The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00037

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
f South Broward
[Volume 15 Number 9
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 26,1966
"Sfr*S*oo*l
Price 35 Cents
Gov. Graham speaks
to Business Forum May 6
Florida Governor Bob
[Graham will appear in the
South Broward Jewish
community Monday May 6
at a special monthly
meeting of the Business
Executive Forum, spon-
sored by the Jewish
Federation of South
Broward.
Graham recently
returned from Israel on a
South Florida mission
[which he headed. On that
trip, the Governor met with
the leaders of the Jewish
State, toured the country,
and saw how Florida's
businesses can interact
1 with Israel.
Throughout his political
areer, Graham has been a
[strong supporter of Jewish
[issues and the State of
[Israel.
To accomadate the
I Governor's schedule, the
Business Forum will
convene this month on a
Monday rather than its Florida Governor Bob Graham
traditional Thursday
meeting day. The starting
time is unusual also 5
p.m., a half-hour earlier
than usual.
As always, the meeting
will be held at the Emerald
Hills Country Club, 4100 N.
Hills Drive, Hollywood.
Four sponsors will help
defray costs of this
meeting.
They are: Darby and
Way, Inc., Engineers,
Surveyors, Planner, and
Landscape Architects,
Gold Coast Savings and
Loan Association of
Florida, Edward Wacks
.Financial Corp., Real
Estate Syndicators, and
Teltec Saving Com-
munications Co.
There is no charge to
attend any meeting of the
Forum. Complimentary
hors d'oeuvres will be
served, and a cash bar will
be available.
Part IV: The West Bank
|By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
NABLUS (JTA) The
test Bank is a time bomb
aiting to explode. The
vest Bank is a foundry
"here suspicion, hatred and
hostility is being forged.
The West Bank is a series
political Rorschach ink
Wots waiting to be
FPreted.
m-
The West Bank is a
rale and uneasy mix of
lews and Arabs. The West
Pa"k >s a maze of super
highways and superan-
hfed roads, the first
gdmg to Jewish set-
pments, the latter to Arab
jwns and villages. The
,RBa?k. w fear- T1"5
.l ,Bank none of these
->'isolation but all of these
ericably interwoven.
On the 60-kilometer drive
^m Jerusalem, along
PairP>n turns through
F"ntains ^ vaJley8i
plate, craggy, moon-like
The Other Side of Israel
landscapes are the per-
vasive designs.
Occasionally, there is a
stretch of green denoting
some plant life and a few
meager crops, a stretch of
olive trees basking in the
warm spring sun, some
furrowed fields waiting for
the first signs of crops to
emerge, and lifeless
terraced mountains once
fruitful but now barren.
Israeli soldiers, in their
teens or barely out of them,
stand forlornly, two each,
in front of refugee camps
while inside the camps
youngsters and adults
roam through mud streets
and live in conditions of
squalor and penury. These
camps are seething with
resentment and anger and
spawn tomorrow's fighters
against the "Zionist en-
tity."
On the roads, a lonely
merchant in an occasional
tourist shop or cafe
lackadaisically waits for a
customer and when one
comes along, laconically
and perfunctorily goes
through the motions of
human relations.
On most days the area is
smothered in eerie silence,
giving the impression of a
dream-like apparition.
There are no signs of
people, other than in the
main market squares or in
and around schools, nor
signs of Israeli soldiers nor
border police. Unless there
is trouble, they are inside
the military compounds
which are usually just on
the outskirts of the larger
cities.
But there are days when
the area is punctuated with
the sounds of violence, and
the roads and streets are
pock-marked with strewn
rocks and Molotov
cocktails and burning tires
filling the air with acrid
smoke. Then, Israeli
patrols are everywhere.
Nablus itself is Charles Boyer would rather
reminiscent of an old tired be caught dead than alive,
movie set in which even Continued on Page H-
INSIDE: A discussion on the work of Marc Chagall
"Jewish subconscious."


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26,1986
UJA/Florida region plans Young Leadership retreat
The Young Men's and
Women's Leadership Cabinets of
the United Jewish Appeal, in
cooperation with Council of
Jewish Federations and the
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations, have set the dates
for the 1985 UJ A-Florida
Regional Young Leadership
Retreat. The program titled Dor
Hadash "A New Generation"
will take place Friday, May 3-
Sunday, May 5 at Grenelefe
Resort in Haines City. Florida.
South Broward expects about 30
representatives.
Co-chairing the retreat
program are Linda Hoffman, of
the Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet; Robert C. Maland of
the Young Leadership Cabinet
and Mel Pearlman of the Council
of Jewish Federations
Leadership Development
Committee. The program will
feature as scholar-in-residence
Dr. Irving "Yitz" Greenberg,
Director of the National
Resource Center and special
guest The Honorable Thomas
Harkin, United States Senator
D-Iowa. The program will in-
clude workshops on the
American-Israeli Political Scene;
Campaign; Leadership Roles;
and Community Development.
There will also be a Middle East
Update. The retreat will also
include special programming for
children, as well as a unique
Shabbat experience.
Linda Hoffman is a member of
the Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet and serves on the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division
Campaign Steering Committee
and Executive Board. She also
serves as the South Dade Area
Co-Chair for Campaign; a
member of the Campaign
Steering Committee and Area
Executive Board. She is also a
member of the New Gifts
Rabbi Margolis bbbies on Capitol Hill for Soviet Jews
About one hundred rabbis
from around the United States
came to Washington to lobby for
the rights of Soviet Jews last
month. Representing the Soviet
Jewry Committee of the
Federation was Rabbi Richard
Margolis of Temple Sinai.
Rabbi Margolis met with Rep.
Larry Smith and Sen. Lawton
Chiles to speak about the change
in power in the Soviet Union and
how it may affect Jews there.
Later in the day, March 20, the
rabbinical group met with
President Reagan at the White
House.
"There is a strong sentiment
favoring the needs of Soviet
Jews in Capitol Hill these days,"
Margolis said. "That the decline
in emigration over the last five
Dor L'dor update
On March 13, our first Dor
L'Dor workshop was held, at-
tended by 70 people. This new
educational concept called Dor
L'Dor, meaning from Generation
to Generation, is based on the
Jewish tradition of having an
elder or Melamed enrich the
learning process of Jewish
children.
The topic for the first
workshop was "Positive Self
Image," and it was led by Dr.
Tamara Cohen, a local
psychologist.
Our second workshop, held on
March 20 was entitled
"Creativity." It was led by
Selma Hopen and Marsha
Kreitman. Mrs. Hopen explained
how the program was conceived,
based on a senior mentor
program that she instituted in
the public schools five years ago.
The program is now channelled
Jewishly and will shortly be in
our religious school.
Marsha Kreitman, the curator
of education at the Art and
Culture Center of Hollywood,
was the second leader of the
workshop. Demonstrating
creativity, she proved that
everyone has the potential for
creativity.
The third workshop, held on
March 26, was led by Barbara
Weiner, kindergarten depart-
ment head of Temple Beth
Shalom, and Rosy In Seidel
Educational Director of Temple
Sinai. Ms. Weiner showed a
video tape of the children with
whom the Melameds will be
working. The workshop ended
with a Show-and-Share session
where everyone demonstrated a
Jewish item that he had brought
along. Then Roayln Seidel
reminisced about her childhood
and related a humorous story
about her religious education.
All three workshops were
videotaped, and articles were
printed in local newspapers.
Eight area Rabbis made
comments on Jewish creativity
which were compiled,
distributed, and read at all
workshops.
The Melamed questionnaires
were explained and then
collected at each workshop. We
now have on file, 48 people who
Shalom event April 28
The third and last Shalom
event of the season will be a
mini-breakfast Sunday April 28
beginning at 9:45 a.m. at the
Jewish Federation building, 2719
Hollywood Blvd.
The Shalom program is meant
for welcoming new arrivals into
our community to what is
available in terms of Jewish
services and friends here. It is
co-sponsored by the Jewish
Community Center of South
Broward and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
If you know of a newcomer to
our community, please invite
him or her. Reservations are
necessary and can be made
through Joan Youdelman at 921-
6511 or Debbie Stevens, 921-
8810. Babysitters can be made
available.
Charitable giving
seminar May 7
A seminar for professionals
regarding the tax aspects of
charitable giving will be held
Tuesday May 7 between 8-10
a.m. at the Holiday Inn, 2276
State Road 84, at Interstate 95.
The program is presented by
the legal and tax committees of
the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
and the Jewish Federation of
Greater Fort Lauderdale. It is
intended for professionals who
advise clients on matters
relating to taxes, estate, and
charitable planning.
Stanley S. Wei thorn of the
firm Baer, Marks and L'pham,
New York, will speak on the
topic "The Do's and Don'ta of
Charitable Giving" with em-
phasis on the considerations of
the practical aspects of gifting.
Weithorn is the former tax
columnist for the National Law
Journal, a contributing editor of
Tax Management, and the
author of several books about
tax policies.
The seminar qualifies for CPE
and CLE credit. A registration
fee of $15 will be charged, and
breakfast will be served at 8:30
a.m. There is limited space, and
reservations can be made by
calling Legacy and Endowments
Director Mark Berkowitz at the
Federation in South Broward,
921-8810.
years has been tied to the decline
in Soviet-American relations is
clear to most Members of
Congress."
Margolis said a very strong
message was conveyed to
Congressmen that day, and that
it was well received. He said
both Smith and Chiles are highly
knowledgeable and sympathetic
to the issues, and are members
DOR L'DOR
to become
variety of their
from art to
are anxious
Melameds. The
talents range
wood carving.
One of these volunteers, Joe
Kleiman, led a training session
for Melameds on April 17 and
April 24 at the Federation
Building. On April 28, at 10 a.m.
the first interaction between
Melamed and children between
the ages of 10 to 13 years, will
take place at Temple Sinai, 1201
Johnson St. Our second in-
teraction date for pre-school
students, is May 1 at 9:30 a.m.
at Temple Beth Shalom, 1400 N.
46 Avenue.
The Dor L'Dor Committee
continues to meet, developing
new creative ideas to make the
program adaptable for our
religious schools.
This program has been
developed under the auspices of
the Education Committee of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, Sandra Ross,
Educational Director.
of the Congressional Coalition
for Soviet Jews.
Margolis and two other rabbis
from South Florida attempted to
meet with Sen. Paula Hawkins,
but could not because she was on
the floor of the Senate for the
day. debating the MX issue.
Instead they met with aides
from Hawkins' office.
President Reagan was familiar
with names of publicized
refuseniks, Margolis said, and
responded sensitively and af-
firmatively to the rabbis'
message.
He said that Reagan reported
of "private, diplomatic efforts"
that will be made to help Soviet
Jews as the new Gorbachev
administration settles into
power.
"If relations improve as they
seem to be, we may have reason
for increased optimism for in-
creased emigration and
decreased persecution of Soviet
Jews," Margolis said.
Committee. Mrs. Hoffman i, \
past PTA president of BrandaJ
Academy; Member 0f i
Central Agency for jJ
Education Board; and sits n Jl
the South Dade Advisory Board '
of the South Dade Office of the!
Greater Miami Jewi,h!
Federation.
Robert C. Maland is .
graduate of the University of
Florida's College of Law and is
partner in the law firm f
Rosenberg, Reisman and Glass
of Miami. He is a principal of
Genesis Development Group
Inc., an Israel trade development
company. He is a member of the
UJA Men's Young Leadership
Cabinet: a board member of the
Florida South East Holocaust
Memorial Center and a member
of the board of the Greater
Miami Jewihs Federation Cable
Television.
Mel Pearlman is the senior
partner of the law firm of
Pearlman and Kutner of
Orlando. He received his law
degree from the University of
Florida and also received a
Masters in Physics from F.I.T.
Mr. Pearlman is a founder of the
Community-Wide Holocaust
Education and Resource Center
and was its first vice president.
He is past president of the
Orlando Jewish Federation and
sits on the Council of Jewish
Federations National Leadership
Development Committee. In
1982 he was the recipient of the
Council of Jewish Federations
Young Leadership award.
For information on the Young
Leadership Development Retreat
contact Debbie Stevens at the
Federation, 921-8810.
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Friday, April 26, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywcod Page 3
From left, back row: Evan and Lawrence Gottlieb, children of survivors; Middle row: Bernard
Berkowitz, liberator; Mr. and Mrs. Victor Karp, survivors; Front Row: Toni and Shari
Weissberg, second and third generation children of survivors; Randi Gottlieb, child of survivor;
Mrs. Carl Rosenkopf, survivor.
From left, Richard BarnettjCRC Chairman; James Barnett. liberator; Paul Orlan, Holocaust
chairman; Stunner Kaye, JFSB Executive Director; Carl Rosenkopf, survivor, member of U S
Holocaust Commission.
Death camp liberator speaks
at Yom Hashoah program
"I opened the door, stepped
back out of the way fast. and
found my Judaism." Thus spoke
James J. Barnett, guest speaker
at the Yom Hashoah com-
| memoration held on Sunday,
April 14 at Temple Israel of
Miramar. The event, titled
; "Days of Remembrance: 40
Years Later We Remember The
Liberators," honored the
Holocaust survivors, their
| children, and the liberators.
There are only 246 liberators,
I so designated 'by Emory
1 University as the first three men
I who freed each concentration
camp. James J. Barnett is one of
these men. The year was 1944.
And l.e was 19 years old. Yes,
| Just 19 years old.
Recalling the events that
Preceded his becoming a
Liberator, Barnett told of his
early days, growing up in
"arberton, Ohio. While raised as
I* Jew, and becoming a bar
[mitzvah at 13, he felt no strong
1 identity with his religion.
In a surge of patriotism, at the
\*& of 17, he enlisted in the
gjr, rising to the rank of
IsSu?" Sergeant Major which
entitled him to lead the way on
Jtt fateful day in April, 1944.
"* name "Matthausen" didn't
12? ^ snify much to him
I wen. But it is seldom out of his
thoughts now. Unsuspecting, he
"BJked past barbed wire fencing
Mjhrough the bleak campgrounds.
m \T. r OP6""* it quickly
M instructed, the voice asked
bt >Du biat a Ykl?" I"
Barnett recalled, "the stench
fcn^ar?a-iwe.were8
I God thfl but ** grace of
V"< and the foresight of my
Women's Division Siate
of Officers 1985/86
President Meral Ehrenstein
Metro Campaign Vice President Susen Grossman
Beach Campaign Vice President Evelyn S tieber
Community Education Vice President Naomi Prever
Leadership Development Vice President Merle Orlove
In-Service Vice President Penny Warner
Secretary Sylvia Kalin
Parliamentarian Janie Berman
Nominating Committee Chairwoman Joyce Newman
Goodwill and Grievance Chairwoman Beverly Shapiro
2 appointees from the
Nominating Committee Hannah Adel
Joan Gross
WOMEN'S DIVISION
PROPOSED
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
1985-86
Hannah Adel Rochelle Koenig
Sis Altman Shirley Kravitz
Judee Barron Rhea Krieger
Libby Behar Isabelle Levene
Janie Herman Gloria Levin
Frances Briefer Merle Lundy
Nancy Brizel Audrey Meline
Anne Cohn Bea Mogilowitz
Edna Cohen Gerry Morrison
Barbara Desky Joyce Newman
Meral Ehrenstein Merle Orlove
Bertha Goldberg Fass Elaine Pittell
Mildred Friedman Naomi Prever
Edith Frost Arlene Ray
Sandi Gelfand Delia Rosenberg
Selma Gersten Avis Sachs
Ruth Glickman Joanne Schoenbaum
Ruth Goldberg Fredda Schwartz
Esther Gordon Dina Sedley
Mary Gottlieb Beverly Shapiro
Brenda Greenman Evelyn Stieber
Joan Gross Margarita Terkiel
Susen Grossman Doris Tolpen
Fran Has kin Penny Warner
Gloria Hess Edna Warren
Sylvia Kalin Dodie Weinstein
Roberta Karch Lynda Wilentz
Jo Ann Katz LilaZedek
Dina Kaye Helene Winnick
ASSOCIATE
BOARD MEMBERS
Mina Finkelstein Anne Lowe
Lillian Koffler Rhea Pollak
Gert Kronovet Sally Winograd
Temple Israel Choir led by Cantor Joseph Wichdewski per-
formed at Yom Haahoah, April 14, at Temple Israel of
Miramar.
grandfather, it could have been
me."
After World War II James J.
Barnett returned to the I.A.
Barnett Company in Ohio,
serving as Executive Vice
President until his retirement in
1982. Fonser Board member of
Temple Israel of Akron, Ohio,
Mr. Barnett is also former
Chairman of Israel Bonds,
former Board member of the
Jewish Federation of Akron, as
well as other Jewish
organizations. Mr. Barnett is
married and has three sons. One
son, Richard Barnett is chairman
of the Community Relations
Committee and a member of the
Board of Directors of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Prior to James Barnett's
speech, the Yom Hashoah
program featured a moving
Candlelighting ceremony led by
Carl Rosenkopf, past president
of the Ben Gurion Club.
Dedicated to the liberators,
survivors and children of the
survivors, they walked a solemn
march towards the pulpit,
lighting candles when they
reached the pulpit. Also par-
ticipating in the proceedings was
Paul Orlan, Holocaust Com-
mittee Chairman who introduced
the speaker and others, including
Mayor of Miramar Frank Branca
who proclaimed that April 14th
be designated the Day of the
Holocaust, the day of remem-
brance forever to be ob-
served.
Marine Jordan
CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
WASHINGTON. D C 20SI5
Lawrence J Smith
i(h Diaraict
April 14, 1985
Temple Israel of Miramar
6920 S.W. 35th Street
Miramar, Florida
Dear Friends:
I am sorry I cannot join you tonigh't for your special
program honoring both Liberators and Survivors of the
Holocaust.
We know the pain in remembering the holocaust
committed against our people, but only by recalling
that sacrifice can we prevent this atrc
happening again. The Holocaust survi
families' dedication is a visible
commitment to the Jewish heritage;
forget.
With warm regards.
y from
and their
ori of
II never
LJS:eh
Congressman Larry Smith sent his regret*.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26.1986
Arens fears Labor wants new elections
By ROSALIE ZALIS
Israel Today
LOS ANGELES Moshe
Arens does not demur when he is
introduced as a "future Prime
Minister of Israel." Amerian
born, a graduate of the*
prestigious MIT and Cal Tech
Universities. Arens is equally at
home in the United States and in
Israel. As Israel's Ambassador
to the United Nations, the
buttoned down and articulate
Arens was admired and
respected by the media, the
Reagan Administration, Capitol
Hill, and the American Jewish
community.
A pragmatic hardliner. Arens
believes that both Israel and the
U.S. must strengthen their
defenses to protect their security
and influence in the international
arena. This philosophy served
him well as Defense Secretary in
Begin s Likud government.
The Likud Party, now part of
Israel's National Unity
Government, is headed by
Yitzhak Shamir. According to
terms of the agreement with the
Labor Alignment, led by Shimon
Peres, Shamir should rotate into
the Prime Minister's slot in
March 1986. However. Arens is
concerned that Peres could
renege on this agreement if he
believes Labor has the clout to
gain solo control of the gover-
nment.
By bringing an issue to the
Knesset on which there is no
consensus, Peres could force a
"no confidence" vote, a collapse
of the government, and then
could call for a new election.
With such a scenario, the Likud
Party would hold internal
elections to determine the
position of its leaders on this
new slate. Shamir and the
popular David Levy are con-
sidered party favorites, but
Arens could emerge as a "dark
horse." Arena does not view
either former Prime Minister
Begin or former Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon aa party
standard bearers. "Begins
political days are in his past; he
will not stage a comeback," he
predicted, and Sharon is too
controversial both in and out of
Israel."
Recent polls published in
Israel's daily newspaper Maariv
indicate that Labor has gained
substantially since it won only
40 seats in the July 23 elections
and was forced into a bipartisan
government with the rival Likud
bloc, which garnered 41 seats,
and with six smaller parties. The
polls predict that Peres' party
could now win 55 seats in the
120-member* Knesset which,
together with the eight seats its
centrist and left wing allies could
win, would give the Labor bloc a
three vote majority without
including Likud and without the
support of the small religious
parties.
Arens believes the Likud can
meet the challenge and can win if
new elections are called but will
face an uphill battle in funding
the campaign because Labor
controls Israel's labor union, and
so much of industry that con-
tributes money to party politics
in Israel. Therefore, Arens
believes that Likud's immediate
goal is to raise Likud's 26
percent representation to more
than 33 percent in the Histadrut
elections slated for May 13. The
Histadrut Constitution states
that if Likud has less than one-
third representation. Labor
controls the Health Fund, Bank
Leumi and other subsidiaries.
Arens said that he sees two
essential differences between
Labor and Likud Israel's
relationship with the U.S. and
the economy.
"Israel is a Western country
with a Bolshevik economy." he
explained The GNP per capita
in Israel is $6,000 compared to
$12,000 in the U.S. and most of
the westernized countries. Arens
calls this inexcusable because
the skills, talent and
motivation in Israel are at the
top of the world and today it is
the resources above the ground
that determine the economic
strength of a country." Arens
blames Israel's stagnant
economy on the socialism
inherent in the Labor Party that
founded Israel, "a socialism that
believed in centralized economy
under government control." He
noted that 400,000 people, one-
third of Israel's work force, is on
the public payroll, which has
produced a sluggish economy
and the highest tax rate in the
world.
Arens, professing the Reagan
supply side theory of economics,
believes that Israel must open
its economy to the private
sector, must revise its tax
structure and must get
government and labor unions out
of business.
Noting his general agreement
with Secretary of State George
Schultz's assessment that Israel
must put its economic house in
order to receive increased U.S.
economic aid, Arena pointed out
an important essential difference
in this county's treatment of
Israel in the last few years.
Arens said. "In the past, the
U.S. would have demanded
political concessions in return for
aid, aa for example when the
U.S. interrupted the shipment of
F16s in 1962 when there was a
dispute between the two
countries, but now that attitude
is gone. Labor always claimed
that Likud was too hardline to
talk with Congress, yet it was
Likud who brought about the
best relations ever with
Washington."
Arens continued. "It was hard
work but we effectively com-
municated in a straight forward
fashion the areas about which
there could be no compromise;
we talked like two allies who
would meet halfway on any issue
that was not of ultimate im-
portance but who would not
yield one inch on issues of
survival." The State Depart-
ment, therefore, came to the
conclusion that it would be
counterproductive to press for
compromise on issues like Judea
and Samaria, according to
Arens.
Arens expressed concern that
this special U.S.-Israel
relationship might not be
sustained by the Labor
Government's policy of
weakness and appeasement.
"Likud moved the U.S. from
being a mediator of the Mideast
to being an ally and a friend," he
stated, "and the Labor gover-
nment is pushing them right
back into being a mediator, a
role in which the U.S. would be
forced to push Israel into
making concessions."
Moving to the question of
TheJcwiSrl
.FkwffciAM,
FREDSMOCMET
EdilO' and PuDiisner
of South Broward
Public at.on No (USPS 864 5001 (ISSN 0746-773?)
fnd Shochlt
ART HARRIS
Associate Editor
SUZANNE SMOCHET
Eiecutrve Editor
Published Bi Weekly Second Class Pottage paid at Maiiandaie. Fla
HOLLYWOOD FORT LAU0ER0ALE OFFICE. 83MW Oakland Part BJwJ.
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Main Oftice t Plant 120 NE 6th St Miami. Fla 33132-Pnone 1373,4605
POSTMASTER: Sand address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
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Saul Si.-ger Ted Newman and Nat Sedley Treasurer Or Howard Barron. Secretary Otto
Stieber fiecutive Director Sumner G Kaye Submit material lor publication to Art Harris
associate emor. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Florida 33020
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............ Number 9
Lebanon, Arens said that it is
unfair to blame Israel for the
eruption of Shiite terrorism, aa
its emergence was only a matter
of time. "The finger should be
pointed at Iran and Khomeini to
whom the Lebanese Shiites
pledge allegiance," Arens said,
"and at former President Jimmy
Carter for contributing to the
downfall of the Shah of Iran
which culminated in the
Ayatollah's ascension to power."
"Carter's handling of Iran was
abysmal," he concluded.
Arens believes that l*^
needs all the friends it can ,
and would welcome support from
Jesse Helms and any other
Congressmen who have
previously had negative voting
records. "During my years^
Washington, I personally knew
90 to 95 Senators on a first name
basis, but Helms was certainly
not one of them. However, if his
recent pro-Israel letter to the
President signifies a change of
heart, I welcome him with open
arms," stated Arens.
Cuba to allow rabbis to visit
during Jewish holidays
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Cuban government, reversing a
long-standing policy, has agreed
to liberalize its religious liberty
policy toward the small Cuban
Jewish community, including
permission for a rabbi to visit
and conduct religious services on
major Jewish holy days, the
American Jewish Committee
reported.
The announcement of im-
proved religious conditions for
Cuban Jewry was made by Dr.
Jose Felipe Carneado, director of
the Religious Affairs Division of
the Central Committee of the
Cuban Communist Partv
lOficina de Asuntos Religiosos
del Comite Central del PCCl,
during a meeting held on March
19 with three leaders of the
Cuban Jewish community: Dr.
Jose Miller, president of the
Jewish Community of Havana:
Moises Asis, secretary general,
and Abraham Berezniak, a
Jewish leader.
Leo Nevas, chairman of the
AJC's International Relations
Commission, and Rabbi Marc
Tanenbaum, AJC's international
relations director, characterized
the development as "an im-
portant breakthrough for the
continuity and survival of the
800-member Cuban Jewish
community."
According to the AJ( report,
the Cuban official has agreed "to
help Cuban Jewry open a kosher
restaurant in Old Havana
maintain and take care of
synagogues and Jewish
cemeteries, and open a Sunday
religious school for Jewish
children and young people."
Significantly. Carneado agreed
also to grant visas to rabbis who
will be allowed to conduct
religious services during the
major Jewish holy days
AJCongress criticizes
Social Security officials
The American Jewish
Congress has criticized the
Social Security Administration
for failing to notify Holocaust
survivors that reparations
payments they receive from
West Germany will no longer be
counted as income and used to
deny social security benefits.
Germany. A federal district
court upheld the federal agency,
but the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Ninth Circuit overturned
the lower court ruling and or-
dered Social Security officials to
stop including reparations
payments as income when
determining eligibility.
In an amicus, or friend-of-the-
court, brief which it filed with
the appeals court last year in the
Grunfeder case, AJCongress
argued that the Social Security
Administration should exempt
reparations payments just as H
exempts personal injury awards
and other "tort damages"
received as compensation for
civil loss. The brief declared that
Congress did not intend German
reparations to be considered as
"income" when it passed the
Social Security legislation, and
that this principle was long ago
recognized by the Internal
Revenue Service which exempts
such reparations from income
taxes.
Although a U.S. appeals court
ordered the federal agency last
November 26 to eliminate
reparations as a barrier to
benefits eligibility, Social
Security officials, while agreeing
applicants, have been dragging Israel to assist Caribbean agriculture
their feet in informing applicants
who previously had been turned
down that the rules have been
changed. AJCongress has
charged.
Friday, April 26, 196fJ
^'oltimelS
As a result, many survivors of
Nazi terror living in the U.S. are
still not aware of the federal
court ruling, says the
organization.
A Jetter sent to the federal
agency, by Naomi Levine and
Jerome J. Shestack. co-chairs of
the Commission on National
Affairs of AJCongress, was
critical of a memorandum from
the Social Security
Administration to its employees
instructing them not to search
out such cases and to apply the
federal court order only to cases
coming up after November 1,
1984.
A J Congress wants the federal
agency to "undertake an
aggressive approach to finding
potentially eligible
beneficiaries," including a review
of records of claimants who
previously had been denied
eligibility.
The organization also wants
the Social Security
Administration to issue an-
nouncements to the media of the
change in rules, to contact
organizations of Holocaust
survivors and to ask the West
German government to notify
reparations recipients residing in
the U.S. of the change in
regulations.
The appeals court ruling grew
out of a case brought on behalf
of Felicia Grunfeder, a disabled
Holocaust survivor who had
been turned down by the Social
Security Administration for
supplemental social security
payments because she was
receiving reparations from West
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel will help in agricultural
development in three Caribbean
countries the Dominican
Republic, Jamaica and Antigua
under a project sponsored by
the U.S. Agency for Inter-
national Development (AID).
The $550,000 grant for the "first-
of-kind agreement" was signed
at the State Department by M.
Peter McPherson, AID
Administrator, and Ambassador
Aharon Ofri of Israel's Mission
to the United Nations. AID will
finance technical services to be
implemented by Israel's Division
of International ooperation and
Center for International
Cooperation for Agricultural
Development.
AID has been seeking "better
ways of using the considerable
capability of Israel in connection
with our programs arond the
world," McPherson said as the
agreement was signed. "We are
particularly pleased that we can
put some of this competence at
the service of our Caribbean
friends."
McPherson called the j
agreement "a first modest step;
we look forward to continuing I
collaboration in the Caribbean]
and other parts of the world"
Ofri also said Israel wants to j
"broaden this cooperation to
other countries in the I Carib-
bean) region where our
assistance is requested.
Referring to future US-Israel
cooperation elsewhere, he
stressed in particular Africa
where "hunger is killing |
thousands of children a
adults."
The Hollywood Community and the Emerald Hi*
Organizations gathered Tuesday evening, March 26 to honor
Grandview Hadassah, accepting Verbena Levy, Emerald H"
B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 3107, Arnold Goldstein, PresiD
accepting, Sabra-Scopus Hadassah, Lucy Katz, President
accepting and Grandview American ORT, Annette Slow.
President, accepting. All were honored for their leadershipan"
achievements in the community with the coveted Israel Bon
Scroll of Honor. This was a beautiful and memorable evening
for all. From left, Verbena Levy, Arthur Goldstein, Luci*
Katz, Annette Sloss.
_.


Friday, April 26,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
It was a warm Friday af-
ternoon, that 5th of Adar 5708
(May 14, 1948) when they
crowded into the Tel Aviv
Museum to hear David Ben-
Gurion his white hair puffed
above his ears as he stood
beneath a picture of Theodore
Herzl and a Star of David
read the Declaration of
Independence for the newly
established State of Israel.
"Eretz Israel was the bir-
thplace of the Jewish people," he
An Israel Independence Day Message
began, as the crowd listened in
hushed silence. He recalled the
Jewish heritage and history from
ancient forced dispersion to the
recent United Nations partition
and read clearly, "We .
hereby declare the establishment
of a Jewish State in Eretz Israel,
to be known as the State of
Israel."
He appealed for peace as
bombs were being loaded onto
Arab planes, but he also, still
reading, spoke to us: "We
appeal to the Jewish people
throughout the diaspora to rally
round the Jews of Eretz Israel in
the tasks of immigration and
upbuilding and to stand by them
>n the great struggle for the
realization of the age-old dream
the redemption of Israel."
We American Jews have tried
to rally "in the tasks of im-
migration and upbuilding."
Through the United Jewish
Appeal-Federation Campaigns,
Grass re-elected UJA national chairman for 2086
NEW YORK Alex Grass of
Harrisburg, PA was
unanimously re-elected to his
second term as UJA National
Chairman. "I am honored," said
Grass, "to be chosen to lead the
1986 UJA-Federated Community
Camnaitrns. We have done quite
well in the '85 Campaign and I
predict even greater
achievements in the year ahead."
During his innovative first
year in office. Grass led the
UJA-Federated Community
Campaigns to new heights.
These included the campaign
Saudis may soon eat
Israeli kosher hotdogs
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
citizens of Saudi Arabia may
soon be eating strictly kosher
hot dogs made in Israel, though
they will not be labeled as such.
Reuven Maskit, general
manager of the Soglowek
Sausage and Meat Factory in
Nahariya, said that a European
middleman has offered to buy a
large consignment of kosher
sausages for shipment to Saudi
Arabia from Europe. According
to Maskit, the Saudi authorities
selected his product after
conducting an extensive market
survey which showed that
Soglowek meats are best suited
to their country's requirements.
The Nahariya factory is now
looking for a senior Moslem
religious figure to provide official
certification that the sausages
contain no pork or pork
byproducts which are forbidden
to Moslems as they are to Jews.
If the deal goes through, the
Israeli sausages will be marketed
in Saudi Arabia with no visible
indication of their country of
origin.
_______________________^^
opening in Israel last September
which raised more than SI 2
million; a Hineni meeting in
Washington, D.C., where
pledges came to $7.6 million, and
a national Young Leadership
Retreat raising $3.2 million. In
addition Super Sunday has
raised over $37 million and the
'85 Campaign is running almost
15 percent ahead of last year.
One of the most outstanding
accomplishments of Grass'
Chairmanship was Operation
Moses, which vividly demon-
strated that the Jewish people
will always take care of their
brethren regardless of the cir-
cumstances. When the final and
complete story can be published,
it will be recorded as one of the
Jewish people's most ex-
traordinary achievements.
Grass is a former Chairman of
the United Jewish Federation of
Greater Harrisburg which he led
to the highest per capita rate of
giving in the country. He for-
merly served as a UJA National
Vice Chairman and as President
and Chairman of the Board of
the Israel Education Fund.
for instance, we have helped
Israel absorb 1.8 million im-
migrants; aided pioneers who
have made the desert bloom;
provided for promising
university students, troubled
teenagers, needy senior citizens
and small children; and have
helped people in disadvantaged
neighborhoods. Since 1948 we
have raised over $10 billion, and
have allocated over half of that
the meet humanitarian needs in
Israel.
April 26 marks the 37th
anniversary of Israel's birth and
is an occasion for Jews to rejoice
around the world. It corresponds
to the 5th of Adar and will be
celebrated here April 25, to
precede Shabbat.
Israel has survived. That has
been no easy feat and her
continued survival must never
be taken for granted. We have
access to the Western Wall for
the first time in many years. We
have been gratified by a daring
peace treaty with Egypt, thrilled
by Entebbe, inspired by the
"coming home" to Israel of so
many Ethiopian Jews. But we
have also seen our Israeli
brothers and sisters suffer five
terrible wars, a cold peace and
dashed hopes.
Still, Israel at 37 is remarkable
among nations: a democracy in a
region of monarchs, sheiks and
dictators. She remains America's
staunchest ally, a place of
personal freedom, committed
and persevering against all odds.
We American Jews salute the
people of Israel, who have fought
the wars, taken the risks for
peace, fashioned the freedoms
and instilled pride in every Jew.
Israel is the center of world
Jewish affairs and you and I are
more secure and more fulfilled
because she has been restored in
our lifetime.
Let us sing and dance and
pray and give thanks on Yom
Haatzmaut, Israel's Indepen-
dence Day, for every year is a
miracle of its own. And let us
rededicate ourselves to the Jews
of Eretz Israel, "to stand by
them in the great struggle for
the realization of the age-old
dream the redemption of
Israel."
Shalom, ^^ GRASS
UJA National Chairman
Professionals' breakfast
May 2
The growth of anti-semitism in
Florida will be the subject of a
Professional's breakfast
Thursday May 2 at 7:30 a.m. at
the Emerald Hills Country Club,
4100 N. Hills Drive, Hollywood.
The speaker will be Dr. Stanley
Kessel.
Anti-semitic incidents
statewide increased 33 percent
last year, according to figures
released by the B'nai B'rith
Anti-Defamation League in its
annual audit. This is part of a
national trend, which League
officials labeled as "diaturbing."
To make reservations for the
Professional's Division break-
fast, please call Dave Kaplan at
the Federation, 921-8810.
Save
1 llwlCn enjoyai
Effort,
Worry
For a limited time, Amtrak has reduced the fare by 25%.
Time: You save 900 miles and 18 hours of hard driving when you take
the Auto Train. It transports you and your car from Sanford, Florida, near Orlando,
to Lorton, Virginia, near Washington.
Effort: It's hardly any effort at all. You can sightsee in the dome car,
socialize with friends around the piano in the lounge car, or watch a movie. You'll
enjoy a complimentary full course buffet dinner in the evening and a continental
breakfast in the morning.
Worry: You won't have a care in the world. You don't have to
search for a decent restaurant or a comfortable motel. Or worry about
your car and belongings.
For more information, call your travel agent or call Amtrak at
1 800-USA RAIL.


I
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26, 1986
On the Way Home (The Walk from Niezhin)
By ABBA BEN YAMIN
(Hebrew Name for
Abe Hal pern
PART III
In my last two articles entitled On the
Way Home, Parts I and II, I wrote that I
had to leave Simferopol as fast as I could.
The reason for this was that for five months I
was a member of a cell of Mensheviks
working surreptitiously for the overthrow of
the Communist regime in the USSR. This
cell consisted of six members including the
two leaders. The leaders were my good friend
Nikolai Matveyevich Petrov and his
assistant Isaac Moyseyevich Brodsky.
One of the members of the cell betrayed us.
We were all arrested by the local police and
representatives of the Cheka (Russian
acronym for Extraordinary Committee). The
Cheka was the forerunner for the NKVD
(National Committee for Internal Affairs). It
was finally succeeded by the KGB (Com-
mittee for Government Security).
We were taken to the police station and
questioned by the Cheka. Fortunately we
had destroyed all evidence. Everyone was
released except Petrov and Brodsky, who
were exiled to Siberia. (See Jewish Floridian
of Dec. 21,1984 and Jan. 4,1985).
It was on Monday, the third week of May
1922, when I left Simferopol. I traveled by
passenger-freight train and reached Niezhin
in three days. When I left Priluki for Sim-
feropol I was a youngster of 15. Now less
than a year later, because of all that I had
experienced in that short span of time, I felt
grown up and very much older than my age
of 16. During the three days on the train I
had plenty of time to reflect on all that had
happened to me.
As the train approached Niezhin my mind
kept whirling round and round in time with
the wheels, about my past, present and
uncertain future.
Anxious to catch the shuttle to Priluki I
got off the train in a hurry. To my disap-
pointment I was told that the shuttle tram
from Niezhin to Bachmach had already gone.
This shuttle train ran once a week on
Thursdays from Niezhin and returned to
Niezhin on Tuesdays. Bachmach was the
station at the other end of the shuttle.
At that time Niezhin, also spelled Nyezhin
or Nezhin, was a town of Russia m the
Chernigov Gubernya (State). Itchnya, my
birthplace was also a part of Chernigov
Gubemya, while Priluki was part of Poltava
Gubernya. It is on the railway between
Kursk and Kiev.
After the Second World War the entire
area was changed to the Chernigov Oblast
(Region). The town has been in existence for
hundreds and hundreds of years and in 1922
had a population of about 35,000, 10 percent
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of whom were Jews. The non-Jews were
mostly Little-Russians and belonged to the
Eastern Orthodox Church.
Until 1909 and 1910 there was no way to
get from Niezhin to Bachmach except by
horse and wagon or shanks' mare. It became
the junction for the wide railroad gage which
was built over a period of about three years.
Before my father left for America in 1912
he travelled with horse and wagon
throughout the area selling beer, vodka,
soda, candy, halvah, cigarettes and many
other items, a veritable village super market
on wheels. During the building of the
railroad he sold these items to the railroad
workers.
Although I was familiar with the area I
had never been to Niezhin.
It was early morning and I had several
options. I could walk to the Synagogue and
there try to find someone who was going to
Priluki by horse and wagon. Or I could try to
hire a horse and wagon to take me to my
destination. I realized however, that this
would take a great deal of time and I couldn't
be sure what would happen.
The station was at least a mile from the
beginning of the town. I therefore came to
the conclusion that the best thing for me to
do would be to walk to Priluki. The day was
warm and comfortable and since it was
approximately 35 miles I believed I could
reach Priluki by nightfall.
I decided to walk with the railroad tracks
in order not to get lost while going through
fields, forests and farms. After I rested a
while I began my trek with the railroad
tracks. On the way I had to stop and rest
several times.
When I reached the station at Linovitz, a
small village, it was almost twilight. I
realized that I had miscalculated because I
was still about 10 miles from Priluki. The
station was very small. There was no one
there but the waiting room was open. I didn't
want to spend the entire evening in the
station so I started walking to the village.
Soon after I started I caught up with a
farmer and his horse and wagon carrying
wood chopped from the nearby forest.
Together we walked slowly with the horse
and wagon. The young farmer told me that
he was recently married and that his farm
house was one of the first on the outskirts of
the village.
I told him that I was on the way to Priluki
which would take me about three or four
hours, but I didn't like to walk at night. He I
invited me to his home, have a meal and rest'
a while. But he warned me that I could not
Stay over. I thanked him and said that I
would walk back to the station and sit
there until morning.
When we reached the house he was greeted I
by his wife, a beautiful young girl. He in-
troduced us and she welcomed me warmly.!
He told her to prepare a meal for us. He I
would be with us in a short while. He had to
put the horse in the stall.
I was tired and hungry. I had a good meti
of grits, fresh milk, freshly baked bread and
fruit. I tried to keep awake but began to doze
off. Half asleep I heard them arguing. It
seemed to me that the wife asked her
husband to allow me to sleep over until
morning. But he insisted that he told me l
before he invited me in, that I must leave and
go back to the station. I picked up my
belongings, thanked them for their
hospitality and left.
I had taken just a few steps when he came
running after me and asked me to come back
and stay over night. He said that his wife
convinced him that it was the right thing to
do.
He then brought in a bundle of dry straw,
and spread it out in a corner of the room
where I was to sleep. As I was getting ready j
to lie down I asked him to please wake meat
soon as the sun rises because I wanted to get
an early start. I fell asleep immediately.
What seemed to me only a few minutes
later the farmer began shaking me. I thought I
that again he had changed his mind and
wanted me to to go back to the station. As I ]
got up I was surprised to see that the sun']
was rising. It was early dawn. I had slept |
more than nine hours.
The farmer brought me a glass of milk
with some cookies. He suggested to me not
to walk with the railroad tracks but to take;
Continued on Page 9-
An Evening With
Yitz Greenberg
Wednesday, May 8,1985
8:00 p.m.
Sheraton Riverhouse
Miami Airport
tt
The Challenges of Choice
93
The Challenges facing the Jewish Community as we enter the
21st Century.
- Admission Free to all current and prospective members of the
National Jewish Resource Center (Membership categories begin
at $100)
Host Committee
Judy and Michael Adler
Gladys and Rabbi Haskel Bernat
Linda and Kenneth Hoffman
Ellie and Herb Katz
DonLefton
THE NATIONAL
JEWISH RESOURCE
CENTER
Nancy and Norman Lipoff
Maxine and Kenneth Schwartz
Harry Smith
Barbara Wiener
JE
Educating Leaders
for Jewish Leadership


Friday, April 26,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Jewish Federation
1985 Missions
Singles Mission meeting May 8
IA meeting for prospective
ticipants of the 1985 National
nmer Singles Mission to
ldel will be held at the Jewish
deration May 8 at 7:30 p.m.
| Come meet the young
lembers of the community who
ill see the Jewish state together
Jid experience it like no other
federation group can. Listen to
jie reminiscences of last year's
gles Mission and the good
aies had in Jerusalem, Tel
viv, and rural parts of Israel.
now friendships made then
Lve lasted one year later.
[This year's mission leaves the
nited States on July 21 and
returns July 31. One price in-
cludes flights, from Fort
Lauderdale, meals, sightseeing,
ground transportation, guides
and hotels.
Participation is limited to
those currently single between
the ages of 22 and 40.
The trip includes organized
tours and free time in three
cities; Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and
Eilat. All hotels will be five star
- the Dan in Tel Aviv, the
Hilton in Jerusalem, and the
Sonesta in Eilat. South
Broward's delegation will share
its discoveries with members of
other Florida federations, and
Jewish singles from all over the
U.S.
This year a special "pre-
mission" to Paris will be offered.
There will be five days and four
nights in that city, which will
include meals and sightseeing.
The date for those leaving Fort
Lauderdale on the Paris-Israel
trip is July 17 with a July 22
arrival date in Israel.
For costs and to make
reservations for the mission
meeting, please contact Sheryll
Hirschberger at Federation, 921-
8810.
T
I
Return this form to:
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, FL 33020
Please send more information about Missions:
2 Prague Budapest Israel Mission, Sept 29 Oct. 13
D Young Leadership Mission to Israel, Oct. 5-16
D National Singles Mission to Israel, July 21-31
Name
^RA^,UE MISIPN MEETING From left, Mr. and Mrs. Joe and Jean Rosenberg, Mr.
nd Mrs. Henry and Florence Rick, Mr. and Mrs. Louis and Sarah Haut.
Address
City
Zip
Phone
m
JBMSH
rvuiorw.
FIH1D
iooooobobci
eoooooooooooooooooo
Jewish National Fund
Abraham Grunhut
Pres.JNFGr. Miami
Zev W. Kogan
Pres. JNF Southern Region.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn.
Ernest Samuels
V.P. JNF Gr. Miami
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board

GIVE HONOR UNTO WHOM HONOR IS DUE
9hndap,$u*u>2, 4985 0uba*uUna ^AluAiccU'&%emea*m
For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353. Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Tel 538-6464
Jewish National Fund Strengthens Israel
Strengthen the Jewish National Fund


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26,1986
Israel
I
Continued from Page 1
The city is on two levels:
the lower is filled with
shops, decrepit dwellings,
and the casbah; the upper
level is peppered with sun-
drenched and bleached
homes of the local middle
class. The casbah, with
labyrinthine alleyways and
innumerable stalls, with
hawking merchants and
gawking customers and
passerbys, is a sniper's
paradise.
The main entrances and
exits in the casbah were
sealed off by the Israeli
military government
personnel to prevent
terrorists from losing
themselves in there and
eluding the police and
soldiers. One or two of the
gateways were recently
reopened after the local
Arab officials promised to
apprehend terrorists in the
area. "We also did it as a
sign of good will and
trust," the local Israeli
military government
commander said.
Israeli soldiers and police
are seldom to be seen in the
casbah. It was a strange
sight, therefore, for the
denizens to see a convoy of
armed Israeli soldiers
marching through the
casbah flanking an army
spokesman, this reporter
and Gil Sedan, the Israeli
TV West Bank
correspondent and
correspondent for the
Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, as they walked
through the city streets and
the casbah at the invitation
of the local Israeli com-
mander.
"This is an unusual
scene," he said, "but we
can't allow non-Arab
persons to walk throuigh
the casbah by themselves.
You could get killed and
I'm sure you would rather
make the headlines than be
in the headlines." The
commander was in his late
twenties r early thirties,
clean shaven with close
cropped hair who looked
more like a kibbutznik than
a soldier.
He took the scene in his
stride and engaged in light
banter with this reporter
and Sedan. Told that we
appreciated the protection
to either side of us. he
smiled. Asked what we
should do if someone armed
approached us from up in
front, he smiled again and
said, "Duck." But on that
day, we didn't have to.
Nablus is one of the cities
on the West Bank where
there have been anti-Israeli
demonstrations. One
reason for this, it was
pointed out, is that the
local university of Al Najah
is a breeding place for PLO
sympathizers and student
.agitators, similar to the
situation at Bir Zeit
University near Ramallah.
"When classes are in
session the campuses are
volcanoes of terrorist

preparation and its lava
flow spills onto the streets
and highways," said one
military government of-
ficial. "When school lets
out, things are quiet."
He minimized the per-
ception which is prevalent
outside the West Bank and
Israel, that the West Bank
is seething with organized
armed mass resistance.
"There is no such thing,"
he said, "because the
people can't get together.
There is too much com-
petition between the PLO
and other groups,
especially the Moslem
Brotherhood which lurks
behind the scenes. Cer-
tainly most of the Arabs
here hate Israel, but many
also depend on Israel for
jobs and many, especially
the older Arabs and
merchants, want to be left
alone to ply their trade."
The official pointed out
that what is frequently
stressed in the press are the
rock-throwing, tire-burning
incidents and anti-Israeli
pro-PLO demonstrations
and attacks on Jewish
settlers by teen-agers and
their older mentors. "But
what is overlooked is that
while these incidents occur
in a few large towns, most
of the towns are quiet and
without disturbances, such
as Jericho and Jenin and
other places. This, too, is
part of the West Bank
reality."
Another reality is the
pervasiveness of PLO
propaganda among Arab
students and professors.
But a great deal of this
tends to be an unthinking,
uncritical acceptance of
emotion-laden and volatile
anti-Zionist shibboleths
and slogans. There is
almost no effort to develop
a coherent ideology and
there is a penchant for
gross distortion of history
even in the face of contrary
evidence. Dr. Morad Asi,
an assistant professor of
journalism at Najah
University in Nablus, is one
of these people.
During an interview at
his home in Nablus, on a
hill overlooking the
university, he defined
himself as a "moderate."
But during the almost one-
hour interview it became
apparent that his
moderateness was confined
to his willingness to "talk
to Jews and Zionists" but a
total unwillingness or
incapacity to reconsider
his thinking.
A Zionist, he said, "is a
person who thinks
Palestine should be ex-
clusively a Jewish state and
that the land belongs to the
Jews wherever if jj
Zionist is a person *
doesn't have to be a Jew *
who believes that PalestiflJ
the Holy Land or jwl
whatever you like to call it'l
belongs to the Jews and I
any other group doesnj
belong there."
Would it be correct
given this approach, tl
define adherents and
supporters of what J
called the Palesti?
liberation movement
Jewish Family Service case history
Lydia is a forty-two year old
woman who has been married to
forty-seven year old Norman for
22 years. They have a 20 year
old son who is a second year
student on full scholarship at a
first rate University, and an 18
year old daughter who had been
accepted at another top rated
University, also on a scholar-
ship. Lydia's mother and father
live near by and are an integral
part of this family's life.
Lydia initiated contact with
the agency when she was in an
emotional crisis. Her husband
had just lost his job because he
was "too stupid to see that his
principles were in conflict with
company policies." She was also
feeling "frantically busy"
getting her daugher ready to
leave for her first year at
college."
Lydia was a very bright,
attractive, well groomed, soft
spoken woman, who wore ex-
pensive clothes and jewelry. She
had a job as a part-time
teacher's aide in which she felt
over-worked and underpaid and
had been thinking of leaving.
She had a self effacing, gentle
manner of speaking and every
other sentence was punctuated
with a hostile statement about
her husband whom she described
as being a "weak, passive,
selfish, self-destructive man"
who never did anything right.
She further described their long
relationship as having been
unsatisfying over a period of 20
years. She said that since her
husband had become impotent a
few years ago due to a physical
problem, she "got nothing out of
it at all." It was a wonder to
Lydia how the children had
grown up so well adjusted and
competent, considering the lack
of input there had been from
their father. She stated that she
had been planning to leave him
when the children were on their
own and now she wanted to
leave before they were finished
with college because she didn't
know how she could continue to
live with such a "loser." Lydia
said she was furious with her
husband, he never did anything
right and he always ended up
"letting his family down."
Her husband got a job three
and a half weeks after therapy
had begun, and the family's
financial problems stabilized. As
Lydia's emotional crisis subsided
and her history unfolded, it
became apparent that she was an
intelligent, articulate, humorous
and dominating woman, who
generally had hill control of i
aspects of her life. She had I
personal fulfillment in
her children and they were i
embodiment of all of her dn
and ambitions. For the past
years she had been hari
resentments against her husk
because he'd been busy travel.
on business while she had i
raise the children alone. Lyi
described her early years
being dominated by her c
trolling, willful mother who I
forced her into an ea
marriage. She had ambivai
feelings towards her mother i
she said always negated
accomplishments and Ly
went out of her way to build i
her children's confidence
counteract her feelings of failu
She described feeling
emotional closeness to her fai
despite the fact that he wasi
weak, ineffectual person
would not have had fina
Continued on Page 11-
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lose who believe that Jews
lave no right to any part of
Lrael and should be driven
lut, he was asked.
I don't think so," he
Answered. "This is a big
jisrepresentation by
Zionist groups. Even if this
pas the view in the 1950 's
L 1960s, it was the view of
Immature people. No
jesponsible person would
lay such a thing."
Did he recognize that
[here were different ten-
dencies within the Zionist
novement ranging from
light to left, from secular to
[eligious, who had different
Hews about the Palestinian
[eople? Asi offered a half-
hearted yes.
Did he accept the fact
hat there were
[rganizations like the Brit
fhalom and Ichud in the
|930's and similar
rganizations today in
srael the Labor Party,
llapam, Peace Now
Ihich advocated peaceful
joexistence with the
Palestinian people and
ihich did not seek
erritorial conquests?
^gain, a half-hearted yes.
"But.*' he added, "these
just ideas, ideas that
ave not been put into
|ractice and those who try
put them into practice,
ke Emil Grunzweig (a
ace Now activist), get
|iemselves killed by other
onists."
I Who, he was asked, are
Grunzweigs among the
ilestinians and which are
ie organizations
uivalent to those in Israel
eking coexistence with
Jewish State and
cognizing its right to
|ist? He took time to sip
ae tea and then said,
iePLO."
lut the PLO was
responsible for the bloody
massacres against unarmed
civilians at Maalot,
Avivim, Munich, along the
Haifa-Tel Aviv highway,
Paris, Amsterdam, Athens
and along the Israel-
Lebanon border. Was this
how the PLO recognized
Israel's right to exist? Asi
cited attacks against Arab
villages by "Zionists."
These acts, he was told,
were condemned by the
official Zionist leaders and
by the Israeli government
as acts of extremists.
Where were similar con-
demnations of the PLO
atrocities by Palestinians
and who were they? Asi
went into an explanation
that defied the imagination.
"Arabs react, they don't
act," he said. "They react
to attacks, they don't
initiate them."
In Munich, he said, "the
guerrillas didn't kill the
Israeli athletes. The
German police did and they
tricked the guerrillas into
participating. In Maalot,
who started tne shooting?
On the Haifa-Tel Aviv
highway, they wanted to go
somewhere and negotiate
with the Israelis, but Israeli
troops attacked them."
Pressed for proof and told
that this view was totally
without foundation, he
looked at his watch and
said it was time for him to
leave for the university.
Asi is a mild-mannered,
soft-spoken man, even
gentle and sociable. He had
worked in the United
States, he said, for various
news agencies. There was
not a trace of hostility, of
animosity in his voice
during the interview. It was
all the more frightening
and sad to hear him
espouse such "moderate"
views. If this was
"moderate," what are the
extremists saying?
Friday, April 26,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 9
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During the drive back to
Jerusalem, the homes of the
Jewish settlers in Eton
Moreh could be seen on a
verdant hill not far from
Nablus. This reporter,
Sedan and the army
spokesman drove along a
super highway into the
settlement.
The streets were im-
maculately clean and the
homes along the treelined
streets and gardens evoked
a totally different world,
one of peace and serenity.
The stucco homes had the
appearance of stately
mansions. They were all
constructed by Arab labor
with what was apparently
loving care.
But why all that love and
care, this reporter asked the
army spokesman.
"Because," he answered,
"the Arabs feel that in a
few years all this will
belong to them."
Hadassah
conference
Ambassador Aryeh Levin,
Deputy Permanent Represen-
tative of Israel to the United
Nations, will be guest speaker
for the Florida Mid-Coast Region
of Hadassah Conference Sunday.
May 5, 8 p.m. at the Fort
Lauderdale Beach Hilton Inn.
Born in Tehran, Iran,
Ambassador Levin studied
idle Eastern History and
litics at the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem. He
served in the Jewish Agency,
Joint Distribution Committee,
was Director of emigrant camps
and active in emigration of
Kurdish and Iraqi and Iranian
Jews to Israel. He also served on
the IDF General Staff. He was
in the Israel Foreign Service. He
held Posts to Ethiopia. East and
Central Africa, France and Iran.
His last position in the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs was Director
of Middle East and Eastern
Mediterranean Division. He
published articles of political
analysis in the Israel Press and
contributed to foreign language
broadcasts of Voice of Israel
Radio programs.
Also, a guest speaker will be
Elaine Bloom, former member of
the Florida House of
Representatives, who has been
an active leader of the South
Florida community for many
years. She was the Founding
Chairperson of the Dade County
Commission on the Status of
Women. She has been
professionally active as a
Government Relations Con-
sultant and represents the
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations to develop their
government relations activities.
She is listed in many national
and international Who's Who
volumes. Ms. Bloom is well
known to radio and TV
audiences of the South Florida
area as the host of a weekly
program for WPBT-Channel 2
and a daily radio talk show on
WHAT.
On The Way Home
Continued from Page 6-
the dirt road because It was much shorter. I
thanked him once again and began my walk
home.
I could hardly wait to get home to be
reunited with my brothers, and to see my
sister again whom I had not seen for five
years. I was also anxious to meet my new
brother-in-law and curious to find out what
he was like.
I wondered how long it would take before
we could leave for America. I was ap-
prehensive about whether the KGB would
come after me in Priluki. But most im-
portant, was the question in my mind about
my immediate and long range future.
As I write this, 63 years later, the
memories and concerns of that day are still
crystal clear in my mind.
Emerson said "Mankind is divided bet-
ween the past and the future, between
memory and hope. While these are two
halves, it is not a complete whole!"
In order to bridge the gap between
"Memory and Hope," we have to utilize the
present each and every day in order to
achieve a "A Complete Whole for ourselves.
LIVING WITH ONESELF
My importance to the world is relatively
small. On the other hand, my importance to
myself is tremendous. I am all I have to work
with, to play with, to suffer and to enjoy. It
is not the eyes of others that I am wary of,
but my own. I do not intend to let myself
down more than I can possibly help, and I
find that the fewer illusions I have about
myself or the world around me, the better
company I am for myself.
Noel Coward
Kutsher's
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summer days
with sun.
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with/\stars.
NEIL
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from New York area airports to Kutsher's!
Kutsher's
Monticello. New Yok 12701 (914) 794-6000
CALL TOLL FREE: 18001 431-1273
Complete Convention racihtm Mor Credit Card! Honored


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26, 1985
Synagogue News
TEMPLE BETH EL
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth El is sponsoring an af-
ternoon at the Royal Palm
Luncheon Theatre in Boca
Raton, to be held on Wednesday,
May 8. If you wish to enjoy a
delightful afternoon of en-
tertainment and food, please
send your reservation together
with check for $30 to Hilda
Bloom, 1833 South Ocean Drive,
Apt. 406, Hallandale, 33009,
phone: 464-2346, or Mary,
Temple Beth El, 1361 S. 14th
Ave., Hollywood, phone: 920-
8225 or 944-7773.
The bus will leave promptly
from Temple Beth El at 9 a.m.,
so please arrange to be on time.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe will be
leading a 13-day trip to Israel,
departing from Miami on May 7
and returning on May 19. The
accommodations are all deluxe
and include a full Israeli break-
fast and dinner.
This fully escorted tour will
visit Tel Aviv, Jaffa. Haifa,
Tiberias, Eilat and Jerusalem. In
addition to the regular itinerary
of all the historic and important
modem sights throughout the
country, there will be special
events which have always made
these trips so unique.
There will also be an optional
extension to this tour which will
visit Egypt from May 19-23.
For further details, please feel
free to call Evelyn at the
Temple; Bcoward 920-8225, or
Dade 944-7773.
A 10-week course entitled,
"Introduction to Judaism," is
being offered to the community
at large as an outreach program
to those who are interested in
becoming Jews by choice. The
course started Tuesday evening,
April 23. It will be taught by Dr.
Samuel Z. Jaffee of Temple Beth
El and Rabbi Morton Malavsky
of Temple Beth Shalom.
The classes will meet regularly
on Tuesday evenings from 7:30-
10 p.m. and will deal with basic
Jewish concepts and practices.
The first five sessions will be
held at Temple Beth El, 1351 So.
14th Ave., Hollywood and the
last five sessions will be held at
Temple Beth Shalom, 1400 No.
46th Ave., Hollywood.
For further information, please
call 920-8226 or 981-6111.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth El Luncheon Meeting will
be held on Tuesday, May 14, at
noon, in the Tobin Auditorium of
Temple Beth El, 1351 S. 14th
Ave., Hollywood.
The program will feature
Cantor Moshe Friedler with
songs of current Jewish music
and popular Israeli tunes.
Cantor Friedler is a Musical
Director. Cantor, Composer and
Arranger. He has performed in
Buenos Aires, Argentina (his
own Country), in Mexico and in
Florida. Cantor Friedler is a
sensitive and sentimental artist
of many talents, and composed
the musicals "Wunder Iber
Wunder," "Menachem Mendel,"
" Achnosis Kale," and wrote the
score for "Chelem." His per-
formance in Yiddish and Hebrew
have always been warmly
received. He is the Cantor of
Temple Beth Moshe in North
Miami. Florida.
Reservations must be made by
Friday. May 10. Please call
Anna Wolfe, 927-0876, Judith
Ellis, 929-6442. This event is
open to members and their
houseguests only.
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth El rummage and white
elephant sale will be held on
Thursday, May 23, from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m., 1351 S. 14th Ave.,
Hollywood, rear entrance to the
Temple. A complete line of men's
and women's clothing in all
sizes. We have large and small
sizes for men. Men's shirts 50
cents Men's Jackets $5
Men's suits $7.50 Men's
slacks $2.
TEMPLE BETH AHM
Reservations are being taken
for our Lag B'Omer Sports Day
being held Sunday, May 6, at
the Temple. Donation is $15 per
family. We will have a day of
Athletics Games Ham-
burgers Hot Dogs Chips
Potato Salad Cole Slaw -
Sodas, etc
Registration is still in progress
for Camp Chai. For further
information please call, > the
Temple office 431-5100.
TEMPLE SOLEL
The Senior Youth Group
(SOLTY) will host Kiddie
Movies for kindergarten through
fifth grade on Sunday, April 28
from 12 noon to 3:30 p.m. Fun,
food and film. Come and share
the fun! There is a $5 fee.
Tuesday, April 30 the S,.
Support Group will meet an
p.m.
Senior Seminar for Adult...
meet on Tuesday, April 30
noon. Rabbi Frazin jL*
group for study and discS,
Open to all members a
over Bring a brown bag L
For further informationlall
UzUo.
Construction starts on Beth Shalom W<
COOPER CITY Con-
struction began recently on Beth
Shalom West, located at Stirling
Road in Cooper City. The an-
nouncement was made by Rabbi
Morton Malavsky, Spiritual
Leader of Temple Beth Shalom
in Hollywood and Dr. Fred
Blu men thai. Proiect chairman.
The first phase of the multi-
purpose educational-religious
facility will have 25,000 square
teet ot space. Completion for the
first phase is scheduled for Fall,
1985, according to Rabbi
Malavsky and Dr. Blumenthal.
"There is a dire need for an
educational facility of this type
in the western area of the county
because of the rapid growth in
population, said Rabbi
Malavsky. "We also have
reached our capacity at our
educational facilities at Beth
Shalom Academy in Hollywood.
Aliyah conference in
Hollywood May 29
The Third Annual Aliyah
Conference will take place on
"Yom Yerushalayim ", Sunday,
May 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
at Temple Beth El, 1351 S. 14th
Avenue, Hollywood. The theme
of this year's Conference is
"Experience Israel. For A
Month, For A Year, For A
Lifetime". The conference is
being sponsored by the Aliyah
Council of South Florida, Inc. in
conjunction with the Israel
Aliyah Center and Israel
Programs Office. Shane and Bob
Wolf are co-chairing this event.
Opportunities and Programs
for persons of all ages will be
featured during the day long
program. Workshop topics to be
discussed will answer questions
regarding the following: Initial
Absorption, Business and
Employment, Professional
Opportunities. Settlements,
The
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Hotel...
a catsklii
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that lets you
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SS75-$390
Per week, per person (dbJ. occ.)
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For reservations and
information phone
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1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South FaHsburg. MY 12779
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Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course.
Fffic
*"{ don't fit then
When you escape the Florida heat this
Summer, escape to something more
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
Vou go on vacation to do more then live
from one meal to the next That's why we're
on the Modified American Plan, serving two
sumptuous meals dairy. Breakfast (until 11 JO
am), and Dinner (from 630 to 830 pm).
Mid-day snacks? Magnificent Poolside
Coffee Shop.
There wifl be no announcement at 1 pm
calling you back to the Dining Room which
you just left, no need to rush off golf course
or tennis courts. Linger at the pool all day if
you choose. We have one outdoor and
indoor (containing health club and jet
whirtpool spa). Play duplicate bridge, take
art classes, go folk dancing, jog, or work out
on our Universal mini- gym. In short, enjoy a
full day of outdoor activities and sunshine,
and ail the other fabulous things we have to
offer, including ertertainment that's second
to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun...not something that qets
in the way of fun!
*Au*breakit'
four host for three generations.
The Posner Family
Kibbutzim, Israel Programs, and
Retirement in Israel.
The object of the Aliyah
Conference is to provide in-
formation regarding programs in
Israel, life in Israel and to help
prepare prospective "olim" for
the transition that awaits them.
Admission fee for the Con-
ference is $5 for adults, $2.50 for
children 12 and under. Baby
sitting service will be available.
Admission fee includes a strictly
kosher lunch.
For further information, please
contact the Aliyah Council, tel.
576-4000, ext. 360 or the Israel
Aliyah Center, tel. 573-2556.
In fact, we have to turn
hundreds of children a
because we can't acco
them," he said.
The new school facilities!
accommodate the upper
of Beth Shalom Acu.
(grades 5-8) plus a new divi
of the early childhood de
ment. The east campus
Arthur Street in Hollywood w,
be refurbished and continue
Provide the finest qualiuj
education for youngsters in ,
early childhood department i
through grade four.
Facilities in the first phase I
Beth Shalom West will inch|
science and compi
laboratories, as well as ath
facilities. There will also I
chapel for student wontl
services which will be ava__
to parents for special occasia
According to Rabbi MalavsL,
future phases will be construct)
as community growth dictati
and its ability to supp
subsequent phases is met.
Mr. Sam Lasko is the
headmaster of Beth Shi _n
West and also the east campuii
Beth Shalom Academy n|
Holy wood.
Sam Shapiro is the architeal
for Beth Shalom West and wu|
formerly a student in
educational division of Tempi
Beth Shalom, Hollywood.
Candle Lighting Time
April 26 6:31 p.m.
May 3 7:35 p.m.
FJeligious directoi
ORTHODOX
Congregation Lev! Yltschok Lubavltch. 128S E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale. 458-1877. Kabbl Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services 7 M am .*
minutes before sundown; Sabbath service.. 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath morning.
o clock; Sundays, 8:80 a.m. Religious school; tirades 1-8. Nursery icno*I
Monday through Friday.
Vouag Israel of Hollywood Sl Stirling Road: 986-7877. Rabbi Edwrt1
Davis. Dally services. 7:80a.m.. sundown: Sabbath services, one hourbeleri|
sundown; Sabbath morning, 8o'clock; Sunday,Sam.
CONSERVATIVE
Hallaadals Jewtsb Ceater 416 NE 8th Ave.; 464-9100 Rabbi Carl Kiel" |
Dally services, 8:S0 a.m.. 6:80 p.m.: Sabbath p.m.; Sabbath morning
8:6 am.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N 46th Ave Hollywood; 981 -6111 Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Dally services, 7:46 a.m.. sundown; Sabbath evening. |
o'clock; Sabbath morning, o'clock. Religious school: Klndergarten-8.
Temple Both Akm- 97SO Stirling Road. Hollywood; 411-6100 Rabbi Avrahw
Kapnek. Services dally 8 a.m.; Sabbath p.m.; Sabbath morning 8:*a*
Religious School: Nursery. Bar Mltsvah, Judaic* High School.
Temple Israel ef Miramar 6920 SW 88th 8t; Ml-1700. Rabbi RapM^ I
Adler. Dally services. 8:80 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning.
o'clock. Religious School: pre-klndergarten8.
Temple Slaal- 1201 Johnson St.. Hollywood: WO-IBTT. Rabbi R'c,hwti i
Margolls. 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, t a.m. Religious school: rrv
klndergarten-Judalca High School.
REFORM
Temple Belli El 1*81 8. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 930-8236 Rabbi Samu'J?:
Jaffe. Sabbath evening 8 p.m. Sabbath morning 11 a.m. Religious school
Grades K10.
Temple Beth Emel Pembroke Pine* Oeneral Hospital auditorium, >
University Drive, Pembroke Pines: 481-8888. Rabbi Bennett Oreenspe |
Sabbath services. 8: IB p.m. Religious school: Pre-klndergarten-10.
Temple Selel 6100 Sheridan St.. Hollywood 988-0205 Rabbi It*"'1 j
Fraxln Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath morning. 10: *
Religious school: Pre school-12
BEOONSTBUCTIONIST
araat Shalom ni W. Broward Blvd.. Plantation: 473-88O0 RabbiUW
Skldell Sabbath services, g: 16 p.m Religious school: Pre-klndergarten-*


Friday, April 26,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 11
Sessional Young Leadership Division
The Professional Young Leadership Division had
their debut event April 13 at Hemmingway's. There
were about 200 in attendance for this fun evening.
The group's second event is scheduled for Sunday
May 19 at 11 a.m. at the Lakes of Newport
Clubhouse, 7380 NW 1st St., Plantation, for a break-
fast and morning with Jerry Gleekel, whose topic will
be "Behind Israel's Closed Doors." For more in-
formation or reservations, call Debbie Brodie
Stevens at Federation, 921-8810.
r>
uingway's hosted a busy night when the Professional Young Leadership held its first
ent April 13.
From left, Sandy Silverman, Neil Notkin, committee members;
Nola Goldberg, PYL chairman; Sondra Schneider, committee
member.
- *" ^
11^ a^Hta^a^a^A i b
^m It 1 Ma^L^sY H IB
From left, steering committee members Marshall Krupnick,
Susan Maker, Steven Geller, Michelle Weitman, Scott Rassler.
I'nai B'rith Women to break with BBI Jewish Family Service
VASHINGTON (JTA) -
mixing several years of public
hanges, the executive board
B'nai B'rith Women (BBW)
[approved a resolution calling
the development of a plan to
pnate BBW's present af-
relationship with B'nai
International (BBI),
ding to Beverly Davis,
/ president.
lie resolution was adopted in
onse ;<> a proposal approved
fall by the BBI to admit
ben into its generally all-male
Res and chapters. BBW
pals publicly assailed the
1 action as a threat to BBW's
Bus as "an independent
fish women's organization,"
fing that it was "im-
nf'that the organization's
identity "remain intact."
Davis said that language was
included in a "Platform of
Purpose" for the agency adopted
at a 1978 BBW convention. She
said the proposed plan for
disaffiliation will be presented to
a special Delegate Assembly, to
be convened in Chicago June 30-
July 1 and that a final plan of
action will be presented to the
delegates at the next BBW
biennial convention in Las Vegas
in March, 1966.
After the executive board
vote, Davis said "BBW has been
moving in this direction for a
long time." She said BBW
leaders will devote the next
several months to discussions
with members about the
potential of a new organization.
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A series of "town hall"
meetings have been scheduled in
50 cities to poll the BBW
members and obtain their views
about a separate and new Jewish
women'8 organization, Davis
reported. In addition, 18 regional
conferences have been scheduled
in major cities to explore
organizational options with
regional leaders, she added. She
said BBW currently has more
than 120,000 members in 834
chapters.
Seymour Reich, BBI senior
vice president, who was acting
chairman of the study committee
which proposed acceptance of
woman, said the committee
treated the issue as one of male
bias against women members.
Reich declared that "the fact
that women have not been
admitted to membership in B'nai
B'rith in the United States for
141 years does not make it right.
At worst, these have been in-
justices; at best, they have been
cultural lags. There is no valid
reason for B'nai B'rith to
continue its anachronistic
membership policy."
Technion officers
Sam B. Topf, Chairman of the
Southern Region of the
American Technion Society
(ATS) and ATS National
Missions chairman, installed
officers of the South Broward
Chapter of the Women's
Division of ATS, on April 16, at
the Galahad North in
Hollywood.
New officers of the Chapter
are: Mrs. Ruth Teich, president
Mrs. Dorothy Hodes, vice
president-Program chairman
Mrs. Ruth Gross, vice president
MEP chairman; Mrs. Rose
Goldstein, vice president
membership chairman; Mrs
Anre Blau, treasurer; and Mrs
Elizabeth Feinerman, recording
secretary.
The Women's Division of ATS
works in support of Technion-
Israel Institute of Technology in
Haifa, Israel. Among its current
special projects are scholarships
and funding of a chair in
biomedical engineering and life
sciences at Technion.
Continued from Page 8-
security if it hadn't been for her
mother's ability to control the
family finances and her father's
career.
As therapy progressed, Lydia
became aware that she was like
her mother in many ways and
she had married a man who was
just like her father. She gained
an understanding of the ways in
which she attempted to control
her husband and how she
focused her energies in un-
productive ways. She discovered
aspects in her marital
relationship and in her husband
which were very appealing, and
she began questioning her
motivation to leave him.
Lydia had begun to confront
the realities she was facing. The
children had left the nest, and
her husband didn't have to
compromise his principles as his
talents were very much in
demand. Her dreams and am-
bitions were lacking in ap-
propriate outlet. Awareness that
she had the capacity to pursue a
professional career stimulated
her to take a position which
REMEMBER ISRAEL
IN YOUR WILL
THROUGH A BEQUEST TO
THE ISRAEL HISTADRUT
FOUNDATION YOUR NAME
OR THE NAME OF A LOVED
ONE CAN BE
PERPETUATED AT A
HOSPITAL. SCHOOL OR
SOCIAL SERVICE
INSTITUTION IN ISRAEL.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
CONTACT:
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
420 LINCOLN ROAO. SUITE 389
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA 33139
OADE 531-8702
BROWARO 462-5740
LEWIS ALPERT, Exacutma Orator
offered excellent opportunities to
develop her own powerful assets.
She is still in therapy and in the
process of bringing herself up in
her mid-life transition.
Gordon Leland
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432-7247
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26, 1986
You've got what It takes.
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rji OfhsOr QlHfi r\f T 1 _____Friday, April 26,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 13
Part V: A reporter's jottings
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel
is not only a place, it's also a
gtate of mind, a bitter-sweet
reality. It's ebullience, verve and
vitality. It's the quiet measured
pace of 19th century Mea
Shearim, and the now, the in, the
where-ifs-at dizzying and
bedazzling Dizengoff Street.
It's where a Cabinet Minister
can stand on a street corner
chewing the fat with a crony and
where a disgruntled citizen can
chew out a Cabinet minister. It's
where the speech of a Prime
Minister is interrupted on TV
mid radio so that an in-
ternational soccer match in
which an Israeli team is involved
can be telecast and broadcast.
It's where young men and
women soldiers stand at bus
stops waiting to hitch rides. It's
where bus drivers are kings and
riders are peasants in their eyes.
It's where motorists vie with
each other to see who can drive
faster than a Concorde plane.
It's where every red-blooded
Israeli aspires to become a
"pakid" (bureaucrat) and where
every pakid reigns supreme in
his or her own office or cubicle.
It's Yad Vashem and King
David's Citadel. It's where every
street is named after known or
obscure Zionists, Jewish writers,
poets and philosophers and
American Presidents like
"Avraham Lincoln." It's arms
tattooed with concentration
camp numbers, faces from
almost every corner on the globe,
and where the worst form of
intermarriage is that between a
Lit vale and a Galitzianer.
with contented UJA tree
planters, left the base it passed
by the area of the planting. Out
jn the held IDF soldiers were
busy re-planting the saplings,
"doing right what we screwed
up," some of the DJA members
said wistfully.
Kibbutz Grofit, in the Negev
near Eilat, across from Aqaba,
has what might be a unique
relationship with Jordan.
Through a tacit agreement with
the kibbutz and with the Israel
government, Jordanian security
authorities notify the kibbutz
whenever they know or suspect
that terrorists might be in the
vicinity. The Jordanians are
practical about this arrangement
they don't want their only
port city disrupted, and so they
keep the kibbutz informed. "A
cat couldn't slip through the
area without us being informed,"
said one leading member of the
kibbutz.
One of the hottest items in
Israel is a T-shirt with the in-
scription, "America, feel safe.
Israel is behind you."
Owners and workers in the
"shuk' (open air market) in the
Old City are inveterate hawkers
and talkers. They entice
customers into their emporiums
by assuring each and every
passerby, "Come in, doesn't coet
anything to look." Once in, the
customer is asked his place of
residence. In my case, the an-
swer was New York. It seemed
as if almost every merchant if
one took seriously every one of
them had either visited New
York, intended to visit it or had
friends or relatives who lived or
had visited the city. Invariably,
the areas were identified as
"Central Park West," "Forest
Hills,' or "West End Avenue."
Real Arab enclaves.
Tourists love to take pictures.
And what better place is there
than at an absorption center for
Ethiopian Jews. The ever-
smiling youngsters are a joy to
behold. And so, on this af-
ternoon a group of American
tourists were cocking shutters,
flashing bulbs and having a time
photographing the Ethiopian
youngsters and each other
photographing the youngsters.
One of the Ethiopian children
turned to his counselor and
asked, in all innocence, "Are
Americans born with cameras?"
Few Israeli civilians are seen
in Nablus. The few that are are
cabbies. It seems that they come
here to have work done on their
cars because the mechanical
work is better and cheaper than
it is in Jerusalem. Although it
might take a whole day for the
job to be done, the cabbies don't
mind. While waiting for their
cabs, they sit around at the local
cafes and sip coffee at a leisurely
pace.
On a recent Saturday night a
group of young Orthodox Jews
sat around a TV set in a hotel
lobby. They were entranced by
an episode of the popular "A-
Team," with Hebrew subtitles.
They chortled and chuckled with
delight whenever the A-Team
good guys would clobber the
baddies.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, addressing the
Ambassadors' Mission, stressed
that the basic threat to Israel's
national existence comes from
the Arab armed forces and that
"the limited threat to Israel, not
the major one," is posed by
terrorism.
"Whenever we deal with
Israel's security we have to bear
in mind the existence of these
two levels of threats. No terror
organization can threaten the
very existence of Israel, not the
PLO, not the Shiites and who
knows who in the future. But at
the same time they carry out the
daily threat to the normal way of
life of the Israelis. When we talk
about Lebanon, we talk only
about terrorism. Lebanon never
was and will not be in the
foreseeable future an Arab
country that can build an armed
force that can be of any threat to
Israel.
Premier Shimon Peres, ad-
dressing the same mission, said,
"I know that many of us were
suspicious that deep in our
hearts we want to expand, we
want to gain land. Nothing is
more wrong that that. We have
withdrawn from Sinai though we
could have remained there. We
are withdrawing from Lebanon
though we have the military
strength to stay there. What we
are doing represents a policy, a
moral commitment, not a
military must nor an expediency
in political terms."
Israel is land and it is people.
Since 1948, Israel has absorbed
more than 1.8 million Jews from
120 countries, speaking 70
languages. But above all else
Israel is a word and that word
is Shalom.
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Israel is also a place where
primary school students dressed
as American Indians put on a
Purim play for recently arrived
Ethiopian Jewish immigrants at
i*he Kfar Saba absorption center.
I Why American Indians? A
Jewish Agency official was quick
to explain, "Why not? Who's to
say that Mordechai and Esther
weren't Indians?"
^^^M
"vt^OPjji^.,. jy^i>r'
Israelis have always been
known for ignoring lines and for
breaking into them at will at bus
stops, at supermarkets, at
I movies, wherever. I was a
challenge. The usual response
from those waiting was always a
I boisterous, 'Rega, Rega,"
(roughly translated as "wait a
minute or "hold It.") No more.
Lines are respected, and if
I someone should revert to the
I primeval, the offender will
j immediately say, "slicha"
I (excuse me). Unbelievable, but
I true.
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Taba is little more than a hotel
land a strip of sandy beach. The
I Egyptians and Israelis are
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I the ownership of this enclave
[near Eilat. But the Israeli and
[Egyptian soldiers who stand on
J either side of the border, which is
demarcated by nothing more
1 wan two oil drums with a heavy
I metal rod across them, are more
I concerned with who is going to
Ipt the latest container of coffee
P other '*> who owns the
bVT 7atzation is the order
|oftheday.
I*,!!0?* 3 numbers of the 80-
imember United Jewish Appeal
lAmbassadors' Mission visited an
XuL ,f base "omewhere in the
l^v. While there, they planted
W ,th "ncanny adroitness,
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Pag* 14 The
FToridian of South Browerd-Hollywood Friday. Apr- 26. 1966
Chagall's art of the Jewish subconscious
By RABBI
ALLEN MALLEft
The death of Marc Chagall at
the age of 97 shookl help Jews
focus on the greatest Jewish
artist of the 20th century
Chagall's art is largely a prodact
of hat Jewish failing! iTrnhnltrrrl
on the
hi his attachment.
his long hfe. to the
of his chftdhood He
hi Vitebsk. Russia in
1887. His family was both
Orthodox and Chasktk. The
Chasadk fa**** upon joyful
oaebrauon and the love of God
b often represented in Chagall's
many paintings of childhood
scenes involving Jews and
Jewish holidays.
Symbolically most of his
Hanush aiiiah and his love
affair with hfe LXaahu"
represented by hut frequent use
of downs, acrobats, and
especially lovers who spin and
hep m the air. are the expression
of the mystical view of hfe found
among the Chasidim His
style of pamtmg made
i the bgical artist to pamt the
> on the ceding of the Pans
Open House U964>. and the
marau> for the New York
Metropolitan Opera 11966*
Unfortunately. much of
Chagall's work kas been
muuatarpreted bv aon Jeati art
cncics who aaaaty fai to un-
derstand the Jewish sub-
the animal's head that
represents the now destroyed
orld of the shtetl. At the top of
the p*intine fkmts a grand-
father's cloch with hands
pifiii* iig m opposite du actions
(the future and the pastl
Although the painting is clearly
an expression of Chagall's
feehngs of sadness and nostalgia
far the world that was now
destroyed, the painting is en-
titled simply Self Portrait With
A Clock"
Several similar paintmgs
whkh always feature the artist,
the p+**tine of the crucified
People of Israel, and members of
Chagall's family, both human
and animal, are similarly
naslabeued to avoid focusing on
Chagall's intense personal in-
volvement with his Holocaust
art- A similar problem has oc-
curred with Chagall's biblical
paintings, which is clearly
irustrated in a recent book by
Pierre Provoyeur. "Chagal:
Biblical Interpretations' (Alpine
Fine Arts. 1963. 75l.
This book represents the 17
Large bibucal paint ings that
He
Chagall donated to the Frc|
government (along with over 3m '
gouaches, lithographs, sketch*
drawings and pastels" for th,
museum that was built
especially for them m Ni
Pierre Provoyeur is the curator
of the Musee National Me
Bibbque Marc Chagall.
provides a long and searchin.
treatment of the paintings, aided
by references to manv of the
preliminary drawings amj
sketches, as well as other work,
by Chagall's decorative sense."
These Bibucal paintings alkm
the reader to decide to what
extent, and m what way. Chagall
may be regarded as 'a Jewish
artist and-or a religious painter.
Provoyeur devotes a chapter to
the question of The Biblical
Theme: Religious or Poetic." He
quotes Chagall as stating, "Th,
Bible has fascinated me since
childhood. I have always
thought of it as the greatest
source of poetry in all times." By
Chagall's own definition his at
is religious. "Is religious faith
necessary for an artist? Art in
general, is a religious act. And it
trequectiy n fa saws Chagafl s
work Several of has portraits of
Jews engaged m study or prayer
have bean tJttod Rabbi' m
vinous art books, although
there no reason to thmk that
are rabbis. Apparently to
non-JewBk editors, any
Jew wah a Task or a Torah is a
rabbi.
That distortam is cherry seen
Chagal a.-, si --i*
la 1986. Chagal
aaage of the Nan attack upon
th* Jews at C a.i The
shows the Ark of a
a small boat. Jews
to escape the
i both from
a Torak scroll as well as the Ark.
the
to
and n the
center of the canvas, a Jew
wrapped in a Taut *g">g from
a cross. .Ahhough the panne
taken as a whole ihaal.i ex-
presses the martyrdom and
crmifnaat of the Jewish people.
erases. White
aaaaaaa as the typical
dass Jew of Eastern Europe!
and is tied to a stake m the
of a smafl visage- The
1943* shows the
oa the cress agaaa with hat
tied to his head aad
the Torah aa his right arm (at
case aayaau has aay doubt as to
aho is beamg uauJued. even kt
steal
works, thus anrvmg the
terpretatme to the saaaanr.
Over the next two
producec mere
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Friday, April 26,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 16
is sacred if it line above common
' Interests like glory or material
wealth"
What about the Jewish
component in Chagall's art?
Provoyeur claims that the
Biblical message should not be
interpreted as a series of
paintings of a confessional
either Jewish or
Indeed, he
nature of
Christian mode.
states that "it represents a
significance far from con-
fessional. Rather, the figures are
made to serve the universal plan
of their deity, and are stripped of
lne word, because first of all a
jew does not accept Christ as
divine, and secondly, because a
Christian has no theological
explanation for the presence of
the talit around his loins."
Yet, on the same page (109)
the author states that in the first
painting. The Creation of the
World, the idea of the Fall is
emphasized. He also speaks of
"original sin." Of course, these
concepts are explicitly Christian
and therefore sectarian.
Proveyeur falls into the same
trap as most of his colleagues in
the art world. Because he is well-
versed in European art and
western culture, and relatively
ingorant of Jewish thought, he
sees any art painted in Europe
within that context. Thus he
claims that this painting in
particular "relates to
monumental art, retable
tradition, and occidental
religious painting. We must
stress as well the importance in
this painting of the Christ
figure.'
In fact, this unconscious
Christian prejudice distorts his
understanding of the painting.
He claims that the angel holding
the body of man (kind) is
descending, whereas by simply
looking at the painting it is
obvious that the angel is
ascending. The cool blue that
dominates the lower half of the
painting represents nature before
civilization. At the top we see
the symbols of human culture:
the giving of the Ten Com-
mandments, the people of the
small town Jewish shetle, the
suffering of Jewish martyrs
(what he calls the Christ figure),
the person holding the Torah
with the head of a goat (the Jew
as scapegoat), the ladder and the
Menorah as a symbol of hope,
etc.
It is Chagall's use of the cross
las a symbol of Jewish suffering
I which leads most critics astray.
They assume that anyone on a
cross is a Christ figure, with all
of the association that that
implies within Christian
philosophy. In truth, the
crucified Jew first became an
important motif in Chagall's
work during the Nazi period,
with the graphic and prophetic
painting usually called The
White Crucifixion (1938). This
painting clearly shows Jewish
refugees fleeing, synagogues
burning, and a general terror
evoked by Nazi actions in the
preceding three or four years.
Chagall usually dressed his
martyred Jews in a talit so that
there is no mistake as to who is
meant. Yet Provoyeur writes of a
1940 painting of a Jewish martyr
"the figure of Christ is the
convict tied to the execution
pole, in the middle of a burning
village. The use of a religious
theme as archaic as a sacrificial
altar, as well as the use of a
archetype as grandiose as a
Christ figure, help give The
Martyr a universal value."
Unfortunately, in 1940 Jews in
Poland were already being
slaughtered in the thousands.
The theme isn't archaic: it's
prophetic. The crucified Jew
continues to appear in Chagall's
paintings over the next several
decades. It frequently appears in
scenes of national redemption
such as "Resistance," and
"Resurrection": both painted in
1948 when Israel was recreated
as a Jewish state. It also appears
in several of Chagall's self-
portraits, symbolizing his
memories of Jewish suffering
throughout the ages.
While we must wait for a more
insightful interpretation of the
Jewish component in Chagall's
painted poetry, this book will
help the critical reader with a
good knoooooooooow ledge of
Jewish values, see that which in
Chagall's art transcends the
limits of French 20th century
art. These limits, perhaps
blindspot is a better term, is
simply illustrated by the poems
which accompany a. number of
the works. Although originally
written in Yiddish and Russian,
they were translated into French
for the French version of this
book. They remain in French in
the English edition because
someone obviously decided that
French was a more universal
language than English, or that a
French translation is preferrable
to an original Yiddish text.
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Q & A on Medicare
Q: / heard that there is a new
Medicare pamphlet around,
announcing that now a patient
doesn't have to stay in a hospital
for three days prior entering a
nursing home. Instead, he can go
into a nursing home straight
from the emergency room or
even from his own home, and
Medicare will still pay for the
nursing home stay. Is it true?
A: I called the Social Security
office to follow up your question.
Apparently, federal government
had considered such amendment
to the current Medicare
guidelines. However, the
legislature never approved this
proposed change of existing
Medicare requirments for
nursing home coverage.
Presently Medicare will pay for
up to 100 days of "skilled
nursing care" only if all five of
the following conditions are met:
1) you have been in a hospital
at least three days in a row (not
counting the day of discharge)
before your transfer to a par-
ticipating skilled nursing
facility.
2) you are transferred to the
skilled nursing facility because
you require care for a condition
which was treated in the
hospital;
3) you are admitted to the
facility within a short time
(generally within 30 days) after
you leave the hospital:
4) a doctor certifies that you
need, and you actually receive,
skilled nursing or skilled
rehabilitation services on a daily
basis, and
5) the facility's Utilization
Review Committee or a peer
review organization does not
disapprove your stay.
Q: / have recently moved here
from Canada. I'm 67, and the
Social Security office informed
me that I can get Medicare.
However, there is a five-year
waiting period. So what can I do
meanwhile to afford my medical
expenses ?
A: Since you don't carry any
medical protection, you may
want to purchase a private
health insurance plan. You can
obtain information on different
insurance companies by con-
tacting any of the Florida
Insurance Department Service
offices. Call the nearest office in
Miami at 377-5235, or write to
Florida Department of
Insurance, Bill Gunter, Com-
missioner, The Capitol
Tallahassee, FL 32301.
Jewish Family Service is a
recipient agency of Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and the United
Way of Broward County. If you
have a Medicare question or
problem: CALL Medicare
Information Service of Broward
County at 966-0956 in
Hollywood, 735-3394 in Fort
Lauderdale, and 427-8508 in
Deer field Beach.
ISWCJC4.,
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305-538-5721
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where shopping is o pleasure 7days a week
Publix B.k.rl.. opn at 8:00 A.M.
AvafaJBli at Pubax Star wHh
Freeh Daman Bakeriee Only.
Freeh Baked
Chicago Hard Rolls
10$11
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Amiable at Publix Store* with
Fraah Danish Bakerta* Only.
Chocolate Banana
Bavarian
Cream Pie
$098
Avaaabte at Pubax
Freeh Dank*
Lemon or
Only.
Coconut
Jelly Roll
it"
each
AwaJabla at AM PuMx Store)*
and Pawlah Safcartoa.
Hawaiian ^
Sweat Bread.................*. 99*
Single Layer baked bi Ra own pan
Deep South
Carrot Cake...................~h*24fl
Oatmeal Chip Cookies.. '&' $149
Cherry Cheese
Coffee Cake
Available at Publix Storaa with Fraah
Danish B.k.ri.m Only.
Mini Bagelettes.......12 .<* 99*
Prices Effective
April 25th thru May 1st. 1985
flfft&3&
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Now Available At Publix.
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evary 13 grocery puchaaa you ma*, a PuCtoi
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4 Compiata your Coaactor Broehwa *** 20
amp. and Mm horn, your i2-pca danar a*


1 Tte Jeeriah FferidiBB of South
Fradary. Apt! 26.1906
Jcc
JEWISH COMMLMTY
ONTIRSOF
SOUTH BROWARD
921-6511
Beam* or Karen. 921-6516
Jem into Community Center of
South Broward and the
Southeast Focal Pooat Senior
Center will araaaat a aeries of
JCC News
prograrnf
or over-the counter
taiad Let s Take All Our
ManaaTami Senonahr The
sene* wiD be presented or May
16. and 10 at 12:S0. at 283*
Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood
For further maonnauoc call Liz
H1TP7
JCC Price: 173 Double
Occupancy (paua 53 lor angle
occupancyl Trip Itenerary >
dudes:
Day 1-BBQ Dinner. Sunset in
June show at Mauory Square
Lnwrtamment by local Jugglers.
Maaerisii and Pantomimea.
Da* 2-Sightaeeing troiey
Visit Audobaun Houae.
Hemmgwav House Alter dinner
Day 3-Explore exotic Ke
t"rt>?,VaL ** of Morad. a
.Key Hotel. With,
f^^^-tT^e^
or Karen. 921-6518. ^"*
SOUTHEAST FOCAL
POINT SEMOB CEVTEB
We are pleased if aiimwta
that Ms. Yafrc Sovar weE
knowr. Israel porter wiL be
tescnmc a new course c-
gerarr.ir* a: ti* Soutrteast Focal
Point Sptu.t Center riecmnmg
laa ciasse* wil re or
Taeaiay inunang* at 9-11 a jr..
and oantaaae ibsiaiii Mr
h i tour-wee* course an:
co*r. a r more nifca mat-we
cal. Bonnie or Karat 9T1
M HoU iiaad
Holrvwood
a*
Mr Mike Save. Ph -D wiO be
nreaenuric ciasses or Apri 2f.
Ma? a, and Man- 10 irorr .
c ine .~>ewaafc Comrnumr>
Center at Soutx Hum arc and the
Soutneasc Focal Poan Sensor
Center The subiects ail u>
dude Urw. Privacy Wner*
one* pnvary end anc the
pubbr rurr.: u ano becir'
Far runner miormatjat cal
Vew Sewing Class
and Intermediate every Taeaday
starting April 23 at 10 ajn at
the Southeast Focal Point Senxr
Center. 2836 Hollywood Brvd
HolH-wood A atatck as time
save* nine, yam our das* anc
youT do fine' Do yoc like to
sew* Do vac already knew how'
Cease tons our das* Call Banna
; 921-6516.
Community Calendar
Apri 2*
Florida region of Women a League for Israel will host an Oner
shabbat at 6 p Jn at Temple Beth Ahtn. 9730 Stirtmg Road LorraS
Frost wfll speak on the future of the local lua isfa community Retn&
Cal?<"
The 20 trHBon
shekel budget
bt rnwnr poyas
Israel Tanay
JERUS.ALEM The Knesset
apprmec a state budget of 21.1
rrilhnr sneaeis labour 820
haaaun far fiacal :9SS-8f which
aegar Apri 1 after ?>vcommr a
last-minute emus as the religious
names mreaienec to topper the
government if they dad not gat
thaar special allocations.
Thnaiai will take up just over
2.' percent of the budget, al the
-i-itiT mmjstnee mdurimr
noarrr aaucauat and bousing.
wiL receive under ST1 percent
wnik- almost half the enure
uudgat wiL be aarmaraac for
repaymant of tne fnreagz debt
now SSSVi ifcrii
The same night a? the badaaa
was adopxac the treasure traoe
unions anc manufacturers f""1
Package Dee.___u staniim the
ernnorr? At rrntmignt Sunaey
aurmg nena Paasover amsaung
al price* snot ur barwaar I end
2C pt^-.wc anc wiL now be froaac
far ran; months They are
u gr ur ther by fV
tne nevaiuauor of the
pajafjaaaj to fall span ire
mediateb after tbe aaactpnt to
the paaaaaM Hattadrat traoe
umar faaerataa: on May IS The
general pradactjoc n that the
aajaaaaaBjaal a- wakaag until
tnese important r a trmF mrc
over before *Tg the j+<&*-
witr a new wave of stringent
wiiiMainf and fiscal aaaaaaaaaj
The moat tar-mam mf are
expected to be a large
OPA-aiuauoE of the sfaekal the
irnirnamg of the aaaaaaaaj to the
D -S dollar and the tHrg of
auuimatar atdexataai of
and aavmge tc the
prase index Tbea
a wet me stiff real bndget cute
n: SI bUhoc anc imriiwr SI
bilboc cut from snaaaBBaa a weL
mt ax enc to the printing of nea
money ny the Central Bank
were urged by rwr seaanr US
aoaBBansKa durmg aaaaaaaaaaal
before the Tlsaiai ad
h) preparec ti grve
israe, tne S1J Dtlbor sup-
pasmenxary emergency aad for
the mmmg rwr years If these
measuree are not ajkeasaj the
u; i ji.ii: mfjationary cyde wfll
iust aaaaaaaaj sne the money wiL
gc opwt the dram.' the
Amencanf waraed ir
a source saic
Belly ilani nif at the Jewisr.
'Community Center Where ease
wonk sbbj k* learnmg ar ArabK
dance' Held is a Isaaasl
Coenmunity Center Taught by
ar insr. Cathohc* Our very owr
Sr.tr.e knows as Shan:
McManaa ito w Shana-La
McManus. Have fur. anc iearr.
the anraan art of belb danemp
and fr-rr up too'
Cost S3.75 Pre-
ragaKration reauired. 6 week
uuatai m.bb
Starung April 10. Wed-
nesday 2 pj& mtermednte
das* at 1 pjr.
T: be head at the JCC
Southaaai Focal Point Senior
Center Cal Banna? or Karec
ac:-65is.
The Jewish Common it v
Center and the ^luithiaat Focal
Pomt Senior Center. 26Sf-
HoDywood Blvd. Holh-wood are
navmg a trip to Key West, for
Three devs-Twc nights
May i^r aaaaad trip Oan-
aaenu
Apri 28
Tat Workmen s Cirde boat* Larry Schural for a diacussKm entity
Cultnatine Cult-ev ading at 10:30 aum. at Broward Federal Savings
A' Oakland Park Blvc Laudarbili Baaaaa and coffee served,'
non-members are crvrted Contact 922-1144
InrtbiaiT Reapor Bnai Zaon celeoratee Israel "a 37tfc birthdav m tne
Panorama Roon: of tbe Pier 66 Hotel m Fort I annWdik at 10:30ajn.
Tne chapter wiL honor it* man and woman of tne year. 120 cot-
TrjK-rtMi nrrt^MJ a*am nd ean^rtaiaawL Call 456-1999
The Mens Club of Tetnpie Beth Shahanhoau a breakfasi meetings
930 a jn. featuring a speech by Rabbi Babes Doom of Temple Young
Israel of Holivwood-Fort LauoWciaa*on The Jew* and the Cult* "No
charge bnng tbe wboiefamih- Contact Berme Roth. 961-7112.
May 1
Bna. Zkm Harry Maunsky Stmcha chapter features a Man- Kay akin
care and make up deaaeaaacrataon by a Iiiiih.i conaulur: at 7:30 p.m
at Broward Federal Savings. 5519 W. Oakland Pant Bhrd. $.75
contribution Call 741-1136
May 5
Harry Maunsky Bna: Zion chapter holds aa
Day dance at Ling; s danceworkL 4950 W
pjn Donation. S3.50.CaJJ 741-1136.
Israel iDxiependence
Pant Blvd. at 7:30
Mas*
Hadassah chapter of rLukreet meets at 12 noos at the Hdkrest
Playdnun. HOkrest Drive. Hollywood. Scon Evans Duo a the en-
tertainment Public kn-ited Call 966-2994.
Sandpiper chapter of Amencan Women a OKT holds its monthly
meeung at 12 noon at Broward Federal lerangi 10060 Pinas Blvd.
Mini lunch precedes program. Guests arrited CaD 431-5141.
May7
Shalom chapter of Hollywood Hadaasah heads an installation kin-
cheon at 12 noon at the Orangehrook CooDtry Cfaib. 450 Entrtdi
Drive, Holi\-wood A musical aaaaaaaaj wil be presented. Call 454-
5962
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Friday, April 26,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 17

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Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26,1985
Soviet Jewry update
Kharkov Arrest
Mechanical engineer Evgeny
Aisenberg. aged 33, was arrested
in Kharkov on March 19, and
three days later charged with a
breach of Article 187-1 of the
Ukrainian Criminal Code (190-1
of the RSFSR Criminal Code)
"Circulation of Fabrications
Known to be False Which
Defame Soviet State and Social
System."
His wife, Marina Bor-
shchevskaya could give no
further information, other than
she expected the investigation to
last at leat two months. A Mr.
Logunov of the District
Procurator's Office is the in-
vestigator in the case.
We understand that Aisenberg
applied for permission to
emigrate to Israel in 1978.
Yosif Begun
The number of people who
have asked that their name be
placed on the rota of hunger
strikers in protest against the ill
treatment of the imprisoned
Yosif Begun has now reached 50.
We publish the names of some of
them below.
- Meanwhile Inna. Begun's wife,
has stopped her own hunger
strike March 27, on doctor's
strict orders but Boris, Yosif's
20-year-old son, is continuing
with the fast.
Friends participating in the
hunger strike are:
Voronov, Gal per in. Shneider.
Shifrin, Shfrina, Zolotolovsky,
Shukhman, Zolotorevsky,
Zolotorevskaya, Roitman,
Gorodetsky, Shipov, Briskin,
Kontsevaya, Yanikov, Yanikova,
Marmalshtein. Zarkharova,
Zalkin. Lantsman, Gurvich,
Yusefovich.
Berenshtein: Wife fights on
Mrs. Fanya Berenshtein is
continuing to fight to save her
imprisoned husband's eyesight,
and has now asked the
authorities that Yosif be
transferred to the Central Prison
hospital in Leningrad for
treatment.
The last information we have
is that Yosif has reached his
designated labor camp in
Zholtiye-Vody (detailed address
not yet known).
Home searched: Mark Mikhlin
Last week he Kiev home of
Mark Mikhlin, an Orthodox
Jewish refusenik. was searched
by the KUB and at least 50
books almost all of them of a
religious character were
confiscated.
The search is believed to be in
connection with the arrest of a
21-year-old Moscow friend who is
charged with stealing books
from the Kiev Synagogue, and
whose parents have asked us not
to publish his name, or any other
details of the case.
Prof. Lerner: "We came to a
critical moment"
The next few months may well
be the crisis point for Soviet
Jewry, Prof. Alexander Lerner of
Moscow, possibly the most
senior of Moscow's refuseniks
told BBC journalist Richard
Lindley in an interview
broadcast by Panorama. Asked
by Lindley whether a large
number of Soviet Jews wishing
to leave would not embarrass the
State, the professor replied:
". It doesn't matter for
them, you see, there is no public
opinion here, so such things
doesn't matter for the State, and
we saw in the past that 52,000
were allowed to go in 1979, and
nothing happened to the Soviet
Union. And in the newspapers.
and in the mass media all the
public opinion sources
everything was okay, so if it will
be decided that for the State it's
reasonable to let Jews go, it will
be done immediately. In one day
position will change, and I feel
that such a possibility exists
now. We came to a critical
moment, from this moment
situation can be changed in
positive or in negative direction.
In positive it means that many
people who want to leave will
receive the permission, and the
negative means something very
terrible for the Jews.
".... You see I know quite
well the Helsinki Agreement.
and I and many refuseniks
attempts to demand
on the grounds of
Agreement, but it doesn't
anybody, because in this cou
the law doesn't mean any
the situation and
demand of the will" t
officials, and what they
they do pay no attention}
any international or nati
agreements, laws and so on."
Asked about the possibiL.
to study Hebrew. Lerner said:
"Officially every language I
permitted, every culture
permitted, every nation
movement is permitted, but i
only a decoration because i
Hebrew is absolutely forbic_
Even when our friends tried |
bring us text books of He
the customs confiscated, so i
good sign that a proof
Hebrew is the only 1;
which is forbidden here."
Israel exports cheese, goose liver to France
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
may not be sending coals to
Newcastle, or selling
refrigerators to the Eskimos, but
it is exporting cheese and goose
liver to France.
Daniel Rouach, an in-
ternational business consultant
and new immigrant, says his
first trial consignment of 10 tons
of Kosher Le Pesach Tnuva
cheese is already being sold in
France. He plans to export pate
de foie gras (goose liver) shortly.
Rouach says the French are
very strict about cheese imports
The two cheeses he is selling
there had to be renamed to
distinguish them from French-
made parmesan and roquefort.
He said he hopes Tnuva will be
able to export $150,000 worth of
the cheese this year.
Until now, Israel exported raw
goose livers to France, where
they were processed into pate de
foie gras. French-born Rouach
has advised a focal goose
slaughterhouse how to process
the liver. It has hired a French
expert and bought special
machinery to produce the
delicacy for export.
PERSONAL CARE FOR THE ELDERLY
An alternative lifestyle for
independent seniors who need
assistance with life's daily chores.
And there's no admission fee.
THE MONTHLY RENTAL INCLUDES:
One bedroom apartments
Delicious. Kosher-style meals
Weekly maid service
Transportation to doctors and
shopping
24-hour licensed nurse and security
Full time activities program
Emergency buzzers in each
apartment
Personal aid and
supervision of
medication
available
Orlyle
1900 N Bayshore Drive, Miami. FL. 371-3035
Master of Arts
Jewish Studies
t(
Fix A Time For The Study Of Torah"
Shammai (Ethics Of The Fathers 1:15)1
SUMMER SESSION I (May 14-June 21)
BIBLICAL LITERATURE (RJS 602) will focus on the
methods for understanding the biblical text developed by
literary criticism in order to give the student a better
appreciation of the beauty and meaning of the Bible.
Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:00-9:30 in
Andreas 106. Instructor Dr. Jeremiah Unterman.
HEBREW LITERATURE (RJS 613). Selected portions
of Hebrew literature, such as the Bible, Mishnah. Medieval
Hebrew poetry, and modern Israeli fiction, will be
examined. Prerequisite one year of college Hebrew (or
equivalent). Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:00-
9:30 in Andreas 106. Instructor Dr. Rachel Abramowitz.
SUMMER SESSION II (June 24-August 2)|
MEDIEVAL JEWISH HISTORY (RJS 621), From the
period of the Talmud until the emancipation in the 18th
century. Topics will include the Golden Age of .Spanish
Jewry and the historical development of Jewish -mysticism
(The Kabbalah). Tuesday and Thursday evenings from
6:00-9:30 in Andreas 106. Instructor Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
JEWISH PHILOSOP/HY (RJS 633) Will analyse the
thought of such ancient and medieval Jewish
philosophers as Philo, Saadia Gaon, Maimonides, and
Judah Halevi. Monday and Wednesday evenings from
6:00-9:30 in Andreas 106. Instructor Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIP AID IS AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED STUDENTS.
AUDITORS WILL BE GRANTED A 50% DISCOUNT.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT 758-3392, Ext. 524.
BARRY UNIVERSITY
11300 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI SHORES, FLORIDA 33161


Friday, April 26,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 19
Reconstructionist rabbis
hold 10th convention
Reconstructionist Rab-
tcal Association held its 10th
rsary convention in
hev Pennsylvania from
lh I? ,to 20. Recon-
ktkmist. rit^is from around
US.. Oanada, and the
rfobean' gathered to discuss
lues concerning Recon-
uctionist ideology for the 21st
jtury Workshops addressed
.subjects of theology, liturgy,
tcation and Jewish practice,
newly elected Executive
consists of Rabbi Ira
biffer, of Newark, De.,
dent; Rabbi Joy Levitt of
,tclair, N.J., vice-president;
Fbi Mark Finkel of Holyoke,
T treasurer; Rabbi Ron Aigen
| Montreal, Canada, recording
^retary; and Rabbi Sandy
of Indianapolis, In.,
spending secretary.
his inaugural address,
fobi Ira Schiffer congratulated
(Conservative) Rabbinical
^mbly upon its decision to
ept women rabbis to mem-
ship, noting that the
_nstructionist Rabbinical
Lsociation has counted women
Jwng its membership since its
ption. There are presently 15
women rabbis in its
organization.
The Association passed
several resolutions on pressing
social issues. These included an
endorsement of religious com-
munities' efforts to end the
nuclear arms race, and the
encouraging of Reconstructionist
congregations to consider
sanctuary for refugees escaping
economic oppression and
totalitarian regimes.
Past presidents of the
Association were honored at he
closing banquet. They included
Rabbi David Brusin, Tampa,
Fla.; Rabbi Arnold Rachlis,
Evanston, 111.; Rabbi Dennis
Sasso, Indianapolis, In.; Rabbi
Elliot Skiddell, Plantation, Fla.;
and Rabbi Steven Sager,
Durham, N.C.
The Association issued its
first two life cycle certificates for
the birth of a boy and girl. Of
special note was the certificate
welcoming a girl into the
covenant (Brit) of the Jewish
people. This reflects the long
held understanding of Recon-
structionism that girls as well as
boys should be welcomed into
Jewish life in a covental
ceremony. The certificates were
designed by noted Jewish artist
Betsy Platkin Teutsch and are
available through the Recon-
structionist Rabbinical
Association at Church Road and
Greenwood Avenue in Wyncote,
Pennsylvania.
The Reconstructionist Rab-
binical Association was founded
in 1974. Originally consisting of
nine graduates of the Recon-
structionist Rabbinical College
(founded in 1968), it has grown
to membership of over 100.
The Reconstructionist Rab-
binical Association represents
the rabbinical leadership of the
Reconstructionist Movement. It
is dedicated to the advancement
of Judaism as an evolving
religious civilization. The
Association works with other
arms of the Reconstructionist
Movement in promoting Jewish
learning and living, advocating
the centrality of Israel-Diaspora
cooperation in the strengthening
of Jewish peoplehood and
stressing Jewish values of social
justice for all.
Life Care Appoints Loeb
Life Care Communities
Corporation of Bala Cyn-
wyd, Pennsylvania, recently
announced the appointment
of Bobbi Loeb to the
position of Director of
Resident Services for The
Court at Pabn-Aire, in
Pompano Beach. The court,
a residential retirement
community, located across
the street from The Palm-
Aire Spa Hotel, is expected
to greet its first residents in
October of 1985.
The community is being
designed to enable its future
residents to Uve an in-
dependent.active and secure
lifestyle. A variety of
amenities including elegant
dining, mini-bus tran-
sportation, maid and linen
service, 24-hour security,
emergency care in each
individual's apartment, an
outpatient clinic, beauty and
barber shop, and skilled
nursing are provided to give
its residents physical and
emotional security. In
addition, a choice of
financial programs allows a
resident to choose a plan
that best meets his or her
individual needs.
Loeb
Ms. Loeb assists residents
in planning their move to
The Court at Pabn-Aire,
coordinating a variety of
details prior to occupancy.
She also will be working
directly with the Resident's
Association in programming
the community's activities.
Ms. Loeb, who recently
moved from the Philadelphia
area, has held the same
position with Life Care
Communities Corportation
at two of its other com-
munities Martins Run in
Media, Pennsylvania, and
Logan Square in
Philadelphia.
ARMDI breakfast
and Mrs. Sidney J.
dman of Miami Beach were
..J guests of the Tovah
iupter of the American Red
jen David for Israel ata
nt Bagel and Lox Breakfast
hich took place at the Olympus
lotunda on Three Island
[oulevard in Hallandale.
Vfr. Goodman, Community
stations Representative for
.p Savings on Lincoln
jad in Maimi Beach, is a leader
various community endeavera,
ich as Miami Heart Institute's
I million construction project
I the "We Care" volunteer
ncv for elderly volunteers to
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
l me, Esther, 1-635-6554
I let me quote you
Jtes. Also local moving &
ng distance moving
Inywhere in the U.S. or
Jverseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
asist people in distress or need.
Citicorp Savings sponsored
the entertainer, Joseph Lewin, a
world renowned pianist and
composer of an original rendition
oof the Warsaw Concerto, which
he performed. In addition, Mr.
Lewin entertained his audience
with "Freilach" or joyous music,
celebrating the deliverance of the
jews from the Holocaust and
their happiness on the sub-
sequent emergence of th State
of Israel.'
In addition, Rabbi Richard
Margolis, religious leader of
Temple Sinai of Hollywood
spoke on "Magen David Adorn
and its Lifesaving Work for the
People of Israel."
The Tovah Chapter of AR-
MDI, the sole support wing in
the United States of Israel's Red
Cross Service, represents
residents of T-Towers of
Oceanview, O-Plympus, V-
Venetian Park, and A, H
Harbourwood, is a newly
organized chapter under the
leadership of President Jack
Kuscher of Olympus, and
Executive Vice President Paul
Weil. Other officers include Vice
President Sam Stogel and Jack
Spector, Treasurer.
The Magen David Adorn,
Israel's Red Cross Service
provides Israel with ambulance
services, first aid stations, blood
services, disaster relief and
paramedic training for both
civilian and military personnel.
MDA also operates a modren
and efficient R-T com-
munications system to facilitate
central control and efficient
activation of all MDA services.
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney J. Goodman, enjoying the Bagel and Lox
Breakfast of the Tovah Chapter of ARMDI. Mr. Goodman is
Community Relations Representative of Citicorp Savings on
Lincoln Road in Miami Beach.
m
s
GRANDPARENTS:
Come Stay With Us For A Week or More
and Well Give Your Grandchild a
Winter Weekend Absolutely FREE!
When you join the Pines Junior Citizen's Club, for only
$50 deposit which is credited towards your stay, your
grandchild* can come and enjoy free winter weekend at
the Pines! Do something special for you and ypur
grandchild.. loin the Pines Junior Citizen s Club NOW.
This special offer is only good until May 1st.
(GRANDCHILD MOST BE UNDER If YEARS OF AGE)
Plus, Stay Two Weeks a Mw Get A winter WfrirMd Ftm!
EXTRA-LOW RATES FOR EXTENDED STAYS
' "" "fywhrnn you turn
"0*)' on the pnmt:
ffM Go* on PtmM Plum 36
Ho of Golf Ncarby-OrM Inflow
Jwnii Court* ft All WMttwr Toonli
Count Outdoor Indoor
pool ( HMkh Club Indoor
J Skating Rmk Indoor MknKMura -----------
Q" TopSuri-UKShorn Oat* *m FriMtnvi, Mm York 12771
ErngEnMtnmnNClob ^^ mil 111 MM
Osoo-Dwu^AcoomodMion. ,wm 111 VOJ
SupwbCuwrwEmatorSwvto* Call tail tret: IVUUI *tTI-OU
^dwvuoo CniMrtn't Dy Camp ^ .^ ._,
pUnndTenio Program s" Yw 'm*_*?"V
*toPPllUtn!mj2y1UwuS*.2 "" ""
rrarcpommn
In/ormXion
AiUtM
71 slice of lochs.
Was it really the game of golf that tempted Jewish immigrants to call
Scotland their home? Was it the taunting call of the little white hall? The
lure of those infernal sand traps? ftrhaps some strange appeal in the
monstrous-ness of the lochs? And just what accounts for todays weekly
pilgrimage to the country club outside Glasgow?
One thing we can account for. After an invigorating day chasing
divots those frazzled duffers are apt to require a neat shot of Scotch
whisky, R* that is surely one of Scotland's more soothing pleasures. The
one preferred stateside is J&B Rare Scotch. It is blended from the best
whiskies its native country has to offer. That makes for a scotch that is
smooth. A far cry, indeed, from the strokes seen on the back nine.
*6 Proof Sr^ Scotch Wtwky ? MM The Pidrjmolon Conxwmon NY
J&B Scotch


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26,1985
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175 70-13 41 95
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P185/75-14 55.95
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TRXHAOnMU J8OG5-390 78.95 22tt 55 390 a* OK WHITE ***"
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SIZE PRICE
185/80-13 XH 54.95
185/75-14 XH 59.95
195/75-14 XH 62.95
205/75-14 XH 67.95
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215/75-15 XH 71J6
225/75-15 XH 7346
235/75-15 XH 77 JB
ALL SEASON RADIAL
torn iw
P175/80R13 61.95
P185/75R14 64.96
P195/75R14 MJ6
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P215/75H15 78.95
P22S/75R15 81.95
P235/75R1S 17 J6
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SIZE PMCE
P2O6/70R13 8345
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155SR12 28 95
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175SR14 37.M
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195/70SR14 49.95
* New P44 available in these
sizes in some stores
CLEAN AIR CONDITIONED WAITING ROOMS
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Save up to MO unvour purchase
of BFGoodnch 11K Radial Tuts.
V* Redeem
At&t
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^ M1BMUS
CLM WHITEWALLS SIZE PRICE
P155/80B13 23.95
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available in all stores.
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RBBKLASSBBJED 1
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P196/75B14 25.16
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Repack wheel beanngs
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CORAL GABLES............Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
CUTLER RIDGE...............20390 S. Dixie Hwy. 233-5241
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DEERFIELD BEACH .......2265 W. Hlllsboro Blvd. 427-8800
FT. LAUDERDALE ...........1740 E. Sunrise Blvd. 463-7588
HIALEAH PALM SPRINGS MILE ......127549th St. 822-2500
HOMESTEAD...............30100 6. Federal Hwy. 247-1622
KENDALL DR. HIGATE SQUARE 13872 S.W. 88th St. 387-0128
N. KENDALL DR........S.W. 88th St. and 107th Ave. 595-1545
MIAMI AIRPORT......N.W. 25 St. Milam Dairy Rd. 593-1191
MIAMI BEACH...................1454 Alton Road 672-5353
J^STHNAMI"...............13360 N.W. 7th Ave. 681-8541
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, April 26,1986
Israel
Continued from Page 1
The city is on two levels:
the lower is filled with
shops, decrepit dwellings,
and the casbah; the upper
level is peppered with sun-
drenched and bleached
homes of the local middle
class. The casbah, with
labyrinthine alleyways and
innumerable stalls, with
hawking merchants and
gawking customers and
passerbys, is a sniper's
paradise.
The main entrances and
exits in the casbah were
sealed off by the Israeli
military government
personnel to prevent
terrorists from losing
themselves in there and
eluding the police and
soldiers. One or two of the
gateways were recently
reopened after the local
Arab officials promised to
apprehend terrorists in the
area. "We also did it as a
sign of good will and
trust," the local Israeli
military government
commander said.
Israeli soldiers and police
are seldom to be seen in the
casbah. It was a strange
sight, therefore, for the
denizens to see a convoy of
armed Israeli soldiers
marching through the
casbah flanking an army
spokesman, this reporter
and Gil Sedan, the Israeli
TV West Bank
correspondent and
correspondent for the
Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, as they walked
through the city streets and
the casbah at the invitation
of the local Israeli com-
mander.
"This is an unusual
scene," he said, "but we
can't allow non-Arab
persons to walk throuigh
the casbah by themselves.
You could get killed and
I'm sure you would rather
make the headlines than be
in the headlines." The
commander was in his late
twenties or early thirties,
clean shaven with close
cropped hair who looked
more like a kibbutznik than
a soldier.
He took the scene in his
stride and engaged in light
banter with this reporter
and Sedan. Told that we
appreciated the protection
to either side of us, he
smiled. Asked what we
should do if someone armed
approached us from up in
front, he smiled again and
said, "Duck." But on that
day, we didn't have to.
Nablus is one of the cities
on the West Bank where
there have been anti-Israeli
demonstrations. One
reason for this, it was
pointed out, is that the
local university of Al Najah
is a breeding place for PLO
sympathizers and student
agitators, similar to the
situation at Bir Zeit
University near Ramallah.
"When classes are in
session the campuses are
volcanoes of terrorist
preparation and its lava
flow spills onto the streets
and highways," said one
military government of-
ficial. "When school lets
out, things are quiet."
He minimized the per-
ception which is prevalent
outside the West Bank and
Israel, that the West Bank
is seething with organized
armed mass resistance.
"There is no such thing,"
he said, "because the
people can't get together.
There is too much com-
petition between the PLO
and other groups,
especially the Moslem
Brotherhood which lurks
behind the scenes. Cer-
tainly most of the Arabs
here hate Israel, but many
also depend on Israel for
jobs and many, especially
the older Arabs and
merchants, want to be left
alone to ply their trade."
The official pointed out
that what is frequently
stressed in the press are the
rock-throwing, tire-burning
incidents and anti-Israeli
pro-PLO demonstrations
and attacks on Jewish
settlers by teen-agers and
their older mentors. "But
what is overlooked is that
while these incidents occur
in a few large towns, most
of the towns are quiet and
without disturbances, such
as Jericho and Jen in and
other places. This, too, is
part of the West Bank
reality."
Another reality is the
pervasiveness of PLO
propaganda among Arab
students and professors.
But a great deal of this
tends to be an unthinking,
uncritical acceptance of
emotion-laden and volatile
anti-Zionist shibboleths
and slogans. There is
almost no effort to develop
a coherent ideology and
there is a penchant for
gross distortion of history
even in the face of contrary
evidence. Dr. Morad Asi,
an assistant professor of
journalism at Najah
University in Nablus, is one
of these people.
During an interview at
his home in Nablus, on a
hill overlooking the
university, he defined
himself as a "moderate."
But during the almost one-
hour interview it became
apparent that his
moderateness was confined
to his willingness to "talk
to Jews and Zionists" but a
total unwillingness or
incapacity to reconsider
his thinking.
A Zionist, he said, "is a
person who thinks
Palestine should be ex-
clusively a Jewish state and
that the land belongs to the
Jews wherever if jg
Zionist is a person J |
doesn't have to be a Jew .
who believes that Palest^]
the Holy Land or ls J
whatever you like to ca
belongs to the Jews
"crre.^oup d^
Would it be cor.
given this approach^
define adherents a
supporters of what
called the Palesti
liberation movement
Jewish Family Service case history
Lydia is a forty-two year old
woman who has been married to
forty-seven year old Norman for
22 years. They have a 20 year
old son who is a second year
student on full scholarship at a
first rate University, and an 18
year old daughter who had been
accepted at another top rated
University, also on a scholar-
ship. Lydia's mother and father
live near by and are an integral
part of this family's life.
Lydia initiated contact with
the agency when she was in an
emotional crisis. Her husband
had just lost his job because he
was "too stupid to see that his
principles were in conflict with
company policies." She was also
feeling "frantically busy"
getting her daugher ready to
leave for her first year at
college."
Lydia was a very bright,
attractive, well groomed, soft
spoken woman, who wore ex-
pensive clothes and jewelry. She
had a job as a part-time
teacher's aide in which she felt
over-worked and underpaid and
had been thinking of leaving.
She had a self effacing, gentle
manner of speaking and every
other sentence was punctuated
with a hostile statement about
her husband whom she described
as being a "weak, passive,
selfish, self-destructive man"
who never did anything right.
She further described their long
relationship as having been
unsatisfying over a period of 20
years. She said that since her
husband had become impotent a
few years ago due to a physical
problem, she "got nothing out of
it at all." It was a wonder to
Lydia how the children had
grown up so well adjusted and
competent, considering the lack
of input there had been from
their father. She stated that she
had been planning to leave him
when the children were on their
own and now she wanted to
leave before they were finished
with college because she didn't
know how she could continue to
live with such a "loser." Lydia
said she was furious with her
husband, he never did anything
right and he always ended up
"letting his family down."
Her husband got a job three
and a half weeks after therapy
had begun, and the family's
financial problems stabilized. As
Lydia's emotional crisis subsided
and her history unfolded, it
became apparent that she was an
intelligent, articulate, humorous
and dominating woman, who
generally had hill control of i
aspects of her life. She had I
personal fulfillment in
her children and they w_,
embodiment of all of her dii
and ambitions. For the
years she had been hari
resentments against her husb.
because he'd been busy travel
on business while she had
raise the children alone. Lyi
described her early years
being dominated by her c
trolling, willful mother who I
forced her into an
marriage. She had ambivt
feelings towards her mother i
she said always negated
accomplishments and Lyi
went out of her way to
her children's confidence
counteract her feelings of failu
She described feeling
emotional closeness to her fai
despite the fact that he
weak, ineffectural person
would not have had fin
Continued on Page 11-
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ISRAEL IS LOOKING FOR
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o
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lose who believe that Jews
lave no right to any part of
fcrael and should be driven
ut, he was asked.
I don't think so," he
knswered. "This is a big
misrepresentation by
jionist groups. Even if this
uas the view in the 1950's
fr 1960's, it was the view of
.imature people. No
[esponsible person would
ay such a thing."
Did he recognize that
Ihere were different ten-
fencies within the Zionist
novement ranging from
light to left, from secular to
leligious. who had different
ijews about the Palestinian
leople? Asi offered a half-
ieartedyes.
Did he accept the fact
hat there were
Irganizations like the Brit
lhalom and Ichud in the
|930's and similar
Irganizations today in
Israel the Labor Party,
lapam. Peace Now
fhich advocated peaceful
JoexisU-nce with the
Palestinian people and
rhich did not seek
erritorial conquests?
Lgain, a half-hearted yes.
'"But," he added, "these
just ideas, ideas that
ave not been put into
^actice and those who try
put them into practice,
Ice Emil Grunzweig (a
ace Now activist), get
^emselves killed by other
onists."
|Who, he was asked, are
Grunzweigs among the
ilestinians and which are
organizations
uivalent to those in Israel
eking coexistence with
Jewish State and
pognizing its right to
pt? He took time to sip
oe tea and then said,
lie PLO."
Jut the PLO was
responsible for the bloody
massacres against unarmed
civilians at Maalot,
Avivim, Munich, along the
Haifa-Tel Aviv highway,
Paris, Amsterdam, Athens
and along the Israel-
Lebanon border. Was this
how the PLO recognized
Israel's right to exist? Asi
cited attacks against Arab
villages by "Zionists."
These acts, he was told,
were condemned by the
official Zionist leaders and
by the Israeli government
as acts of extremists.
Where were similar con-
demnations of the PLO
atrocities by Palestinians
and who were they? Asi
went into an explanation
that defied the imagination.
"Arabs react, they don't
act," he said. "They react
to attacks, they don't
initiate them."
In Munich, he said, "the
guerrillas didn't kill the
Israeli athletes. The
German police did and they
tricked the guerrillas into
participating. In Maalot,
who started the shooting?
On the Haifa-Tel Aviv
highway, they wanted to go
somewhere and negotiate
with the Israelis, but Israeli
troops attacked them."
Pressed for proof and told
that this view was totally
without foundation, he
looked at his watch and
said it was time for him to
leave for the university.
Asi is a mild-mannered,
soft-spoken man, even
gentle and sociable. He had
worked in the United
States, he said, for various
news agencies. There was
not a trace of hostility, of
animosity in his voice
during the interview. It was
all the more frightening
and sad to hear him
espouse such "moderate"
views. If this was
"moderate," what are the
extremists saying?
Friday, April 26,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 9
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Telephone: (9141 794-6900
Direct N.Y.C. Phone (2121924 tilh.
Hotel
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ClubsMassage Roomlndoor and Outdoor Pools*
Music and Entertainment DailyPlanned Activities
All Rooms Air ConditionedTv"s*Capacity 450 Guests
| Make "Gibbers" Your Summer Vacation Home,
You'll Love Us. The Gibber Family
AWE*
ir
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For Brochure Ph: Sl3/9* 3094
Installment Payments Offered
During the drive back to
Jerusalem, the homes of the
Jewish settlers in Elon
Moreh could be seen on a
verdant hill not far from
Nablus. This reporter,
Sedan and the army
spokesman drove along a
super highway into the
settlement.
The streets were im-
maculately clean and the
homes along the treelined
streets and gardens evoked
a totally different world,
one of peace and serenity.
The stucco homes had the
appearance of stately
mansions. They were all
constructed by Arab labor
with what was apparently
loving care.
But why all that love and
care, this reporter asked the
army spokesman.
"Because," he answered,
"the Arabs feel that in a
few years all this will
belong to them."
Hadassah
conference
Ambassador Aryeh Levin,
Deputy Permanent Represen-
tative of Israel to the United
Nations, will be guest speaker
for the Florida Mid-Coast Region
of Hadassah Conference Sunday,
May 5, 8 p.m. at the Fort
Lauderdale Beach Hilton Inn.
Born in Tehran, Iran,
Ambassador Levin studied
idle Eastern History and
Hi tics at the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem. He
served in the Jewish Agency.
Joint Distribution Committee,
was Director of emigrant camps
and active in emigration of
Kurdish and Iraqi and Iranian
Jews to Israel. He also served on
the IDF General Staff. He was
in the Israel Foreign Service. He
held Posts to Ethiopia, East and
Central Africa, France and Iran.
His last position in the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs was Director
of Middle East and Eastern
Mediterranean Division. He
published articles of political
analysis in the Israel Press and
contributed to foreign language
broadcasts of Voice of Israel
Radio programs.
Also, a guest speaker will be
Elaine Bloom, former member of
the Florida House of
Representatives, who has been
an active leader of the South
Florida community for many
years. She was the Founding
Chairperson of the Dade County
Commission on the Status of
Women. She has been
professionally active as a
Government Relations Con-
sultant and represents the
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations to develop their
government relations activities.
She is listed in many national
and international Who's Who
volumes. Ms. Bloom is well
known to radio and TV
audiences of the South Florida
area as the host of a weekly
program for WPBT-Channel 2
and a daily radio talk show on
WKAT.
On The Way Home
Continued from Page 6-
the dirt road because It was much shorter. I
thanked him once again and began my walk
home.
I could hardly wait to get home to be
reunited with my brothers, and to see my
sister again whom I had not seen for five
years. I was also anxious to meet my new
brother-in-law and curious to find out what
he was like.
I wondered how long it would take before
we could leave for America. I was ap-
prehensive about whether the KGB would
come after me in Priluki. But most im-
portant, was the question in my mind about
my immediate and long range future.
As I write this, 63 years later, the
memories and concerns of that day are still
crystal clear in my mind.
Emerson said "Mankind is divided bet-
ween the past and the future, between
memory and hope. While these are two
halves, it is not a complete whole!"
In order to bridge the gap between
"Memory and Hope,' we have to utilize the
present each and every day in order to
achieve a "A Complete Whole for ourselves.
LIVING WITH ONESELF
My importance to the world is relatively
small. On the other hand, my importance to
myself is tremendous. I am all I have to work
with, to play with, to suffer and to enjoy. It
is not the eyes of others that I am wary of,
but my own. I do not intend to let myself
down more than I can possibly help, and I
find that the fewer illusions I have about
myself or the world around me, the better
company I am for myself.
Noel Coward
Kutsher's
lights your
summer days
with sun.
And your nights
with/\stars.
NEIL
SEDAKA
JULY 4th
. WEEKEND
Give us
your summer.
And we'll give
you all the day
and evening
pleasures
of our
thousand-
acre estate.
aSSSK
**
itifi
SBS
_^olf on an 18-hole. 7,157
LOLA i ""d championship
FALArVA >tourse.l2 all-weather
1 S^ and clay tennis courts.
A fully equipped
health club
Lakeside walking
"*- trails. Outdoor
GLADYS )'1ikI '"door pools.
KNIGHT / Three firSS?
& THF V meals dally'
Pipe \ geared to your own
special diet
.VEBEEN
ROBERT
KLEIN
J*
Call us for informaliorrabout transportation
from New York area airports to Kutsher's!
Kutsher's
Montit-elIo, New York 12701 |914) 794-6000
CALL TOLL FREE: (8001 431-1273
Camplaw Convention rciM Miyx CiMH Ci

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