The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00039

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
if South Broward
Number 12
1 Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 7, 1985
I FratfMocftcr
: Price 35 Cents
thiopian Jews Face Modern Problems
)REW POLIN
kiate Editor
Jews not only
ture shock" after
Moses" brought
rael, they also fac-
shock.'r
popian Jews, who
[rural existence,
lemselves in a
J-tech society.
re coming to an
11985. And they
close that
leal gap," said
In, head of the Im-
migration and Absorption
Department of the Jewish
Agency. Operation Moses
brought Ethiopian Jews to
Israel in late 1984 and early
1985. The Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward has
already sent to Israel
$250,000 of the $400,000
raise locally to help settle
Ethiopian Jews.
Aron, in an interview with
the Jewish Floridian of
South Broward, said the
Ethiopian Jews living in
Israel are undergoing an in-
tensive learning experience,
rfi Trip Sparks
Vitzvah Dream
m Staff Report
?e Saltzman of
the number 13
Mrs. Saltzman
Israel for the
the bat mitzvah
zman, who is a
kberof the Jewish
ion of South
I was on a f act-
specifically to
ward's Project
city of Hod
where the
lily is building
1 for p re-
en children and
!y-retarded
lg the flight to
Saltzman decid-
lize a lifelong
Saltzman
dream. She wanted to
become a bat mitzvah.
What would be more ap-
propriate for a bat mitzvah
than the 13th trip to Israel.
That decision triggered a
series of events which even-
tually led to Mrs.
Saltzman's bat mitzvah.
Mrs. Saltzman would have
wanted the service at the
Western Wall, but because
men and women pray
separately there, the service
had to be held elsewhere. In-
stead, Mrs. Saltzman had
her service in the City of
David excavations where
there is an extension of the
Western Wall. Dr. Howard
Barron, vice president of
the Federation and chair-
man of Project Renewal, his
wife Judee, and Sumner
Kaye, executive director of
the Federation, joined Mrs.
Saltzman in celebrating her
bat mitvah. Rabbi Yehoram
Mazor of Ramat Hasharon
officiated.
When Mrs. Saltzman told
her husband about her
plans, Jack Saltzman was
ecstatic. Mrs. Saltzman
would have wanted her hus-
band and family present
which would have made the
ceremony perfect.
Mrs. Saltzman said she
had not decided what to do
for Project Renewal, but
knew she probably would
help pre-kindergarten
children and mentally-
retarded youngsters.
"I thought we might help
a home for the aged, but
when I was in Hod
Hasharon I realized the
Continued on Page 3
which includes not only
Hebrew but also how to live
in a modern society.
Aron said Ethiopian Jews
are learnnig how to handle
money, which they did not
have to worry about in their
previous rural society.
For example, they need to
learn how to live in a
building with different
floors which is in marked
contrast from the huts they
used to live in.
Nor did they know how to
take advantage of modern
conveniences, such as cook-
ing on a gas stove or using a
bathroom.
Living in Israel would be
difficult enough without
these concerns, but the
Ethiopian Jews have other
obstacles to overcome.
They are facing a kind of
"religious shock" because
their Judaism is based on
the Five Books of Moses.
Ethiopians Jews do not
follow the rabbinic tradition
that developed for the rest
of Jewry since the destruc-
tion of the second Temple in
ancient Israel.
As such, Aron said, the
Ethiopian Jewish aliyah is
very different from other
waves of immigration, in-
cluding the Yeminite Jews
who came to Israel during
"Operation Flying Carpet"
fa 1949-50.
Aron said Yeminite Jews
faced problems because
they knew Hebrew and
practiced their religion
along the same guidelines as
others in Israel.
How is the religion prac-
ticed by the Ethiopian Jews
different from the rest of
world? Since Ethiopian
Jews have lived without the
Talmud or the Mishnah and
other rabbinic traditions,
that means Shabbat is
strictly kept.
Aron said Ethiopian Jews
will not let officials take so-
meone who is ill to a hospital
Chain Aron
on Shabbat. Ethiopian Jews
are not familar with the
tradition that permits Jews
who are sick to travel to a
hospital if their lives are
threatened.
Aron said his department
is teaching Ethiopian Jews
Continued on Page 12
Aliyah: Where's the Romance?
By ANDREW POLIN
Associate Editor
Romanticism and idealism
surrounded aliyah to Israel
in 1948 and even during the
days of the 1967 Six-Day
War.
"Perhaps that's what
we're missing today
romanticism and idealism,"
Chaim Aron, head of the Im-
migration and Absorption
Department of the Jewish
Agency, said in an interview
with the Jewish Floridian of
South Broward.
The largest numbers of
olim from the United States
came to Israel immediately
after the 1967 Six-Day War.
Olim from the United States
before and since usually
numbered between 1,500 to
3,000 a year.
But now, perhaps because
of a lack of romanticism and
idealism, aliyah is experien-
cing troubled times.
Aron said immigration
has decreased in the last
year from the Western
countries, including the
United States and Western
Europe.
"We are, however, seeing
the start of an increase in
aliyah in Latin America
because of economic and
political reasons," Aron
said.
But Aron added, "We
have not given aliyah from
the United States enough
emphasis, enough thought.
We haven't shown a will-
ingness to find solutions.
Continued on Page 2-
Women's Division Holds Luncheon
Jewish Floridian Staff Report
The Women's Division got
a chance to meet Jewish
women from four corners of
the world during the annual
Awards and Installation
Luncheon held earlier this
month.
Four local women Bar-
bara Desky, Rhea Krieger,
Naomi Prever and Lila
Zedeck portrayed Jewish
women from Ethiopia,
Russia, Israel and South
Broward.
The program tied
together the work of the
Women's Division to the
women of the world and also
emphasized how UJA-
Federation has helped im-
prove the quality of life for
the Jews oi the world.
Fran Haskin, chairwoman
of the awards and installa-
tion luncheon, emphasized
the importance of the
Women's Division to UJA-
Federation and the work
done worldwide.
"Each year Women's
Division raises funds for
Jews in South Broward, in
other countries and in
Israel. This year we will
raise over $2 million. That's
a lot of money, but what
does that mean in human
terms," Mrs. Haskin asked.
The women in the pro-
gram talked about the plight
of other Jewish women in
South Broward and in the
world.
Mrs. Prever portrayed a
Jewish woman from Iraq
now living in Hod
Hasharon, the Project
Renewal city of the Jewish
Federation of South
Broward.
"Then Project Renewal
began ... It happened slow-
ly, but when we saw tha
Continued on Page 3


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, June 7, 1985
Aliyah
Continued from Page 1
Neither us nor the govern-
ment and neither the
American Jewish
community."
He said aliyah must be a
"top priority" among the
Jewish people and Israel.
"That means not only pay-
ing lip service to aliyah, but
it means really creating an
atmosphere where you are
wanted, needed and
welcomed in Israel," Aron
added.
Aron's department, which
has the task of settling olim
in Israel, is working on pro-
moting aliyah and Israel.
"Until now we have not
done that," Aron said,
referring to 80 percent of
the Jewish people in the
Diaspora who have not been
to Israel.
When asked why most
Diaspora Jews have not
visited Israel, Aron
Lubavitch Off ers
Israel Trip
The Lubavitch Center of South
Broward is offering two free
round-trip tickets to Israel in-
cluding one-week hotel accom-
modations for the winner of the
Lubavitch 9econd annual raffle.
There will be three second-place
prizes of 19-inch portable televi-
sions and 10 third-place prizes of
dinner-for-four at the Golan
Kosher Restaurant. A $5 donation
enables participants to join the
raffle.
Proceeds from the raffle will go
towards the spreading and
strengthening of Judaism in the
South Broward area.
The Lubavitch Center of South
Broward reaches out to 1000s of
Jews, many of whom are unaf-
filiated. The Lubavitch institu-
tions include Congregation Levi
Yitzchok-Lubavitch, Free Hebrew
for Juniors-Chabad and Chabad
Community Services.
To acquire a raffle ticket, write:
Free Trip to Israel, Congregation
Levi Yitzchok-Lubavitch, 1295 E.
Hmllandale Beach Blvd., Hallan
dale, Fla. 33009.
For more information, call
458-1877.
responded: "I think they're
not interested.
"They hear about Israel in
the news and that's not the
best image. It's much easier
to say we're not interested.
Israel is a commitment."
He said his department
must work on housing and
job opportunities. Today,
Israel is lacking about 5,000
engineers, computer pro-
grammers and technicians.
Aron specifically mention-
ed the "Lavi" project which
Israel is in the process of
building. The Lavi will be
the state of the art fighter
plane of the 1990s.
Aron said the Lavi offers
high-tech workers an oppor-
tunity to work on a challeng-
ing project.
"In general, all the high-
technology in Israel is a
challenge for those who
want to come. It's a Zionist
and scientist challenge,"
Aron said.
Aron said anyone in-
terested in making aliyah
should first visit Israel.
"See how we live here,"
Aron said. "Israel is not a
country of wars. It's not a
country of terrorism. Israel
is a country in spite of its
economic situation is a
country of development, of
progress."
In the interview, Aron
also talked about Soviet
Jewry, which could be a ma-
jor source of olim should the
Soviet Union decide to allow
Soviet Jews the right to
emigrate to Israel.
Aron said he is "very op-
timistic" that a change will
occur.
"But that belief should
not give us the impression
that some change in policy
has already happened, '
Aron said.
"On the contrary, we
must strengthen our public
campaigns and create public
opinion in order to make the
Russians understand that
Jews should be free to come
to Israel," Aron added.
GUARDIAN
SAVINGS & LOAN
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
THE PURCHASE OF A
250,000
GOVERNMENT
OF ISRAEL BOND
IN CELEBRATION OF
THE GRAND OPENING OF OUR
NEW HOLLYWOOD BRANCH.
Akin S. Becker,
Chairman off the Board
GUARDIAN
SAVINGS & LOAN
FHOTlCTIMG YOUH INTIKIST
E33C
Judith Levy Assumes Chairmanship
Of UJA National Women's Division
Judith Levy of Boston was in-
stalled as National Chairman and
Harriet Zimmerman of Atlanta as
President of National Women's
Division of the United Jewish Ap-
peal at the recent Annual Spring
Board Meeting at the Vista Hotel
in New York.
According to UJA National
Chairman Alex Grass, National
Women's Division is responsible
for almost 20 percent of the funds
raised by the United Jewish
Appeal.
"Harriet Zimmerman's inspira-
tional chairmanship and Judith
Levy's performance as Chairman-
elect and Chairman for Women's
Division's Major Gifts," Grass
said, "have contributed
significantly to UJA's expectation
that women's major giving will
have a growing impact on the
campaign."
Under Zimmerman's guidance,
National Women's Division's
definition of a major gift has risen
from $5,000 to $10,000 the stan-
dard of major giving in the
regular campaign. She recently
led Women's Division's first
$10,000-minimum mission to
Spain and Israel which raised a
total of $566,900. A UJA National
Vice Chairman, Zimmerman
assumes the Presidency of Na-
tional Women's Division upon
completing a two-year term as
Chan-man.
In the coming two years, Levy
hopes to develop programming
that will focus on women's gifts of
$18", 000 and above. She also hopes
to conduct a National Women's
Division "Dor le Dor Genera-
tion to Generation" Mission to
Israel for women and their adult
daughters.
"As Women's Division has
matured in its ability to open new
vistas for women's giving," Levy
says, "we've also grown in our
ability to communicate to the next
generation of Jewish women's
leadership what Israel and Jewish
peoplehood are all about."
Levy served National Women's
Division for four years as Chair-
man of Region I. She has chaired
the National UJA Walkathon for
the general campaign, and is a
member of the UJA National
Campaign Policy Board and a
graduate of the NWD Training for
Trainers Program at The Whar-
ton School, University of
Pennsylvania.
She is a past chairman of the
Women's Campaign in Boston, a
past chairman ot a major divi*.
in Boston's general campaign J
a trustee and Officer of the Con, I
bined Jewish Philanthropies Ei
ecutive Board. She is the Pre*
dent of the New England ReU.
of American Friends of Hebrew
University.
A past president and founder J
The Women's Divison of the]
Greater Boston Chapter of thel
Heart Asosciation, Judith Lenl
has received the Association!
Distinguished Service Award.
Jewish Sexuality
Topic for Meeting
"Sexuality and Judaism" will be
the featured topic at the first an-
nual dinner meeting of the South
Broward Business and Profes-
sional Women's Network on June
20.
Susan Symons, an adjunct pro-
fessor at Broward Community
College in the behavioral science-
department, will be the guest
speaker. Ms Symons' community
involvement has included par-
ticipation in the establishment of a
sexual assault treatment center,
and with the annual Women in the
Arts program. Her research
studies helped to initiate a mx-
education program at the Univer I
sity School.
The dinner meeting, which mil I
start with cocktails at 6:30 p.m.,
will be held at Hemingway's in |
Hollywood.
All business and professional
women are invited to attend the I
monthly meetings.
For reservations please call thel
Federation at 921-8810.
ISRAEL
TOUR OF LEISURE $1082. piusAir
Four Week Relaxed Vacation in Netanya & Jerusalem
Monthly Departures Optional Week in Tel Aviv
alSO TWO WEEK VACATIONS From $510. PiusAir
TRIANGLE TOURS
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From out of town call Miriam collect
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DtERFIELD BRANCH
1305 South Military Trail
421-4800
IW WE'LL MEET YOU
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Then well drive you and your be-
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when you leave, well drive you back1
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price that includes nothing but the best, and plenty of it.
Baggage handling and limo transportation to and from hotel AD taxes and gratuities
3 Gourmet meals dary Dancing to 4 orchestras Cocktail parties. 2 shows nightly
Indoor and outdoor pools Free golt on two tS-hole courses Tennis Roller skating
Extra care for special diets Supervised children's camp and teen programs
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Friday, June 7, 1985/THe Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
WOMEN'S DIVISION AWARDS From
left to right, Meral Ehrenstein, president
of the Women's Division, Fran Haskin,
chairwoman of the awards and installation
luncheon, and Ellie Katz, installation of-
ficer headed the recent Women's Division
program.
JEWISH WOMEN FROM AROUND THE
WORLD Local Jewish women portrayed
the plight of four Jewish women in the
I world from Russia, Israel, South
Broward and Ethiopia. The women were
Naomi Prever, Barbara Desky, Rhea
Krieger and Lila Zedick.
Women's Division Holds Luncheon
Continued from Page 1
ierb and Ellie Katz Com-
nunity Center and the Nat
nd Dina Sedley Gym-
"sium being built, we knew
at the Jews of South
Broward had made a com-
nitment they would not
break," Mrs. Prever said.
"And I go the the com-
munity center everyday
nth my youngest child. He
~es to enrichment classes
1 plays in the playground
i built for us while I learn
nebrew. Because of the
Jasses at the center my
Hebrew has greatly improv-
"1 and my family is proud of
, she added.
lu^x' Zedeck portrayed an
fWerly Jewish woman living
oouth Broward.
She, at first, was not in-
vested in going with her
'eighbor to the Jewish Com-
ity Center for a hot
peal.
"I wasn't interested.
nose places are for other
Ple, not me. Then I notic-
[jyoay looking so happy
[ja she would tell me about
we nice people she met
there," she said.
"Well, finally one day, I
went along when the bus
came to pick her up. And,
you know, it wasn't so bad.
"Now I go everyday to see
the lovely young people who
work there. I've made so
many new friends and I'm
feeling stronger now that
I'm eating more," Mrs.
Zedeck said.
"I only wish (my husband)
was here to share this with
me. But he'd be glad to
know that I'm not alone
anymore," she added.
Mrs. Desky portrayed an
Ethiopian Jewish woman
now living in Israel.
"My parents could not
come with us. They are old
and tired and would not
have been able to walk the
distance to the Sudan. We
said goodbye to them know-
ing we would never see
them again," Mrs. Desky
said.
Living conditions in the
Sudan were harsh. "There
was little water or food in
the camp. Everyday more
people died. Everyday we
prayed and waited."
Then the Ethiopian Jews
were taken to Israel during
"Operation Moses."
"How can I describe our
arrival in Israel? How can I
begin to explain ... The
best I can do is tell you that
Israel is a place where
miracles happen and that
my family and I are fullfill-
ing the dreams of my
parents," she added. "In
Israel they clothed us, fed
us, helped us find my
brother and his family, gave
us Hebrew names and
helped us start our new life
in this strange yet familiar
land."
Mrs. Krieger told the
story of a Soviet Jewish
woman, a scientist who
could only work in a hospital
lab because she and her hus-
band were refuseniks.
"We both lost our jobs and
started to live on what we
could sell from packages
sent from other Jews in the
Jewish world," she said.
"I lost the security of
home, but gained a new
identity. I have learned of
Aviv Mission Participants
Pledge $543,400 to Israel
NEW YORK The National Women's Division of the United
Jewish Appeal sponsored its first $10,000 Women's Mission to
Israel recently and raised a total of $543,400 towards the 1986
UJA/Federation Campaign. Harriet Zimmerman of Atlanta, Na-
tional Women's Division Chairman, headed the Aviv Mission,
which saw a 23 percent increase over last year's gifts.
In addition, $55,500 in new money was raised for Project
Renewal, the partnership program between American and Israeli
Jews to help rehabilitate distressed Israeli neighborhoods.
"We are extremely gratified with the fund-raising results,"
said Mrs. Zimmerman. "We feel a great sense of accomplishment
to hold a major gifts event at this level for women. It's an event
whose time has come."
Thirty-six women participated in the springtime mission which
took its name from "aviv," the Hebrew word for spring, and had
as its theme the rebirth and revitalizatin of Israel.
The mission participants visited Jewish Agency and JDC-
sponsored programs includng an absorption center and ORT
vocational training center for Ethiopian Jews in Kiryat Gat, the
archaeological excavations under the home of Theo and Miriam
Siebenberg in Jerusalem's Jewish Quarter, the Hebrew Universi-
ty Faculty of Agriculture, Yad Vashem and Omikron, a
biomedical engineering and research development company.
Other highlights included a visit to the Rishon le Zion com-
munities of Ramat Eliyahu and Mizrach for a comparative study
of the accomplishments of Project Renewal, and meetings with
prominent Israeli women at the homes of Jerusalemites Rivka
Burg, wife of Minister of Religious Affairs Yosef Burg, Elka
Toussia-Cohen, an artist, and Btia Rekem, a communication
executive.
Following the Israel visit, there was a post-mission visit to
Spain where the group met with members of the Madrid Jewish
community and toured the synagogue, school and community
center there. The visit to Spain was timed to coincide with the in-
creased relationship between Israel and Spain.
the Jewish spark we all
share and now my children
will never again be ignorant
of who they are. Thank
you," Mrs. Krieger said.
The program was follow-
ed by a message from Meral
Ehrenstein, Women's Divi-
sion president, who
reflected on her first year of
office. She thanked all the
women and applauded their
philosophy of team work
and collaborative efforts.
The Women's Division Cam-
paign this year yielded a
21.6 percent increase over
last year, from $1,657,164
to $2,014,859.
Campaign Awards were
distributed by Mildred
Friedman and Susen
Grossman, the Campaign
Vice-Presidents, to all the
comittee members for their
outstanding job.
Dodie Weinstein, chair-
woman of the Women's
Division Business and Pro-
fessional Network had the
?leasure of presenting the
une Gordon Leadership
Award to an outstanding
and committed individual in
our community who shows
great leadership promise.
The award is not given out
each year, but only when a
deserving person is iden-
tified. This year's proud
recipient was Nola
Goldberg, a Broward Coun-
ty School teacher who is ac-
tively involved with the
Young Professional Leader-
ship Division and the
Women's Division Business
and Professional Network.
The installation of the
Women's Division Officers
and Board Members was
carried out by Ellie Katz,
the installing officer. A true
community leader, Ellie is
the vice-president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, the President of
the Jewish High School in
South Florida and the chair-
woman of the Planning and
Allocations Committee of
the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. Mrs. Katz
gave meaning to the in-
stallation process by
welcoming each new and
returning board member
and officer, and outlining
their responsibility as
leaders.
Meral Ehrenstein gave
the 1985-86 President's
message in which she spoke
of the rewards of undertak-
ing a leadership role. She
then outlined the goals for
the coming year. The unity
of the women in the room
set the tone for what is not
only a new beginning, but a
continuation of the never
ending work of Women's
Division.
Saltzman Bat Mitzvah
Continued from Pag* 1
greatest need was for pre-
kindergarten children and
mentally retarded kids,"
she said.
The building, which will
be named the Marge and
Jack Saltzman School for
Children, will be completed
next year. One wing will
have about 50 pre-
kindergarten children while
the other wing will be the
location where a smaller
number of mentally-
retarded children will
receive one-to-one therapy.
Mrs. Saltzman has always
been active in volunteer pro-
grams concerning children
especially in education.
The Saltzmans are active
supporters in the Hillel
School, Hebrew University
and the University of
Miami, Mrs. Saltzman is a
former president of the
Friends tor Life Organiza-
tion of the University of
Miami.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, June 7, 1985
State Dep't. Still Studying
Palestinian Delegation Makeup
ISRAEL BOUND From left to right are
Mitchell Marder, Geri Kugler, John and
Sandi Flint, Marshal Krupnick and Lanny
Marks, all of whom will be visiting Israel
later this year on the Young Leadership
Mission.
YOUNG LEADERSHIP MISSION From
left to right are Mr. and Mrs. Steve Borns-
tein, Fran Slabeek and Mr. and Mrs. An-
Herut Zionists Rap Rabbis
For Blacklist of 51 MK's
drew Molot, all of whom will be visiting
Israel later this year on the Young Leader-
ship Mission.
BY DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
said that it was looking into
ways the U.S. could meet
with a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation,
although it conceded that
the major problem is the
"composition" of the
Palestinians in the
delegation.
At the same time, State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Edward
Djerejian stressed that such a
meeting would be an "exploratory
process" aimed at bringing about
direct negotiations between the
Arabs and Israelis. Djerejian
noted at one point that the
Palestinians in the delegation
would be "non-PLO Palesti-
nians," but he refused all com-
ment on how the U.S. would
determine if any of the delegates
were members of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
HE INDICATED, however,
that the participants may be
members of the Palestine Na-
tional Council which sets policy
for the PLO but includes members
from the West Bank and Gaza.
Djerejian stressed that the U.S.
believes that "public discussion
will not be helpful" at this time.
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
during his recent visit to the Mid-
dle East, met with Palestinians
from the West Bank and Gaza and
apparently sought to persuade
them to provide non-PLO
members for the joint delegation.
The Palestinians reportedly said
the PLO was the spokesman for
all Palestinians.
The U.S. apparently believa
that if the Palestinian delerata
are chosen from the West Bank
and Gaza, it will overcome objec-
tions to any possible rnernbersW
in the PLO both for a meeS
with the U.S. and for later hop3
for negotiations with Israel.
HOWEVER. King Hussein of
Jordan and PLO chief Yaar
Arafat, in their Feb. 11 jojt
agreement, seek an international
conference which would include
the five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council and not direct talks with
Israel. A Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation is seeking meetings
with all five powers.
West Bank
Town Curfew
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
West Bank town of Halhoul was
placed uner curfew as a large
scale manhunt got underway for
the attackers of an Egged bus in
the vicinity.
A woman passenger suffered
slight injuries from flying glass,
but no one else was hurt when the
bus came under automatic fire
between Hebron and Halhoul. The
bus, enroute from Jerusalem to
Kiryat Arba, sustained con-
siderable damagae.
The attack was linked to the
date, May 15, which, by the
Western calendar is the day after
Israel proclaiming its in-
dependence in 1948. The last at-
tack on an Israeli bus in the West
Bank occurred on Mar. 30, "Land
Day," when Arabs protested the
confiscation of Arab-owned land
in Galilee by the Israeli authorities
in 1976.
NEW YORK Hart N.
Hasten, president of the
120,000-member Herut Zionists of
America organization, has issued
a strongly-worded statement call-
ing for the repeal of the resolution
by the Rabbinical Assembly of
America to "blacklist" 51
members of the Israeli Knesset
from speaking in certain
American synagogues.
"We believe that this recom-
mendation," Hasten said, "will
serve only to cause a deep and
dangerous division between the
people of Israel and America's
Conservative Jewish
community."
HASTEN CALLED on the
Rabbinical Assembly to "repeal
its resolution at once."
Herut Zionists of America is the
United States branch of the
worldwide Herut movement.
Members of the Herut Party in
Israel include Vice Prime Minister
and Prime Minister-Designate
Yitzhak Shamir, Industry and
Trade Minister Ariel Sharon, Con-
struction Minister David Levy,
and others.
Israeli Knesset members in-
clude some of the 51 government
representatives whom the Rab-
binical Assembly "blacklisted"
from speaking or receiving
awards in more than 800 Conser-
vative Jewish synagogues
throughout the U.S. Herut-USA
plays an active role in arranging
for many of the Israeli Knesset
members to visit communities
throughout the U.S.
The resolution by the Rabbinical
Assembly came after 51 members
of the Israeli Knesset voted last
January to amend Israel's Law of
Return in a way that would grant
immediate citizenship to con-
verted Jews only if they had con-
verted according to halacha.
HASTEN SAID that members
of the Knesset "enjoy the basic
and fundamental right to vote
their conscience on each and
every issue before the
Parliament."
Thejewish
.rlorfMaM.
FHEOSMOCHET
Editor and Publishei
of South Broward
Publication No (USPS 864 500) (ISSN 074*7737)
&fm4S*ocmt
SUZANNE SMOCHET
Eieculive Editor
Published Bi Weekly Second Class Postage paid al Haiianoaie. Fla
HOLLYWOOD -FORT LAUDEFIDALE OFFICE. 8358 W Oakland Pan. 8ivd
Foci Lauderdale. FL 33321 Phone 7484400
Abraham 8 Halpern. Advertising Supervisor
Main Ollice Plant 120 NE 8th St Miami. Fla 33132- Phone 1 373.460S
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Jewish Federation of South Broward ollicers President Df Philip A Levin. Vice Presidents Or
Saul Si. oer Ted Newman and Nat Sedley Treasurer Oi Howard Banon. Secretary Otlo
SlieOer. Executive Director Sumnei G Kaye .SuOmit material lor publication to Art Hartis.
associate elitot. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood Florida 33020
Member JTA. Seven Arts. WNS, NEA. AJPA. snd FPA.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area *3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum IT), or by membership Jewish
Federation of Souin Browa'd. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Fla 33020 Phon?921 8810
Out of Town Upon Request
Friday, June 7. 1985
Volume 15
11SIVAN5745
Number 12
For deliriously cool summer-
time refreshment, pour on the
Scrap* Brond Decoffemoted
Coffee
Pioca one: rounded tea-
spoon Sorfp I nstont or
Freeze-Dried Decaffeinated
Coffee in a tall glass Stir in one cup cold woler Add
ice and serve wttfi cream and sugar, if you want ur
atlt for it at your favorite restaurant. You'll nave a a"
lighfful summer cooler Rich real coffee that's 07Sv
caffein-free. And Kosher, too Sanfcp *
for summer is such a mechaieh-the rest
of your summer should only be so
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K Certified Kosher
tee? o~.i ** cWec"*"


fie Jewish
londian of
9Ut
Iron
'age
Binder Appointed B'nai B'rith Women Exec.
Stanley Weithorn, (left) a New York lawyer, greets Seymour
Berzofsky, (right) a CPA, during a Tax Seminar sponsored by
the Jewish Federation of South Broward and the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale. Weithorn discussed
tax aspects of charitable donations.
Tax Benefits Maximized for Ben Gurion
American Associates, Ben-
Gurion University of the Negev
has embarked upon a Deferred
Giving Program as part of its com-
mitment to a strong future for
Israel's youngest university.
"Through this program, con-
tributors will be able to establish
significant resources for the
University while taking maximum
advantage of charitable tax deduc-
tions allowed by the Internal
Revenue Service to encourage
such contributions," according to
Jack J. Spitzer, president of
American Associates.
Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev was established in 1969 to
further David Ben-Gurion's
dream of an institution of higher
education in the southern region
that is 60 percent of the land of
Israel. The University is
distinguished worldwide for its
pioneering work in desert
agriculture, its outreach pro-
grams in Negev development
towns and its community-oriented
medical school.
The University is supported in
ike United States through
American Associates, Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev with na-
tional offices at 342 Madison
Avenue, Suite 1924, New York,
NY 10173, telephone
212/687-7721. The local office is at
6635 West Commercial Blvd.
Suite 104, Tamarac, FL 33319,
telephone 305/722-6100.
Elaine Kotell Binder has been
appointed executive director of
B'nai B'rith Women, Inc. She will
direct operations and planning for
the 120,000 member Jewish
women's advocacy and service
organization from its interna-
tional headquarters in
Washington, D.C.
Mrs. Binder, who is from
Maryland, comes to this position
from the American Association of
University Women, where she
served as Administrative Direc-
tor. She has an extensive
background in management and
administration, fiscal and pro-
gram planning, and leadership
training for volunteers.
"B'nai B'rith Women is an
organization oriented toward the
future and targeting its efforts
toward meeting the needs of
Jewish women for Jewish affilia-
Bnai Zion
Sponsors
Summer
Vacation
B'nai Zion is sponsoring a sum-
mer vacation at the Brown's Hotel
in New York, which will include a
July 4 celebration.
The summer vacation will run
from June 30 to July 14.
Anyone interested in receiving
a brochure or more information
about the summer program can
contact Chairlady Lorraine
Jacobs by calling 1-800-431-3856.
Proceeds derived from the sum-
mer vacation will go to the Haifa
Medical Center, Beit Halochem
Rehabilitation Centers for disabl-
ed Israeli War Veterans and other
projects supported by the B'nai
Zion Foundation.
tion, service, and intellectual and
career development," said Mrs.
Binder. "Providing staff leader-
ship to this dynamic organization
will be an exciting challenge."
BBW provides educational,
public advocacy and service pro-
grams for the Jewish and general
communities, with an emphasis on
the needs of women, children and
the elderly.
Mrs. Binder has been a partner
in a consulting firm designing
career management programs
and providing training for profes-
sional managers in communica-
tions and counseling skills. She
previously worked for the
Women's Equity Action League
(WEAL) and Wider Opportunities
for Women (WOW).
Elaine Kotell Binder
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, June 7, 1985
Florida's Jewish Population Third
The third largest percentage of Jews in
state population in the United States now
live in Florida. They rank only behind
New York and New Jersey as the first
and second largest Jewish populations
respectively.
This is the conclusion of the 1985
American Jewish Yearbook to be publish-
ed in June, which reports that Florida's
Jewish population showed the greatest
gain of any state in the country in 1984.
THE JEWISH population in Florida
has jumped from 479,180 to 558,820. Fur-
thermore, Jews now make up 5.2 percent
of the total state population. And, m addi-
tion, Florida is one of nine states in which
the Jewish population is above the na-
tional average of 2.5 percent.
According to the Yearbook's statistics,
the total Jewish population in the Unites
States is 5.817 million, and all but 6 per-
cent are Jewish by birth.
Canada Inquiry Commission
Hears Testimony on Nazi Criminals
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
A Federal Commission of
Inquiry into Nazi war
criminals living in Canada
heard testimony here from
representatives of Canadian
Jewry, law enforcement and
immigration officials and an
attorney for local Ukrainian
organizations which object
vehemently to evidence
against war criminals from
Soviet bloc sources.
The one-man commission, con-
sisting of former Quebec Superior
Court Justice Jules Deschenes,
was told by Mc Gill University law
professor Irwin Cotler that there
is evidence that Canadian im-
migration officials "however in-
advertently," facilitated the entry
of Nazi war criminals into Canada
after World War II.
THAT ASSERTION was con-
firmed by Randolph Schramm,
Assistant Commissioner of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
(RCMP), and George O'Leary,
chief of the Immigration Depart-
ment's Guidelines Division, who
also appeared at the hearings at
the Queen Elizabeth Hotel.
Cotler, a prominent jurist and
legal consultant, testified on
behalf of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, along with Alan Rose,
the CJC's executive vice presi-
dent. He cited as an example
Helmut Rauca who was ex-
tradited to West Germany in 1983
to face trial on charges of com-
plicity in the murders of 11,000
Lithuanian Jews.
Rauca, who died before the trial
began, lived openly in Canada for
20 years under his own name,
Cotler pointed out. He said, "If no
criminals are brought to justice
there will be those who say there
were no crimes."
LEADERS OF Canadian Jewry
are urging the commission to
recommend legislative measures
that would lead to the
denaturalization, deportation and
prosecution of war criminals in
Canada. Rose called their
presence in the country "a moral
stain" and made an impassioned
plea for action against those "guil-
ty of the most terrible crimes in
the history of barbarism."
He said, "War criminals should
not be allowed to receive as a
perverse reward for their acts, the
Canadian citizenship valued by all
of us. There are such persons
dwelling amongst us who should
be brought to justice." Rose added
that the Canadian government's
"lack of initiative in pursuing the
matter over the past 30 years has
been a major disappointment to
the Canadian Jewish Congress."
SCHRAMM testified that the
RCMP did not begin serious in-
vestigations of alleged Nazi war
criminals in Canada until 1982
20 years after an official policy on
war criminals was promulgated on
September 26, 1962. He said the
RCMP officers had been in-
structed not to conduct investiga-
tions unless they received explicit
instructions to do so from RCMP
headquarters in Ottawa.
He attributed this to concern
that individuals and organizations
seeking to trace and punish war
criminals would try to use the
RCMP as an investigative agency
for their own purposes. He said
that policy was revised in July,
1976, to allow investigation of im-
migration violations in cases
where extradition was possible,
through diplomatic channels or by
request from a foreign police force
with which the RCMP had good
relations.
Schramm said it was not until
1982 that the RCMP began in-
vestigating leads provided by
private citizens about alleged Nazi
war criminals in Canada.
O'LEARY testified that all Ger-
man nationals were officially
denied entry into Canada until
1950 but after that date the rules
were gradually eased and
automatic rejection of former
Nazi party members and the ban
on former members of the SS and
Waff en SS was removed in 1955.
At
First we created
the complete
summer vacation.
Then*|erfec*
That's a big statement. But Kutsher's is a
vacation. Even by Catskills' standards. We're
big enough to offer poolsindoors and out-
golf, racquetball, tennis, indoor ice-skating, a
supervised day camp, two nightclubs with new
shows nightly.. and that's just for starters! If
you want to find out just how complete a sum- .
mer vacation can be come!
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CALL TOLL FREE: (8001 431-1273
Cample* Ccmxtio* Facilities Map* Credit Caret Homieed
' RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL N<
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli.
M cup chopped or whole small
onions
Vi cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or marganne
W package (10 oz.) frozen whole
green beans, cooked and drained
1 can (15 Oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
da?n garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
^ cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Serves 4.
As always...
Half the calories
of butter
& twice as good
Most people are surprised to find out that
Philadelphia Brand cream cheese has always
had half the calories of butter or margarine. But
fortunately they've always known That Philty
cream cheese tastes twice as good.
The good news is, now that they know Philly
cream cheese-either soft or regularhas half
the calories of butter, they can en|oy twice as
much Philadelphia Brand cream cheeseor
twice as often.
Whether you use our super-spreadable soft
package, or the regular Philty cream cheese,
your whole family will en)oy a terrific spread.
What a mechayeh f or your bagel, matzoh, btaly
ortoasfl
So, pick up a package of Philly cream cheese,
because naif the calories means a great deal.
t 1984 Krott


Friday, June 7,1985/The Jewish Flbridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
IS \ M
!lt
^"^* 1
House Approves Free Trade
Area Over 10-Year Period
WASHINGTON (JTA) The House has approved
by a 422-0 vote the bill establishing a Free Trade Area bet-
ween Israel and the U.S. The bill, which would eliminate
tariffs and other trade barriers in phases over a 10-year
period, was also approved unanimously last week by the
Senate Finance Committee.
The agreement was signed in a ceremony April 22 by
Israel Minister of Commerce and Industry Ariel Sharon
and former U.S. Trade Representative William Brock.
President Reagan submitted it immediately to Congress
which has 60 days to approve it.
JULY 4th WEEK-END CELEBRATION


The Broward Pops Orchestra performed
earlier this month at Temple Beth El in
Hollywood to celebrate Israel In-
Idependence Day. The "Pops" performed
with the Beth Shalom Intergenerational
Day School Choir. The Israel Independence
Day festival was sponsored by the Jewish
Community Center and Temple Beth El.
Naphtali Lavie Named to Direct UJA Operations
NEW YORK, N.Y. Am-
I bassador Naphtali Lavie, Israel's
Consul General in New York, has
been named Director General of
United Jewish Appeal operations
in Israel commencing Sept. 1.
Lavie succeeds Chaim Vinitzky
who will retire after 50 years of
[distinguished service as the
[United Jewish Appeal's represen-
Itative in Israel.
"Through United Jewish Ap-
Ipeal," said Lavie, "American
| Jews express their solidarity with
other Jews and with the values of
I our tradition. I have long admired
Ithe United Jewish Appeal's
magnificent accomplishments and
I commitment to Jewish causes,
| and consider it a privilege to serve
l this new capacity."
Lavie, the son of a rabbi, was
born in Poland. He spent the war
lyears in Nazi concentration camps
land was freed from Buchenwald
lin 1945. Immediately thereafter,
|heand his brother went to Israel.
In 1946, he joined the Haganah
land fought in Israel's War of In-
dependence. After the establish-
Iment of the State, he was sent to
Eastern Europe to assist in bring-
ing Jewish refugees, including
[many children, to Israel.
At the request of Moshe Dayan,
Naphtali Lavie
he served as spokesman and ad-
visor to the Minister of Defense
and he continued in that same role
when Shimon Peres succeeded
Dayan as Defense Minister. In
1977, Lavie was appointed
spokesman of the Foreign
Ministry and Advisor to the
Foreign Minister on Public Af-
fairs, serving Moshe Dayan and
his successor, Yitzhak Shamir.
Lavie participated directly in all
phases of the peace negotiations
between Egypt and Israel.
In 1981, he was appointed Con-
sul General of Israel in New York.
In this demanding assignment, he
was an articulate advocate of
Israel's cause before diverse au-
diences, including world
statesmen, visiting dignitaries,
New York's Jewish community
and the media.
As Director-General of UJA's
operations in Israel, Lavie will
direct a wide range of activities in-
cluding programs of overseas mis-
sions, public relations, Project
Renewal, and leadership
seminars. In addition, he will
serve as the representative of the
National Chairman, President,
and other leaders of the United
Jewish Appeal.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoHywood/Friday, June 7, 1985
Israeli To Help
Rocket Hornets Into Space
TEL AVTV When 180
Oriental hornets are
rocketed into Earth's orbit
during the summer of 1986,
Tel Aviv University Prof.
Jacob Ishay is convinced
there is no chance that they
will escape inside the space
shuttle.
No, they will not sting the
astronauts with their poisonous
venom. No, they will not create a
space nightmare worthy of
Hollywood scriptwriters inside
the tight confines of the orbiting
space vehicle.
The hornets, says Ishay, their
caretaker, will be contained
securely inside a metal locker.
THE HORNETS will be sent in-
to space for a study of how they
adapt to near-weightless condi-
tions an environment in which
gravity is a thousandth or less of
that on Earth. By studying the in-
sects' behavior, Ishay hopes to
learn how humans can cope better
with space sickness, an unusual
malady that has caused more than
one-third of the astronauts to suf-
fer from headaches, nausea and
weakness.
Ishay, a professor of en-
tomology at Tel Aviv University,
met with University of Penn-
sylvania bilogists recently to
discuss his research.
He said Oriental hornets were
being used because of their
unusual ability not found in
humans or other mammals to
detect tiny amounts of gravitation
and react to them.
AMONG THE questions Ishay
hopes to answer as a result of his
hornet mission are these:
Will the hornets build combs,
similar to a bee's honeycomb, in
the same manner they do on
earth? Or will these combs be
larger, smaller or built at a dif-
ferent angle?
Israel Fears for U.S. Aid Future
By YORAM KESSEL
(Jerusalem)
And WOLF BLITZEK
(Washington)
London Chronicle Syndicate
Israel is desperately try-
ing to play down an alleged
plot to smuggle krytrons
timing devices which can be
used in the manufacture of
nuclear weapons out of
the United States and into
Israel. Future U.S. aid to
Israel could be seriously
affected.
An Israeli Defense Ministry
spokesman has confirmed that a
"certain number" of krytrons
were brought to Israel between
1979 and 1983, but stressed that
they had been used in the research
and development of conventional
weapons only.
THE SPOKESMAN said that
some of the krytrons had been us-
ed, while others were still in stock.
None had been sent out of Israel
again for use by other countries,
Newsweek, claimed in a report.
Shimon Peres, the Israeli Prime
Minister, denied that Israel had
been involved in any plot to smug-
gle krytrons out of the U.S.
The extremely close U.S.-Israeli
relationship meant that Israel did
not have to use clandestine means
to obtain such high-technology
devices.
The man allegedly involved in
the secret plot is an Israeli film en-
trepreneur and businessman, Ar-
non Milchan, who is well-known
for having conducted various
arms deals.
MILCHAN DESCRIBED as
ludicrous attempts to create an
impression that he had been in-
volved "in some sort of fantasy
secret nuclear arms deal."
Newsweek said that, when
Milchan was contacted in Paris,
he insisted that he knew nothing
about the alleged plan.
He said that his family's
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business in Tel Aviv, Milchan
Brothers, might be involved, but
he himself had had no association
with the company for 12 years.
The case could have serious im-
Dlications for Israel. An amend-
ment attached to the pending
Foreign Aid Bill would cut off all
U.S. financial assistance to any
country found guilty of attemp-
ting to smuggle out of America
material involved in the produc-
tion of nuclear weapons.
IRONICALLY, that amend
ment was introduced by
Representative Stephen Solarz
(D., N.Y.), who is one of Israel's
best friends in Congress.
Another amendment, the
Helms-Hecht amendment, seeks
to require the U.S. State Depart-
ment to include Jewish settlers on
the West Bank and in the Gaza
Strip in the foreign aid allocation.
In specific terms, it would order
the $17 million due to be alloted to
American private, voluntary
organizations working on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to be
available for Jews as well as
Palestinians on a percentage
basis.
IN THE PAST, the U.S. has
always opposed any financial
assistance for Jewish settlement
in the occupied territories.
JFS Case History
Mr. T. contacted the agency
for marital counseling. When the
therapist contacted Mr. T. to set
up an appointment he stated
that he felt that the problem was
really his wife's. He would be
willing to come in with her but
he disclaimed any responsibility
in the marital conflict. The
worker told Mr. T. that she
needed to see both Mr. and Mrs.
to understand the problem and
what it meant to the two of
them.
Mr. T. was a very anxious 50
year old man who kept running
his hands through his thinning
hair during the first interview.
He was employed as an ac-
countant in a manufacturing
firm in Dade County. Mrs. T.
was a pleasant looking attractive
SO year old woman who was
dressed appropriately and
stylishly. She was currently
working as a secretary in an
advertising agency.
Mr. T. kept stating over and
over that if his wife stopped
working there would be no
problems. He saw Mrs. T.'s
working as getting in the way of
their family life. He said that the
children had to do too many
things for themselves without
their mother's assistance and
supervision and that he often
had to come home and wait for
his dinner. Mrs. T. replied that
she had no thoughts of giving up
her job and that she had waited
until the children were in junior
high school to go back to work.
Mrs. T. had prepared herself to
re-enter the work world by at-
tending a local vocational school.
She said that working was
important to her aa a person and
that the family could use the
additional income which was
budgeted for future college
tuitions.
At first Mr. T. tried to deny
that his wife's income would be
helpful but soon admitted that it
probably would be useful.
In counseling the T.s were
helped to develop new ex-
pectations for their relationship
and to define new roles for each
other. Mr. T. had very fixed
ideas about the way a wife
should stay home which was the
way his mother did. He was able
finally to accept his wife's desire
to work and not be threatened
by it. He also began to observe
indications of his children's
independence which pleased him.
Mrs. T. was able to work out
in counseling that she had to
redefine her role at home; that it
was no longer possible for her to
work full time, be a mother, wife
and a full time homemaker. She
had to learn to involve the
family in doing household tasks,
especially Mr. T. whom she had
never involved in that role.
The T.s had many ups and
downs in their adjustment but
because of their strong com-
mitments to their relationship
worked it through. On their last
interview at the agency, Mr. T.
said he was surprised at the way
he had come "full circle" as he
smiled fondly at his wife.
NCJW Dinner
June 14
The Plantation section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women will be gathering for din-
ner at the Inverrary Country Club
on Tuesday evening, June 14, at
6:30 p.m.
This will mark the 10th anniver-
sary of officers for this extremely
active community service
organization in West Broward.
These women have volunteered
their time for the senior citizens at
the Jewish Community Center by
sponsoring the holiday parties.
Ambliopia screening also goes on
every month reaching out to all
pre-school childen throughout the
community. Baskets go to the
needy, clothing and toys go to
shelters, and the list of good deeds
goes on and on.
Will space travel affect the
hornets' unusual capability to con-
vert sunlight into electricity? On
Earth, this capability provides
power for their natural air-
conditioning units, which help
them survive in the 110-degree
heat found near the Dead Sea.
Will the hornets work
together, as they do on Earth, or
will they become disoriented and
abandon their cooperative
instincts?
Will the hornet's unhatched
young, or pupae, still emit a
"hunger signal" a rhythmic
beat emerging from the comb
when they are hungry in space?
Ishay, 54, said the hornets were
expected to be sent up sometime
between July and October, 1986.
His shuttle project will mark the
first time that the Israel Space
Agency and the National
Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration (NASA) have col-
laborated on a space mission.
ISHAY SAID the hornets
would be enclosed in a box about
the size of a large typewriter case
that will be stationed on the mid-
deck, near the front of the space
shuttle.
He said 10 hornets would be
enclosed in each of 18 compart-
ments inside the metal locker. The
temperature will be kept at about
84 degrees a condition the
hornets are used to in their
natural habitat of the Middle
East, East Africa and India.
"We are using Oriental hornets
because they are the only species
of hornets that builds a comb in
laboratory conditions and without
a queen," he said. "Within four to
six days after they are sent up, we
ORIENTAL hornets norn*.
attach their comb to the roofV
small chamber in the mnriJ
then build i==S55a
center of gravity. In laboratj
experiments, they have beaffl
to detect as little as a th28
of Earth's gravity, Ishay ST
Ishay believes that the rmJ
will build their combs in a 2
fashion in the space shuttle 7
will test his hypothesis in !
number of ways. |
Some of the hornets will \ \
light affects the way they build '
THE HORNETS also will h. |
placed inside three different
shaped containers box-shaped
egg-shaped and domed-shaped -
to see where they attach their
combs.
Ishay said he was not worried
that the hornets would die
space, becuase of their unusal
abilities to adapt. In laboratory
experiments, they have survived
up to 500 times the gravity found
on Earth, he said.
Contrary to the case on some
past shuttle flights, NASA of-
ficials are not requiring the Td
Aviv University professor to
remove the hornets' stingers -
event though the venom of 40 to
50 Oriental hornets is potent
enough to kill a person.
"Oriental hornets are one of the
most dangerous types of
hornets," Ishay said. "But don't
worry. There is no chance that
they will be able to escape."
Reprinted by permission of
the Philadelphia Enquirer
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Friday, June 7, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 9
Pan Am.
The Key lb
A Great European
Vacation.
LOW Fares. No airline has lower fares to
more European destinations than Pan Am.
And only Pan Am flies all 747's to Europe.
Affordable
Hotel Accom-
modations.
Thanks to
Pan Am, you
can rest as-
sured that al-
most anywhere
you spend a day,
you'll have a place
to spend the night.
You'll be able to
check into any of
these select ho-
tels: Holiday Inn
$26 a night, Best
Western$28 a
night including
breakfast. Trust-
house Forte Hotel
$27 a night including
breakfast? The only
thing harder than finding a
hotel room in Europe is finding
one at these prices.
Lowest Priced
Car Rentals.
With Pan Am, you're
free to see as much or
as little of Europe as
you want. And, at
your own pace.
Rent a Kemwel
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with unlimited
mileage, for as
little as $69 to
$79 a week. No
one has lower
prices.
Call Ynnr Travel Agent Today.
fares Shown Are Each Way, Based On Roundtrip Purchase And Do Not Include $3 Departure Tax.
I London:
I Paris
Home
[Frankfurt
I Zurich
I Nice
Berlin
Warsaw
399s0
" 1 V \II\AB
142700
VtS- $483
6/l-WM'YMXAP
418
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4715C
SM-904/YHXAP
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444
f. 1 t H.YHXABJM
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fl.IS/YH
Brussels
Athens**
Dubrovnik
Amsterdam
Hamburg
Belgrade
Munich
Bucharest
$449*0
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508
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I444OO
i/l-WMlYHXABW
580"
VB-fM YHAP
Stuttgart
Nuremberg
Zagreb
Istanbul
Budapest
Geneva
Vienna
41800
.. I 1 U MIXABIM
$44400
6ll'14'YHXABlM
508
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VIS-WM/ YHXAP
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S/I-WM' YHXAP
* **50 with*** for won. lr.vH to OS MS-WM
f*rt Fact: There are advance purchase and length of
PJ'''Julr<'menlt depending on your destination.
j-'ncellaiion penalties may also apply. Some farrt require
L '*? on specific days of the week Travel at these fares
pust originate and/or terminate by a specific date
m" K "n your denation. Seats are limited. All fare
Ruirr roundtrip purchase and are subject to change
I ,.L*'Firt: Car rentals not available in Bucharest.
rppsl Istanbul or Warsaw. Car offer good now thru
October 31, N85 There are some age requirements and gas.
optional insurance, collision damage waiver, taxes and drop-
oft charges are extra. .
Hotel Facts: Hotel accommodations not available in
Athens, Belgrade, Bucharest. Budapest, Dubrovnik^
Istanbul, Warsaw, or Zagreb. Hotel pnees are per person
based on double occupancy Seasonal supplements
apply m certain cities.~Trusthouse ForteHotels available
only in U.K
The key to a great European vacation this summer is flying
Pan Am. For starters, Pan Am is the key to incredibly low fares,
spacious 747's, and the choice of the most cities in Europe of any
airline. Then you get a key to something to help you see Europe
once you've arrived. A Kemwel rental car with unlimited mileage
for as little as $69 a week. And last, a key to one of the rarest sights
in all of Europe: Hotel Accommodations. Hotel vouchers must be
purchased in advance for the number of nights you plan on being
in Europe. And, they're refundable, in case you have a change of
heart or plans. .
Pan Am. We'll get you keyed up about going to Europe this
summer. ..... .m
For more information on Pan Am Hobday 497, call your
Travel Agent or Pan Am in Miami at (305) 874-5000, en espanol
(305) 874-4455, in Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood at (305) 462-6600,
and in other areas at 1-800-221-1111.
Pan Am
You Can't Beat The Experience.
^a^. '^ ^h


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, June 7, 1985
Q and A On Medicare
INTER-FAITH HARMONY From left to
right, Rev. John Winters, Sister Noel
Boggs of the Archdiocese of Miami, Ar-
chbishop Edward McCarthy of the Ar-
chdiocese of Miami, Rabbi Harold Richter
of the Jewish Federation of South Broward
and the Rev. Gail Reynolds, president of
the Hollywood Ministerial Association,
1'Dined together to remember 10 years of the
nter-Faith Council of Greater Hollywood.
The council celebrated its 10th anniversary
earlier this month in a program at the
Hollywood Hills United Methodist Church.
INTER-FAITH BELIEF Mayor David
Keating received a plaque from Rabbi
Robert Frazin, President-elect of the Inter-
Faith Council of Greater Hollywood, for his
dedication to brotherhood. Keating was be-
ing honored since he was the first president
of the Inter-Faith Council, which
celebrated its 10th anniversary earlier this
month.
Inter-Faith Council's 10th Year
The Inter-Faith Council of
Greater Hollywood celebrated its
10th year anniversary earlier this
month with a look back at the past
decade of Inter-Faith activity in
the community.
Archbishop Edward McCarthy
of the Archdiocese of Miami, the
keynote speaker, focused on
"inter-faith relations in the age of
space and technology." The ar-
chbishop talked about the issues
and relationships that developed
from Pope Paul VTs Vatican II
declarations of 20 years ago.
Vatican II asked people to be
more understanding and less
obstructive and suspicious of the
Catholic Church.
The archbishop said Pope John
Paul II feels these suspicions have
been removed throughout the
years because of actions by inter-
faith groups.
McCarthy said inter-faith ac-
tivities have nurtured mutual
reconciliation between Catholics
and Jews. There also have been
coalitions established to deal with
social issues such as the Religious
Heritage Task Force against
crime.
The archbishop said he believed
that inter-faith forums can deal
with many social justice issues and
encourage people to participate.
particularly where there can be
agreement.
At the end of the 20th Century,
the archbishop said, the National
Council of Catholic Bishops will
establish a large social agenda
looking at the economy; social
justice regarding the needs of the
poor over the needs of the rich;
workers over profit makers. The
archbishop used as an example of
these issues Florida and National
Impact, which is a lobbying
organization made up of in-
dividuals, members of religious
organizations and representatives
from various faiths and churches.
The archdiocese has set up the
St. Thomas Lutheran-Catholic
Dialogue; and the Anglican-
Catholic Dialogue at Barry
University because in the end, we
all as individuals form one com-
munity, we all share a common
destiny with G-d's providence and
goodness.
The Inter-Faith Council of
Greater Hollywood celebrated its
10-year anniversary at The
Hollywood Hills United Methodist
Church. Reverend Dr. John
Winters hosted the evening pro-
gram with Rabbi Robert Frazin,
President-elect of the Inter-Faith
Council officiating.
The Inter-Faith Choir perform-
ed a special musical program and
past presidents Sal Olivery and
Sandi Khani presented a nostalgic
look at the past 10 years of Inter-
Faith activity in the community.
Jewish Day School
In Tampa
Seeking Full-Time Hebrew Teacher, and
Part-Time Kindergarten Aide.
If interested in either position, please call:
813-875-8287
By MARGARITA FIKS
Q: I asked Medicare for a
hearing, and I'm now waiting for
the date of the hearing. I wonder
what I can do in order to win
that hearing? I'm planning to
represent myself
A: In order to win a hearing,
you will need to present any
appropriate evidence indicating
that the initial Medicare decision
on your claim was incorrect. You
may begin collecting your
evidence by calling your doctor
and requesting a detailed
operative report on the per-
formed service. Also, organize
any hospital statements, doc-
tor's bills and Medicare
paperwork that apply to this
particular case. You may need to
speak with a nurse who filed
your Medicare claim. Or, you
may need to look through
Medicare technical literature.
The more effort you will put into
preparing facts for the hearing,
the more chances you have to
win your case. In the future, you
may ask someone else to
represent you at a hearing. Keep
in mind that you can ask
Medicare Information Service for
help. Experienced volunteers at
our service represent Medicare
beneficiaries in appeal cases of
Medicare Part A and Part B free
of charge, and over the years
MIS helped many of our clients
to win back additional Medicare
payments. You can contact any
of the three MIS offices by
calling 966-0956 in Hollywood,
735-3394 in Fort Lauderdale, and
427-8508 in Deerfield Beach.
Q: As a recovering stroke
victim, rm presently undergoing
rehabilitation therapy. Among
many exercises, one includes
extensive use of an exercycle. I
am wondering if Medicare could
pay anything to reimburse me
for the use of such equipment,
rm thinking of buying an
exercycle for the use at home.
A: Medicare will deny your
claim for the cost of an exer-
cycle. Since exercycle is basically
exercise equipment which is not
primarily medical in nature.
Medicare denies any coverage for
the equipment.
Jewish Family Service u
recipient agency of Jewi,h
Federation of South Broward,
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and the United
Way of Broward County. If ^
have a Medicare question or
problem: CALL Medicare
Information Service of Broward
County at 966-0956 in
Hollywood, 735-3394 in Port
Lauderdale, and 427-8508 in..
Deerfield Beach.
Lessons
Are Ignored
TEL AVIV (JTA) Tne
lessons learned from the Lebanon
war are not being applied to the
Israel Defense Force, State Com-
ptroller Yitzhak Tunik charged in
a report highly critical of the
General Staff and the defense
establishment.
The 90-page report expressed
concern about the cumulative ef-
fects on the IDF's operational
capability as a result of defense
budget cuts and the war in
Lebanon and the General Staffs
lack of emphasis on the lessons
learned. According to Tunik, the
chief of Staffs demand that every
change in training programs must
be brought to him personally for
prior approval makes the process
cumbersome.
He found that the General Staff
has neither set priorities nor pro-
vided the wherewithal for the
lessons to be incorporated into
doctrine. Although the IDF has
been increased in size, its training
budget has been reduced with pro-
found effects on the quality of the
army, particularly its reserve
forces, tiie comptroller said.
He criticized the shortage
simulators which would allod
reservists to train at their bases
rather than going into the field for
training in tanks and other expen-
sive heavy equipment.
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BaVMBBBBeal
Despite Argentine Democratic
large, Anti-Semitism on Rise
BUENOS AIRES -
(JTA) A year-and-a-half
after the democratic change
in regime in Argentina, the
recurrence of anti-Semitism
and the weakening of
Argentine-Israeli relations
have come to be major con-
cerns of Jewish communal
'leadership here, the World
Jewish Congress reports.
According to the Latin
American branch of the WJC, the
Jewish community remains one of
the most enthusiastic supporters
of the Alfonsin government, but
its enthusiasm has been tempered
by its concern with not only rising
anti-Semitism in the country but a
perceptible shift away from Israel
'by Argentina in its Middle East
policy.
THESE JEWISH fears were
expressed during a meeting bet-
ween the Minister of Interior, An-
tonio Troccoli, and represen-
tatives of the DAIA, the represen-
tative body of Argentine Jewry
and the WJC affiliate here.
Following the meeting, the Presi-
dent of the DAIA, David
Goldberg, told reporters:
"There is an anti-Semitic escala-
tion in the country, with a clear
anti-democratic connotation,
which finds expression in attacks
' against synagogues, Jewish
schools and cultural centers, graf-
fiti in central streets, and
anonymous telephone and written
threats against leaders and other
members of the community."
Goldberg noted that during a re-
cent soccer game a Nazi banner
with a swastika was raised. "All
this does not just happen. It is a
well-orchestrated campaign
undertaken by anti-democratic
sectors and this is why society as a
whole must forcefully react to
such incidents." He added: "We
know that anti-Semitic organiza-
tions are active in Argentina."
The Jewish community has also
been shaken by the non-
fulfillment of the planned visit of
President Raul Alfonsin to Israel,
the WJC further reported. Since
the beginning of the year it had
been understood that the head of
the Argentine government would
visit the Jewish State in June
either before or after his presence
in Geneva to address the Interna-
tional Labor Organization.
HOWEVER, hardly had Alfon-
sin ended his American tour when
the Foreign Ministry announced
that "it had never been foreseen
that the President would make an
official visit to Israel," which in
turn led to a statement by the
Israeli Ambassador that "the in-
vitation (to visit Israel) had been
accepted" but no definite date had
been set.
Third World expectations about
Argentine diplomacy evidently
prevailed in this matter, and in
particular, considerations concer-
ning United Nations votes and the
role which Argentina believes it
can play among the non-aligned
countries.
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Friday, June 7, 1985rThe Jewish Ftoridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11
Florida AmK Women Celebrate 60th Year
Amit Women, Florida Council
(formerly American Mizrachi
Women) celebrated its 60th an-
niversary earlier this month with
more than 450 members attending
the annual donor luncheon on
Miami Beach.
Amit Women, a major women's
religious organization, operates in
Israel 20 high schools, community
centers and youth villages which
provide more than 16,000 needy
youngsters with education and
social care. Amit youth villages
are home to almost 200 Ethiopian
Jewish children who recently ar-
rived in Israel.
Give Your Recipes
The Gulden's Taste
VEGETABLE STII-HtY
2 teaspoons comstarcti
Vi cup soy sauce
1 cup chicken broth
'-'< cup Gulden's Spicy
Brown Mustard
ft teaspoon powdered
ginger
3 tablespoons vegetable
oil
t cup or '/v large chopped
Spanish onion
1 thinly sliced red bell pepper
t thinly sliced green bell
pepper
6 ozs tresh or frozen
Chinese pea pods
8 ozs. fresh bean sprouts
Cooked rice
CHUNKY SWCY
Premix comstarch with soy sauce. Mix together soy
sauce mixture, chicken broth, mustard, and ginger.
Heat vegetable oil in a large skillet Stir-fry onions arid
peppers for 3 minutes, stir in pea pods and cook for an
additional 2 minutes. Stir in soy sauce mixture. Bring
to a boil while stirring constantly. Gently stir in bean
sprouts. Heat to warm Serve over rice Makes 4-6
servings
Vi cup mayonnaise
V} cup dairy sour cream
V? cup crumbled Bleu cheese
2 tablespoons Gulden's Spicy
Brown Mustard
Thoroughly
combine all
ingredients.
Refrigerate
until well
chilled
Makes
about
1)4 cups
dressing
.

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.,-,.., i.iwwaiu-riuiiywooa/rnaay, June 7, 1985
Ethiopian Jews Experience
Culture Shock in Israel
Continued from Page 1
the concepts of rabbinic
Judaism.
"It's not updating their
religion. It's just giving
them the progress of
Judaism through the last
2,000 years. The Mishnah.
The Talmud.
"All of us received these
things, but the problem is
that they were separated
from the Jewish people,"
Aron said.
But Aron emphasized that
Israel does not want the
Ethiopian Jews to lose their
heritage.
"We tell them to keep
their heritage. We en-
courage them to keep their
heritage," Aron said, ad-
ding that Ethiopian Jewish
children will be taught to
read and write in Amharic
so they will be able to talk to
their parents and grand-
parents. Amharic is the
native tongue of the Ethio-
pian Jews.
These are the problems
facing Aron's department
which has been given the
task of settling the Ethio-
pian Jews and other olim in-
to Israeli society.
Israeli officials are trying
to avoid the mistakes made
during previous waves of
aliyah, specifically with
Sephardic Jews immediate-
ly after the founding of the
state.
"We do not want to create
Ethiopian ghettos. That
would be a very big
mistake," Aron said. "They
will live all around the coun-
try, but only in strong towns
and cities Jerusalem, Tel
Aviv, Haifa, Netanya."
Aron said Ethiopian Jews
have asked that they live
five to six families in a
building. They also want no
more than 30 Ethiopian
families to live in a
neighborhood with other
Israelis.
"We'll see if we can match
that," Aron said.
"We also are trying to
create an autonomous
Ethiopian leadership that
will speak for the communi-
ty. We do not want them
totally dependent and
passive.
"We're trying to teach
them to be independent and
active. We would like the se-
cond generation to be ab-
sorbed," he said.
GSPECIALIZED CARE
DRTHEHOMEBOUND
24 hr. nursing service since 1972
Serving All Dade & Broward Counties
R.N.'s, LP.N.'s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
Specialize in Live-Ins & Post Hospital Care
Insurance Assignments
ALL DADE HOME CARE
r 6-0383 Hwd. 963-1417 Ft. Laud. 566-6503
where shopping is o pleasure 7doys o week
Publi. Bak.n.i open .1 8:00 A.M.
Available at PubHx Stores with
Frash Danish Bakarias Only.
Makes DaMcious Garlic Braad
French Bread
69
Available at Publix Storaa with
Frash Oantah Bakariaa Only.
"Juet Baked" Flavor
Chocolate Chip
Cookies
$1
dozen
29
Availabla at PubHx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakarias Only,
Topped with Chocolate Icing,
7-Inch Size
Chocolate Cake
$999
each Mm
AvaftaMa at AN PuMx Store*
and Danish Bakariaa.
Cinnamon, Powder ad or Plain, Family Pak
CakeDonuts.................SfM*1
lead
YeHow Cupcakes.........SiM*
Deecloua
Danish Almond Ring.....-a,*!88
Prices Effective
June 6 thru 12. 1985
A variable at PubHx Storaa with Frash
Danish Bakariaa Only.
6 m 99*
Plain or Onion
Bagels..................
Serve with PubHx ke Cream
Apple Pie......................M88
McCain*
mi in i
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 6
Book of
Cakes and Pies
81.79
Waich foi
Ne Books Weekly


HMBbbhI
Friday, June 7, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 13
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good/year SIZE PRICE P155 80-13 34 85 SIZE P205 7S IS PWCE 53.88
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P185/80R13 49.62 92.24 182.48 ]
P18575R14 55.08 103.16 204.32 ]
P19575R14 59.50 112.00 222.00J
P205/75R14 60.96 114.92 227.84 J
P205 7SR15 62.39 117.78 233.56 I
P21S75R15 66.16 125.32 248.64 1
P22575R1S 1 68.02 129.04 256.08
P23575R15 [ 72.62 | 138.24 274~48 j
FIBERGLASS BELTED
SIZE 1TIRE 2 TIRES 4 TIRES
P19575B14 2918 51.36 100.72
P205.75B14 30.18 53.36 104.04
P21575B14 31.08 55.16 108.32
P22575B14 34.23 1.44 120.92
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P22575B15 33.59 60.18 118.36
P23575B15 35.82 64.64 127.28 I
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SIZE h 1T1RE 2 TIRES 4 tires]
P165/B0R13 33.50 60.00 118.00
P185/80R13 35.57 84.14 176.28
P185/75R14 30.57 72.14 141.00
P195/75R14 38.25 80.50 137.00
P205/75R14 40.11 73.22 144.44 J
P215/75R14 44.04 81.08 100.10
P205/75R15 43.52 80-04 158.08
P215/75R15 42.01 78.82 15564
P22S/75R15 45.18 83 36 104.72
P235/75R15 46.75 86.50 171.00 j
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l.'.IMIN
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P165/80B13
P175/80B13
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P17575814^
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BUY DIRECT FROM
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5512 33.98
14513 30.98
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175/70-13 41.98
185 70-13 48.95
10570-14 49.95
1856515 TOM
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145SR13
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165SR13
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28.05
28.95
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P77 WHITEWALLS
XZX TUBELESS WHITE
P-METRIC
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wt | wet
P175/80R13 I 81.88
P18S7SRI4 84.95
P19575R14 I 88.95
P205 70R 14 78.95
SIZE PRICE
P20570R13 53.05
P18575R14 S4.0S
P19S76R14 58.95
P20575R15 03.05
P215 75R15 00.05
P22S70R15 77.05
P155-80-13
P165 80 13
38.98
43 95
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SIZE
P19575-14
P20575-15
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P205 75R15
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750-16 XCAT 8 Ply 106 95
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N KENDALL OR ......S.W. 88th St and 107th Ave 595
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PLANTATION ....... ........381 N. State Rd. 7 587-2186
POMPANO BEACH ...........3151N Federal Hwy 943-4200
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TAMARAC ...........N. Univ. Dr. & McNab Rd. 721-4700
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoUywood/Friday, June 7, 1985
Soviet Jewry update
SHNIRMAN GIVEN THE
TREATMENT'
It seems that almost universally
Jews who are given sentences for
any reason find that their punish-
ment is doubled, and the prison or
camp authorities are ready to
make them understand that.
ANATOLY SHCHARANSKY,
YOSIF BEGUN, YURY TAR-
NOPOLSKY, ZAKHAR ZUN-
SHAIN, ALEXANDER KHOL-
MIANSKY, all of them quickly
found out that they would be con-
sidered special cases who merited
additional punishment.
Recently we learned about
28-year-old SIMON SHNIRMAN
from Kerch, who was sentenced to
three years detention for refusing
to serve in the army because he
thought it would stop him from
getting a visa for Israel, and then
another three years on January
10, 1983 for refusing a second
time.
According to reports, Shnirman
has already served seven periods
of isolation in the punishment cell.
Last February he was given a
four-month punishment in the
Vinnitsa region camp prison. His
wife Elizaveta has expressed a
fear that the camp authorities
might avail themselves of recent
legislation to increase the overall
sentence, on the grounds that he
is "a persistent offender against
camp regulations."
She recently went to Moscow to
ask the Labor Camps Head Ad-
ministrator to have SIMON
transferred to another camp on
the grounds that he was being vic-
timized. She was told that all
camps were the same, and that
Shnirman was at fault because he
retained "wrong ideas." She has
now written to Mikhail
Gorbachov.
SHNIRMAN married
ELIZAVETA, a girl from
Kishinev, in 1983. Their daughter
YONA was born when her father
was already in prison.
LATE NEWS
ANATOLY VIRSHUVSKY (or
VIRSHUBSKY), the young man
from Moscow who was accused of
stealing books from the Kiev
Synagogue, was, on Tuesday May
7 sentenced to two years im-
prisonment. We have no further
details at the time of publication.
IDA NUDEL
Ida Nudel, perhaps the best
known and loved woman
refusenik, now living in Bendery,
Moldavian SSR, is suffering from
some sort of stomach cancer.
We were informed that a few
days ago Ida was taken off a train
bound for Moscow. She did,
however, later manage to arrive
in the capital, where she consulted
a doctor specializing in
homeopathy, who was prepared to
begin treatment provided she
could attend sessions regularly.
We understand that Ida will be
asking the appropriate authorities
to allow her a temporary stay in
Moscow to receive the special
treatment, which she believes will
help her condition.
Last month IDA celebrated her
54th birthday, and although she
already knew about her illness she
kept it secret from most of her
friends. During the past 14 years
as a refusenik in exile and now in
banishment, Ida has captured the
hearts of all those who knew her,
not only for her outstanding
courage and fighting spirit, but
also for her deep concern for the
right of Jews to be allowed to be
repatriated to Israel.
A LETTER FROM YOSIF
There was some alleviation of
the deep depression felt by INN A,
YOSIF BEGUN's wife, and
BORIS, his son, at the news of
YOSIF's transfer to Chistopol
prison, when they received a let-
ter from him, the first in five
months.
"We were both very, very hap-
py," INNA told a friend on Fri-
day, May 3. "It was like a drink of
water after months in a desert.
Although the letter was
generally sad, it nevertheless con-
tained the courage and forward
looking hope characteristic of the
imprisoned 52-year-old Candidate
of Technical Sciences and teacher
of Hebrew. "Even more impor-
tant," INNA said, "was the sug-
gestion that BORIS and I may be
allowed a short visit (2-3 hours)
next June. If that really happens,
it will be joy indeed."
YOSIF BEGUN, a refusenik
since 1971, has served two periods
in exile. On November 6, 1983 he
was arrested for a third time on
charges of "Anti-Soviet Agita-
tion." At a trial in October, 1983,
which his wife and son called a
"total farce," YOSIF was
sentenced to seven years labor
camp which will be followed by
five years exile.
Last month, the terms of
YOSIF's detention in labor camp
were changed to a stricter regime
he was sent to serve the next
three years in the notorious
Chistopol prison.
NO AMNESTY FOR
PRISONERS OF ZION
Details of the conditions of the
amnesty for some Soviet
prisoners to coincide with the 40th
Anniversay of Victory over the
Nazis were published in the Soviet
press last month.
All those serving sentences for
crimes against the State (Article
190/1 and 70 of the RSFSR
Criminal Code) are excluded. This
applies almost universally to all
so-called Prisoners of Zion. The
possible exception is ALEX-
ANDER KHOLMIANSKY,
sentenced for possessing ammuni-
tion. The KHOLMIANSKY
FAMILY are claiming that
ALEXANDER'S case entitles him
to a release. And indeed it was
hinted to them by the camp
authorities in Sverdlovsk region
that if ALEXANDER "behaved"
himself, such might be the
outcome.
WIVES THREATENED
INNA, TANIA and FANYA,
the wives of Prisoners of Zion
The
Brlckman
Hotel...
a catsklll
resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun...M
SS75-S390
Per week, per person (dW. occ.)
Every room with Private Bath,
Air Conditioning and Color TV.
For reservations and
information phone
1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South FaJbburg. MY 12779
Master Card, visa, Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole got course.
When you escape the Florida heat this
Summer, escape to something more
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
>fou go on vacation to do more than Ive
from one meal to the next That's why we're
on the Modified American Plan, serving two
sumptuous meals dairy. Breakfast (until 1130
am), and Dinner (from 630 to 830 pm).
Midday snacks? Magnificent Poofide
Coffee Shop.
There l be no arrouncement at 1 pm
calng you back to the Dining RoornWich
you just left, no need to rush off golf course
or tennis courts. Linger at the,pool al day If
you choose. We have one outdoor and
indoor (containing health dub and jet
whirlpool spa). Play duplicate bridge, take
art classes, go fok dancing, jog, or work out
on our Universal mini- gym. to short, enjoy a
ful day of outdoor activities and sunshine,
and al the other 'fabulous things we have to
offer, toducfing entertainment mat's second
to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun...not something that gets
in the way of fun!
We dOtl t \ yburhostforthnegmefaUonSf
The Posner Family
YOSIF BEGUN, YULY
EDELSHTEIN and YOSIF
BERENSHTEIN have been
warned by the KGB that if they
continued to agitate on their
husbands' behalf, they would find
themselves in trouble. Allegedly
they were told: "You could find
yourselves not seeing your
husbands for a very long time."
PROTEST OF TWO LEN-
INGRAD REFUSENIKS
VLADIMIR LIFSHITS, who as
we reported last week began a
hunger strike in protest against
non-delivery of his mail, was join-
ed on May 2 by BORIS
DEVYATOV, in his early thirties,
ilso of Leningrad, who has writ-
ten to the Supreme Soviet and to
the Central Committee of the
Communist Party, protesting
against the general harassment of
Jews and specifically for "stopp-
ing of teaching of the Hebrew
language and Jewish culture "
MARK NIEPOMNIASHCHY
MARK NIEPOMNIASHCHY
of Odessa, who recently
sentenced to three years im
pnsonment for allegedly "urfZ
ing the Soviet Sta." l*^,
the labor camp on April 24, wher,
he will serve his time. In a uZ
to his family dated Mav T
NIEPOMNIASHCHY sai?thi
he has already started work His
address is:
USSR, UKR. SSR., Krimsluv, I
Ob.ast.Simferpolaaa^Sl
YOSIF ZISELS
YOSIF ZISELS, a 39-year-old
radio engineer from Chernovtsy
a former member of the dissident
Ukrainian Helsinki Monitorine
Group, was sentenced on April 10
to three years in camp. We do not
have details of the charges.
Japan Lectures Israel
On Release of Okamoto
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel has undergone the
painful and humiliating experience of being lectured to by a
foreign country about the evils and dangers of surrender-
ing to Palestinian terrorists' blackmail.
The Ambassador of Japan, Shozo Kadota, called on
Director-General of the Foreign Ministry David Kimche to
inform Israel of his country's "regret" over the release of
Kozo Okamoto, who killed 27 people in a terror attack at
Ben Gurion Airport in 1972.
OKAMOTO ARRIVED in Libya from Geneva am
reportedly collapsed at the airport and was taken to a
hospital.
Kimche, in response, said Israel itself "regretted that
its action had "caused concern and unease in Tokyo. This
was certainly not Israel's intention .. Israel had no choice
in light of its humanitarian .. effort to secure the release
of its three prisoners ..."
Candle Lighting Time
June 7 7:50 p.m.
June 14 7:53 p.m.
Religious directory
ORTHODOX
rwwwwMM U*J TtaA^ lAwWA in* q.ii..wfau n~* Rivrf gsfjg.
dale; 468-1877. Rabbi Rafael Tennonbaua. Daily service* 7:66 a.m., 6:80 p.m.; Friday
evening, 6:80 p.m.; Saturday morning, 0 s.m., Batuidaj evening, 7:80 p.m.. Sunday
8:30 a.m. and 6:80 p.m. Religious school: Grades 1-8. Nursery school Monday
through Friday-
Yeeng Ianal *f Hofljussd 8291 Stirling Road; 966-7877, Rabbi Edward Davi.
Dairy services, 7:80 e-m.. sundown; Sabbath services, on* hour before sundown; Sab-
bath morning, 9 o'clock; Sunday, 8 s.m.
CON8ERVATITK
HaJlaadal* Jewish Ceater 416 NE 8th Ave.; 464-9100. Rabbi Carl Klein. Daily
services, 8:80 a.m 6:80 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46 ajn.
Tsssais Bath Baal 1400 N. 46th Av*., Hollywood; 981-6111. Rsbbi Morton
Malavsky. Daily services, 7:46 B-m., sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:16 o'clock; Sab-
bath morning, 9 o'clock. Religious school: Kindergarten-8.
Tansy!* Beta Aim 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood; 481-6100. Rabbi Avraham
Kapnek. Services dairy 8 a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning 8:46 a-m. Religious
School: Nursery, Bar aftevah, Judaiea High School.
Tes.pl* Ianal of Uirassar 6920 SW S6tfa St; 961-1700. Rabbi Raphael Adtar.
Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath. 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46 o'clock. Religious
School: pre-kindergarten8.
Tesnal* Sinai -1201 Johnson St, Hollywood: 920-1677. Rabbi Richard J. Margolit,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 9 a.m. Religious school: Pre-kindergarten-Judaica High
School.
REFORM
Temple Bath El 1861S. 14th Avn., Hollywood: 990*228. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffa.
Sabbath evening 8 p.m. Sabbath morning 11 a.m. Religious school: Grades K-10.
Taanal* Bath Esaet Pembroke Finos General Hospital suditorium, 2261 Univerav
ty Drive, Pembroke Pines: 4814688. Rabbi Iteniiall Greenspon. Sabbath service*,
8:16 pnL Religious school: rY*Jdirfe*ai1*o-10.
Tesssle Solol 6100 Sheridan 8t, Hollywood: 96*0206. Rabbi Robert P. Fraxm.
Sabbath service*, 8:16 o.m.; Sabbath morning, 10:80 o'eloek Religious school: Pre-
sehool-12.
RECON8TRUCTIONI8T
- 1x801 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation: 4724600. Rabbi Elbot
Mflsfl. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m. Religious school: Pr^ldndargart*o-8.


Friday, June 7, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 15

4*i
Jcc
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838 HOLLYWOOD BLVD HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 3 3020
921-6511
SUMMER SPECIAL
The Jewish Community Centers
of South Broward will sponsor a
"Summer Special" at the Raleigh
Hotel in the New York Catskills.
The one-week vacation Aug.
4-11 includes round-trip airfare,
three gourmet meals daily, and
recreational activities. The cost is
$675 per person for double oc-
cupancy. A $100 deposit is needed
before June 1.
For more information, contact
Dene at 921-6511.
TENNIS
The Jewish Community Centers
Synagogue News
TEMPLE BETH EL
Academic Achievement awards
at the Temple Beth El Religious
School and the Hebrew Depart-
ment were presented earlier this
month at the closing school
session.
The followng are the award-
winning students:
Hebrew Level I: Esther Rosen-
baum, Ariana Meyer. Hebrew
Level II: Brian Lerner. Hebrew
Level III: Andrew Finegold.
Hebrew Level IV: Stacy Gordon.
Academic Achievement in Sunday
School: Grade I: Tracee Lea
Sampson. Grade II: Melissa Bar-
ton, Jennifer Glantz, Spencer
Gold. Grade III: Jason Gordon.
Grade IV: Esther Rosenbaum,
David Goldstein. Grade V:
Stephanie Esbin, Brian Lerner.
Grade VI: Andrew Finegold, Geri
Newburge, Richard Goldstein.
Grade VII: George Soriano, Shani
Kanner. Grade VIII: Marni Kar-
ren. Grade IX: Teri Goldfine.
Sara Selis, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Selis, was presented
,the Jodi Sandier Memorial
Award, for being the outstanding
Confirmand for a superior job in
Confirmation studies this year.
The President's Award, intiated
by Mr. and Mrs. Milton Forman,
for outstanding achievement
which encompasses Scholarship,
attendance and character was
presented to Marni Karren,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Karren.
TEMPLE SOLEL
Family Night Shabbat Worship
Service will begin at 7:30 p.m.,
Friday, June 7. Rabbi Robert P.
Frasin will conduct the Worship
Service. Cantor Israel Rosen will
chant the liturgical portion of the
Service. The Solel Singers will
participate in song.
The Oneg Shabbat following the
Worship Service will be hosted by
Dr. and Mrs. Charles Kahn in
honor of their son Evan, and Mr.
and Mrs. Allan Carmel in honor of
their son Mark.
Shabbat Morning Worship Ser-
vice will begin at 10:30 am.,
Saturday, June 8. During this
Worship Service Evan Lawrence
Kahn, son of Charles and Elaine
Kahn and Mark Jason Carmel, son
of Allan and Barbara Carmel will
be called to the Torah to become
B'nai Mitzvah.
Evan is in the 7th grade at
Pinecrest Preparatory School and
in the 7th Grade of the Abe and
Grace Durbin School of Living
Judaism.
Mark is in the 7th grade at
University School and in the 7th
Grade of the Abe and Grace Dur-
bin School of Living Judaism.
TEMPLE BETH AHM
Sabbath evening services will
be held at 8 p.m. Friday, with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek of-
ficiating and Cantor Abraham
Koster chanting the Liturgy.
Sabbath morning services con-
tinue at 8:45 a.m. with Junior
Congregation at 10 a.m.
There are still some openings in
Summer Camp Chai. For further
information call the Temple office
at 431-5100.
Registration is being taken for
the Religious School.
LIFE CARE
NURSING SERVICE
COMPLETE HOME HEALTH CARE SERVICE
REGISTERED NURSES
PHYSICAL, SPEECH
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
HOMEMAKER/HOME
HEALTH AIDES
MEDICAL SOCIAL
WORKERS
COMPANIONS SITTERS
ATTENDANTS
24 HOUR SERVICE
ADJUSTABLE RATES
983-6979
SEE JUST HOW AFFORDABLE WE ARE
of South Broward will sponsor a
mixed-doubles tennis tournament
June 9 at David Park Recreation
Center.
The cost to join the tennis tour-
nament is $15 per person for JCC
members and $20 for non-
members. The number of tennis
players participating in the tour-
nament will be limited to 12 men
and 12 women.
For more information, contact
Jeff at 921-6511. Applications can
be picked up at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, 2838 Hollywood
Blvd.
SEA ESCAPE
The Jewish Community Centers
of South Broward invites the
public to join the Tampa Sea
Escape-Dinner Theatre Tour plan-
ned for July 30 to Aug. 1.
The tour includes round-trip
motorcoach transportation, full
day cruise with casino and three
meals, deluxe hotel accommoda-
tions including breakfast and din-
ner plus Naples Dinner Theater.
The cost for JCC members is
$199 with non-members paying
$209 for double-room occupancy.
A $50 deposit is needed by June
15.
For more information, call
921-6511.
NUREYEV
The Jewish Community Centers
of South Broward is now selling
tickets for Rudolph Nureyev's
performance in "Giselle," which
will be held June 25 in the Dade
County Auditorium.
Cost for JCC members is $35 a
ticket with non-members paying
$37. Transportation from the
center is available. Only a limited
number of seats are available.
For reservations, call Dene at
921-6511.
GOLF-THEATER
Golfers are invited to par-
ticipate in a three-day golf and
theater retreat which will be spon-
sored by the Jewish Community
Centers of South Broward.
The three-day event beginning
July 16 will be held at the Sand-
piper Bay Hotel in Port St. Lucie.
The activities include golfing, ten-
nis and an evening at the Burt
Reynolds Dinner Theater.
The cost to JCC members is
$199 per person for double-room
occupancy with non-members pay-
ing $209. A $50 deposit is needed
by June 8.
Round-trip transportation from
the center will be available.
For reservations and informa-
tion, call Dene at 921-6511.
Gold Coast BBYO
Elects Officers
The Gold Coast Council of B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization elected
its slate of officers earlier this
month to represent the 600 youth
in the Gold Coast Council region.
The elections took place at the
Gold Coast Council Convention
which was held at the Eden Roc
Hotel on Miami Beach.
The officers for the various
branches of BBYO are:
AZA, the boy's branch of
BBYO, elected Ed Capp of Planta-
tion, President; Darren Frost of
Plantation, Vice President; Jeff
Moshe of Plantation, Membership
Vice President North; Jason
Goodman of Pembroke Pines,
Membership Vice President
South; and David Dunay of Boca
Raton, Secretary. The job of these
officers is to oversee and assist
the ten chapters in Gold Coast
Council.
BBG, the B'nai B'rith girls,
elected as their officers Ilyssa
Kraus of Plantation, President;
Stacy Steiner of Plantation, Pro-
gram Vice President; Lisa Stein-
man of Coral Springs, Member-
ship Vice President North; Sheryl
Sandburg of North Miami Beach,
Membership Vice President
South; and Kerith Stern of Pem-
broke Pines, Secretary. The job of
We Hope
' You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument. Inc.
.'b1' Nortneast 2nd Avenue
I hi LollP< 1
Phone 759-1669
these officers is to assist the more
than 13 BBG Chapters throughout
the council.
BBYO is the world's largest
Jewish youth organization, offer-
ing a well-rounded program that
includes religious heritage, social
and athletic programs, communi-
ty service and a wide range of in-
ternational and regional leader-
ship programs. Any Jewish teen
between 14 and 18 is eligible to
join.
^HOTLINE-,
TO JERUSALEM
In time ol illness, surgery or
crisis, special prayers will be
recited at the Western Wall and
at eur Yeshiva in Jerusalem.
CALL 24 HOURS
(718)871-4111
A FREE PUBLIC SERVICE OF
The American Rabbi Neir
Baal Haness Charity
KOLEL AMERICA
132 N.iiou St NT. NT 10038
V W I A. 1 J j jA
Mishnayolh. Yizkot & Yortzeil
observed with a minyon in our
Yeshiva Heichal Rabbi Meir
Baal Haness in Jerusalem
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Remember Kolei America
Rabbi Meir Baal Haness In
Your Will
Order Our Puihka. "A Stful* Per God
Health Happinesi And Succeu
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Without Spending a Dime
At first glance, ift just a living room
filled with furniture. Or maybe ift
a garage filled with tools. Oracloset
filled with clothes
It might not be worth much to you.
but to us its worth millions. Ift worth
medicine and medical supplies lor
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital fa the Aged
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible. Of course, we will be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience. A licensed
appraiser is available upon request.
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
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Its that easy. And you'll feel like a
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Irving Cypen Chairman of the Board
Harold Beck. President
Aaron Kravitz. Chairman. Thrift Shop
Committee
Red O. Hit. Executive Director
J


.'
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood/Friday, June 7, 1986

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