrested at Protest for Soviet Jewry
By Judith Kahn
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Representatives of the Reform,
Conservative and Orthodox rab-
binical bodies were among 21 rab-
bis and lay leaders from across the
country arrested recently in a
peaceful demonstration for Soviet
Jewry. The protest, which is the
most recent in a nearly year-old
series of arrest rallies outside the
Soviet Embassy here, appeared to
mark a new phase in the nation-
wide Soviet Jewry movement
following the release last month of
the celebrated Jewish Prisoner of
Conscience Anatoly Shcharansky.
For the first time since the civil
disobedience strategy was
adopted here last May, the Na-
tional Conferene on Soviet Jewry,
the main "establishment" Soviet
Jewry organization with member-
ship agencies throughout the
country, effectively endorsed the
arrests by supporting the rab-
binical groups. All three rab-
binical associations, as well as
three other lay groups
represented among those arr-
rested are member agencies of the
Hadassah Relief Group
Holds first Congress
NEW YORK (JTA) The
historic first Congress of the
Hadassah Medical Relief Associa-
tion (HMRA), which brought
together leaders in government,
medicine and philanthropy from
four continents, has just been con-
cluded after three days of inten-
sive sessions in Paris.
According to Bernice Tannen-
baum, chairman of the almost
three-years-old organization,
delegates from 11 countries con-
vened "to relate the challenge of
medical science today to the uni-
que role of the Hadassah Medical
Organization (HMO) which, as the
Mideast's pacesetter in healing,
teaching and research, is the focus
of medicine between Rome and
Tokyo."
Simultaneous translation into
French, English, Spanish and
Hebrew was necessary to accom-
modate both panelists and
members, many of whom
represented the highest levels of
medical, legal and community in-
volvement in their home
countries.
A symbol of the truly interna-
tional scope of the undertaking
and its significance in fostering
breakthroughs in cooperation bet-
ween countries was the announce-
ment at the Congress of the ac-
cord between the French and
Israeli government to support the
creation of Europe's and the
Mideast first medical imaging
treatment and research center,
which will be located at Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical
Center in Jerusalem.
The announcement was made by
Ovadia Soffer, the Israeli Am-
bassador to France, on behalf of
Hubert Curien. the French
Gampel
Re-elected
DENVER Harry A. Gampel
of Gampel Realty. Hallandale, has
been re-elected to a three-year
term on the council of national
trustees of the National Jewish
Center for Immunology and
Respiratory Medicine, Denver.
The council offers advice and
counsel on policy matters and
elects the board of directors, the
governing body of the Center.
The National Jewish Center for
Immunology and Respiratory
Medicine is the nation's only
medical facility focusing its com-
plete research and clinical
resources on respiratory, allergic
and immune disorders, including
asthma, emphysema, chronic
bronchitis, tuberculosis, occupa-
tional and environmental lung
disease, juvenile rheumatoid ar-
thritis and immune-deficiency
disorders, including AIDS.
Non-profit and non-sectarian,
the Center accepts adults and
children as patients without
regard to race or religion and has
cared for patients from every
state in the nation.
Cabinet Minister for Research and
Technology, and Dr. Henri Atlan
chief of Haassah's Department of
Medical Biophysics, who was the
impetus behind the creation of the
project.
Highlights of the unprecedented
gathering included multi-national
symposia on current medical
economics and "Who shall Live
and Who Shall Die," an in-depth
debate of the medical, legal,
psychological, neurological and
ethical ramifications of current
medicine led by Dr. Charles
Sulman of France.
The Congress was held under
the patronage of Georgina Dufoix,
France's Minister of Social Af-
fairs and National Solidarity.
Ruth Popkin, national president
of Hadassah in the United States,
and Frieda Lewis, national
chairperson of the HMO for the
United States, were leaders of
some of the pivotal sessions which
also included an address by noted
lawyer and writer Samuel Pisar
on "Human Resources."
The Congress resulted in a
renewed dedication among the
participants to expand the inter-
national support of the HMO and
to build closer relations between
the members of the HMRA and
Israel via the mechanism of HMO
involvement.
National Conference.
The previous protests here have
been sponsored by the
Washington Board of Rabbis, in
coordination with the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews, the
other main umbrella Soviet Jewry
organization. Over 130 have been
arrested in Washington since last
May by violating a District of Col-
umbia code that prohibits
demonstrations directly in front
of the Embassy building.
Together with demonstrators in
San Francisco and New York,
over 1,000 people have been ar-
rested to date, some 500 of them
rabbis.
The National Conference had
long withheld endorsement of the
arrests, maintaining that break-
ing the law was neither necessary
nor justified, especially when the
U.S. Administration is already
sympathetic to the Soviet Jewish
plight.
But disappointment over
Moscow's failure to follow
through on signals that it would
ease its emigration restrictions,
and its continued harassment at
Jewish activists, led many of the
member agencies to call for an
"accelaration" of the campaign,
William Kaiserling, Washington
director of the National Con-
ference, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
At a press conference held by
the demonstrators before protest,
Keyserling also announced the in-
itiation by his organization of an
"aggressive public education ef-
fort" to ensure that Jewish
emigration and human rights are
on the agenda of any future talks
between President Reagan and
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
He said the "pre-Summit II"
campaign will be chaired by Elie
Wiesel and will host recent Soviet
emigres to Israel first Ilya
Essas here to be followed by
Shcharansky in May if his health
permits. On a very tentative agen-
da being worked out for
Shcharansky by a group of
representatives from various
Soviet Jewry organizations is the
Kutsher's
lights your
summer days
with sun.
And your nights
, with /\ stars.
\
RANKIF.
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CompfeM Convention FaciMwt M|or CtmM C* annual "Solidarity Sunday" rally
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Those arrested included Rabbi
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bis, the rabbinical association of
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Representatives of the lay
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Some 20 others, including
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A REFUSENIK FOR 13 YEARS, Eliahu Essas of Moscow
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Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 13-A
Technion's, Israel's Future Tied Together
By Yitzhak Rabi
NEW YORK (JTA) Prof.
Josef Singer, president of the
Technion, Israel's famed institute
of technology and science in
Haifa, warned that the severe cut-
backs to the university's
operating budget and the growing
deficit imposed by Israel's conti-
nuing economic crisis might have
a long-term effect on the coun-
try's economy and its effort to
reach economic independence.
Singer, in an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, said
that Israel's economic future is
dependent on the development of
high-tech industries as a source
for export and improving the
country's balance of payment.
Noting that Technion trains 70
percent of all of Israel's scientists
and engineers, and is, therefore,
the key to the State's economic
and defense needs. Singer said the
financial cutbacks represent two
unacceptable options: reducing
the number of engineers and
scientists who graduate from the
Technion, or lowering the stan-
dard of excellence in teaching and
research for which the Technion is
known the world over.
Singer said that Technion
graduates every year about
1,000-1,500 new engineers and
scientists. But Israel's needs to
develop high-tech industries, he
noted, require at least 5,000 addi-
I tional new engineers in the next
decade.
"The question before the Tech-
nion is what kind of Technion are
we going to have," Singer said.
"Will it be a Technion that keeps
its standard of excellence or not?
Will it be a Technion that cuts the
number of students and teachers,
but then won't be able to meet the
national needs of economic
growth and development?"
Singer pointed out that the
training of a student at the Tech-
nion is much more expensive than
the training of a student in any
other university. He said that
Technion needs millions of dollars
to invest now "in order to have
very good new engineers in sue or
seven years from now."
Singer said that the operating
budget of the Technion for
1985786 is $64 million. "We need,
however, an additional $7 million
to solve our operating needs for
the year," he said. He added that
Technion has an accumulated
budget deficit of $12 million in ad-
Technion Center:
'Factory of the Future'
The Jack W. Ullmann Center
for Manufacturing Systems and
Robotics Research at the Tech-
nion has been established to
develop a "factory of the future"
in Israel: computerized integra-
tion of all aspects of manufactur-
ing which will be key to Israel's in-
dustrial growth and very survival,
according to Dr. Martin Kellner,
national president of the
American Society for Technion
Israel Institute of Technology.
"The Center was created in
memory of New York philan-
thropist Jack W. Ullman by his
family and many friends through
the American Society for Tech-
nion at the university's Faculty of
Mechanical Engineering. It brings
together experts and research ef-
Who Wrote The Bible?
Continued from Page li
hanged upon the gallows."
(Book of Esther, 9:13) a reply
which has puzzled scholars for
centuries, since the ten were
already dead.
A major hi
mystery, saic
pearance of the three Hebrew
fetters "taf," "shin" and
"zayin" in the list of Hainan's
ten hanged sons (written
smaller than the other letters);
"taf "shin" "zayin" spell out
the number in the Jewish
calendar for the year 1946 of
the Gregorian calendar. On
October 16, 1946, explained
Dr. Kate, who showed a slide
of the front page of the Herald
Tribune of that date, ten Nazis
were hanged following their
conviction and sentencing in
the Nuremberg Trials. (Eleven
had been convicted, in fact, but
Herman Goering had commit-
ted suicide by poisoning an
hour before the execution.) In-
explicably, Julius Streicher,
one of the ten hanged, seconds
before the noose was tightened
cried out, "Purim Fest, 1946!"
Both Goering and Streicher
had become instruments in the
fulfillment of the prophecy of
the Book of Esther, said Katz.
Additionally, said Katz, in
1946 according to the Jewish
Calendar, October 16 fell ex-
actly on the annual Jewish
holiday Hoshana Raba which is
considered the last day of
judgement in a chain of high
holidays including Rosh
Hashana and Yom Kippur a
period of judgement.
The Purim-Nazi story was
one of the most dramatic ex-
amples given by the Israeli
scientists of the many ways
the Bible and other holy
writings provide prophetic
hints of the future.
"Such a phenomenon cannot
be explained rationally," com-
puter expert Dr. Wiener com-
mented. "So we need a non-
rational explanation. And ours
is that the Bible was written
by G-d, through the hand of
Mosea. Clearly, we have not
scientifically proved this, but
the preponderance of occur-
rences certainly points to it.
And it is as reasonable a sup-
position, if not more so, than
the theories claiming that the
Vaa^gejal authors."
The doctors have only scrat-
ched the surface with their
research so far. Unexplored
Biblical texts are already on
the computer, waiting to be
tackled. The scientists also
plan to make this method of
studying the Bible available on
micro-computer to high school
students.
Inevitably there will be scep-
tics and critics to answer, but
whichever views other
scholars hold, many will admit
that computer technology is
adding powerful new dimen-
sions to the study of the Bible.
torts to create a completely com-
puterized Israeli manufacturing
environment," Dr. Kellner noted.
Jack W. Ullman, a national leader
of the Society, served as its presi-
dent, chairman of the board, and
treasurer, and as a member of
Technion's International Board of
Governors.
"Israel is a small country lack-
ing abundant natural resources
and population. Innovative
research and the expansion of
sophisticated industries which
generate high quality products for
export are absolutely essential to
Israel's economic viability," Dr.
Kellner stressed. "Today, Israeli
industry must compete with
Western and Far Eastern coun-
tries in the world marketplace. To
be successful, Israel must achieve
and maintain a qualitative edge in
industrial productivity. This is a
national priority."
"The initial goal of one million
dollars to establish the Center is
nearly completed through the
generosity of the Siegried and Ir-
ma Ullmann Foundation,
longtime ATS leader Ludwig
Jesselson, the ATS Women's Divi-
sion, which established an
academic lectureship in the
Center, and other significant
donors throughout the U.S.A.,"
stated Meivyn H. Bloom, ATS ex-
ecutive vice president.
The Ullmann Center will focus
research conducted since the early
1970s at Technion anticipating
Israel's future needs in the areas
of computer-aided manufacturing
and design, robotics, laser beam
machinery, welding, assembly,
production, planning, transport,
and information flow examin-
ing virtually every aspect of in-
dustrial productivity. Research
will concentrate on optimizing the
work flow, reducing manufactur-
ing costs, increasing efficient pro-
duction.
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"The Technion is one of the best
dition to the extra $7 million gap technological institutes in the
in this year's budget. worl?,' d we waPl to keeP ,l **"*
^ way, Singer said.
"The experience I had in
Israel mas the most meaningful
experience of my life."
Randall Lending. Vanderbili University 1985 Participant
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1


r age it-A ine Jewish rioridian of South Broward-HollywoooVFriday, April 11, 1986
Over 50,000 attended services in New York
for Rabbi Moshe Feinstein who passed
away March 13. Interment followed in
Jerusalem.
Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Dead at 91
NEW YORK (JTA) Tens of
thousands of Jews converged on
the Lower East Side to pay their
last respects to Rabbi Moshe
Feinstein, one of the world's
outstanding authorities on Jewish
law and author of multi-volume
texts of responsa and Talmudic
commentary, who died March 23
at the age of 91.
At least 50,000 mourners pack-
ed the streets outside Tifereth
Jerusalem, the yeshiva where
Feinstein served as dean since he
came to the United States in 1937.
Afterwards, a long cortege follow-
ed his casket to JFK Airport. His
body was flown to Israel for burial
at Har Menuchot cemetery in
Jerusalem.
Leading rabbis spoke of Feins-
tein's prodigious scholarship, and
stressed as well his piety, humility
and sense of mission. He made
himself accessible to all people
with problems seeking his counsel
and blessings; to young scholars
who needed clarification of dif-
ficult Talmudic passages; and to
seasoned rabbis who sought his
advice and opinion on complicated
halachic issues.
Associates recalled Feinstein's
"hasmada" (diligence). He struc-
tured every minute of the day for
some scholarly pursuit, such as a
review of two chapters of
Mishnayos while folding his
tefillin straps. He reviewed the
Shulchan Aruch, the code of
Jewish law, more than 300 times
during his life.
Feinstein served as president of
Agudas Israel of America from
1966-1980 and had headed its
presidium since the early 1950's.
He also headed the organization's
Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah (Coun-
cil of Torah Sages), which he
chaired since 1962; and was presi-
dent of the Agudas Harabbonim
(Union of Orthodox Rabbis of the
U.S. and Canada) from 1968 to
I960.
He was a member of the rab-
binical board of Torah Umesorah,
the National Society of Hebrew
Day Schools, of which he served
as vice president, and was a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of Chinuch Atzmai/Torah
Schools for Israel.
Feinstein's prolific responsa to
halachic queries from all over the
Jewish world from 1950-75 were
published in the seven-volume
"Igroth Moshe" (Letters of
Moshe). He also published, bet-
ween 1948-79, 13 volumes of
Talmudic commentary, "Dibroth
Moshe" (Moshe's Statements).
Feinstein was born in 1895 in
Uzda, near Pinsk, Russia, and was
reared in an atmosphere of rab-
binic scholarship and responsibili-
ty. His father, Rabbi Dovid Feins-
tein, served as rabbi of Uzda for
25 years and then assumed the
rabbinate in Starobin, where he
served another 22 years. As a
You've
\ 1
} i
* B

Got What
T" TTT


+ + 1 +
Takes.p.'
(And You May Not Even Know It)
Help Those In Need...
And Help Yourself To A
Tax Deduction At The
Same Time. '
The Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops can use your
gifts of resaleable furniture,
appliances, and household
goods. Items YOU may no
longer need will buy life-
giving medicines and
medical supplies for the
indigent residents of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. For free
pick-up of your donations
simply call:
Dade: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
ouglas
Gardens
Thrift Shops
Two convenient locations:
5713 N.W. 27th Ave., Miami
3149 Hallandale Beach Blvd.. Hallandale
A division of Km Miami Jtwisk Homo and
Hospital for tha Aaed at Dotflas Garaons
young man, Moshe Feinstein
studied at the famed yeshiva of
Slutsk under Rabbi Issur Zalman
Meltzer, and later in Schklov
under Rabbi Pesach Pruskin.
Following his ordination in
1921, Feinstein assumed the rab-
binate in Luban, Russia, a position
he held until 1936. But for more
than 10 years he was under house
arrest in Luban for religious ac-
tivities. Nevertheless, he con-
tinued to (rain international
renown as an outstanding
Talmudic scholar. Through
diplomatic intervention, he suc-
ceeded in obtaining an exit visa to
the U.S. in 1936.
On his arrival here the following
year, Feinstein was invited to
head the yeshiva Tifereth
Jerusalem on East Broadway on
the Lower East Side, then still a
flourishing center of Jewish life,
learning and culture. Tifereth
Jerusalem was a small school.
Under Feinstein's leadership it
grew, reaching its peak enroll-
ment of 800 students during the
1950's.
r -
SOUTH BROWARD RABBIS Rabbi Carl Klein, who
recently returned from Israel on a tour sponsored by Israel
Bonds to enhance tourism, briefed his colleagues at a
meeting of the South Broward Council of Rabbia. From left
seated, Rabbi Bennett Greenspon, Rabbi Carl Klein, and Rab-
bi Harold Richter. Prom left standing, Rabbi Avram Drazin
and Rabbi Avraham Kapnek.
The Board of Directors, the Officers
and the Professional Staff
of the Jewish Federation of South Broward
express deep sorrow at the passing of
Beatrice Mogilowitz
s
1 5
Candle Lighting Time
Apr. 11
Apr. 18
6:22 p.m.
6:26 p.m.
y:%:::::::::W::;X-:!:-W!:-W:::W
FJeligiousdire
ORTHODOX
Coagregatioa Leri Yitschok Lubavitch, 1296 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallan-
dale; 468-1877. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services 7:66 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Friday
evening, 6:80 p.m.; Saturday morning, 9 a.m., Saturday evening, 7:30 p.m., Sunday
8:80 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Religious school: Grades 1-8. Nursery school Monday
through Friday.
Yoaag Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877, Rabbi Edward Davis.
Daily services, 7:30 a.m., sundown; Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sab-
bath morning, 9 o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
CONSERVATIVE
Hallaadale Jewish Cater 416 NE 8th Ave.; 464-9100. Rabbi Carl Klein. Daily
services, 8:80 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46 a.m.
Teaplt Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-6111. Rabbi Morton
Maiavsky. Daily services, 7:46 a.m., sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock. Religious school: Kindergarten-8.
Teaple Both Aha* 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 481-6100. Rabbi Avraham
Kapnek. Services daily 8 a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning 8:46 a.m. Religious
School: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High School.
Tesiple Israel of Miraaaar 6920 SW 36th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi Raphael Adler.
Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46 a.m. Religious
School: pre-kindergarten-8.
Temple Siaai 1201 Johnson St.. Hollywood: 920-1677. RabM Richard J. Margolis.
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 9 a.m. Religious school: Pre-kindtigarten-Judaica Hiah
ScIkv.i.
RE' KM
Ten Beth El 1361 S. 14th Ave., Hollywood; 920-8226
Sabi ith evening 8 p.m. Sabbath morning 11 a.m. Religious
Tea le Beth Esset 10801 Pembroke Road, Pembroke
Ben t Greenspon. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m. First Frida
at 7 ii p.m. Religious school: Pre-kindergarten-10.
Tew.le Said 5100 Sheridan St.. Hollywood: 989-0205. I
Sabi ith services, 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 10:30 a.m
echo 12.
ibbi Samuel Z. Jaffa,
hool: Grades K 10.
nes: 431-3638. Rabbi
f the month we meet
bbi Robert P. Frazin.
ieligious school: Prt-
RECONSTRUCTIONI8T
Raasat SkaJosa 11801 W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation: 472-3600. Rabbi Elliot
Skidell. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m. Religious school: Pre-kindergarten-8.
I



*_:j---- A-..J1 11 Miocirm t-----: i-
jffl 1
Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of^South BrowardHollywood Page 15-A
Israel Considering Future Relations With Waldheim
As Evidence Mounts That Former UN Official Was a Nazi
By David Landau
(Jerusalem)
And Reinhard Engel
(Vienna)
Justice Minister Moshe Nissim
said recently that mounting
evidence that former United Na-
tions Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim has a Nazi past will re-
quire Israel "to consider careful-
ly" whether it is possible to have
any relations with him in the
future.
Waldheim is the conservative
Peoples Party candidate for the
Presidency of Austria in elections
to be held May 5. Austrian and
Yugoslavian newspapers and the
World Jewish Congress have
made public in recent weeks war-
time and post-war documents in-
dicating that Waldheim was in-
volved in the murder and torture
of partisan fighters while a lieute-
nant attached to the German
General Staff in the Balkans dur-
ing World War II.
He also may have been im-
plicated in the deportation of
Greek Jews from Salonika. Nissim
was the first ranking Israeli of-
ficial to comment on the
Waldheim affair. He said that
Israel would have to weigh its
position if, for example, the ques-
tion of Waldheim's visiting Israel
arises in the future.
There have been no indications
from present or past officers of
the Israel foreign service as to
whether Israel knew of or
suspected Waldheim's alleged
Nazi activities during his two
terms as UN Secretary General
1972-81.
Waldheim has denied any Nazi
past in an interview with Israel
Radio from Vienna. He said his
wartime service in the Balkans
was limited to acting as an inter-
preter for the German High
Command.
Two Yugoslavian newspapers
and the Austrian daily Kurier
published documents found in a
Belgrade archive which reveal
that Waldheim was wanted for
war crimes in 1947 in connection
with atrocities committed against
partisans and civilians during the
German occupation.
Last month, the World Jewish
Congress in New York released a
1948 U.S. Army document show-
ing that after World War II both
the Army and the United Nations
War Crimes Commission listed
Waldheim as a suspected Nazi war
criminal. The document, from the
Army's "Combined Registry of
War Criminals and Security
Suspects" (CROWCASS), reports
that Waldheim's arrest was
PURIM KIDS The Bet and Gimmel students of Temple
Israel of Miramar's Religious School recently visited the
Hollywood Hills Nursing Home during Purim. They shared
beautiful "Shlach Manot" which were individually decorated
and filled with food purchased with "tzedakah" money. Seen
above are David Silver and Allison Crespi talking to one of
the residents at Hollywood Hills.
TOGETHER
WE WILL KEEP THE
FLAME OF REMEMBRANCE
ALIVE
a very special
YOM HASHOAH PROGRAM
featuring
ALLAN A. RYAN, JR.
will be held at
Temple Beth El
1351 South 14th Ambm
Hollywood
on
Sunday, May 4, 1986
at
8:00 P.M.
sought by Yugoslavia on suspicion
of complicity in what the Registry
listed as "murder."
According to the documents
published in Belgrade and Vienna,
it was Waldheim who, despite his
junior rank, made proposals for
retaliation measures against local
Dooulations after partisan attacks
A Dm J >! uootfftod t tnt Artornf Otnnl of 0w UHa sam 10 conauci
VJSrmrZ^iSKJSStom rr*tr*io*to, *** ccompHrtmw*
no" nottmorlhy tcofnmtn in 0w pubHc mo:
Mr. *n l, mt tuthw of Out* Highboft: PnmtcuUng Nul mr ChmUml* m Amtria puVHtna
mm*.
and on the treatment of hostages.
His proposals were passed on to
his superiors.
Waldheim flatly rejected the
allegations as "lies, defamation
and devilish intrigue." He main-
tained that the documents lumped
all German officers together and



i
Letters to the Editor
Continued from Page 4
cises and programs. It also mandates the in-
stallation of "walk through" metal detectors
or more advanced screening systems at the
main entrance of each U.S. diplomatic mis-
sion abroad.
As a member of the Subcommittee which
drafted the legislation, I also raised some
concern about the cost of constructing the
new embassies. I have had first-hand
knowledge of poor construction managment
and high cost overruns, and I wanted to en-
sure that the bill would address these
problems.
At my insistence, the embassy security bill
contains provisions attempting to prevent
excessive spending. The State Department
must notify Congress about specific projects
in advance so that we can determine if the
project is necessary and the costs are
justified. In addition, State would have to
reprogram money from other accounts to
pay for cost overruns on embassy
renovations.
The legislation also provides for a system
of bonuses and penalties to promote contract
efficienty. I intend to monitor closely all
security improvement projects to ensure
that these guidelines are strictly followed.
A secure, "terrorist-proof embassy does
not come cheaply. An American mission
abroad is a mini-U.S. Government facility
with unique requirements that contribute to
the relatively high costs. However, we must
not condone the construction of gold-plated
embassies. With this legislation, the U.S.
taxpayers will get the most for their tax
dollars without sacrificing the security of
our diplomatic personnel.
Larry Smith
Washington, D.C.
i
1
>:
m
I
I
i
m
m
Si-;
because no proof was ever found,
the charges were quietly dropped
by the Yugoslav authorities.
Simon Wiesenthal, who heads
the Nazi war crimes documenta-
tion center in Vienna, said that
the Yugoslav authorities should
check into why the allegations
against Waldheim were not pur-
sued after 1947. "There is a whole
range of possibilities, from pure
laziness and sloth to a feeling that
the suspicions were not justified,"
he said.
Meanwhile, Alois Mock, chair-
man of the Peoples Party, accused
the WJC of "infamous meanness
and unwarranted interference
with Austrian political matters."
Mock called on the Socialist-led
Austrian government to protect
Waldheim as a citizen from un-
justified attacks coming from
abroad.
Another Peoples Party
spokesman, Robert Graf, called on
President Rudolph Kir-
chschlaeger to call a special ses-
sion of Parliament to reject
foreign intervention in Austrian
politics.
But Socialist Chancellor Fred
Sinowatz said no such session was
necessary. He said it was
Waldheim's duty to prove the
charges unfounded. He added that
the government would not in-
tervene against a private
organization in the U.S., meaning
the WJC.
JTA Services
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
7blON ISl 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
:::'::
Levkt-Weinstein
presents the New
Beth David Memorial Gardens
and what it means to
South Florida.
Now Levitt-Weinstcin offers the con-
venience of a complete funeral chapel
and interment service at one location.
Now Star of David of Hollywood
becomes Beth David Memorial
Gardens... the only Jewish family-
owned-and operated cemetery and
chapel facility in Dade and Broward
Beth David Memorial Gardens offer
a choice of above ground mausoleum
entombment or ground burial... mon-
ument sections... strict adherence to
Jewish burial and funeral laws... Jew-
ish funeral directors on call 24 hours
.. .and pre-arrangement plans provid-
ing comfort, security and cost savings.
Soonu'M D, IR Mowciuit Sub-Commit im si li> Commuml, ftMMwmt
Fo*fition o* Soul* ftfoword
fr ana Opr to Iff Intira CommvWlx
CwMW oi in* J*ir>
Mo Solicitation
Counties.
... because the griefls enough to handle.
Memorial Chapels
North Miami Beach, 949-6315 Hollywood, 921-7200
Wtst Palm Beach, 689-8700 Boca/Deerfield Beach, 427-6500
? HI IMDWin
a WIMOKIM d\KI)l Vn
3201N. 72nd Avenue Hollywood, FL. 963-2400
i




^
Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986

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FHday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page IB
Buy a Piece of the 'UCC"
Exciting opportunities to sponsor honorials and memorials for the new
David Posnack Jewish Community Center on the Nina and Louis Siiverman
Campus featuring the Jack Malamud Performing Arts Pavilion. Join our
many supporters who are establishing the Building Blocks to the Future.
(Your contribution may be payable over a five-year period.)
_IN ^H-J J~* ./*>>
,, ,, il j( ..... J


> 1
Contribute to the JCC Capital Fund Campaign
1. Posnack Jewish Community Center- David Posnack Trust- 43.
Joel Reinstein, Sumner Kaye & Merwm J. Erenbaum 44.
2. Eariy Childhood Wing-Dr. and Mrs. Saul Singer 45.
3. Early Childhood Directors Office- Mrs. Bertha Fass 46.
4. Furnishings 47.
5. Classrooms (8) 48.
6. Equipment/Furnishings (8) 49.
7. Restrooms (Childrens) (4) 50.
8. Restrooms (Teachers) 51.
9 Central Indoor Play Area-Mr. and Mrs Morton Kahn 52.
10. Resource Center/Conference Room 53.
11. Chtldren/TWeen/TeenWing-Hillcrest 54.
12. Children Directors Office-Mr. and MrsRichard Daub 55.
13. Furnahings 56.
14. Tween Directors Office 57.
15. Furnishings 58.
16. Teen Directors Office 58.
17. Furnishings
18. teen Gameroom/Lounge Mr. and Mrs. Paul Weiner 6 60.
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Rosenberg 61.
19. Arts and Crafts Room-Mr. Roy Bazeton 62.
20 Dance/Karate Studio 63.
21. Classrooms (2) 64.
22. Furnishings (2) 65.
23. Adult Wing-Mr and Mrs. Bert Mot* 66.
24. Auditorium-Mr. and Mrs Jack Malamud 67.
25. Stage-Pasac^ Homes, mc. 68.
26. Dressing Rooms (2) 69.
27 Adult Lounge/Activity Room- Mr. Harvey Fell 70.
28. Dairy Kitchen 71.
29. Meat Kitchen 72
30. Board Room 73.
31. Furnishings 74.
32. Library/Media Center 75.
33. Furnishings 76.
34. Musk Room-Mr. and Mrs Michael Orlove 77.
35. Arts and Crafts Room- Dr. and Mrs. Alan Wotoowrtz 78.
36 Adult Services Directors Office 79.
37. Furnishings 80.
38. Cultural Arts Directors Office 81.
39. Furnishings 82.
40. Singles Workers Office 63.
41. Furnishings 84.
42 Senior Citizens Services Directors Office- 85.
Mrs. Esther Gordon 86.
Furnishings-Mrs. Ida Adler
Senior Citizens Workers Office
Furnishings
Restrooms (2)
Secretarial Office
Meeting Rooms (2)
Furnishings (2)
Health and Physical Education Wing
Gymnasium-Jeffrey Kaye Memorial Fund
Nautilus Center
Mens Locker Rooms
Womens Locker Rooms
Basket Room
Sauna-Mr. Merwin J. Erenbaum
Steam Room
Racquetball Courts (4)
CardkWascular Testing Room-
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Feinberg
Physical Education Directors Office
Furnishings-Dr. and Mrs. Richard Reines
Assistant Physical Education Directors Office
Furnishings
Aquatics Directors Office
Furnishings
Lounge
Furnishings
Administrative Wing-Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rose
Executive Directors Office
Furnishings
Assistant Executive Directors Office
Furnishings
Business Managers Office
Furnishings
Program Directors Office
Furnishings
Office Managers Office
Furnishings
Bookkeeping Office
rurmsmngs
Computer Room
Furnishings
Computer
Mail/Duplicating Room
Furmehmgs
necepeomsi Area
87.
88.
89.
90.
91.
92
93.
94.
95.
96.
97.
98
99.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
106.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
112.
113.
114.
115.
116.
117.
116.
119.
120.
121.
192.
123.
124.
Furnishings
Public Relations Directors Office
Furnishings- News/Sun Sentinel Co.
Membership Directors Office
Furnishings
Secretarial Office Area
Furnishings
Lobby-Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bass
Snack Bar
Holocaust Memorial
Cornerstone-Mr David Rothman
Hide! Office
Furnishings
BBYO Office
Furnishings
High School in Israel Office
Furnishings
Bureau of Jowish Education Off ice-
Ms. Mildred Luna Langsam
FumiaMngs
Jewish Federation of South Broward-Branch Office-
Dr and Mrs Joel A. Schneider
Furnishings-Mr. & Mrs. Drew Pickard
GsKhop
vending Machine Area
FfagpetssOr-Mr. and Mrs. Harry Rosen (American)
Dr. and Mrs Morton Diamond (Israeli)
Mrs. Leah Sugarman (Florida)
Jewish Family Service Wtog
T*i i [in ijii 11 Oil 111
swimming r^ooi
Hi ill n^iji
root raDO
Tennis Courts (4)
SottbaM Fields (2)
Basketball Court (outdoor)
volleyball Court (outdoor)
Jogging Track/Par Course-Mr. Alan Gordon
Day Camp
Gazabo
Retreat Lodge
Family Picnic Areas (4) Mr. and Mrs. Don Hsrsh-I
Arts and Crafts Cabin
(2)
Already Subscribed
The new David Posnack Jewish Conrtmjrity Center on the Nira
will be ona29-acre site centralryl^
Wexler, Development Director-921-8810; or Edward Finketetein, Executive Director-921-6511.
Brenda Greenman, President, Dr. Peter Livingston, 0>Charrnan Capital Fund Campaign.
1


Page2-B The Jewiah Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April U, 1986
400-Year-Old Torah Just Would Not Die
By Susan Birnbaum
NEW YORK (JTA) In
March 1944, as the Nazis over-
ran Hungary, an enraged Nazi
soldier, finding nobody home
at the Lisker Synagogue,
threw the Torah he found into
the waters of the Bodrog
River, which flowed through
the synagogue's backyard.
Hidden from view, a 17-year-
old Christian boy, Istvan
Fenye, watched in disgust, and
as the Nazi departed, the boy
stole down to the river and
rescued the Torah.
On Sunday, March 16, 42
years to the day the Torah was
desecrated, it was rededicated
in a profoundly moving
ceremony at the new Lisker
Synagogue in Manhattan.
Before an unanticipatedly
large crowd, the 400-year-old
Torah was brought out in a
new white velvet cover and
marched into the street under
a chuppah, the canopy under
which Jewish weddings are
peformed.
Livened by music and dance,
the procession then returned
into the sanctuary to inscribe
the names of victims of the
Holocaust who left no pro-
geny, and of loved ones of
those present at the ceremony.
A special parchment addition
was provided at the end of the
Torah scroll upon which a
scribe penned the names
given.
Thus came full cycle an
episode of death and rebirth in
a Jewish community, a small
yet greatly significant gesture
in the ongoing tale of broken
and demolished Jewish con-
gregations that refuse to let
the memory die. More than
that, the act of rededication
signaled yet one "more effort of
those who suffered the Nazi
scourge to let the world know
"We are here."
The Fenye boy, an orphan
who was taken into the Lisker
rebbe's household years before
the incident and who retained
his Christian beliefs, also
found his way into permanent
remembrance as his name, too,
was inscribed in the Torah
scroll.
But this wasn't the only
righteous Gentile who saved
the Torah and the rebbe's
family. This is also a
"Wallenberg story," for the
family of the rebbe, Solomon
Friedlander, who had been
hiding in Budapest with Chris-
tian papers, were left to fate
once more as Budapest was
bombed. And the tall Swede
named Raoul Wallenberg pro-
vided them with papers and
gave them and the valise they
carried with the Torah inside
just as Fenye had brought it
to them under great peril
himself shelter in the
Swedish Embassy, where they
remained for the 10 days till
liberation.
In a ceremony of remem-
brance and testimony
preceding the taking out of the
Torah, tribute was paid to
those who perished and to the
power of the Torah itself,
whose importane to the Jewish
people did not die in the
Holocaust's flames.
Rabbi Samuel Ashkenazie of
Kew Gardens, Queens, and
brother-in-law of the Lisker
rebbe, reminded those
gathered that "when these
monstrous people, the beasts
of humanity, the Germans,
came into Hungary, and they
were sure that they'd be able
to extinguish the Jewish na-
tion, they were sure the Torah
would not exist any more .
today we can come together
and proclaim to the world 'We
are here to stay.' The Torah is
our life and the Torah is with
us There is no greater joy,
no greater privilege than to
tell the world 'We saved the
Torah, and we are here with
it'."
Keynote speaker Jack
Eisner, founder of the
Holocaust Survivors Memorial
foundation and cofounder of
the Warsaw Ghetto Resistance
Organization, remembered
that he was only one of 30
grandchildren who survived.
In a deeply felt testimony, he
recalled his grandmother's
near-survival, and his
presence, in hiding, as she was
thrown down the stairs by the
Nazis.
And he remembered the
question often asked, as the
Jews tried in vain somehow to
escape the round-ups. "Why
save the Torah?" He spoke of
the Torahs burned, and "thp
letters (that) will float in
Heaven to come back to us to
teach our grandchildren what
Judaism is all about."
The ceremony was sweeten-
ed by the voice of Cantor
Chaskele Ritter, who sang in
Yiddish as well as Hebrew, and
was enhanced by a candle-
lighting ceremony by
survivors.
The Lisker shul itself is a
testimony to survival. It is a
beautiful melange of artifacts
brought to the East Side san-
tuary, the only Hasidic shtiebel
on the Upper East Side, from
emptied and vandalized
synagogues in The Bronx
where the Lisker shul stood
from 1949 to 1977. Mismatch-
ed chandeliers, menorahs,
clocks and even the doors to
the Ark where the Torahs are
kept were all brought to the
new Manhattan location nine
years ago as The Bronx emp-
tied of its once heavily concen-
trated Jewish population.
Rebbetzin Judith
Friedlander, a gracious
woman, eagerly talked about
the synagogue and the
275-year-old dynasty of
Lisker, from the Hungarian ci-
ty which goes by the name of
Olaszliszka and in which the
synagogue still stands, unus-
ed, surrounded by the old
Jewish cemetery.
Her father, the rebbe who
brought the Torah to America
with them in 1949, was in-
terested in Bikor Holim, the
visiting of the sick. It was this
interest, she said.that brought
them to the Upper East Side,
the locale for so many of New
York's hospitals. It is to this
seemingly unusual location for
a Hassidic shtiebel that the
memories of Hungary and,
more recently, of The Bronx!
have come.
Former Expatriate's Reunion With Son Completes
Circle off Events That Spans Six Decades
NEW YORK. NY Eighty-six-
year-old Irving Milman recently
welcomed his son, Aaron, his
daughter-in-law. and grandson at
JFK International Airport. Their
arrival from the Soviet Union
completes an intricate circle of
events that began in the 1920s.
Irving Milman was born in the
Soviet Union in 1900. He
emigrated to the United States in
1920, becoming a citizen 10 years
later, after the birth of his son,
Aaron. With the onset of the
Depression, the employment
situation for him in the United
States grew untenable, and, in
1936, the family returned to the
Soviet Union. Forty years later,
Milman's sister, still living in New
York, became seriously ill. He was
granted permission to leave the
Soviet Union, and saw her only 15
days before she died. Deciding to
remain in this country, Milman
had his U.S. citizenship
reinstated. Meanwhile, in the
Soviet Union, Aaron applied to
join his father and was denied per-
mission to exit.
Finally, nine years later, in
January of this year, Aaron, his
wife, Alexandra, and their
adopted son, Alexander, received
word that they would be allowed
to emigrate. Upon receipt of this
news, in New York, Irving
Milman purchased and sent to the
Moscow Milmans airline tickets to
the United States via Zurich. As a
dual national. Aaron Milman will
be readmitted to the United
States as a returning American.
His wife and son are entering as
immigrants, beneficiaries of a
petition that he submitted in
Moscow.
Because of this series of unusual
circumstances, the U.S. State
Department called upon HIAS,
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Socie-
ty, for help in the Milman's recep-
tion and in overseeing the
preliminary stages of the family's
resettlement. NYANA, the New
York Association for New
Americans, the agency that
handles the resettlement of im-
migrants in the New York area,
will assist the family in their in-
itial weeks here, should the need
arise.
"For more than a century,
HIAS has had the privilege of tak-
ing part, in the reunification of
families." said HIAS President
Robert L. Israeloff, who was
among those at Kennedy Airport
to greet the Milman family
"While HIAS is always happy to
save even one life, to reunite even
one family," he said, "it should
not be forgotten that there are
thousands more who wish to leave
the Soviet Union and other op-
pressed lands. We look forward to
the day when they too, will be free
to live their lives in freedom and
dignity."
HIAS is the international
migration agency of the organized
Jewish community. HIAS is a
beneficiary of the UJA of Greater
New York and Jewish federations
across the country.
"What
other coffee
would I
choose?"
<**


r_ij_.. -ji 11 iftoc/mi- ?__J-l m ...! o .> r.
._J T..1|--------_j
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Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3-B
<
4 Injured By
Bomb Explosion
In K. Shemona
By Hash Orfri
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
Katyusha rocket exploded in a
school yard in Kiryat Shemona
recently slightly injuring three
students and a teacher. Shorty
afterwards, Israel Air Force iets
bombed two targets in Sidon,
south Lebanon, said to be installa-
tions of the Palestinian Liberation
Organization. Beirut radio said six
Israeli planes carried out the raid,
which lasted 15 minutes and caus-
ed heavy casualties.
The 122 mm. rocket struck the
school yard at 9:30 a.m. local time.
Two of the injured were hit by fly-
ing glass and two others were
hurt in a stampede to air raid
shelters. Order was quickly
restored and within an hour after
the attack youngsters were kick-
ing a football over and around the
crater left by the rocket in the
schoolyard.
Although casualties were minor,
they were the first casualties in
Kiryat Shemona since Israel in-
vaded Lebanon in June 1982 with
Premier Menachem Begin's
assurance that rockets will never
again fall in Galilee. The town has
been hit by rockets numerous
times since then but no one was
hurt until now.
An Israel Defense Force
spokesman said the targets for
the retaliatory air raid were Sidon
headquarters of El Fatah, the
PLO's terrorist branch, located in
the Miamia refugee camp and a
tented PLO training area south of
the camp. All Israeli aircraft
returned safely to their bases, the
spokesman said.
New Robot to
Aid Bomb
Disposal Unit
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel
has developed a lightweight, easi-
ly portable robot that can lift and
examine suspicious-looking ob-
jects and safely detonate bombs at
long range. Called Bambi, it was
recently unveiled by the police
bomb disposal unit. It is the first
such device made in Israel and has
promising export possibilities.
The Tel-Aviv-based Sivan Cen-
tury 21 Co. which manufactures
the Bambi hopes to sell it abroad
for $20,000 each, half the price
Israel pays for the much heavier,
more cumbersome bomb-disposal
robots it now imports from Bri-
tain and Ireland.
According to Yehuda Shalom,
an engineer who helped design
Bambi, it will make the larger im-
ported machines obsolete. Shlomo
Aharonishky, chief of the bomb
disposal unit described the 70-kilo
remote controlled robot as "uni-
que" to Israel's needs. It can be
transported in a pick-up truck or
station wagon. In contrast to the
Irish-made Golem robot which re-
quires a special vehicle with a
ramp, Bambi can be lifted easily
by two men.
It can climb a flight of stairs,
cross crevasses 20 centimeters
deep and is controlled by radio
signals, obviating the need for
cables that are part of the im-
ported models. It greatly reduces
the dangers and stress faced by
police sappers, Aharonishky said.
Bomb disposal police can guide
it by closed circuit television from
the safety of their vans. The robot
carries an automatic rifle sighted
by its own built-in television
system, which explodes bombs at
a safe distance. Aharonishky
hopes to supply every bomb
disposal unit in the country with a
model. "It all depends on our
budget," he said.
Refusenik News
CHAN A NEPOMNIASHCHY and her daughter, IDA
(YEHUDIT) LEVIN, were both given permission to visit their
imprisoned husbands in January. Before their visits, however,
they were both warned by the authorities to cease their
"propaganda" about the mistreatment of their husbands in the
labor camps. YAKOV LEVIN is being pressured into making a
public confession of his guilt. Yakov and his father-in-law, MARK
NEPOMNIASHCHY, are both serving three year sentences for
allegedly "Defaming the Soviet State." Yakov's prison address
is: g. Dzerzhinsk 2, YU. E 312/2 A-16, Donnetakaya Oblast
343550, Ukrainian SSR, USSR. Mark's prison address is: OU -
85/8 2/22, Simferopol 333000, Krimskaya Oblast, Ukrainian SSR,
USSR. Write to Chana and Ida at: Gagarina 16/4/5, Odessa 39,
Ukrainian SSR, USSR.
IDA NUDEL is being followed by the KGB constantly, 24 hours
a day. She fears that she will suffer a nervous breakdown because
of this. Her friends in Moscow have decided that she is in such a
deep state of depression that they will be sending someone to be
with her every month. From Bendery, where Ida lives in virtual
exile, she sent a desperate letter to the authorities appealing to
them to allow her to leave the Soviet Union by the time the Com-
munist Party Conference which opened at the end of February.
Please send letters of support to Ida at: Ul. Sovietakaya 69/2,
Bendery 278100, Moldavian SSR, USSR.
ALEXANDER PARITSKY suffered a serious heart attakc
earlier this month. He is feeling better now but because of his
heart problems, Alexander has not worked for more than two
months. He appealed to the head of the Kharkov OVIR, Davidov,
referring to Gorbachev's statement about the 10-year wait.
Davidov answered cynically, that Paritaky's turn to leave "did
not come yet." Send get well wishes to Alexander at: Tankopiya
19/2/48, Kharkov 310091, Ukrainian SSR, USSR.
SHABBAT BREAK-IN On Shabbat, Jan. 17, in the city of
Razlie, 35 kilometers from Leningrad, the police raided a home.
Four young men and three young women had come to the home of
one member of the group in order to celebrate the Shabbat. (Only
one of the group, Maria Dobrosina, is a refusenik but it seems that
all seven are connected in some way with LEONID ROCHLIN or
his wife, Olga.) Seven plainclothesmen and one uniformed man
burst into the apartment and demanded to see their documents.
Even though five of them had documents, they were all forcibly
taken to the district police station. They were not even allowed
time to put on their outer garments, despite below zero
temperatures. Two boys were punched and a number of threats
made. They were all interrogated and the authorities demanded
to be told with whom they were studying religious matters. They
were asked, "Who does the commentaries on the Pentateuch
and don't try to conceal anything. Your Elimelech (meaning
Rochlin) already told us all. Think about the health of your
mother; think about your university." The sue who came from
Leningrad were released late at night but the seventh, a young
girl from another city, was kept until the morning. The other six
waited for her outside, despite the cold. One of them, Ilya
Dworkin, had been taken in his slippers and the others had to
wrap his feet with scarves while they waited. The same day as the
raid, LEONID ROCHLIN and his wife were called in for an inter-
rogation regarding the case of Vladimir Lifshitz.
We have recently learned from a letter written by MIKHAIL
SALMAN that one of the young women at the Shabbat gathering
was his sister. In January, Mikhail, a 29-year-old former medical
student, was once again refused permission to emigrate to Israel.
He first applied for an exit visa eight years ago. His address is:
Moskovsky Pr. 4/15, Leningrad 190031, RSFSR, USSR.
TROUBLE IN TBILISI According to ISAIGOLDSHTEIN,
the Ashkenazi Synagogue in Tbilisi will be bulldozed and a square
or park will be put in its place. As of January 1986, the City OVIR
office in Tbilisi is closed. The State OVIR office for the Georgian
SSR is "effectively closed." Only tourists are being processed
through this office.
LEONID (ARI) VOLVOVSKY, computer scientist, Hebrew
teacher and Prisoner of Zion, was sent on Jan. 17 to Yakutsk
Oblast in northwestern Siberia, where he will serve a three-year
sentence for allegedly "Defaming the Soviet State." His wife,
MILA, is entitled to a meeting with him but in order to get to the
camp, she has to fly out of Moscow. The authorities in Gorky will
not allow her to leave. Write letters of support to Mila at: Krilova
14A/115, Gorky, RSFSR, USSR.
BATSHEVA YELISTRATOV is still not well but her weight
has stabilized. She has a small benign tumor. It is imperative that
Batsheva and her husband, VIKTOR, receive messages of sup-
port. Their address is: Cherkizovskay Bolskaya Vfe/50, Moscow
107061, RSFSR, USSR.
ROALI) (ALEC) ZELICHENOK is in the prison hospital and
will be there for at least a month due to intestinal bleeding.
(Soviet authorities claim that the bleeding has now been stopped.)
After receiving the news, his wife, GALINA, went to the Medical
Department of the Ministry of Interior Affairs. She was told that
documents had already been prepared for his transfer to another
camp because he had been brought by mistake to the camp where
he is now. Galina gave a written appeal to the governing Board of
the Corrective Labor Institution to demand it postpone moving
Alec as she is sure that it would result in his death. She stressed
that Alec should be hospitalized and be given a salt-free diet.
Galina recently received two letters from her husband. Send ap-
peals to: Sergei Burenkov, Minister of Health, 3 Rakhmanovsky
Pereulok, Moscow, RSFSR, USSR and Mr. Romanov, Head of the
Department of Health, Ministry of the Interior, Raspletina St. 26,
Moscow, RSFSR, USSR. Galina's address is: Nab. Krpovky
19/56, Leningrad 197022, RSFSR, USSR.
ZACHAR ZUNSHAIN has written to his wife, TATIANA,
that there are anti-Semitic activities in his prison unit. He said
that he cannot tolerate these activities and indicated that he will
go on a hunger strike in protest. Tatiana held an international
hunger strike on March 6, the second anniversary of Zachar's ar-
rest. Zachar's prison address is: Angarsk, Institution U.K. 272/2,
Irkutsk Region 665800, RSFSR, USSR. Tatiana's address is:
Lenina 11%2, Riga 226001, Latvian SSR, USSR.
LEV AND INNA GTOLDFARB (Moscow) and their two
children emigrated from the USSR in mid-January and are now in
the United States.
ISAI AND GRIGORY GOLDSHTEIN (Tbilisi) are expected to
receive permission to leave the Soviet Union. Recently, the
brothers, their mother, and Isai's family (his wife, Elizaveta, son,
Avi, and his mother-in-law) were on a list of families Senator Ed-
ward Kennedy submitted to Gorbachev during a visit to Moscow
last month. Also included on the list was the GENFAN FAMILY
of Moscow.
YAKOV AND POLINA GORODETSKY (Leningrad) and their
daughter, Elena, arrived in Israel on Feb. 2.
BORIS KALENDAROV (Leningrad) has received an exit visa.
He is waiting for his International Passport. He will now, hopeful-
ly, be reunited with his American wife who lives in Israel. Boris'
parents were not given permission to leave.
ALEKSANDER KHOLMIANSKY was released from prison
on Feb, 4 and is now back in Moscow with his family.
YAKOV AND MARINA MESH (Odessa) and their son, Marat,
left the USSR on Jan. 24. On Feb. 26, they are expected to arrive
in the United States where both Yakov's and Marina's parents
live.
The Puritan Oil Difference.
It's Clear!
Leading Vegetable Oil.
More saturated and other fats.
Frozen to -4f. and partially thawed.
Many health experts recommend lowering the
saturated fat in our diets. So it's important to know
Puritan has less saturated fat than the leading
vegetable oil.
Pui
Lesssatural
Frozen to -4F. and partially thawed.
To prove this, both oils were frozen, then thawed.
The other brand is cloudy, in part because it has
more saturated and other fats. Puritan has less of
these fats. So the difference is dear.

Puritan Oil. Low in saturated fat
J


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Phi Beta Tomatoes, Melons Grown in Israe
By BUI Clark
UJA Press Service
BEERSHEBA, ISRAEL A
new tomato landed in the Big Ap-
ple last winter, and New York
shoppers found it plumper, redder
and more delicious than anything
else in the supermarket. The im-
port came all the way from here,
in Israel's Negev Desert.
That tomato represented a ma-
jor accomplishment for the Jewish
Agency's Rural Settlement
Department because it proved a
very important point. Not only is
Israel capable of self-sufficiency in
agriculture, but a large surplus
can be grown economically and
shipped half way around the world
to compete in one of the world's
toughest markets.
"Research and development is
the key," said Benjamin Hofshi,
chief of the department's Unit for
Marketing Research, which is
funded mainly by the United
Jewish Appeal/Federation Cam-
paign. "We've got to keep produc-
ing new varieties with higher
quality at competitive prices.
We've got to keep ahead of the
competition."
Israel sold 1,500 tons of
tomatoes to New Yorkers last
winter because, Hofshi said,
"They're fresher and they're
tastier."
Israel produces fresher and
tastier tomatoes because the
Jewish State commits a tremen-
dous amount of its brain-power
resources to agricultural science.
Botanists like Beersheba's Dr.
Dov Pasternak have discovered
techniques to irrigate crops with
the Negev's abundant salty water
aquifer, 15 billion cubic meter pro-
ven reserves. They've discovered
how to dissolve fertilizers and
pesticides into a farm's irrigation
water, and then pipe the enriched
fluid through a computer-
controlled drip irrigation system
that applies to each plant precise-
ly what it needs for optimum
growth. And then they discovered
how genetic engineering can give
a plant a much greater "shelf life"
so it can be shipped economical-
ly by sea and still arrive in a New
York market fresher and tastier
than tomatoes picked in a Florida
hot house the day before and ship-
ped north on an overnight train.
Research has also yielded unex-
pected benefits. Israeli scientists
have found that plants, just like
people and animals, produce more
sugar under stress and salty
water irrigation puts plants under
stress. The extra sugars go right
into the fruit and unlock even bet-
ter natural flavors.
"There's one particular type of
melon, called Even-Kay, which
gross very well in the Negev," Dr.
Pasternak said. "And we've found
that when we irrigate it properly
with salty water, it becomes much
sweeter and tastier than usual."
Selling tomatoes and melons to
new Jewish communities in the
underpopulated Negev. Further-
more, Hofshi adds, the exports br-
ing in more foreign currency and
this helps Israel's hard-pressed
economy. And techniques learned
here can be shared with drought-
stricken parts of Africa, Asia and
Latin America where mass star-
vation is a constant danger.
Using UJA/Federation Cam-
paign funds, the Unit for
Marketing Research has created a
sophisticated infrastructure in
Israel for the systematic coordina-
tion of local high-technology
agriculture with foreign market
demands. This year, Israeli
growers are exporting 2.5 million
flower bulbs because they are
virus-free, and those from their
main competitors, the
Netherlands and Japan, aren't.
Europeans now eat a better quali-
ty iceberg lettuce in the winter
when they import Israeli-grown
varieties, than they do in the sum-
mer when they eat their own.
Israel's new "Yarden" and
"Gamla" fine wines which
entered the vinters' marketplace
last year, have competed suc-
cessfully against traditional high-
quality and high-priced
foreign vintages. A half-million
bottles were quickly sold and a
larger volume is being prepared
for the coming season. Perfect
Israeli roses are now air-freighted
to every continent. Those roses
are perfect because they are
grown under perfect conditions in
newly-designed, high-tech
greenhouses which maintain
computer-precise climate control
without buring a drop of fuel or
using a spark of electricity.
New Yorkers who were pleased
with last winter's new Israeli
tomato can expect a new innova-
tion next winter. The garden pro-
duct is still under wraps, but at
least we can let its name out of the
bag. This culinary delight will be
called "Goldie" and it will come in
cartons labeled "Grown in
Israel."
1%
** j \
*v
V .
i --V
-

\* 1
TOMATOES "TAM" is Hebrew for
"taste," and it deliriously describes the
tomatoes grown in greenhouses in Israel's
Negev Desert thanks to American
Jewish aid through the United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation Campaign. Israel's
agricultural genius has made it possible for
plump, red tomatoes to be grown in desert
hot houses, such as this one in Moshav
Talmei Yosef near the Esrvntian border,
and have them delivered fresh to the U.S.
UJA Press Service Photo.
Modern Hassidic, Israeli Concert to
Feature Joel Sharabi, Country Yossi
New Party Shaping Up
By David Landau
JERUSALEM (JTA) Yosef
Lapid, a senior editor of the daily
Maariv, has been named
Secretary General of the newly
formed Liberal Center Party. He
was appointed by the party's unof-
ficial leadership Mayor Shlomo
Lehat of Tel Aviv, Leon Dulzin,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization and Jewish Agency
Executives, and Yitzhak Berman,
a former Speaker of the Knesset.
The Liberal Center Party was
founded several months ago by
disaffected members of the
Liberal Party wing of Likud. It
will hold internal elections soon.
Lapid retired last year after a
five-year term as Director
General of the Israel Broad-
casting Authority, which runs the
country's radio and television. He
has long been a senior staffer at
Maariv, where he wrote food and
travel columns.
Politically he is considered to
the right of center. On the ques-
tion of the future of the ad-
ministered territories, he said the
Liberal Center platform wants
"what most Israelis want: a solu-
tion that avoids the twin dangers
of a binational state and a security
risk."
An evening of Hassidic music
starring the Israeli and interna-
tionally acclaimed singer Joel
Sharabi and also featuring the
Jewish Western stars. Country
Yossi and the Shteeble Hoppers,
is set for Sunday evening, April
27, at 8:15 p.m. at the Diplomat
Hotel, 3515 South Ocean Drive in
Hollywood. Also featured will be
the Neginah Orchestra.
The concert will be the first of
its kind ever in the history of
Broward County.
Sharabi is a dynamic young
"Sabra" who enchants his au-
dience with his delightful per-
sonality and singing. A multi-
talented performer, he plays the
guitar, tambor and two chalils at
the same time.
Country Yossi and the Shteebel
Hoppers are making their in-
novative mark in the Jewish world
of music. They have produced four
highly popular records in the last
four years. Their creative songs
reflect many facets of the Jewish
experience, and provides excep-
tional entertainment to the hun-
dreds of crowds that they play for
across the U.S.A.
Sponsored by Congregation
Levi Yitzchok-Luhavitch and
Chabad of Broward. the concert is
expected to draw from com-
munities all over Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach counties.
Tickets will be available the
evening of the concert at the
Diplomat Hotel box office. Ad-
vance ticket sales are avilable at
Judaica Enterprises, 1074 NE,
163rd St., North Miami Beach;
Sarah's Pizza, 2214 NE 123rd St.,
North Miami; Torah Treasures,
1309 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach; National Hebrew Israeli
Gift, 1507 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach; Embassy 41
Delicatessen, 534 41 St.; Embassy
Peking, 1417 Washington Ave..
Miami Beach. In Broward, tickets
will be available at the Emh,
North Steakhouse, and Kezreh
Kosher Meat Market both at 1025
East Hallandale Beach Blvd.,
Congregation Levi Yitzchok-
Lubavitch, 1295 East Hallandale
Beach Blvd. in Hallandale;
Arnee's Kosher Restaurant, 1814
Harrison St., Hollywood; Masada
Imports, 8277 W Sunrise Blvd. in
Plantation; and Masada Imports.
7050 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Boca
Raton.
One can also order tickets at all
Select-a-Seat outlets including
Jordan Marsh. To charge by
phone call in Dade 625-5100, and
in Broward 462-7900.
Tickets range in price from $14.
$17 and $20. For more informa-
tion and reservations as well as
group rates call in Broward
458-1877, and in Dade 531-8145.
If s been an honor
and a pleasure for generations.

m m\-
[CimTl
FISH
LXJ
Manisctiewitz
.PASSOVER:; f^ATZOS
; i iSti'iii-iiiHiliiiliilt'fifiitiiiltiiiiiiiii !i!:!iii,i!ii .hiililil )t j. u
sa Manisctiewitz. ^
t */ QUALITY JEWISH FOOT*. SlfT* QUAUTY JEWISH FOOOS SINCE 5649
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision g
For Kashruth Certificate write
Board ot Rabbis PO Bo 214 Jersey City NJ 07303
1HMH


Friday Aoril 11 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HollvwooH Paw 7-R
Friday, April 11, 1986/The^Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5-B
4,000 Celebrate Purim at Young Circle
A tremendous turnout of some
4,000 men, women and children
took part in a unique ceremony
honoring the Rambam
(Maimonides) last month at
Hollywood's Young Circle Band-
shell. The ceremony coincided
with the fourth annual South
Florida Purim Festival sponsored
by Congregation Levi Yitzchok-
Lubavitch in Hallandale and
Chabad of South Broward. The
event has become Florida's
largest public celebration of the
holiday of Purim.
The evening opened with the
reading of an inspirational Purim
letter written by the Lubavitcher
Rebbe, Shlitah, Rabbi Menachem
M. Schneerson. Rabbi Raphael
Tennehaus, coordinator of the
community celebration, then call-
ed upon Rabbi Leib Schapiro,
dean of the Rabbinical College of
Greater Miami.
Rabbi Schapiro delivered the
formal conclusion and commence-
ment of Maimonides' Mishna
Torah, the classic, all encompass-
ing Code of Jewish Law that is be-
ing studied, in its entirety, for the
third consecutive year, by Jews
throughout the world on a daily
basis.
"This project", remarked Rabbi
Schapiro, "of studying Rambam
daily, as suggested by the
Lubavitcher Rebbe, applies to
men, women and even children.
No doubt that such studies will
raise the moral and ethical stan-
dard of living in this and all
communities."
Joining Rabbis Schapiro and
Tennenhaus on the dais for the
Maimonides celebration were the
following city, county and state
leaders: Then Mayor David
Keating of Hollywood along with
Commissioners Suzanne Gunz-
burger and Guy Roper; Mayor
Sam Waterman of Hallandale
along with Commissioners Nat
Cutler and PhU Cohen; Broward
Countv Commissioner Nicki
Grossman; and State Represen-
tative Irma Rochlin who brought
greetings from Gov. Bob Graham
to mark this occasion.
Both the cities of Hollywood and
Hallandale, as well as the county
of Broward, issued proclamations
that call for "A Month To Educate
The Young The Elderly And The
General Population." The month
began Thursday, March 20, and
will conclude with Sunday, April
20. On the Hebrew calendar, the
month began with the ninth of
Adar Sheni and will conclude with
the eleventh of Nissan.
County Commissioner Nicki
Grossman, who was the featured
guest speaker at the recent Con-
gregation Levi Yitzchok-
Lubavitch dinner, praised the
work of Lubavitch as being so uni-
que and meaningful to this and all
Jewish Communities. She em-
phasized the innovative educa-
tional projects sponsored by
Lubavitch that literally unites
Jews from various backgrounds.
A touching moment during the
festivities came when Rabbi Ten-
nenhaus presented the outgoing
mayor of the city of Hollywood
with a beautiful plaque in ap-
preciation of the mayors' devotion
to goodness and G-dliness. A long-
time good friend and supporter of
the Jewish people and Israel,
Mayor Keating, after 25 years in
city hall, performed his last formal
act as mayor when he presented
the Education Proclamation to
Rabbi Tennenhaus. It was an emo-
tional moment, and the audience
extended to the cherished mayor a
well deserved standing ovation.
Every dignitary was presented
with a brief biography describing
Maimonides, the giant amongst
Jewish and universal scolars.
Music was provided by the Dov
Litwin Orchestra. Cantor Yitz-
chok Rosenberg led in the singing
of cantonal, Yiddish and tradi-
tional Purim favorites. Hundreds
in the audience joined in the lively,
Not since the asking of the Four Questions
has something so tiny made it so big.
It's Tetley s tiny little tea leaves. They ve been making it big in
Jewish homes for years. Tetley knows that just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same thing is
true for tea leaves So for rich, refreshing flavor, take time out
for Tetley tea. Because tiny is tastier!
Tins* Ml for
Kosher fof Passover
.tea
"Tin* la imnlirr-:
Hassidic dancing.
Highlighting the entertainment
was the performance of the world
reknowned Jewish humorist Emil
Cohen, who brought joy to the
overflow crowd with his classic
style of wit. storytelling and
humor.
Several hundred children were
called up on stage to recite Torah
passages. Many of the boys and
girls were dressed as traditional
Purim characters, while others
went with more of the modern
look. They were met on stage with
the beloved TV characters such as
Big Bird, The Cookie (Homen-
tashen) Monster and others. All
the children received colorful
Purim boxes that included
Hamentashen, raisens, candy and
pennies that were to be given to
charity on Purim day.
At the end of the program, 70
valuable prizes were handed out
to lucky winners in the audience.
In addition to the good time had
by all, many reports of people who
were inspired that evening to take
upon themselves one extra Mitz-
vah (good deed), including the
study of Rambams' teachings can
be heard in South Florida by dial-
ing a toll free number. Many
Syangogues and centers in South
Florida offer daily Rambam
classes, including Congregation
Levi Yitzchok-Lubavitch in
Hallandale. For further informa-
tion on studying Ramabm daily in
South Florida phone 458-1877.


PURIM Kids enjoyed the festive atmosphere of Purim at
Young Circle where more than 4,000 people turned out to
celebrate. The festive occasion was sponsored by Congrega-
tion Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch.
I

PURIM FESTIVAL Former Mayor David Keating, left, in
his last official Bet, received a plaque from Rabbi Raphael
Tennenhaus, right, for his friendship to the Jewish communi-
ty. Keating attended the Purim festival at Young Circle last
month.
MM,
II
A fruitful Passover.
m _________. m. .-i~. Dormer \t\ rirtirim k it's Kosher for
ThK vear eniov Brevers yoqurt during Passover. It's delicious, it's Kosher for
r^o^S-SSnSSfS fruit than Dannon. More stra^rr^nme
Sa^rv rnore blueberries in the blueberry, and more peach rithe peach
Sh^Srtry^veSfttht fulM-fruit yogurt So go ahead, use the coupon.
andse^ u-----.-^. aw* Rouoon. No ExotratJOO Data 7 O /2
f20 I
Manufacture* Coupon. No Expiation Oat*
Save 20< when you buy two
8 os. cups of BREYERS yogurt.
(Any flavor.)
mmtSn Kr.fl. mc (Dairy Group) w* raT*ura. you^L"^^^*?!
tt*. coupon plu. t tobmrnw) tn compMnc. ""* "??*5oup0n
RadampMon Pottcy. pravtouary pro-
vtdad to ratallar and mcorporatad by
rafcranca naram. VWd whara taxad.
raatrtctad or prontbrtad Car. vatu.
VOOc. For radamptlon. ma* to Kran,
loc (DairyGroup). TO Box 179a. canton.
low. 52734.
#



Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Israel Bonds Notebook
South Broward
Rabbis
"Nothing equals the effect of
actually visiting Israel in
strengthening Jewish identifica-
tion" was the statement of Prime
Minister Shimon Peres at the Con-
ference on Tourism, held in Israel
in March, and attended by Rabbis
from United States and Canada.
At a meeting of the Rabbinical
Council, Rabbi Carl Klein, one of
the more than 200 Rabbis that at-
tended the Conference in Israel,
reported on the proceedings. A
group of local Rabbis attended the
Rabbinical Council, and the
following South Broward Rabbis
announced plans for their trips to
Israel.
Rabbi Samuel Jaffe, Temple
Beth El, 920-8225, May 18-June 1.
Rabbi Robert Frazin, Temple
Solel, 989-0205, June 18-July 2.
'Rabbi Klein, Hallandale
Jewish Center. 454-9100, June
23-July 7.
Rabbi Morton Malavsky, Tem-
ple Beth Shalom, 981-6111, June
23-July 7.
Rabbi Robert Greenspon, Tem-
ple Beth Emet, 431-3638, June
27-July 13.
"Capital For Israel"
Arthur Joseph of Teaneck,
New Jersey, who is prominent in
many Jewish communal
endeavors, has been named chair-
man of the Board of Capital for
Israel, an affiliate of the State of
Israel Bond Organization.
In this position, Joseph will lead
a special effort to increase sales of
the Bond Organization's various
Israel Government securities in
the American business world.
A key leader in the Bond
Organization for many years,
Joseph is also a director of the
Development Corporation for
Israel, the corporate entity of
Israel Bonds and a member of its
Executive Committee.
For the Bond campaign, he is
serving as national chairman for
Commerce and Industry and has
served as National Cash Collec-
tions Chairman, National
Reinvestment chairman as well as
chairman of the Fruit and Pro-
duce Industry Division campaign.
Joseph's activities reflect a deep
commitment to the Jewish com-
munity. He holds or has held
leadership roles in efforts for
Israel, education, philanthropy
and health. He is president of the
New Jersey Association of Jewish
2 Jews Elected
Mayors in
South Africa
JOHANNESBURG (JTA)-
Two leading Jewish political
figures have been elected mayors
of Johannesburg and Sand ton.
Prof. Harold Rudolph, 38, serv-
ed for 14 years on the Johan-
nesburg City Council before being
inducted as the city's mayor last
month. Rudolph, who is associate
professor at the Wits University
School of Law, is an active
Rotarian, past chairperson of the
Emmarentia Hebrew Congrega-
tion, and vice chairperson of the
Transvaal Council of the Jewish
Board t* Deputies.
Haw .^dea-Shochet, 52, has
been aandton town councillor
for almost nine years before tak-
ing on the duties of mayor this
month. She was the town's
Mayoress as the wife of the late
Morris Egdes, Sandton's mayor in
1973. She was also the first
woman to be elected to the town's
management committee.
MOONLIGHT MADNESS
At the First Annual North
Dade/Broward New Leader-
ship Moonlight Madness Af-
fair, Diane Gorfinkel was the
winner of the free trip to
Israel. Congratulating her
was previous winner Eileen
Ginzberg. From left, are: Dr.
Mario Ginzberg, Mrs. Eileen
Ginzberg, Mrs. Diane Gor-
finkel and Marcos Gorfinkel.
Federations, serves on the Board
of Governors of the Wurzweiler
School of Social Work and is presi-
dent of the Bergen Jewish News.
Israel Bond 35th
Anniversary
Conference
More than 400 Jewish leaders
representing 86 communities in
16 countries, including the United
States, Canada, Europe and Latin
America, arrived in Israel last
month to take part in week-long
International Israel Bond 35th
Anniversary Conference in Israel.
The international gathering com-
pleted plans for the Bond
Organization's expanded 1986
campaign for a substantial in-
crease in its results this year.
In 1986, the Bond Organization
mobilized a record $505 million in
loan funds for Israel's economic
development, which was an in-
crease of $91 million over 1984,
and was its best achievement in its
35-year history with the exception
of the Yom Kippur War year of
1973.
The conference delegates were
led by David B. Hermelin of
Detroit, internation campaign
chairman of Israel Bonds, and
Brig. Gen. (Res.) Yehudah
Halevy, world-wide president and
chief executive office of Israel
Bonds.
In the announcement of the con-
ference, General Halevy said: "At
a time when Israel has experienc-
ed a decline in tourism, we of the
Israel Bond Organization are pro-
ud to bring 400 of our top leaders
to Israel to demonstrate our
solidarity and to lay the ground
work for repeating, and hopefully
increasing, our 1985 achievement
as Israel moves forward with its
impressive economic recovery
program."
BROTHERHOOD LUNCHEON From left sitting, Rabbi
Robert Frazin, president of the Inter-Faith Council of
Hollywood; Rev Charles Bergstrom, Lutheran Council in the
USA Office for Governmental Affairs; and Rev. Paul
Kirsch of St. John's Lutheran Church are seen here at the re-
cent Brotherhood Luncheon. From left standing Jack Ber-
man, member of CRC; Rabbi Harold Richter, director of
chaplaincy at the Federation and executive secretary-
treasurer for Inter-Faith; Melissa Martin, director of CRC;
then-Hollywood Mayor David Keating; and Rev. Paul
Winters, Hollywood Hills United Methodist Church.
99
"Share A Seder
If you would wish to invite someone who does
not have a Seder to your home or if you
would like to be invited to a Seder, please call
Corrine Hirsch 989-2387
or
Rabbi Harold Richter 921-8810
Chaplaincy Committee
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Start a tasteful tradition. Make your
knaidlach with G. Washington's
Seasoning and Broth.
*k*^Mtanu' r a,, s.i,-,. w- make knaidlach that are different
'' >* Inwin ,rom a" 0,her knaidlacn *lln
'i nmm ,ww" G Washington s Seasoning and
^JMK Bro(h Q Wash(ngIon s IS more
[ J&- &(L^Cn&nZ than a flavor enhancer
' fftffftAifll It's a complete seasoning
Ifj tSAaoMww^**0 Theuniquebtenti ofnerbsand
spices flavors your knaidlach in
more ways than one
Serve knaidlach made with
G Washington's and hear your
guests sing their praises'
5 packets G Washington s
Golden Seasoning and Broto
dash pepper
G. WASHINGTON'S
KNAIDLACH 'flKft
2 tegs, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
Vi cup matzah meal
t quart boiling water
Mix eggs, oil 1 packet G Washington s and pepper Gradually add matzah meal,
stirring until thick Refrigerate 20 minutes m covered bowl Form dough into 8
balls Add remaining 4 packets G Washington s to boiling water stir Drop mat-
zah balls into broth, simmer 30 minutes Makes 8 matzah balls
K Certified Kosher for Passover m Specially Marked Packages
Why Are These
Birds Eye Vegetables
Different From All Others?
Small Whole Onions
Cauliflower (box & bag)
Chopped Spinach
Leaf Spinach
Cooked Squash
Small Whole Onions
Whole Baby Carrots
Whole Strawberries
Red Raspberries in lite syrup
Strawberries in lite syrup
Because they're Kosher for Passover.
While most of our delicious fruits and
vegetables are Kosher and marked with a K,
these Birds Eye products are also Kosher
for Passover. However, they have no special
marking to let you know.

Certified by Rabbi J.H. Ralbag
So if you want to make sure the Birds Eye
products you're buying are Kosher
for Passover, be sure to clip this ad
and take it with you when you're
shopping.
glWeOentlFoodtCocpwhon


Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7-B
Finnish Official Offers to | The Name of the Game is PACs
Help Israeli-Soviet Ties
By Gil Sedan
JERUSALEM (JTA) Foreign
Minister Paavo Matti Vaeyrynen
of Finland recently ended a three-
day official visit to Israel with an
offer to convey to Moscow Israel's
desire to improve relations with
the Soviet Union and to have
emigration restrictions eased for
Soviet Jews seeking exit visas to
go to Israel.
The Finnish Embassy in Tel
Aviv has represented Soviet in-
terests here since Moscow broke
diplomatic relations with Israel
after the 1967 Six-Day War.
Finland maintains close relations
with the superpower on its
eastern border.
Vaeyrynen is the first Finnish
Foreign Minister to visit Israel
and, following his meeting with
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
the Foreign Ministry announced
that Shamir has accepted an in-
vitation to visit Finland "in the
near future." No date was
announced.
Israel and Finland have sharp
policy differences over the Middle
East conflict. Vaeyrynen stressed
to reporters here that his country
supports an independent Palesti-
nian state and inclusion of the
Palestine Liberation Organization
in Middle East peace talks.
Finland, nevertheless, is in-
terested in improving relations
with Israel.
Vaeyrynen and Shamir discuss-
ed the situation in south Lebanon
where Finland provides a con-
tingent to the United Nations In-
terim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL).
The two men differed over the
UN force. Shamir maintained it
was "highly inefficient," whereas
his guest saw UNIFIL as carrying
out an important function. He
spoke of Finland's support for the
"territorial integrity of Lebanon,
an implied criticism of Israel's
continuing, though limited
presence in south Lebanon.
PRESIDENTIAL TOWER From left, Dr. Howard Barron,
campaign chairman; Alex Goldberger, chairman; Gus Lipps,
co-chairman; Gil Elan, guest speaker; and Evelyn Richman,
co-chairman are seen here at a recent UJA/Federation
breakfast.
HEMISPHERES From left standing, Morrie Rosenthal,
co-chairan; Jack Udis, co-chairman; Charles Pollack, chair-
man; Sumner G. Kaye, executive director of the Federation;
and Morse Engelman, co-chairman are seen here at a recent
UJA/Federation breakfast. From left sitting, Sadie Levinson,
co-chairman; Lila Brecker, co-chairman; Mary Lipschutz, co-
chairman; and Ada Engelman are seen here at a recent
UJA/Federation breakfast.
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By David Friedman
WASHINGTON (JTA) While a debate con-
tinues in the American Jewish community whether
it is wise to be perceived as a single-issue com-
munity, political action committees (PACs) formed
to ensure continued support for Israel are expan-
ding rapidly.
A recent report by Common Cause, the citizen's
advocacy group, asserts that "the pro-Israel
PACs' contributions may well have been the
fastest growing of all interested groups during the
past five years," increasing their contributions
between the 1980 and 1984 elections by nine times
as compared to a doubling by all PACs during the
same period. Since 1961, 65 pro-Israel PACs htve
contributed $6,120,713 to candidates for the
Senate and the House.
In 1985, the pro-Israel PACs gave Congressional
candidates $853,520, according to Common Cause.
The top recipient was Sen. Robert Kasten (R.,
Wise.), chairman of the Senate Appropriations
Subcommittee on Foreign Operations, who receiv-
ed $107,600 in 1985. He was followed by Sen.
Arlen Specter (R., Pa.), a subcommittee member,
$70,375; and Sen. Alan Cranston (D., Cal.), a
member of the Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, $57,250. All three face tough re-election cam-
paigns this year.
The report shows that five other Senators, who
are either on the Foreign Operations Subcommit-
tee or the Foreign Relations Committee and are
seeking re-election received large contributions
last year.
They are Daniel Inouye (D., Hawaii), $29,050;
Christopher Dodd (D., Conn.) $28,250; Alfonse
D'Amato (R., N.Y.), $28,250; Frank Murkowsi (R.,
Alaska) $8,000; and Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.)
$3,500.
Common Cause also points to contributions in
1985 to members of the House Foreign Affairs
Committee. They are Reps. Lawrence Smith (D.,
Fla.) $15,000; Lee Hamilton (D., Ind.) $11,800;
John McCain (R. Ariz.) $11,000; Sam Gejdensen
(D., Conn.) $9,250; Harry Reid (D., Nev.) $6,000;
and Mark Siljander (R., Mich.) $5,000.
Those who received contributions from pro-
Israel PACs do not always win. Of the 10 can-
didates receiving the most funds from 1981
through 1984, four were defeated, including the
second highest recipient, James Hunt, who was
defeated by Sen. Jesse Helsm (R., N.C.) in 1984.
In the House, eight of the top recipients for the
same period are still in Congress. But the top reci-
pient, Rep. Clarence Long (D., Md.), who was
chairman of the House Appropriations Subcom-
mittee on Foreign Operations, was defeated in
1984 by his Republican opponent, Helen Bentley.
Common Cause also found that 18 pro-Israel
PACs contributed more than $100,000 for the five-
year period through 1985. Leading them all was
the Washington-based National PAC with
$1,352,000.
Common Cause president Fred Werthetmer, in
commenting on his organization's report, said it
"provides a classic case study of the PAC problem
in our political system the proliferation of PACs,
the increase of PAC dollars, the concentration of
interest group money in key Congressional com-
mittees, and the single-minded focus of PAC-
giving."
Richard Altman, head of the National PAC, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that the Common
Cause report made him "proud" that so many sup-
porters of Israel were willing to respond in the
same way their fellow Americans supported issues
important to them.
Altman noted that NatPAC was created not to
support PACs but to stand by those who reflect the
belief that the survival of Israel is important to the
United States.
There are many in the Jewish community who
believe, along with Common Cause, that PACs
pose a danger to the political system. But as long
as PACs exist, there is no reason why supporters
of Israel should not make their influences felt just
as every other interest group does.
Critics of pro-Israel PACs point to the part they
played in the defeat of Sen. Charles Percy (R., 111.)
in 1984 and Rep. Paul Findley (R., 111.) in 1982. But
they fail to mention that these two candidates
received large contributions from oil companies,
companies that do business in the Arab countries
and others who want the U.S. commitment to
Israel lessened. Should Israel's supporters leave
the field open to them? This is a question frequent-
ly posed.
Some Jews argue that the community should not
be viewed as a single-issue oriented and as
evidence of this point to the formation of the Il-
linois Multi-Issue PAC. This is all to the good, but
it is still important to focus attention on the
American Jewish commitment to Israel. After all,
it is pointed out, Jews who contribute to pro-Israel
PACs can still contribute to other PACs that sup-
port the many other issues with which American
Jews are concerned.
Whether one likes it or not, PACs are the
political game in the U.S. today. Jews and other
supporters of Israel cannot be criticized for play-
ing it just as everybody else does.
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Maimonides Subject of Stamp Salute
This past year has seen nine
post offices from around the world
release special postage stamps
and souvenir sheets to com-
memorate the 850th birth an-
niversary of the famous Jewish
philosopher and physician
Maimonides (1135-1204.)
Maimonides, whose real name
was Rabbi Moses ben Maimon (or
the Rambam), was born in Cor-
doba, an important city in
southern Spain on the day before
the Jewish festival of Passover in
the year 1135.
Throughout the world, his
reputation as an outstanding
religious leader, physician,
philosopher and scholar is now
recognized. He is best known as
the author of "Guide for the
Perplexed," a major work not just
in Jewish writing, but also in
world literature and religion, in-
fluencing the philosophy of
Judaism, Islam and Christianity.
The book reconciles reason with
faith, giving rational interpreta-
tions to numerous Biblical con-
cepts. Because of his immense
contributions to Jewish
theological philosophy, it was said
of the Rambam shortly after his
death:
"From Moses (the Law giver) to
Moses (Maimonides, the Law in-
terpreter), there has arose none
like Moses (Maimonides.")
Post offices in South America,
Africa and the Caribbean have all
participated in the recent
philatelic salute in honor of the
850th birth anniversary of
Maimonides.
The first to issue a series of
stamps for the Rambam was An-
tigua & Barbuda, a former British
colony in the Leeward chain of the
West Indies. The Caribbean na-
tion issued a $2 stamp and $5
souvenir sheet featuring
Maimonides' portrait on June 17,
Historic Event
Almost Goes
Unnoticed
By David Friedman
WASHINGTON (JTA) Last
month the seventh anniversary of
the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty
almost went unnoticed.
But Israeli Ambassador Meir
Rosenne reminded guests at an
Israeli Embassy reception for
visiting Tourism Minister
Avraham Sharir that it was on
March 26. 1979 that the treaty
was signed in Washington by
then-Israeli Premier Menachem
Begin and Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat.
While the treaty has not
brought about the full normaliza-
tion of relations the Israelis ex-
pected in 1979, Rosenne stressed
that for the last seven years no
soldier has been killed on either
side of the Egyptian-Israeli line.
Sharir, who spent most of
Wednesday discussing means of
increasing American tourism to
Israel with United States govern-
ment officials, conceded that the
recent terrorist incidents in the
Middle East have cut tourism to
Israel.
But he stressed the need not to
give in to terrorism and said
Israelis were ready to welcome
thousands and even millions of
American tourists with "open
arms." To help facilitate increas-
ed tourism, the Ministry of
Tourism is opening an office at the
Embassy here.
1985.
The Republic of Guinea, a
former French colony in West
Africa, released an interesting 7
Syli stamp and 7 Syli souvenir
sheet. They pictured Maimonides
when a young man of 13, being
forced to flee with the other Jews
of Cordoba in the aftermath of the
town's conquest by a band of
fanatical Moslems.
In the foreground of the stamp
is another portrait of the famed
Jewish philosopher as he appeared
in later life. At the bottom of the
souvenir sheet is an illustration of
a rabbi reading from a Torah
scroll to a group of young Jewish
orphans in the State of Israel
today.
The artwork on the Guinea
souvenir sheet would appear to
serve as an effective contrast by
showing the enduring strength of
the Jewish faith over the centuries
despite the outbreak of major
persecutions against the Jews in
various Gentile-dominated lands.
Fiver other nations
Dominica, Grenada, the Grenada
Grenadines, Lesotho and Sierra
Leone have issued single
stamps bearing a portrait of the
Rambam and highlighting his im-
portant contributions in the field
of medicine.
Two more recent countries to
honor the legacy of Maimonides
on the occasion of his 850th birth
anniversary are the South
American republics of Paraguay
and Bolivia. Both issued special
souvenir sheets in rather limited
editions of just 5,000 copies.
In an attempt to satisfy the
strong interest of both stamp and
Judaica collectors, the Atlas
Stamp Company, 48 West 48th
Street, New York, NY 10036 has
designed a special stamp album to
house the new Maimonides stamp
issues.
In addition to the above men-
tioned sets released this past year,
the stamp album also includes
spaces for earlier stamps and
souvenir sheets issued in honor of
the Rambam bv Israel (1953),
Spain (1967) and Grenada (1971).
A complete Maimonides collec-
tion with every postage stamp or
souvenir sheet ever issued in
honor of Maimonides retails for
$69.50. The collection without the
scarce Bolivia and Paraguay
souvenir sheets retails for $42.50.
One can purchase the stamp
album alone for $10.
Shown above are examples of recent stamp issues com-
memorating: the 850th birthday of the medieval Jewish
philosopher Moses Maimonides.
where shopping is o pleasure 7 days o week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Out of the Ordinary
(Whole Cake)
Pina Colada
Cake
$4"
each
(Half Cake
... each $2.50)
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakerlee Only.
Plain or Seeded
Cinnamon
Raisin Rolls
$109
pko. |
(Buy one with each fWed S*H
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Available at All Pubix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
each
$159
Lemon Meringue Pie
A Great Value, Mini Powdered
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Prices Effective
April 10 thru 16.1986.
p.- v*
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Chocolate Chip
Cookies......................
dozen
$159
Homemade Goodness
Dinner Rolls...........:.12 tor 79*


Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 9-B
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siiKtiiiii-s subi\ i to lunge withmil notice


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Community Dateline
Miami Jewish Home
A year of festivities marking the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged's 40th Anniversary
will culminate in a lavish dinner
and dance. This gala event will
take place at the Pavilion Hotel on
April 19 at 7 p.m. More than 500
people are expected to attend this
dinner, chaired by MJHHA Chair-
man of the Board Judge Irving
Cypen and coordinated by Muriel
Rudolph and her committee.
Guests at the Anniversary Dinner
will dance the night away to the
music of Marshall Grant's
16-piece orchestra, feast on loin of
veal with all the trimmings, and
be entertained by a surprise
headliner.
In addition, the 40th Anniver-
sary Journal will be presented for
the first time, hot off the presses.
The Journal Committee, chaired
by Jacqueline Traurig, has compil-
ed the efforts of all of the Home's
auxiliaries and created a very
special memento of 40 years of
service to the elderly of South
Florida.
For further information on the
Miami Jewish Home's 40th An-
niversary Dinner/Dance, contact
Susan Holtzman at 751-8626.
Hillel
One student from Broward
Community College or Nova Col-
lege will be awarded a substantial
merit scholarship for study at an
Israeli university this coming year
as part of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation's new Israel Leader-
ship Training Program. This pro-
gram is being made possible
through the support of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel of Broward/Palm
Beach and the Hillel Foundations
of Florida.
The two-year program begins
with a subsidized year of study at
the Israeli university of the stu-
dent's choice (as part of that
school's regular program for
overseas students). During the
year abroad, under the auspices of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tions, the student will attend with
other American and Canadian IL-
TP participants a series of leader-
ship training seminars on campus
organizing, advocacy, and pro-
gramming techniques and attain
fundamental information about
Israel. Upon the student's return
10 their school, he/she will receive
an honorarium to promote study
in Israel programs, as part of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Broward/Palm
Beach Staff.
Nancy Tobin, director of the
Hillel for Broward/Palm Beach,
announced that any Jewish stu-
dent currently enrolled at a school
in our area is eligible to apply to
the Program, but preference will
be given to freshman and
sophmores. "The program is
designed to product- a cadre of
students across the country who
will promote, with an insider's
view, the value of studying in
Israel."
Students interested in applying
tor the Israel Leadership Training
Program can obtain more infor-
mation on the Program and its re-
quirements by contacting Nancy
Tobin, director of the B'nai B'rith
Hillel of Broward/Palm Beach at
652-5672 (please leave a message).
Florida Broward
County Region
Hadassah
A historic first took place in
Paris last month, when the
Hadassah Medical Relief Associa-
tion, Hadassah's new interna-
tional organization convened its
first Conference from fur con-
tinents. Bernice Tannenbaum,
former National President of
Hadassah announced that the
Conference was a great step in
promoting the goals of HMRA to
improve the quality of life in Israel
through education and fund-
raising. Mrs. Tannenbaum is the
first chairman of this Interna-
tional Association. Haddasah
Medical Relief Association is uni-
que in both its origin and struc-
ture which enables it to play a
pivotal role in both Israel and
home countries. Today there are
groups in Israel, Lusanne,
Switzerland, France, Spain,
Malta, Gibraltar, Austria,
Belgium, Great Britain, Germany,
Luxembourg, Finland, the Carib-
bean, Brazil, Argentina and
Uruguay. The overall structure of
HMRA permits a constant high-
level exchange between profes-
sionals and lay persons,
sometimes involving formal
medical study and exchange pro-
grams between the doctors and
personnel of the Hadassah
Medical Organizations with doc-
tors, visitors and students of coun-
tries where HMRA has emerged.
Some countries have even gone
beyond the general support of
HMRA operations to adopt spon-
sorship of HMO (Hadassah
Medical Organization) programs
or projects. Currently these
special commitments include
France's support of pioneer work
in ophthalmology; Argentine's
work in bone-marrow transplant,
and Hadassah-Israel's activities in
the Pediatric Department.
Frist Biohazard
Unit at Hadassah
Hadassah's Medical Center in
Jerusalem has just established the
first Biohazard Unit in Israel for
the preparation of dangerous
cytotoxic drugs used in treatment
of cancer or leukemia, reported
Fanny E. Katz, public relations of-
ficer for the Florida Broward
County Region Hadassah. It is the
first unit of its kind in the Middle
East and one of the few in ex-
istence throughout the world. The
unit was established to eliminate
the serious dangers inherent in
preparing the cytotoxic drugs for
patient use. The unit is located in
the Sharett Institute of Oncology
and is part of the Pharmaceutical
Department. Yaacov Katz, phar-
macist, an emigre to Israel nine
years ago, is in charge of the unit.
His assitant is Emilio Robello, a
new immigrant from Italy. Both
men underwent training in the
operation of the three-room unit
with its special elevator, sealed
preparation unit and dispatch and
protective "space suits."
Hadassah Medical Center is the
largest medical' facility between
Rome and Tokyo, and is the
Mideast's pacesetter in healing,
teaching and research, supported
by Hadassah's 385,000 members
in the United "States."
Brandeis Women
On Thursday, April 17, the
Greater Hollywood Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee will install
new officers at a gala luncheon,
preceded by a sherry hour at
11:20 a.m., in the Emerald Hills
Country Club. The new Mayor of
Hollywood, Mara Giulianti, will be
the guest speaker. The new slate
of officers will be installed by Jay
Coral, president's councillor and
national chairman of leadership
development. The slate is headed
by President Hannah Margulis,
Vice Presidents Sydelle Silver,
Tess Goldman, and Hannah
Rubin, Recording Secretary
Florence Newman, Correspon-
ding Secretary Roselyn. Financial
Secretary Shirley Bergman, and
Treasurer Ethel Edelman.
Sophie Bobb, outgoing presi-
dent, will preside at the luncheon-
meeting, and she will review the
achievements of the chapter this
year. The entertainment will be
introduced by Reba Oppenheim,
luncheon chairman. Lee Barry,
brilliant baritone, with accompani-
ment on the piano will perform.
Tickets for the luncheon are $18,
reservations to be made with
Reba Oppenheim, 989-6221, 3850
Washington St., No. 915,
Hollywood, FL 33021, and Anne
Baizerman, 458-0523, 1817 S.
Ocean Dr. Hallandale, 33009. If
ordering by mail, a self-addressed
stamped envelope would be ap-
preciated. It is suggested that
tickets be bought early to ensure
seating with friends.
B'nai B'rith
Installation at
Emerald Hills
Marking the seventh year since
its inception, the Emerald Hills
Lodge of B'nai B'rith recently
celebrated its installation
ceremony of its Board of Direc-
tors and Officers with 200 people
attending. The gala event took
place at the Emerald Hills Coun-
try Club in Hollywood.
Ben Rosenberg, president
emeritus, was the Installation Of-
ficer. Don Gustin is the new presi-
dent of this active group which
has raised funds for community
service, for youth activities, for
help for the elderly, and has
distinguished itself as the leading
fundraiser of all Florida B'nai
B'rith Lodges for the Anti-
Defamation League.
Stanley Bernstein and Colonel
Martin Oster are the vice-
presidents. Other officers are
Harry Swartzman, recording
secretary; Nat Jacobson,
treasurer; and Malcolm Feldman,
financial secretary.
President Don Gustin outlined a
program which calls for increased
membership, with an accent on
youth oriented activities. Par-
ticipation by local young people in
the upcoming Maccabean Games
is part of his agenda.
JESNA
NEW YORK Dr. Leora W.
Isaacs has been named Research
and Evaluation Consultant of the
Jewish Education Service of
North America, Inc. (JESNA), an-
nounced JESNA President Mark
E. Schlussel of Detroit. She will
formally assume the position in
September. The appointment of
Dr. Isaacs signals the reactivation
of the research component of
JESNA's activities and was made
possible through funding by the
agency's recently formed Leader-
ship Cabinet.
Dr. Isaacs is currently a
Research Specialist for the Jewish
Communal Affairs Department of
the American Jewish Committee
in New York, as well as a teacher
and co-administrator of the
Hebrew High School of Temple
Sholom in Bridgewater, NJ. She
earned her bachelor's in
psychology at the University of
Michigan, summa cum laude, and
her doctorate in educational
psychology at the City University
of New York.
Dr. Isaacs was previously assis-
tant professor and chairperson of
the Department of Psychology at
the College of St. Elizabeth in
Convent Station, NJ and has
taught at Middlesex County Col-
lege, Edison, NJ; Mercer County
College, Clinton, NJ; Trenton
State College, Trenton, NJ: and
Queens College, NY. She has also
been involved in Jewish teacher
training and has given workshops
for the Boards of Jewish Educa-
tion in Boston and New York, the
Principals' Cooperative of Central
New Jersey and the Coalition of
Alternatives in Jewish Education
(CAJE).
A prolific author, Dr. Isaacs has
published papers in a variety of
psychological journals as well as
co-authored My Own Jewish Holi-

It couldn't be anything
but Maxwell House:
DMMIMCnMp
J^Good to the Last Drop4
K GwtHtad Kmhw
..





iv Book of Feelings, to be
lublished by KATV and The
\ewish Grandparent'8 Book of
femories, to be published by
lason Aronson and distributed by
Icribner's.
Dr. Leora Isaacs resides in
ridgewater, NJ with her hus-
ind, a congregational rabbi, and
ro children.
IJESNA, is the central coor-
dinating service agency for
(cwish education in North
jmerica. It delivers a broad range
services and information
esources in: Local Jewish com-
munities, working with central
jencies for Jewish education,
federations and schools; across
he North American continent, in
^operation with national agen-
jes, denominational bodies and
wernmental agencies; and inter-
ationally, as liaison with Israeli
istitutions and other world
:'wish organizations.
South Broward
Technion
The South Broward Chapter of
Ihe American Society for Tech-
lion, Women's Division, will hold
closing meeting of the season
>n Monday, April 21, at noon,
}alahad North, 3001 South Ocean
)rive, Hollywood.
The program will be a luncheon
knd card party. Donation: $7.
wr prizes. Please come for a
fonderful afternoon.
Bnai Zion
Bnai Zion Southeast Region will
lold its next Executive Board
leeting on Monday, April 21, at
7:30 p.m. at Sunrise Savings and
...;m. 1110 East Hallandale
ieach Blvd., in Hallandale, an-
nounced Regional President Ar-
Jthur Y. Klein. The guest speaker
|s Rabbi Kurt F. Stone of Tamarac
Jewish Center. The meeting is
apen to the public. For further in-
formation, phone the Bnai Zion
legional office, 456-1999.
Bnai Zion
The Chapter's next scheduled
social and Card Party is on Sun-
lay, April 13, at 1 p.m. at the
Surfside Holiday Inn, 8701 Collins
We., Miami Beach. Coffee and
ke served. Proceeds to Bnai
ion Homes for Retarded
)hildren, Beit Halochem
tehabilitaion Centers for Disabl-
Israeli War Veterans, and
Haifa Medical Center. Call for in-
formation, 935-2093 (Dade) or
)56-3749 (Broward).
Zionist
Professionals
BALTIMORE The second
iionist Professionals Conference
ittracted more than 65 executive
find field directors, as well as
pther professionals, from Zionist
organizations throughout the
Jnited States and Canada, in a
tiree-day conference March 30
irough April 1. They discussed
ie role of the professionals in the
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North American Zionist
organizations.
The conference was chaired by
Shoshanna Ebstein, executive
director of Na'amat USA, and
was coordinated by the American
Zionist Federation, which has
among its constituent organiza-
tions, the American Zionist Youth
Council, the American Jewish
League, Americans for a Pro-
gressive Israel, Amit Women,
Association of Reform Zionists of
America, Bnai Zion, Emunah,
Hadassah, Herut Zionists of
America, Labor Zionist Alliance,
Mercaz, Na'amat USA, North
American Aliyah Movement,
Religious Zionists of America,
Zionist Organization of America,
and the Zionist Student Move-
ment. Together, these organiza-
tions represent more than a
million registered Zionists.
The participants attended
plenary sessions on such subjects
as "Becoming Better Profes-
sionals: How to make your
organization work for you," and
conducted panels on "Perceptions
of North American Zionism" en-
titled, "How Do We See
Ourselves? How Do Others See
Us?" They also conducted
workshops on "Staff Supervision
and Intra-staff Relations," "Time
Management," and "Utilizing
Computer Technology." They
were introduced to new program
resources and screened video
cassette, on the history, structure
and functions of the World Zionist
Organization and the Jewish
Agency.
A major concern of the con-
ference was preparations for the
Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11-B
forthcoming Zionist Congress
which will take place in Jerusalem
next year. The professionals ex-
changed views and information as
they mobilized for membership
drives in their respective
organizations in advance of the
Congress.
Aging Network
Conference
The Fifth Annual Broward Ag
ing Network Conference will be
held Thursday-Friday, May 1-2, at
Broward Community College's
Central Campus in Davie.
Registration for the conference is
$12 per person. Lunch is available
at $4 per lunch per person each
day. A total of $20 covers
registration and lunch for both
days.
A wide variety of sessions is be-
ing planned for this year's con-
ference. Some of the sessions in-
clude: Pet Therapy, Sex and the
Elderly, Alzheimer's Disease,
Home Care for the Aging, Living
for Wellness, Making the Best of
Retirement Years, You and the
Media, Elderly Abuse, and Legal
Issues. A special plenary will be
devoted to Stress A Problem
for All Ages. Over 40 sessions will
be set for the conference. More
details regarding other sessions
will be sent to registered con-
ferees before May 1.
The 1986 conference is being
sponsored by the Area Agency on
Aging, the Elderly Interst Fund,
Broward Community College,
Florida Power and Light and the
Florida Council on Aging.
We invite you to join us for the
biggest and best conference in our
five-year history! For more infor-
mation, please call 485-6370.

BODY HEAT Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute
of Technology's Faculty of Mechanical Engineering are stu-
dying the biomedical effects of body heat transfer. Their
research will aid in the development of temperature-
controlled clothing, i. e., air-conditioned space suits and
watercooled helmets for pilots.
is Passover.
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Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Israeli-Greek Full Diplomatic Ties Are On Hold
By Judith Kohn
WASHINGTON (JTA) When
Spain established diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel in January there
was eager speculation that a
similarly long-awaited move from
Athens would follow. The expec-
tations were heightened by a four-
day meeting in Greece between
Foreign Minister Karlos
Papoulias and David Kimche,
Director-General of Israel's
Foreign Ministry.
Then, like a bucket of cold water
dispassionately overturned on a
barely rekindled flame, came the
news from Belgrade, where the
visiting Papoulias gave an inter-
view to Greek journalists: Athens
will stick by its "political prin-
ciples," he told the journalists.
Formal diplomatic relations are,
for now at least, out of the
question.
The unequivocal negative
stance of Papoulias left disap-
pointment and puzzlement in its
wake, especially since relations
had appeared to be warming up
between the two countries.
Greece has all the components of
an Embassy in Tel Aviv. The only
real difference is that they fail to
add up to an Embassy, calling
itself instead a "diplomatic
representation."
Turkey, on the other hand, has
an Embassy, but recently moved
more closely into line with other
Moslem states by lowering its
diplomatic representation to the
level of Second Secretary, and
thus stripping the formal
representation of its substance.
Concern about economic sanc-
tions from Arab states and possi-
ble terrorist attacks against
Spaniards at home and abroad had
long delayed Madrid's decision to
establish relations with Israel.
But once the move was taken by
Spain, a recently-admitted
member of the European
Economic Community (EEC),
which had made recognition of
Israel one of the conditions for
Spanish membership, the simple
step from de facto to de jure
recognition of Israel by Greece
another EEC member would
have hardly appeared a dramatic
break with past policy, according
to advocates of Greek recognition
of Israel.
"It's ridiculous." said Joseph
Lovinger, veteran leader of
Greek's tiny Jewish community,
of his country's failure to come
through after Spain made the
move.
Lovinger. who was recently
here on one of his frequent visits
to the United States, said that
before the Papoulias statement he
had predicted to a U.S. Senator
here that formal recognition
would come about under the
leadership of Prime Minister An-
dreas Papandreou.
But a relatively new and other-
wise unrelated concern of Athens
has worked its way into the issue,
according to Lovinger, by adding
to his country's sense of
vulnerability to possible Arab
sanctions.
The issue is the Greek-Turkish
conflict over the island of Cyprus.
The conflict provided a new chip
for Arab states seeking to
dissuade Greek recognition of
Israel, according to Lovinger,
when the Turkish Republic of Nor-
thern Cyprus was established in
1983.
The only country to recognize
the new secessionist state was
Turkey, and the U.S. has been
among those applying diplomatic
6res8ure to dissuade other
[oslem states from following
suit.
But Lovinger said that Greek
officials had told him of concern
that if Athens were to establish
full diplomatic relations with
Israel, Arab countries would
retaliate by recognizing the
Turkish republic in Cyprus. This,
Lovinger told the JTA, was a chief
source of Athens' refusal to
change its policy.
Lovinger suggested that his
government's policy on Israel
might change if Papandreou
moves closer to the center of the
political spectrum in Greece, as he
predicts he will over the next cou-
ple of years. Fear of its isolation in
a region that is becoming increas-
ingly Islamic in character, Lov-
inger said, will naturally push
Greece and Israel closer together.
In the meantime, Greece has ex-
tended an official invitation to
Israel's Tourism Minister,
Avraham Sharir, to visit Greece,
Kimche announced during his visit
there. Sharir would be the first
Israeli Minister to be hosted by
Greece in more than 20 years.
But formal recognition by
Greece remains contingent on its
longstanding conditions that ap-
pear to have little chance of being
met any time soon: the total
withdrawal of Israeli troops-from
territory occupied in 1967, and the
commencement of negotiations
between all parties concerned to
find a just and permanent solution
to the Middle East problem, in-
cluding the Palestinian issue.
On his 18th year as leader of the
Greek Jewish community, Lov-
inger said that irrespective of
disappointment on the recognition
issue, Jews in Greece who now
number some 6,000, over half of
them residing in Athens had
few grievances as Jews.
The appearance of a swastika
"here and there," or an occasional
rabid article from fringe group
newspapers, are a fact of life, but
no more, no less than in other
countries where Jews reside, he
noted.
"Where is there not anti-
Semitism?" asked Lovinger, a
native of Hungary who made his
way to Greece after fleeing a
feared Nazi takeover in 1933. The
now-retired pharmacist said he
was eventually taken by the Nazis
in 1944, but escaned after 20
hours, fleeing on a journey that
took him to Aleppo, Beirut and
Israel, where he stayed for 15
months.
Lovinger, who makes frequent
trips to Israel as well as to the
U.S., where his son and his family
reside, said that the commitment
of the Greek Jewish community to
Israel and Zionism did not make
the country's Jews especially
vulnerable to charges of "dual
loyalty."
"We are married with Greece.
But our mother is Israel. And you
must not forget your mother,"
Lovinger said.
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Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 13-B
U.S. Jews Need to Help Spanish-Israeli Ties
By Marc Tanenbaum
NEW YORK (JTA) On Mon-
day, Jan. 13, my Spanish-speaking
colleague, Jacobo Kovadloff, and I
sat in the office of Ambassador
Manuel Sassot, Consul General of
Spain, discussing the status of the
much-reported plan of the Spanish
government to establish
diplomatic relations with Israel.
While the conversation was warm
and friendly, we told the Am-
bassador that many in the
American Jewish community
were becoming frustrated over
the repeated promises to Jewish
leaders by Spanish officials that
diplomatic ties would soon be
established, but that for more
than a year nothing has happened.
Ambassador Sassot, who
formerly directed the Middle East
desk of the, Spanish Foreign
Ministry, sat back in his chair, and
declared firmly, "I cantell you
now that the decision has been
taken. I have just spoken with our
Foreign Ministry in Madrid, and it
will happen within the next
weeks."
Last month, Spain and Israel
exchanged diplomatic formalities
in The Netherlands when Prime
Minister Felipe Gonzalez and
Premier Shimon Peres, who are
personal friends, met in The
Hague. That development rightly
deserves to be characterized as
"historic." But there ought not to
be any euphoria, for a rocky road
lies ahead with the Arab world.
The rockier that road becomes the
more important will be the role of
American Jewry in helping sus-
tain Spain's rightful decision.
Spain has been subjected to in-
tense pressures from the Arab
League and its member-states
threatening reprisals were
Spanish-Israeli diplomatic accords
realized. The ugliness of that
pressure is reflected in a Spanish-
language publication ittiftdat the
Saudi Embassy in Madrid which
declared, "Do you want to
establish relations with a racist,
fascist and terrorist state?"
But more serious than the pro-
paganda warfare carried out
against Spain by Arab nations is
the brute fact that the Arab world
has become one of the largest
buyers of Spanish-made weapons.
In the first three quarters of 1983,
Spain exported $2.5 billion in
goods to the Arab world while
total imports came to $5.2 billion,
mostly in oil.
Saudi Arabia currently buys
$150 million in Spanish arms an-
nually, and Madrid is seeking to
increase that to $250 million by
the end of next year. Kuwait,
Saudi Arabia, and Libya are the
major Arab investors in Spain,
with large holdings in real estate,
housing, and tourist-related in-
dustries. Spanish exports to Arab
countries include steel, trucks,
heavy machinery, chemicals, and
increasingly, military hardware.
In contrast, trade between
Spain and Israel is relatively in-
significant. Indeed, they are com-
petitors in the world market for
the sale of oranges and other
fruits and vegetables. However,
technical and cultural ties have
been steadily increasing. Israeli
water experts have been called in-
to Spain's southernmost region to
help solve the crippling drought
problem there. Last year, Iberia
and El Al signed an agreement
launching direct flights between
the two countries.
While Felipe Gonzalez is known
to be a genuine friend of Israel's,
it is realistic Jo expect that Arab
pressures, especially economic
leverage, will force him con-
tinuously to make gestures to the
Arab world. Thus, in a letter he
wrote to the Arab League on
April 25, 1985, he assured the
Arab government that not only
will Spain's gesture not entail sup-
port of Israel's policy, but that it
may, in fact, benefit Arab
interests.
But American Jews have an im-
portant role to play in helping
counterbalance these inevitable
Arab pressures against Spain in
the months ahead. Spain has gone
through a decade of industrial
crisis as a result of the 1973
OPEC-induced oil crisis. The of-
ficial unemployment rate is
around 2.9 million, or almost 22
percent of the available work
force, the highest rate in Western
Europe.
While Gonzalez's government
has made significant strides in
lowering inflation and the trade
deficit, Spain is in urgent need of
major investments in industry and
technology, as well as in increased
trade and commerce.
As is the case with West and
East European governments
which have sought American
understanding and support, Spain
very much needs the sympathetic
interest of American Jews in help-
ing to promote increased com-
merical ties between the United
States and Spain.
Spanish Embassy officials have
freely volunteered that American
tourism is one of the largest pro-
ducers of much-needed foreign
currency, and thev are aware that
American Jews are among the
largest groups of tourists to
Spain.
Beyond the natural interest of
American Jews in wanting to
assure the strengthening of
Spanish-Israeli diplomatic and
other human contacts, Jews have
a profound interest as Americans
in helping sustain the democratic
institutions and values that have
emerged out of the darkness of
Franco Spain just some 12 years
ago. Those democratic com-
mitments, as well as Spain's re-
cent firm opposition to terrorism,
deserve to place Spain high on the
foreign policy agenda of American
Jewry.
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"THIS TIME OF YEAR,
THE RABBI'S
EVEN MORE DEMANDING
THAN 1 AM."

MY COTTAGE CHEESE AND SOUR CREAM
ARE KOSHER FOR PASSOVER.
When it comes to making the most delicious sour cream and
cottage cheese, I'm very demanding. That's why my sour cream is so
thick and my cottage cheese is so creamy. In fact, I prepare them so
carefully, at Passover even the rabbi approves.
u KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
1


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Temple Update
Hallandale Jewish
Center
Dr. Carl Klein, rabbi of the
Hallandale Jewish Center, in ac-
cordance with a request from the
Ministry of Tourism of the
Government of the State of Israel,
is planning a two-week group tour
to Israel leaving on Monday, June
23.
As an experienced world
traveler, Rabbi Klein has led
numerous group tours to Israel,
and his contacts with the top
echelon of Israel's political leader-
ship will provide opportunities for
the group to meet with Israeli
government leaders.
Departing from Miami on June
23, the group will arrive in Tel
Aviv on June 24 and spend June
25-28 in Jerusalem. Staying at the
Plaza Hotel and using it as its
base, the group will take City and
outside-of-the-City excursions. Tel
Aviv will be explored on June
29-30 and on July 1-2 in Haifa, and
sites on Environ will be visited.
July 3-4 will be spent in Beer-
sheba, capital of the Negev, retur-
ning to Tel Aviv on July 4 to spend
the Sabbath. The tour departs on
Sunday, July 6 for New York/Fort
Lauderdale.
This year a special treat is in
store for those joining the Rabbi's
tour. The Rabbi and Mrs. Klein
will be participating in the gradua-
tion ceremonies of the Bar-Ilan
University, on which occasion a
Chair on Rabbinic Judaism will be
dedicated to them. The group will,
of course, be included in the clos-
ing ceremonies and invited to the
gala banquet that follows.
Those interested in joining Rab-
bi Klein on this tour to Israel
should contact the Rabbi at
454-9100, 456-6966, or Olympia
Tours at 925-8221.
Passover Holiday
Schedule
Wednesday, April 23, Min-
chah/Maariv services for Eve of
Passover at 6:30 p.m., to be
followed by Seder in the Social
Hall at 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 24, First Day of
Passover, services at 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi's sermon topic: Enslave-
ment and Freedom.
Minchah/Maariv at 6:30 p.m., to
be followed by second Seder in the
Social Hall at 7 p.m.
Friday, April 25, Second Day of
Passover, services at 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi's sermon topic: Freedom
Must be Deserved. Min-
chah/Maariv at 7 p.m.
Saturday, April 26, Shabbat
Choi Hamo'ed, 8:45 a.m. Rabbi's
sermon topic: Man Facing G-d.
Tuesday, April 29, Eve of the
Seventh Day of Passover at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, April 30, Seventh
Day of Passover, services at 8:45
a.m. Rabbi's sermon topic: The
Splitting of the Red Sea. Min-
chah/Maariv at 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 1, Eighth Day of
Passover, services at 8:45 a.m.
Yiskor Memorial Services at 10:30
a.m. Rabbi's sermon topic:
Remembering the Past by Living
in the Future.
Seders are by reservation only.
Call 454-9100.
Temple Beth Ahm
Services continue on Saturday
at 8:45 a.m.
Sabbath Services will be Friday,
April 11, at 8 p.m. with Rabbi
Avraham Kapnek officiating and
Cantor Stuart Kanas chanting the
Liturgy.
Services continue on Saturday,
April 12, at 8:45 a.m. with the Bar
Mitzvah of Aaron Lewis Mills son
of Stuart and Carol Mills. Special
guests will include grandparents,
Harold and Norma Frimowitz and
Morris and Helen Mills.
ECP/PTO will have their An-
nual Penny Cup Auction on Thurs-
day, April 17, at 8 p.m.
Sabbath Services will be held
5%^,
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Mature singles and adults gather at
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Contact Mrs. Irene Unterman (305) 735-6456
or Toll Free (800) 431-7681
Friday, April 18, at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Kapnek officiatiing and
Cantor Kanas chanting the
Liturgy. Our Religious School will
participate in services in honor of
Family Shabbat.
Services continue on Saturday,
April 19, at 8:45 a.m.
Saturday evening, April 19, at
8:30 p.m. The Temple will run a
Bon Voyage Party and pick the
winning Kattle tor a Cruise for
two. Donation is $18 per person.
Dancing, Buffet Dinner will be
served.
Temple Beth El
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe will be
leading of Temple's Annual
Pilgrimage to Israel, departing on
May 18 and returning on June 1.
It will be a two-week, all-
inclusive and fully escorted tour
with three nights in Tel Aviv, a
one night experience in a Kibbutz,
two nights in Tiberias, two nights
at the Dead Sea with therapeutic
health bathing, and five nights in
Jerusalem.
All hotels are deluxe accom-
modations, with breakfast and
dinner daily. There will be three
lunches and three evenings out,
including an Israeli night club and
the Sound and Light Show. In ad-
dition to the regular itinerary of
all the historic and important
modern sights throughout the
country, there will be special
events which have always made
our Congregational trips so uni-
que and worthwhile.
The total price of the tour is
$2,099 per person, double oc-
cupancy. For further information,
please call Evelyn at the Temple
office 920-8225 or 944-7773.
Temple Beth Shalom
Beth Shalom's religious school
is now accepting early registra-
tion for the school year 1986-87.
For the first time, registrations
are being accepted for locations at
1400 N. 46 Ave. as well as Beth
Shalom West, University Drive
and Stirling Road. Classes offered
are: Sunday school, 5, 6, 7 years
old; Hebrew school classes (after
public school), grades 3-7; Judaica
school classes of pre-confirmation
and confirmation, grades 8, 9,10;
college accredited post-
confirmation. Enroll now for all
fall classes at main religious
school office, Monday through
Thursday, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Bruce
Richman is principal of the
religious school.
Weekend services will be held in
the main sanctuary at Temple
Beth Shalom, 1400 North 46 Ave.,
conducted by Dr. Morton Malav-
sky, rabbi, assisted by Cantor Irv-
ing Gold, changing the liturgy. An
early service will be held at 6:15
p.m., Friday, April 11, followed by
the final Friday Night Shabbat
Dinner Club get together for this
season. Late service will not be
held that evening.
Service will begin at 9 a.m.,
Saturday, April 12. The Bar Mits-
vah will be celebrated during the
service of Daniel Mark Rubin, son
of Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Rubin,
who will sponsor the kiddush and
pulpit flowers, in honorofthe
occasion.
Temple Beth Shalom and Beth
Shalom Academy will hold their
annual scholarship ball on Sunday,
April 13, in the ballroom, with
cocktails at 6 p.m., followed by
dinner and dancing at 7 p.m.
Chairing the function is Dr. Fred
Blumenthal and assisting with ar-
rangements is Ellen Greenspoon
and her committee.
Call Temple office to reserve for
Beth Shalom's Annual Communi-
ty Passover Seders, to be held in
the ballroom at 6:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, April 23 and Thurs-
day, April 24, conducted by Dr.
Malavsky and Cantor Gold. Sylvia
S. Senick, executive secretary, is
handling reservations and table
arrangements. Call 981-6111 or
stop at Temple pffice for tickets
and information.
Beth Shalom will hold a blood
drive on Wednesday, April 16, 3
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The Memorial
Hospital bloodmobile unit will be
in the Temple's parking area for
blood donors. Call the Temple to
set appointment or just stop at the
bloodmobile unit on above date.
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Temple Israel
of Miramar
Friday evening services, April
11, will begin at 8 p.m. with Rabbi
Raphael C. Adler conducting and
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski chan-
ting the liturgy.
Randy Zinn, son of Mrs.
Jeanette Zinn of Hollywood, will
become a Bar Mitzvah at Sabbath
morning services beginning at
8:4b a.m. Rabbi Adler and Cantor
Wichelewski will officiate as Ran-
dy chants the Haftorah and ad-
dresses the congregation. Presen-
tations will be made to Randy by
an officer of the temple Board and
various auxiliary representatives.
The Kiddush will be sponsored by
the Zinn Family in honor of
Randy.
There will be a Men's Club
Breakfast Meeting on Sunday
morning at 9:30 a.m.
The semi-annual Congrega-
tional Meeting will take place at
the temple on Tuesday evening,
April 15 at 8 p.m. Election of of-
ficers and directors for the coming
year will take place at that time.
Friday Evening Services, April
18, will begin at 8 p.m. with Rabbi
Adler conducting and Cantor
Wichelewski chanting the liturgy.
The Cantor and Temple Israel
Choir will present "A Taste of
Passover," musical selections of
the" holiday season. Couples
celebrating anniversaries and
children celebrating birthdays
during the month of April will be
honored during the service.
Sabbath Morning Services will
liegin at 8:45 a.m. with Rabbi
Adler and Cantor Wichelewski of-
ficiating. Mr. Joseph Feller will
chant the Maftir.
The children of The Hyman
Drooker Religious School will par-
ticipate in a Model Seder on Sun-
day morning, April 20, from 10
a.m. until noon. Parents are in-
vited to attend.
The Siyum B'Chorim (for all
first born males) will take place on
Wednesday, April 23, at 8:30 a.m.
This will be followed by the last
hametz meal.
Erev First Day of Passover Ser-
vice will be held at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 23. This service
will be followed by the Congrega-
tional Seder at 7:30 p.m. Advance
reservations are required for at-
tending the Seder.
First Day of Passover Services
will begin at 8:45 a.m. on Thurs-
day, April 24. Services will again
be held at 6 p.m.
Second Day of Passover Ser-
vices will begin at 8:45 a.m. on
Friday, April 25.
Please call the temple office,
961-1700 for additional service in-
formation or inquiries regarding
membership and temple activities.
Temple Sinai
Friday evening services, April
11, begin at 8 p.m. in the main
sanctuary with Rabbi Richard J.
Margolis and Cantor Misha Alex-
androvich officiating. Saturday
morning, April 12, we will
celebrate the Bar Mitzvah of
Jacob Richardson, son of Michelle
Roberts. The pulpit flowers, Oneg
Shabbat and kiddush are being
sponsored by Mrs. Roberts, in
honor of her son's Bar Mitzvah.
Jacob is a 7th grade student at At-
tacks Middle School. He is in-
terested in sports, computers and
reading. He was a winner in the
school science fair, taking first
place in category and third place
in the overall fair. He also par-
ticipated in the county science
fair, winning third place in
category.
Sunday, April 13, the Men's
Club will hold their monthly
breakfast meeting at 9:30 a.m. in
the Lipman Youth Wing. An in-
teresting program is being
planned.
Friday evening, April 18, Shab-
bat services begin at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Margolis and Cantor Alex-
androvich officiating. Saturday
morning services begin at 9 a.m.
and all are welcome. The kiddush
will be co-sponsored by Milo and
Lillian Ginsburg, in honor of his
birthday, and by Joel and Blanche
Landres, in honor of his birthday.
Daily minyan services are at 8:25
a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sunday, April 20, the Paul B.
Anton Religious School will hold
its model seder at 10 a.m. in the
Haber Karp Hall, and in the even-
ing the annual meeting of the
Temple will take place at 8 p.m. at
that time, the election of the of-
ficers and board of governors will
be held.
Wednesday, April 23, the Siyum
B'Chorot, the service for the first
born, will be at 8:25 a.m. in the
Louis Zinn Chapel. Passover
begins with the First Seder
Wednesday, April 23, and con-
tinues through Thursday, May 1,
with fizkor Services at 10 a.m.
Temple Solel
Family night Shabbat worship
service will begin at 7:30 p.m.,
Friday, April 11. Rabbi Robert P.
Frazin will conduct the worship
service. Cantor Israel Rosen will
chant the liturgical portion of the
service.
The Oneg Shabbat following the
service will be hosted by Mr. and
Mrs. Alvin Magalnick in honor of
Risa Beth Cummings.
Shabbat morning worship ser-
vice will begin at 10:30 a.m.,
Saturday, April 12. During this
service Risa Beth Cummings,
daughter of Mrs. Michelle Cumm-
ings, will be called to the Torah to
become Bat Mitzvah.
Risa is in the 7th grade at Nova
Middle School and in the 7th
grade of the Abe and Grace Dur-
bin School of Living Judaism.
Enjoy A Strictly Kosher
SEDER
AT
Congregation Beth Kodesh
501 N.E. 26th Ave.,
Boyn ton Beach, FL.
Wednesday Evening
April 23,1986-7:00 p.m.
Per Person $28 Limited Seating
CALL:
737-2927
732-5147
737-9644
Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Young Israel
Young Israel of Hollywood-Ft.
Lauderdale Sisterhood is sponsor-
ing a Yom HaShoah Program,
commemorating those who died in
the Holocaust, on Monday even-
ing, May 5, 8:30 p.m. at the
Synagogue, 3291 Stirling Road.
Marilyn Klompus will be our guest
speaker. She will address the topic
' "Children of Survivors." A
short film "Ambulance" will be
shown, and a candle-lighting
ceremony is planned.
Refreshments will be served. This
program is opened to both men
and women, and the community is
invited to attend.
A Soviet Jewry Walk-a-thon is
scheduled for Sunday, May 18 at
10 a.m. Children, ages 5 and up
are encouraged to participate in
the walk. Certificates will be
issued to all participants, and
refreshments will be served along
the way. Julie Averbuch is the
chairperson of this event. Please
call 981-8569 to register your
child, or for more information on
how you can help.
Young Israel is pleased to an-
nounce the September opening of
its new Pre-School Program for
children Ages 2 and 3. Young
Israel is currently inteviewing
teachers for this 3 morning a
week position. If you are in-
terested, please call 966-7877.
Saturday morning services are
at 9 a.m. Services are also held
every weekday morning at 7:15
a.m. and in the evening 10
minutes before sunset. We
guarantee a minyan so that Kad-
dish may be said. Call the
synagogue office for exact times,
at 966-7877.
The Rabbi class on Shabbat is
one hour before Minchah.
PLACES IN THE HEART The Julius Silver Institute of
Biomedical Engineering at Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology has attracted international attention as an inter-
disciplinary nucleus for innovative research: a dynamic part-
nership between the varied branches of engineering, the
sciences, and medicine. Research at the Silver Institute's
Cardiac Center aims to design computerized three-
dimensional mechanical models to simulate and intensively
study the human heart to aid doctors in their treatment and
diagnosis of heart disease. The computer model can be pro-
grammed to reproduce different heart pathologies in an ac-
celerated time frame, giving doctors better insight into the
dynamics of the healthy and unhealthy heart. In the photo
above, a Technion student volunteer undergoes a "stress
test" to assist heart research efforts.
_ '
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i
MANISCHEWITZ WINE
At A Seder, The Wines Ait Never Questioned.
For generation*. Manuchcwit:
Wine ha heen a pan of the family
Seder And (< many, a Seder would
not he the umr without it
Made in accordance with strict
Orthodox rahhinic.il requirements.
Manischewit: Wine ha hecume a
tradition at the Passover tahle. admit
with the reading of the I lagjtadah,
the Kiddush and the Four Questions.
Manischewir: Without question,
the wine to serve tor Passover "

A Happy and Kosher I'eMch
hfanischeibitz^
rVdaudmllMltalvaa R.WiU I>ci4i' Sbw8 RjI+i.n4.iiR shir,.


Pagel6-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986



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Full Text
Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, April 11, 1986
Temple Update
. *
Hallandale Jewish
Center
Dr. Carl Klein, rabbi of the
Hallandale Jewish Center, in ac-
cordance with a request from the
Ministry of Tourism of the
Government of the State of Israel,
is planning a two-week group tour
to Israel leaving on Monday, June
23.
As an experienced world
traveler, Rabbi Klein has led
numerous group tours to Israel,
and his contacts with the top
echelon of Israel's political leader-
ship will provide opportunities for
the group to meet with Israeli
government leaders.
Departing from Miami on June
23, the group will arrive in Tel
Aviv on June 24 and spend June
25-28 in Jerusalem. Staying at the
Plaza Hotel and using it as its
base, the group will take City and
outside-of-the-City excursions. Tel
Aviv will be explored on June
29-30 and on July 1-2 in Haifa, and
sites on Environ will be visited.
July 3-4 will be spent in Beer-
sheba, capital of the Negev, retur-
ning to Tel Aviv on July 4 to spend
the Sabbath. The tour departs on
Sunday, July 6 for New York/Fort
Lauderdale.
This year a special treat is in
store for those joining the Rabbi's
tour. The Rabbi and Mrs. Klein
will be participating in the gradua-
tion ceremonies of the Bar-Ilan
University, on which occasion a
Chair on Rabbinic Judaism will be
dedicated to them. The group will,
of course, be included in the clos-
ing ceremonies and invited to the
gala banquet that follows.
Those interested in joining Rab-
bi Klein on this tour to Israel
should contact the Rabbi at
454-9100, 456-6966, or Olympia
Tours at 925-8221.
Passover Holiday
Schedule
Wednesday, April 23, Min-
chah/Maariv services for Eve of
Passover at 6:30 p.m., to be
followed by Seder in the Social
Hall at 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 24, First Day of
Passover, services at 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi's sermon topic: "Enslave-
ment and Freedom.
Minchah/Maariv at 6:30 p.m., to
be followed by second Seder in the
Social Hall at 7 p.m.
Friday, April 25, Second Day of
Passover, services at 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi's sermon topic: Freedom
Must be Deserved. Min-
chah/Maariv at 7 p.m.
Saturday, April 26, Shabbat
Choi Hamo'ed, 8:45 a.m. Rabbi's
sermon topic: Man Facing G-d.
Tuesday, April 29, Eve of the
Seventh Day of Passover at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, April 30, Seventh
Day of Passover, services at 8:45
a.m. Rabbi's sermon topic: The
Splitting of the Red Sea. Min-
chah/Maariv at 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 1, Eighth Day of
Passover, services at 8:45 a.m.
Yiskor Memorial Services at 10:30
a.m. Rabbi's sermon topic:
Remembering the Past by Living
in the Future.
Seders are by reservation only.
Call 454-9100.
Temple Beth Ahm
Services continue on Saturday
at 8:45 a.m.
Sabbath Services will be Friday,
April 11, at 8 p.m. with Rabbi
Avraham Kapnek officiating and
Cantor Stuart Kanas chanting the
Liturgy.
Services continue on Saturday,
April 12, at 8:45 a.m. with the Bar
Mitzvah of Aaron Lewis Mills son
of Stuart and Carol Mills. Special
guests will include grandparents,
Harold and Norma Frimowitz and
Morris and Helen Mills.
ECP/PTO will have their An-
nual Penny Cup Auction on Thurs-
day, April 17, at 8 p.m.
Sabbath Services will be held
Live a Jfctfef
Mature singles and adults gather at
The Granit every summer for the
time of their lives! There's every
sport, special entertainment,
wonderful dining and friendly
cocktail hours. There's also
hours of relaxing by the pool or
in the shade of our big willows.
Best of all. there's always
friends to share it with. And
everything happens in
the most beautiful
scenic setting.
It's the perfect'
place to live
it up!
WEEKLY RATES FOR 2 AND 3 MEAL PLANS AVAILABIf.
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THE
HOTEL ANO COUNTRY CLUB
Kerhonkton. New York 12446
Contact Mrs. Irene Unterman (305) 735-6456
or Toll Free (800) 431-7681
Friday, April 18, at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Kapnek officiating and
Cantor Kanas chanting the
Liturgy. Our Religious School will
participate in services in honor of
Family Shabbat.
Services continue on Saturday,
April 19, at 8:45 a.m.
Saturday evening, April 19, at
8:30 p.m. The Temple will run a
Bon Voyage Party and pick the
winning Kattle tor a Cruise for
two. Donation is $18 per person.
Dancing, Buffet Dinner will be
served.
Temple Beth El
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe will be
leading of Temple's Annual
Pilgrimage to Israel, departing on
May 18 and returning on June 1.
It will be a two-week, all-
inclusive and fully escorted tour
with three nights in Tel Aviv, a
one night experience in a Kibbutz,
two nights in Tiberias, two nights
at the Dead Sea with therapeutic
health bathing, and five nights in
Jerusalem.
All hotels are deluxe accom-
modations, with breakfast and
dinner daily. There will be three
lunches and three evenings out,
including an Israeli night club and
the Sound and Light Show. In ad-
dition to the regular itinerary of
all the historic and important
modern sights throughout the
country, there will be special
events which have always made
our Congregational trips so uni-
que and worthwhile.
The total price of the tour is
$2,099 per person, double oc-
cupancy. For further information,
please call Evelyn at the Temple
office 920-8225 or 944-7773.
Temple Beth Shalom
Beth Shalom's religious school
is now accepting early registra-
tion for the school year 1986-87.
For the first time, registrations
are being accepted for locations at
1400 N. 46 Ave. as well as Beth
Shalom West, University Drive
and Stirling Road. Classes offered
are: Sunday school, 5, 6, 7 years
old; Hebrew school classes (after
public school), grades 3-7; Judaica
school classes of pre-confirmation
and confirmation, grades 8, 9,10;
college accredited post-
confirmation. Enroll now for all
fall classes at main religious
school office, Monday through
Thursday, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Bruce
Richman is principal of the
religious school.
Weekend services will be held in
the main sanctuary at Temple
Beth Shalom, 1400 North 46 Ave.,
conducted by Dr. Morton Malav-
sky, rabbi, assisted by Cantor Irv-
ing Gold, changing the liturgy. An
early service will be held at 6:15
p.m., Friday, April 11, followed by
the final Friday Night Shabbat
Dinner Club get together for this
season. Late service will not be
held that evening.
Service will begin at 9 a.m.,
Saturday, April 12. The Bar Mitz-
vah will be celebrated during the
service of Daniel Mark Rubin, son
of Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Rubin,
who will sponsor the kiddush and
pulpitliOwersruifiOTio^ofthe
occasion.
Temple Beth Shalom and Beth
Shalom Academy will hold their
annual scholarship ball on Sunday,
April 13, in the ballroom, with
cocktails at 6 p.m., followed by
dinner and dancing at 7 p.m.
Chairing the function is Dr. Fred
Blumenthal and assisting with ar-
rangements is Ellen Greenspoon
and her committee.
Call Temple office to reserve for
Beth Shalom's Annual Communi-
ty Passover Seders, to be held in
the ballroom at 6:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, April 23 and Thurs-
day, April 24, conducted by Dr.
Malavsxy and Cantor Gold. Sylvia
S. Senick, executive secretary, is
handling reservations and table
arrangements. Call 981-6111 or
stop at Temple pffice for tickets
and information.
*
Beth Shalom will hold a blood
drive on Wednesday, April 16, 3
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The Memorial
Hospital bloodmobile unit will be
in the Temple's parking area for
blood donors. Call the Temple to
set appointment or just stop at the
bloodmobile unit on above date.
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;k> .o- Friday, April 11, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 15-B
Temple Israel
of Miramar
Friday evening services, April
11, will begin at 8 p.m. with Rabbi
Raphael C. Adler conducting and
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski chan-
ting the liturgy.
Randy Zinn, son of Mrs.
Jeanette Zinn of Hollywood, will
become a Bar Mitzvah at Sabbath
morning services beginning at
8:45 a.m. Rabbi Adler and Cantor
Wichelewski will officiate as Ran-
dy chants the Haftorah and ad-
dresses the congregation. Presen-
tations will be made to Randy by
an officer of the temple Board and
various auxiliary representatives.
The Kiddush will be sponsored by
the Zinn Family in honor of
Randy.
There will be a Men's Club
Breakfast Meeting on Sunday
morning at 9:30 a.m.
The semi-annual Congrega-
tional Meeting will take place at
the temple on Tuesday evening,
April 15 at 8 p.m. Election of of-
ficers and directors for the coming
year will take place at that time.
Friday Evening Services, April
18, will begin at 8 p.m. with Rabbi
Adler conducting and Cantor
Wichelewski chanting the liturgy.
The Cantor and Temple Israel
Choir will present "A Taste of
Passover," musical selections of
the" holiday season. Couples
celebrating anniversaries and
children celebrating birthdays
during the month of April will be
honored during the service.
Sabbath Morning Services will
begin at 8:45 a.m. with Rabbi
Adler and Cantor Wichelewski of-
ficiating. Mr. Joseph Feller will
chant the Maftir.
The children of The Hyman
Drcoker Religious School will par-
ticipate in a Model Seder on Sun-
day morning, April 20, from 10
a.m. until noon. Parents are in-
vited to attend.
The Siyum B'Chorim (for all
first bom males) will take place on
Wednesday, April 23, at 8:30 a.m.
This will be followed by the last
hametz meal.
Erev First Day of Passover Ser-
vice will be held at 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 23. This service
will be followed by the Congrega-
tional Seder at 7:30 p.m. Advance
reservations are required for at-
tending the Seder.
First Day of Passover Services
will begin at 8:45 a.m. on Thurs-
day, April 24. Services will again
be held at 6 p.m.
Second Day of Passover Ser-
vices will begin at 8:45 a.m. on
Friday, April 25.
Please call the temple office,
961-1700 for additional service in-
formation or inquiries regarding
membership and temple activities.
Temple Sinai
Friday evening services, April
11, begin at 8 p.m. in the main
sanctuary with Rabbi Richard J.
Margolis and Cantor Misha Alex-
androvich officiating. Saturday
morning, April 12, we will
celebrate the Bar Mitzvah of
Jacob Richardson, son of Michelle
Roberts. The pulpit flowers, Oneg
Shabbat and kiddush are being
sponsored by Mrs. Roberts, in
honor of her son's Bar Mitzvah.
Jacob is a 7th grade student at At-
tacks Middle School. He is in-
terested in sports, computers and
reading. He was a winner in the
school science fair, taking first
place in category and third place
in the overall fair. He also par-
ticipated in the county science
fair, winning third place in
category.
Sunday, April 13, the Men's
Club will hold their monthly
breakfast meeting at 9:30 a.m. in
the Lipman Youth Wing. An in-
teresting program is being
planned.
Friday evening, April 18, Shab-
bat services begin at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Margolis and Cantor Alex-
androvich officiating. Saturday
morning services begin at 9 a.m.
and all are welcome. The kiddush
will be co-sponsored by Milo and
Lillian Ginsburg, in honor of his
birthday, and by Joel and Blanche
Landres, in honor of his birthday.
Daily minyan services are at 8:25
a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sunday, April 20, the Paul B.
Anton Religious School will hold
its model seder at 10 a.m. in the
Haber Karp Hall, and in the even-
ing the annual meeting of the
Temple will take place at 8 p.m. at
that time, the election of the of-
ficers and board of governors will
be held.
Wednesday, April 23, the Siyum
B'Chorot, the service for the first
born, will be at 8:25 a.m. in the
Louis Zinn Chapel. Passover
begins with the First Seder
Wednesday, April 23, and con-
tinues through Thursday, May 1,
with Zizkor Services at 10 a.m.
Temple Solel
Family night Shabbat worship
service will begin at 7:30 p.m.,
Friday, April 11. Rabbi Robert P.
Frazin will conduct the worship
service. Cantor Israel Rosen will
chant the liturgical portion of the
service.
The Oneg Shabbat following the
service will be hosted by Mr. and
Mrs. Alvin Magalnick in honor of
Risa Beth Cummings.
Shabbat morning worship ser-
vice will begin at 10:30 a.m.,
Saturday, April 12. During this
service Risa Beth Cummings,
daughter of Mrs. Michelle Cumm-
ings, will be called to the Torah to
become Bat Mitzvah.
Risa is in the 7th grade at Nova
Middle School and in the 7th
grade of the Abe and Grace Dur-
bin School of Living Judaism.
Enjoy A Strictly Kosher
SEDER
AT
Congregation Beth Kodesh
501 N.E. 26th Ave.,
Boyn ton Beach, FL.
Wednesday Evening
April 23,1986 7:00 p.m.
Per Person $28 Limited Seating
CALL:
737-2927
732-5147
737-9644
Young Israel
Young Israel of Hollywood-Ft.
Lauderdale Sisterhood is sponsor-
ing a Yom HaShoah Program,
commemorating those who died in
the Holocaust, on Monday even-
ing, May 5, 8:30 p.m. at the
Synagogue, 3291 Stirling Road.
Marilyn Klompus will be our guest
speaker. She will address the topic
" "Children of Survivors." A
short film "Ambulance" will be
shown, and a candle-lighting
ceremony is planned.
Refreshments will be served. This
program is opened to both men
and women, and the community is
invited to attend.
A Soviet Jewry Walk-a-thon is
scheduled for Sunday, May 18 at
10 a.m. Children, ages 5 and up
are encouraged to participate in
the walk. Certificates will be
issued to all participants, and
refreshments will be served along
the way. Julie Averbuch is the
chairperson of this event. Please
call 981-8569 to register your
child, or for more information on
how you can help.
Young Israel is pleased to an-
nounce the September opening of
its new Pre-School Program for
children Ages 2 and 3. Young
Israel is currently inteviewing
teachers for this 3 morning a
week position. If you are in-
terested, please call 966-7877.
Saturday morning services are
at 9 a.m. Services are also held
every weekday morning at 7:15
a.m. and in the evening 10
minutes before sunset. We
guarantee a minyan so that Kad-
dish may be said. Call the
synagogue office for exact times,
at 966-7877.
The Rabbi class on Shabbat is
one hour before Minchah.
PLACES IN THE HEART The Julius Silver Institute of
Biomedical Engineering at Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology has attracted international attention as an inter-
disciplinary nucleus for innovative research: a dynamic part-
nership between the varied branches of engineering, the
sciences, and medicine. Research at the Silver Institute's
Cardiac Center aims to design computerized three-
dimensional mechanical models to simulate and intensively
study the human heart to aid doctors in their treatment and
diagnosis of heart disease. The computer model can be pro-
grammed to reproduce different heart pathologies in an ac-
celerated time frame, giving doctors better insight into the
dynamics of the healthy and unhealthy heart. In the photo
above, a Technion student volunteer undergoes a "stress
test" to assist heart research efforts.
' '
CotorTVlMrigrtor
fully Air Condition*!
Strictly D*fryL**\
Social Progrrm-Q'
SSSSST
Bnmo-flll pasMft*
mmmiM $84
?!/#'"/ INCLUDES:
OCEAMFMHT
Miami B*ch,Fl. 33140
CompUm*nt*1*<*"m
pf person
dWe.occ.
..JKSSK.'SS-.
i
MANISCHEWITZ WINE
At A Seder, The Wines Arc Never Questioned.
hot ijtncrMmn*. Manuchcwit:
Winr has been a part (il* the family
Setter. And to many, a Seder would
not he trie same without it.
Made in acinrdance with MfKI
I Vthodo* rahhinic.il requirement-..
Manischcwit: Wine has hecume a
tradition at the Passover tahle, alorsj;
with the reading ot the Hagjtadab.
the Kiddush and the Four Questions.
Manischewit: Without question,
the wine to y-rve tor Passovet
r
A Happy and Kosher I'csach
fs/\mischevbitz^
i i.....


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