The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00030

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
jhejewish
of South Broward
Numbers
Hollywood, Florida Friday, February 1,1966
"EfrtdSHoclfl
Price 35 Cents
War-weary Israel greets
decision to leave Lebanon
H
IAN JEWS SPEAK AT SHOMRAI DINNER Mesfin Gebyehu, who spent months
^nese refugee camp with his cousin Sara Ezra before receiving passage to America,
deration board members Philip A. Levin. Saul Singer and Meral Ehrenstein where his
Ethiopia io located on a map of the Middle East. Next to him is Habtnesh Ezra, who
the dinner and many other events throughout the following week. More Shomrai
1 Ethiopian Jewry stories inside.
tens chair Feb. Metro Pacesetter
[and Harry Rosen
named as chair-
he 1985 Metro-
'acesetter Dinner
^ich will be held on
evening, Feb. 23
! Beth Shalom.
I guest speaker at
It will be Mark
director of the
Jewish Federa-
ishington Office
ig force behind
cious Legacy"
of Czechoslova-
sh treasures.
Is will be served
at 7:15 pjn., fol-
dinner. The min-
Harry and Jackie Rosen
imum family gift for the
Metropolitan Pacesetter
Dinner is $1,500.
The Rosens have been in-
volved in many aspects of
Jewish and general com-
munity events. They are
both members of the Jew-
ish Federation of South
Broward Missions Com-
mittee and Campaign
Cabinet. Harry is also a
member of the Jewish
Community Centers ol
South Broward Board ol
Directors and a former
mayor of Miramar.
Jackie and Harry have
Continued on Page 2
\vuay added to S. America mission
"'a and Joseph Terkiel
A third country has been
added to the itinerary of the
1985 Federation Mission:
South America program. In
addition to visiting Brazil
and Argentina, particip-
ants in the March 17-27
mission will also journey to
Uruguay.
Mission: South
American Chairmen Joseph
and Margarita Terkiel ex-
plained that a special inclu-
sion of Montevideo,
Uruguay has been added to
the mission to expand the
participants' Jewish expe-
rience in South America.
They also said this will
permit new contact bet-
ween the Jewish communi-
ties of South Broward and
Uruguay.
This program also in-
cludes visits to sites of
historical and present
importance in Sao Paulo,
Brazil, and Buenos Aires,
Argentina, where the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward formed its first
contacts last year. The 1984
Mission: South America
program represented the
first major journey of its
kind for a North American
Jewish community.
The 1985 program will
Continued on Page 4
By SUSAN POYAS
Israel Today
JERUSALEM War-
weary Israelis were relieved
by the Cabinet's decision to
withdraw the Defense
Forces from Lebanon by
the summer while residents
of the region were con-
cerned about a return of
ethnic violence once the
IDF is gone.
Sixteen ministers voted
for the pullback while six
Likud ministers, including
Vice-Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir opposed.
Shamir said the move
neglected security for the
Galilee settlement and
would be regarded by Is-
rael'a .enemies as a "sur-
render."
The first of the three-
stage pullback, which will
begin in five weeks time,
will be from Sidon, the
main population center in
South Lebanon, to the
Litani river. The second
stage will be from Syrian
lines in the eastern sector
and the final phase will be
back to Israel's border.
"Each stage will be short
enough so that we shall not
have to fortify our lines and
long enough to enable an
orderly arrangement in
Lebanon," Prime Minister
Shimon Peres told a foreign
press luncheon.
Israel's months-long ef-
forts to ensure a formal
negotiated withdrawal with
the Lebanese government
at the Nakura talks came to
nothing. "The Lebanese
government is completely
under the spell of the
Syrians. It is the most
incoherent government, if
you can call it a govern-
ment, that exists. The
Syrians are unwilling to
reach an agreement and
don't permit the Lebanese
to do so," Peres said.
Both Peres and Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin is-
sued a stern warning that
Israel will not permit the
PLO to reestablish them-
selves in South Lebanon.
"If the PLO tries to re-
build bases in South Leb-
anon, which will endanger
our security, we will take
preventive and reprisal ac-
tions," Peres said. Rabin
described the IDF's policy
after the withdrawal as "a
mobile, aggressive" stra-
tegy. "We will not hesitate
to go back in and destroy
Continued on Page 2
Dr. Robert and Elaine Pittell have been involved with the
concerns of Soviet Jewry for yean, bat this winter they toured
the Soviet Union for the first time and mat with many
refuseniks they had known before only by name. They have
been speaking to groups since their return, and here they are
pictured talking with Beverly Hollander, Chairman of the
Soviet Jewry Committee of the Community Relations Council,
before addressing the most recent meeting of the committee
The Pittells were also involved as the Campaign Cabinet
chairmen for the January Shomrai dinner.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1,1986
War-Weary Israel greets
decision to leave Lebanon
Continued from Page 1
any terrorist cells, he said.
Israel wants to do every-
thing it can to prevent
bloodshed as rival Leban-
ese militias rush to fill the
power vacuum the Israel
withdrawal will create. It
believes the only force cap-
able of keeping the lid on
the violence is the United
Nations force, UNIFL. "I
don't see any alternative,
the Lebanese army hardly
exists and does not even
function in Beirut," Peres
said.
The Cabinet decision
specified that after the final
withdrawal Israel would
maintain a security zone
across the border, policed
by local militias in close
coordination with the IDF.
The pull-out was the
toughest decision taken by
the national unity govern-
ment, set up four months
ago with the twin tasks of
bringing the troops out of
Lebanon and reviving the
economy.
The ministers were pre-
sented with four alterna-
tives but chose the one
described by the army
general staff as the lesser
evil.
"Mothers with sons
serving in Lebanon, in
constant fear for their
safety, will be soon able to
sleep soundly again," the
military correspondent of
Yediot Aronot wrote.
"After 610 dead, thous-
ands wounded, an outlay of
$3 billion, a terrible chasm
in the nation and unpreced-
ented erosion in IDF
morale, the time has come
to return home," he wrote.
While the cabinet was
debating the issue, two
soldiers were killed and
seven wounded in two
separate incidents in the
region.
Zvi Raskin, deputy
chairman of the Council of
Northern Border Settle-
ments, in which 100,000
people live, said they must
get used to "the bitter pill
and to prepare again for the
possibility of a renewal of
katiusha attacks."
Defense Minister Rabin
and the heads of the general
staff will explain the pos-
sible repercussions of the
decision to representatives
of border villages and hear
their reactions over the
next few days. Deputy
Prime Minster David Levy,
one of the two Likud min-
isters who voted for the
pull-out, said he did so be-
cause there was no alterna-
tive.
Communications Min-
As only the
Jewish Federation
can show it to you.
Emotional. Educational.
Enchanting. Enthralling.
These are some of the descriptions given by partici-
pants in the Jewish Federation of South Broward's
Israel Missions.
Be a part of a very special travel experience, as we
spend this Passover in the Promised Land.
For more information about the Passover Mission,
return the form below or call Judy Nemeth at Federa-
tion, 921-8810.
Yes, l/we will join the 1985 Federation Passover
Mission to Israel. Enclosed is a check for our regis-
tration fee ($200 per person).
Please send more information about the 1985 Pass-
over Mission to Israel.
NAME
ADDRESS
.Phone#_
Return this form to
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
921-8810
ister Amnon Rubenstein of
Shinui, said it was a victory
for all those who supported
the establishment of the
unity government. "Only
such a government was
capable of making such as
courageous decision,"
Rubenstein said. Peace
Now also backed the move.
Metro
Pacesetter
Continued from Page 1
participated in several Fed-
eration mission programs
to Israel and Jewish com-
munities abroad. They re-
cently hosted a reunion of
participants of the 1984-85
Young Leadership and
Copenhagen-Amsterdam-
I srael missions.
For more information
about the Metropolitan
Pacesetter Dinner Dance,
call Rabbi Herbert Tobin at
Federation, 921-8810.
THE FAMILY MISSION REUNION gave participant!! i
chance to see tourguide and friend Zvika Geretel and his wife
Tzippy again. Top photo, from left, Jackie Rosen, Zvika
Gerstel, Harry Rosen, Tzippy Geretel. Bottom, from left, Ellen
Don, Caryl Berzofsky, Margarita Terkiel, Bob Don. This year's
Family Mission will see Israel and the 12th Maccabian Games
The trip leaves Ft. Lauderdale July 10, returning July 24.
"The GUARDIAN PLAN program is
also an expression of lover
-Jerry Bynder
Yahrzeit binne of the m .lews. Yahrwit also reminds us of the realities of life. It
helps us raeegnte the nti-d to plan for the protection of
our families..
Now, Riverside sponsors a unique program of lam
ily protection, the Gl AW MAN PLAN. insurance funded
prearranged funeral program It's a sensible idea. Vhi h<1
what you want at a price you can afford That amount is
guaranteed never to increase. And it can be paid over a
number of years.
But most of all. just as Yahrzeit is a symbol of our love
of family, the Gl AMMAN I "LAN program is an expression of
our concern that the people we worry about have less to
worry about And what could be m than that'
Learn more about the GUARDIAN PLAN program Call
toll free 1-9004320653 tor your copy of Funeral Arrantf...
rnent-s in Advance. And with your copy vou will yet an .mH--
gency telephone number stick-on for your telephone receiver.
Name
-." -.,; ----- I w.int anp>
ill yourItooklH .iikI euienielKA
telepbone nilinlier stiek (Ml Aw.
Vidros
City------
State
J3p-
llomel'hone
Mail in (iiianlianl'laa-. Ii"
IllltdX*
winter l*rfc Honda
Or rail toll Tree
1-800-432-0863
JFMJ01
The GUARDIAN PI^UV tt program is sponsored by RIVERSIDE
Sotln*peopfc'y<)uvwJriyabouL
AnlVslKAV t.n M+:iiprrnnKlKio.TlwTM,rpn^Klrdb>(ArdMnl%i^ln. iiuiW>*1WSr,vl",ljft'
bMnnn-Company < FiimkVn H"27 HI u I HI """ *, "f Tiin II imrirl I ) ml pmlMi iffluc fVnia fim"-"


Friday, February 1,1985 / The Jewiah Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 3
Shirley Cole to chair Shanna buffet Rosen to tell her Odyssey
Shirley Cole has been named
Lhsirwoman for the first ever
Ihanna Buffet event, for those
Iho have made combined Family
gifts of $366 to the 1986 UJA-
Kderation campaign to be held
uesday evening Feb. 12 at 5:30
it the Hollywood Beach Hilton,
) S. Ocean Drive.
The appointment was made by
Herb Tolpen, Beach Campaign
Chairman for the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward.
The featured speaker for the
Lening will be Senator Robert
tack wood, an Oregon Repub-
lican, who has been one of the
wrongest supporters of the state
tf Israel on Capitol Hill. Pack-
tood will be up for reelection to
bis fourth term in 1986. Recently
e was appointed to chair the
owerful Senate Finance Com-
nittee.
Shirley Cole
"It is very important that we
all come out to hear and support
Senator Packwood," said Cole.
"Oregon hs a very small Jewish
population, yet the Senator has
taken a very firm stand on
supporting Israel."
Packwood has visited Israel
twice, in 1971 and 1978. As his
tenure increased, Packwood took
a leading role on issues such as
the fight to prevent the sale of
AWACs to Saudi Arabia. He also
led the opposition to the bill
which would have sold the Arabs
enhancement packages for F-15
fighter jets they already possess.
Among his many honors,
Packwood holds an honorary
degree from Yeshiva University,
which he received in 1982 when
he addressed the graduating
class at its convocation.
through the past
\Private showing highlights B'not Shalom
Theo Tobiasse, an inter-
nationally known artist who
Teals with Jewish themes, will
ersonally exhibit some of his
orks for a special Women's
Jivision B'not Shalom luncheon
Feb. 7 at the Sheraton Bal
larbour.
A gallery will be set up ad-
jacent to the luncheon hall where
nembers of the Women's
Division will be able to privately
fiew Tobiasse's paintings and
piscuss the themes of the work
Mth the artist himself. The
fxclusive viewing will begin at
f:3 am. and continue for one
iour.
Also appearing at the affair,
Recording to B'not Shalom
Second shalom
went Saturday
If you have a neighbor, relative
V mend who is new to the South
jiroward area, the Shalom
ffogram is for them.
, ,Th,rough the efforts of the Jew-
fn federation of South Broward
fid the Jewish Community
Renter of South Broward, the
Pnalom Program introduces all
ptets of our Jewish community
^ newcomers.
The second Shalom meeting of
w season is scheduled for
wurday evening at 8 o'clock in
S*pjClty at the home of Mer,e
Ih u Lundy- For directions to
lKn'r l8 and more information
Vki.1 the evening, please contact
*W>* Brodie Suckno at Feder
p'on 921-8810, or Joan
pdelman at the JCC, 921-6511.
Chairwoman Jo Ann Katz, will be
a local scholar in residence, Susan
Miller, sculptress and community
leader.
Other Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division members involved on
the B'not Shalom committee are
Vivien Goldstein, Rochelle
Koenig, Gloria Levin, Delia
Rosenberg, Joanne Schoenbaum,
and Rasha Silberberg.
Abzug, candlelightivg
top Beach Pacesetter
The Women's Business and
Professional Network is proud to
feature Ms. Deborah Rosen at
our Feb. 21 meeting. The Co-
chairwomen of the B&P Network,
Nola Goldberg and Dodie
Weinstein have prepared a
unique presentation for this
meeting, in a discussion entitled
"The Holocaust Revisited, Re-
tracing Our Roots."
Deborah Rosen has a
fascinating story to tell con-
cerning her recent Odyssey into
the past. Ms. Rosen can best be
described as" possessing a dif-
ferent flavor of food on each
finger. Presently she is a
freelance writer and editor
working on a Jewish trivia
project, a teacher of Real Estate I
for the Gold Coast School of
Realty, and the sole proprietor
and real estate broker for the
Winter Harbor Realty Company.
On a more personal light, Ms.
Rosen is a child of Holocaust
survivors. For five weeks, she
Debbie Rosen
traveled through Europe in
search of a cultural identity,
retracing the roots of her parents.
Rabbi Klein honored Feb. 3
Dr. Carl Klein. Rabbi of
Hallandale Jewish Center, will be
honored by the UJA South
Broward Jewish Federation and
his Congregation at its annual
breakfast on Sunday, Feb. 3 at
9:30 a.m. in the Temple Audi-
torium, 416 NE 8 Ave. 4th Ct.,
Hallandale.
Rabbi Klein is a forceful
spokesman for the needs of the
Jewish community and the State
of Israel. An official of the
Hallandale Jewish Center
recently stated, "We are well
aware of the fact that Isrel is, to
our rabbi, one of the most im-
portant issues which he has sup-
ported and is supporting with all
his fervor and enthusiasm. It is,
therefore, befitting that our
Congregation should repay in
some measure his devotion to
Israel and to the Jewish com-
munity in which he serves with
utmost dedication."
Rabbi Carl Klein
In the academic world, Dr.
Klein has a distinguished back-
ground as a professor of Hebrew,
philosophy and -Jewish history.
He is author of "Hungarian Jews
Between the Two World Wars,"
"The Credo of Maimonides,"
"The Anatomy of Judaism," and
"The Eternal Book."
The B'not Shalom luncheon is
open to all women in the
following giving categories:
Tamid ($365-499); Yonah ($500-
999); Meirah ($1,0001799); Chai
($1800-2499); and Shoshana
($2500-4999).
For more information
regarding the event, please
contact Carole at the Federation,
921-8810.
- p-o-a-tter Chairman DeUa Rosenberg lights the symbolic candles jarf. representing XT Jewish Federation of South Broward's c nhaaert to pay
BELLA ABZUG APPEARS IN HOLLYWOOD JFSB leaders
pose with Former New York Congresswoman and activist Bella
Abzug prior to her speech at the Beach Pacesetter. From left,
Beach Campaign Chairman Herb Tolpen; Martin Abzug; Bella
Abzug; Pacesetter Chairman Delia Rosenberg; Campaign
Chairman Saul Singer.
Former New York Con-
gressman Bella Abzug was the
guest speaker at the recent
Beach Pacesetter at the Holly-
wood Beach Hilton. The event
raised $394,500 for the 1985 U J A-
Federation campaign.
Featured at the event was the
symbolic lighting of nine candles
on a five foot long raised map of
Israel, representing the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
commitment to saving ninety
Ethiopian Jews. Resettlement
and absorption costs for the state
of Israel have been placed at
about $6,000 per new immigrant,
and the JFSB has pledged to
raise 90 times that, or $540,000.
The ceremony followed a
speech by Beach Campaign
Chairman Herb Tolpen and an
emotional appeal from Campaign
Chairman Saul Singer who spoke
about the plight of Ethiopian
Jews who have been left with
little choice but to escape their
homeland to get to refugee camps
with the hope at finally arriving
Je^ttiementcosts for ninety Ethiopian Jews who have recently arrived in land. in Israel.


Page 4 TheJewiahFloridiii of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1,1986
Thejewish
rwrfofan
Ol South Broward
PUW.OIKX1 No (USPS SMSOO) (ISSN 0'4* 773T)
_____ OFndShoctvt
r?.! 8HOMJT ART HARRIS SUZANNE SHOCMET
Editor and Publisher Associate Editor Executive Editor
PubllslMd Bi-WMtly Second CI*m Pottaga paid al HallandaM, Fla.
HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDEROALE OFFICE. S36S W Oakland Par* Blvd..
Fort Laudardaia. FL 33321 Phone 74S8400
Abraham I Halflm. AdvarlWng lypiwlur
Mam Oltlca a Plant: 120 NEeth St Miami. Fla 33132- Phona l-373.etOS
POSTMASTER: Sand address changas to The Jewish Floridlan,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Jewish Federation of South Broward oflicars President Or Philip A Levin, Vice Presidents Or
Saul Singer. Ted Newman and Nal Sedley. Treasurer Or Howard Barron. Secretary Otto
Stieber. Enecutive Director Sumner Q Kaye Submit malarial lor publication to Art Harris.
associate editor. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Florida 33020
_ ___ Member JTA, Sevan Arts. WNS. NEA, AJPA. and FPA.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $3 50 Annual (2 Veer Minimum t7|. or by membership Jewish
Federation ol South Broward. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Fla 33020 Phone 921 8810
Oul of Town Upon Request
Friday, February 1,1985
Volume 15
10SHEVAT5745
Number 3
A first Chanukah
for Ethiopian Jews
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Imagine witnessing a young
Jewish child seeing a dreidle for
the first time, watching in wide-
eyed wonder as the Chanukah
candles are lit, symbolizing an
historical religious event that
was never part of his known heri-
tage. So it was for Kehilat Eshel
Avraham, the Masorti (Con-
servative) synagogue in Beer-
sheba, which invited the Ethio-
pian Jewish community from a
local absorption center to a
Chanukah party on the second
night of the holiday.
Fifty new immigrants from
Fthiopia joined Eshel Avraham
in the congregation's small syna-
gogue, located in a local air-raid
shelter, for an evening of tradi-
tional Chanukah songs and
games.
Traditions of the Ethiopian
Jewish community originate only
from the Torah the five books
of Moses and until their aliya
to Israel, the Ethiopians had no
tradition of celebrating the vic-
tory of the Maccabees over
Antiochus. "For many of the
Ethiopians, it was their first
Chanukah celebration ever," said
Rabbi Jonathan Perlman, the
Baltimore-born rabbi of Eshel
Avraham.
"One older man who was
identified as a spiritual leader,
spoke with the help of a tran-
slator on behalf of all of the im-
migrants present. He told us it
was a privilege to come to Israel,
to the promised land, to be to-
gether with the rest of the Jewish
people."
The Ethiopian guests heard
Perlman explain about the light-
ing ot the "Chanukah candles
and other holiday customs. The
children, who go to school and are
learning Hebrew, warmed up to
the children of Eshel Avraham
over games of dreidle and "Pin
the Shamash on the Chanukah
menorah."
"I brought our youth group se-
veral times to the local absorp-
tion center to visit the new im-
migrants, entertain them and
play with the children there. I
was approached by a number ot
young adults who were anxious
to learn about Judaism since
their traditions include none of
the Oral Law (Talmudic) tradi-
tions, and I have been tutoring a
number of them." Perlman said.
Congregation Eshel Avraham
held a meeting a week before
their Chanukah party to hear a
lecture on the Ethiopian com-
munity by the regional Educa-
tion Ministry Supervisor. He
suggested ways in which the
synagogue could begin "cultural
exchanges" so as to help ease the
transition of the new immigrants
into Israeli society.
"I think that the Ethiopians
were very happy to be invited by
veteran immigrants and Israelis
to such a gathering," Perlman
said. "The older people enjoyed
seeing the children adapting so
quickly and enjoying themselves
with the synagogue children. If
we can break the language
barrier, we will have much to
offer the Ethiopian community in
Beersheba. I hope that our syna-
gogue will be a leading force in
helping their absorption."
S. American
Mission
Continued from Page 1
present meetings with top
political and community
leaders, and will feature
home hospitality which
offers the opportunity to
view Jewish life in South
America from a highly per-
sonal perspective.
The mission will be based
in first-class hotels, and all
flight and land arrange-
ments are included in the
total package for this sti-
mulating travel experience.
For reservations or more
information about Mission:
South America, return the
form below or call Debbie
Brodie Suckno at Federa-
tion, 921-8810.
RETURN THIS FORM TO:
Jewish Federation of South Florida
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
I/we wish to receive more information about the
March 17-27 Mission: South America program.
I/we wish to register for the March 17-27 Mission:
South America program. Enclosed is a check to
cover our deposit ($200 per person).
NAME _____________________________________________________
ADDRESS
I
PHONE*.
What we learned from Habtnesh
They are Jews. Jews in trouble.
All of us have known about the problems
of life for Jews in The Soviet Union; in
Arab countries; in Eastern Europe. What
we didn't know much about was life for
Jews in Ethiopia.
In fact, it's only been a couple of months
that most of us in the community had even
known that Jews lived in Ethiopia. So
many of us ask, "Who are they? Where did
they come from? and really the most ob-
vious question, the one we quietly ask,
"How come they are black skinned?
Last month, the Jewish Federation of
South Broward sponsored appearances by
three Ethiopian Jewish refugees in the
area. We learned as much about them as
everyone else did. The leader of the
Ethiopian family, a 28 year old woman who
carries the seemingly un-Jewish name of
Habtnesh, brought her sister and first
cousin whom she had personally rescued
from the refugee camps within the last
year. The sister grew up with the very
Jewish, very Biblical name of Sara Ezra
a name which reminds us of a great Jewish
matriarch and a prophet of Israel.
Are they really Jewish? Theories to their
origin are numerous. According to whom
we talk with, Ethiopian Jews are either
descendants of the Lost Tribe of Dan
one of the ten tribes of Israel which
disappeared after the Assyrian conquest
2,700 years ago;
Or are they descended from King
Solomon and the Queen of Sheba? The
progeny of Moses and an Ethiopian queen?
Of Solomon and one of Sheba's hand-
maidens?
Habtnesh told us that there are no
definite answers; it depends on who's
talking. But what is indisputable is that
the Ethiopian Jewish community has
remained intact and largely unchanged as a
religious Jewish entity for at least 2,000
years. They are a fascinating study of
ancient Jewishness.
Then there it the racial question. w
know our surprise at finding the existent
of black Jews, and seeing some of them
here, as we did recently. Imagine their
surprise, about a hundred years ago at
sighting their first white Jews. Believii
that they are descended from the tribe dl
Dan, which we believe to be a lost tribe
they must have thought that all the ot
tribes were lost they knew where th.
were the whole time. Perhaps the tribe.''
that later were spread over the contiruj
of Asia and Europe which we descend).
were originally black skinned too. All can do is speculate.
All this adds up to the fact that the
Ethiopians are real Jews. We learnedth
in addition to famine in Ethiopia, the
political situation there is untenable ford
Jewish minority. They are kept extren
poor, are unable to own land, and risk
political police actions from an unstable
government.
As we learned, the people are highly
intelligent, motivated, and learn quicklyI
They are also handsome and proud and I
have Biblical facial features. The state of |
Israel has opened their doors to thousaa
of refugees, ready to absorb them fullyi
an already multicultural society. Thisw
take a tremendous effort on the refugees'!
part. It also will take a tremendous effort!
on the part of the Israeli government,
existing Israeli society, and American
Jewry, which is being counted on to help I
pay for much of the absorption effort. V
needs to be done is to teach these people
Hebrew, work skills, and generally,brin
them into a 20th century society.
Everyone has their responsibilities. Wi|
must fulfill ours.
A.H. |
Contributions to Operation Moses, tkt\
Ethiopian resettlement effort, may bei
through the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Wallenberg remembered
Congressman Tom. Lantos,
ID-Calif.) is the first and only
survivor of the Holocaust to be
elected to the United States
Congress. Born in Budapest on
Feb. 1, 1928, Lantos was an
active member of the anti-Nazi
underground by the time he was
16. He was also a leader of the
early post-war anti-community
student movement in Hungary
before he came to the United
States in 1947 on a B'nai B'rith
HUM Foundation scholarship.
By TOM LANTOS
Forty years ago on Jan. 17,
1945 Swedish Diplomat Raoul
Wallenberg was seized by Soviet
troops in Soviet-occupied
Budapest, Hungary. In these 40
years, only his Soviet captors and
a few of his fellow prisoners have
spoken with him. But he is not
forgotten. The tens of thousands
of Hungarian Jews he saved from
certain death in Nazi extermina-
tion camps who lived to raise
families and who love life cannot
forget Raoul Wallenberg. My
wife Annette and I are two of
those he saved.
The outlines of Raoul Wallen-
berg's story are well known. A
well-educated young man, born
to a wealthy Swedish family,
Wallenberg sacrificed his future
in order to undertake a high-risk
effort to save the lives of
thousands of people marked for
extermination. In 1944 he arrived
in Budapest armed with Swedish
diplomatic status and funds from
the American War Refugee
Board. He carried out one of the
greatest humanitarian efforts in
modern history. Displaying
remarkable courage daily,
Wallenberg printed Swedish
passports and passed them out to
thousands of Jews. Single-
handledly he approached
deportation trains and literally
pulled people out ot the cattle
cars destined for extermination
camps. He purchased or rented
dozens of buildings, which he
designated Swedish territory,
and filled them with Hungarian
Jews to protect them from Nazi
round-up squads. Through his
efforts, Wallenberg saved an
estimated 100,000 Hungarian
Jews from the "final solution."
In January 1945, when the
Soviet military drove the last
Germans troops from Budapest,
they arrested Wallenberg as an
"American spy" in complete dis-
regard for his diplomatic status.
He was imprisoned first in
Hungary and then in the Soviet
Union. The Soviets initially
acknowledged that Wallenberg
was being held in "protective
custody" by the Red Army, but
soon they changed the story to a
complete denial of any knowledge
of his whereabouts. In 1957 the
Soviets flip-flopped once more
when the Deputy Foreign Min-
ister Andrei Gromyko acknowl-
edged that he had been taken pri-
soner in Hungary, but said he
died of a heart attack in 1947.
Kremlin leaders cling to this
story to this day, although eye-
witness reports from released pri-
soners documented the survival
of Wallenberg in the Soviet
Gulag throughout the 1960s, 60s.
and 70s.
Wallenberg, who would now be
72 years old, may still live within
the shadowy half-world of Soviet
prisons. As we mark the 40th
anniversary of his disappearance,
it is important that we renew our
determination to secure from his
captors his release or a full ac-
count of his fate. Just as he did
not give up hope in the face of
overwhelming odds, likewise we
must not give up any effort that
may help him.
Thanks to the persistency
my wife Annette, who organ
the first international
Wallenberg Committee,
other committed individui
President Carter, Presic
Reagan, and other world I
agreed to pursue Wallen
fate in meetings with the Sov
I have sought to put pn
on Moscow at every opp
to release Wallenberg. Twoys
ago 1 urged the Swedish gova
ment to hold the crew of a Sort
submarine that ran aground"
Swedish waters until the I
government released Walte*
or provided convincing era"
of his death. Another avenueU
we are now trying is filing i
the U.S. courts to force
Soviet Union to produce info
tion on Wallenberg. Will '
actions break the
silence and deception prac
by the Soviet Union in the <
Raoul Wallenberg? Perhaps"
but as he did not give up, Ml
must continue our effort to r
his freedom.
With each passing day,
ever, the possibility that wa
berg is still alive diminishes
we mark the 40th anniversary
his disappearance, it is uj
that we remember his d
the unspeakable horror ot i
Holocaust one of manKiP
blackest nights the cou
and humanity of Raoul wa
berg was shining beacon ot r
The tens of thousands he*
- and their chUdren and
grandchildren will not m
memory die. Wallenberg has'
his mark on mankind. AJ
two thousand years ago them
Hebraic sage HiUel put tt
context: "He who saves ai
as if he saved an entire wa
How much more so for the i
who has saved tens of thous*


Friday, February 1,1985/The Jewiah FloridianQf South Brpward-HoUywDod Page 5
Hollybrook Women's Division luncheon
The Hollybrook Women'9
I Division Ffrst Annual Luncheon
-rill be held Wednesday, Feb. 27
IT the Emerald Hills Country
flub The Hollybrook Division is
new yet formidable entity
spearheaded by chairwoman
i Jackie Levine together with a
committee of determined and
hardworking women.
The special guest speaker will
be Vicki Agron. She is presently
the Director of the United Jewish
Appeal Young Women's Leade-
ship Cabinet, and the Director, in
the office of the President, of the
National Chairman and Chair-
man of the Board of Trustees.
Since her induction into the
Jewish civil and professional
arena in 1975, Ms. Agron has
demonstrated a tremendous level
of commitment, tenacity, skill.
and leadership abilities.
Ms. Agron has an impressive
list of service activities. She was
the Chairwoman of the United
Jewish Appeal Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet, an officer
and executive committee member
for the UJA, a participant and
leader for the UJA Missions to
Israel in 1974, 1980, 1981, and
1982, a Delegate to the United
Israel Appeal Jewish Agency
General Assembly in 1979, an
executive committee member for
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions Women's Division, an
officer for the Allied Jewish
Federation of Denver, and the
winner of the Mo Katz Young
Leadership Award in 1975. Vicki
has done speaking engagements,
fundraisers and training sessions
at conferences in communities
Hellman to speak at Malaga
Chairman Mel Lazerick of the
Malaga UJA-Federation 1985
campaign announces a cocktail
party Sunday Feb. 17 beginning
at 4:30 p.m. in the building social
hall.
Featured guest speaker will be
Yehuda Hellman, one of the
country's foremost authorities on
the events of the Middle East.
Hellman is Executive Director of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations.
He was one of the first Amer-
ican Jewish leaders to see Presi-
dent Anwar el-Sadat in Aswan
following Mr. Sadat's historic
visit to Jerusalem.
Lazerick, formerly of Cleve-
land, is chairing the Malaga
campaign for the third year. He
has been active in philanthropic
work both in South Broward and
in Cleveland. He is a member of
the national board of Big
Brothers-Big Sisters, and is
Jacqueline Levine
throughout the United States
and Canada from 1975 to the
present.
We feel confident that this first
Annual Hollybrook Luncheon
shall set a high standard for
years to come. For more informa-
tion, please contact Carole Roth
at the Federation, 921-8810.
HOLLYBROOK WOMEN'S DIVISION From left, standing:
Edna Cohen, Frieda Master, Miriam Kasan, Evelyn Goldstein,
Amy Marshall, Ruth Goldberg, Sheryll Hirschberger, Rhea
Krieger, Rosella Grossman, Jacky Levine; Sitting, from left,
Celina Slot nick, Raisie Karp, Gerry Weinstock. Not pictured,
Sylvia Holtz, Harriet Trepner, Ella Jay, Edith Barron, Dorothy
Frank, Joyce Binstock, Ann Cohen, Roberta Fixell, Lil Weil,
Laura Fromberg, Ida Kane, Sylvia Stein, Mary Jaffee, Lil
Ducoff, Claire Wexler, Rosalie Zeldow, Natalie Golub, Rose
Ariel, Julia Left, Ann Barish, Mae Kahan, Myra Kahn, Shirley
Silberberg, Kay Hirschberg, Thelma (Axelrod) Levine, Libby
Meyers, Jeanne Metzger, Esther Leno.
Quadomain breakfast Feb. 17
Melvin Lazerick.
married to his wife, Ina, and has
two daughters, Carol and Beth.
There is a $100 minimum
commitment to the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
campaign necessary in order to
attend this event. For further
information, please call the
Federation at 921-8810.
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The Quadomain 1985 UJA-
Federation campaign will hold a
complimentary breakfast Sunday
morning Feb. 17 at 10 in the
building social hall, according to
chairman Harry Kaplan and co-
chairmen Sam Koffler and Isador
Zaroff.
The event is sponsored by the
King David Lodge B'nai B'rith.
Special guest speaker will be
Yehuda Hellman, Executive
Director of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations. A former
newsman for the Jerusalem Post
based in Arab countries, Hellman
was once imprisoned on the
charge that he was sending press
AIPAC
conference
The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC) will
sponsor a one day, statewide
Political Action Workshop to
teach the pro-Israel community
the nuts and bolts of the political
process on Sunday March 31 at
the Marriott Hotel, 17th Street
Causeway, Fort Lauderdale, from
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information, contact
Melissa Martin at the Jewish
Federation, 921-8810.
(From left to right): Sam Koffler, Harry Kaplan, Isadore
Zaroff.
dispatches unfavorable to the
Arab cause. He has become one
of the top authorities on current
events involving the Middle
East.
Leaders Kaplan, Koffler and
Zaroff have been longtime parti-
cipants in the Quadomain camp-
*
aign. They have been working
harder each year to make this
event a large success and expect
the highest turnout ever this
year.
For more information con-
cerning the event, please contact
the Federation at 921-8810.
laromme jeruseiem hotel
See your travel agent or call toll-
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Not available to tours and groups:
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Laromme eiLat hotel
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1,1986
Jewish Senator, Jewish Ethiopian speak at S
From left, Saul and Edith Schmidt; Bertha and Manny Fass
From left, standing, Sumner Kaye, Executive Director JFSB; Meral Ehrenstein, Women's
Division President; Philadelphia Councilwoman Joan Specter; Sara Ezra; Senator Arlen
Specter; Sitting, from left: Dr. Saul Singer, Campaign Chairman; Dr. Philip A. Levin, JFSB
President; Mesfin Gebyehu; Habtnesh Ezra.
From left, Max and Zelda Morrison; Manny and Bertha Fass.
From left, Donald and Kayla Herah, Shomrai Chairmen; Joan and Arlen
Specter.
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t
t Shomrai dinner
Friday, February 1,1966 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoDywood Page 7
Sea Air to honor Cohens
Jack and Celia Cohen will be
the honorees Sunday Feb. 24 at
7:30 p.m. at the Sea Air Towers
Social Hall for a meeting on
behalf of the 1986 UJA-Federa-
tion campaign.
Special guest speaker for the
event will be Dr. Arieh L.
Plotkin, a former officer in the
Intelligence Corps of Israel's
Defense Forces.
Jack Cohen was born and
raised in Springfield, Mass., one
of three brothers involved in the
family real estate firm of Century
Investments, which owns pro-
pety in Massachusetts and Palm
Beach county. He and his wife
Celia were active in Springfield
Jewish affairs, including the
building of the Springfield
Jewish Community Center and
Temple Beth El in that city.
They have been members of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward since they arrived here
as part time residents 14 years
ago. Six years ago they decided
to become fulltime Florida resi-
dents of the Sea Air.
For additional information
concerning the event, please
Frrattion%ty88lOBaChraCh Mr and Mrs. Jack Cohen
From left, seated, Melvin and Lucille Baer; Standing, Jules
Gordon, Sumner Kaye, Stella Gordon
Seated, from left: Olga and Bernard Goldberger, Molly
Verebay; standing, from left: George and Mina Finkelstein,
Max Verebay.

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1 cup chopped red pepper
1 package 110 oz.) frozen corn.
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I package (10 oz.) chopped
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1 cup sbced mushrooms
Vt cup butter or margarine
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A letter from
Hod Hasharon, Israel
8 :, The J*wieh Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1,1985
The seven Judaica high
schools of South Broward
recently participated in a
exercise which marked the
experience of their grandpar-
ents and great grandparents
who came to America through
Ellis Island. Included were
simulated medical exami-
nations and interviews, cul-
minating in a swearing in
ceremony as new Americans.
Participating were left, Dr.
Philip Gould; top, Dr. Leon
Weissberg, Temple Beth
Shalom; bottom, Judge
Leonard Fleet of Temple Solel.
Project Renewal what does
it mean? The renewal of a neigh-
borhood, specifically one in a
state of distress, through
building on and enhancing what
is rather than destroying and
rebuilding. Through the project,
neighborhoods in Israel have
become organized with commit-
tees working to improve the
quality of life for all giving the
residents a feeling of self-esteem
and fulfillment not known before.
To the partners in the Diaspora
comes the knowledge of the
reality of living in Israel day-to-
day, not just through the win-
dows of the tour bus.
How did a neighborhood like
this develop? In the early 1950's
there was an influx of Jews
escaping from Arab and North
African countries, coming to
their homeland, Eretz Israel. At
the time the thinking was to keep
ethnic groups together during
their absorption into Israeli life.
However, the result of this action
has been that these people, with
their own special mentality and
culture, did not progress into the
mainstream of life in Israel.
Consequently, during these past
30 years, they have stayed with
thier own kind, they have not
moved forward, and have had
problems interacting with others.
Today, the third generation in
these communities feels the di-
rect result of this phenomenon.
Even though these young people
desire to integrate themselves
into the community at large.
Their illiteracy and lack of
education inhibits their contacts
outside of their own neigh-
borhood. Through all of this
emotional turmoil emerges
problems seen at a very early age.
What starts as child hitting
develops into criminal acts as the
child becomes teenager and
adult. Learning is not viewed as a
priority, and behavior problems
prevent progression. As the
vicious circle continues, more
problems are seen as the
youngsters because of previous
records are not accepted into the
Israeli Army, resulting in a
lifelong stigma if not corrected. It
is the combination of all of this
that causes these young people to
resort to street gangs for their
social life.
The moadon (center) in Gil
Amal where I spend each
Wednesday evening talking,
listening, playing ping-pong and
other games, and enjoying the
latest music with the boys and
girls is due to the efforts of a
special young man, Shmuel
Itzhak, madrich (counselor) and
friend to these troubled
youngsters. For the past three
years he has always been ready to
listen and to help them at any
time. Employed by the Depart-
ment of Education in Hod
Hasharon, Shmuel's responsi-
bilities began in 1981 as the
madrich in Gil Amal specifically
for teens aged 16-20 with serious
problems in their lives. He has
arranged activities for them
such as learning trips to make
them aware of the history of the
country, assistance with
studying, and preparing for
Army service. Through visits to
Army facilities and meetings
with Army personnel, the young
people can become acquainted
with what will be expected of
them during their Army duty.
Looking at the faces and into
the eyes of the boys and girls, I
cannot help but wonder what the
future will hold for them. Today
they are troubled with problems
in the family, in school, the com-
munity, and within themselves.
They compete among themselves
for attention and achievement in
the activities as if to say to all, "I
can do it!" Coming to the
moadon gives them the feeling of
something constant. They know
each day between 5-8 p.m. they
have a place to be. The fact that
this part of their lives is so im-
portant is repeatedly seen as they
return week after week, even year
to year. Because they have had
this place, they can learn to
achieve, and can realize the
importance of individual identity.
From them I have learned an
important lesson the value of
trust in another human being .
the true meaning of saying what
you mean and meaning what you
say. I often wonder if they realize
how important the moadon has
become to me. The friendships I
am making there are very special
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Shoppes of Carriage Hills 6946 STIRLING ROAD, HOLLYWOOD
961-1507
and the feeling of being accepted
becomes stronger all the time. I
can only hope that they will have
all the confidence and trust in me
so that I can help make a dif-
ference in their lives.
Providing help and assistance
for these troubled young people
of Giora and Gil Amal is just one
of the ways Project Renewal has
improved the quality of life in
these communities. During the
coming months I will share with
you many other programs made
available to the residents because
of the existence of the partner-
ship between the people of South
Broward, Florida and the people
of Giora and Gil Amal, Israel.
Shalom and love,
ELIZABETH HOMANS
Hod Hasharon, Israel
West Young Leadership
The Western Young Leader-
ship of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward is a dynamic
group of people who live in the
Miramar, Pembroke Pines, Rock-
Creek-Cooper City area and are
made up of couples.
They meet approximately five
t imes a year at different locations
in the west. They have a variety
of different speakers who speak
on Jewish topics of interest to
this group of young adults. Their
next meeting is Saturday, Feb. 9
at 8 p.m. at the chairpeoples
home: Howard and Sheila
Wacks. The speaker will be Larry
Schuval who will speak on the
cults situation in Broward
County.
For information, please call
Debbie Brodie Suckno at the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward at 921-8810.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Ex-
cavations being carried out by
the Institute of Archaeology of
the Hebrew University in co-
operation with the Israel Ex-
ploration Society have revealed,,cfl
impressive fortifications and a
water supply system at Tel
Yoqne'am in the Jezreel Valley
that apparently date from the
days of King Solomon (10th
Century B.C.E.).
Ifs Easy to Feel Like a Million
Without Spending a Dime
At first glance, its just a living room
filled with furniture. Or maybe its
a garage filled with tools Or a closet
filled with ctotnes.
It might not be worth much to you.
but to us its worth millions. Its worth
medicine and medical supplies for
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible. Of course, we wiH be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience. A licensed
appraiser is available upon request.
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets.
Its that easy. And you'll feel like a
million without spending a dime
751-3988 (Dad)
981-8245 (Broward)
In Pstdei 5713 N.W. 27th Ave.
In 9wNl 3149 Hallandale Beach Btvd
Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board
Harold Beck, President
Aa/on Kravitz. Chairman, Thrift Shop
Committee
Fred D Hirt. Executive Director


Friday, February 1,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Houywood
Page 9
Broward religious schools have exciting plans
I exciting innovative pro-
I be introduced to South
rd Jewish schools. This
ducational concept called
iL'Dor, meaning from
ktion to Generation, is
on Jewish tradition of
an elder or "Melamed"
the learning process of
j children. A community
[search is underway for
Tinterested in sharing time
knowledge with Jewish
ha Hopen, prominent
fin the field of education,
the "Senior Mentor for
festive Student" concept
Broward Public School
Realizing its merit,
ir Graham effected a
i grant which was followed
^0,000 from Chevron USA
itewide implementation.
Jopen and Rochelle Koenig,
ttee member, introduced
r I, Dor plan in Jewish
lion.
Education Committee of
fSB, headed by Sandra
aid that our youth need to
tivated by creative Judaic
non. Jewish children suffer
in identity crisis. Through
^novative Dor L'Dor pro-
an adult (Melamed) will
then his self-image while
king Jewish identity in our
jpeople.
th Broward is ideally
for the Dor L'Dor
Our area has the
number of retirees in the
States. Retirees and
| 1 and life experiences that
transmitted to students,
(of the many, areas needing
Blamed are: Music, Hebrew
aphy, holiday enrichment,
From left, Sandra Ross, Bonnie Weinreb, Bob Smolian, Selma
Hopen
rituals, drama, story telling,
living history and culture, arts
and crafts, sharing Jewish values
and tradition, coping with stress
in the family, and developing
pride in being Jewish. Mrs.
Hopen stresses that the "Me"
generation needs to interact with
the generation raised with the
"We" philosophy.
Presently, the JCC, area syna-
gogues, and others concerned
with quality education are
cooperating with the JFSB to
develop thsi pilot program.
Participation in the Melamed
Corps is offered as a viable
alternative to days of luncheons,
cards, golf, shopping and
boredom.
Three in-service Melamed
workshops have been planned
without charge:
March 13, Wednesday from
10:30-11:30. Dr. Tamara Cohen
will speak on Positive Self-
image.
March 20, Wednesday from
10:30-11:30. Selma Hopen,
chairman, and Marsha Kreitman,
from the Art and Culture Center
of Hollywood, will speak on
Creativity.
March 27, Wednesday from
10:30-11:30. Roslyn Seidel from
Temple Sinai, and Shirley Cohen
from Temple Beth Shalom, will
speak on Bridging the Inter-
generational Gap.
VOLUNTEERS ARE
NEEDED. Call Sandra Ross at
9-J1-8810 for information. Free
transportation is available.
Final Mideast
Forum Feb. 5

ft
with
KO-TOURS-
t the
hotil
miami baa oh. florida
>H[)Arl. I '" (
hiy coofcad giatt koahar meaii daily
f M(vict conducted by ranowned
ntor
i on premiaaa
The third and final Middle
East Forum update of the year
will be held Tuesday Feb. 5 at 8
p.m., featuring Phil Baum from
the American Jewish Congress
speaking on the topic of the
Ethiopian Jewish absorption in
Israel.
There is no charge for the
event, to be held at Temple Sinai,
1201 Johnson Street, Hollywood.
The general Community is
welcome.
Baum is the Associate Ex-
ecutive Director of the AJC, and
an attorney, expert in con-
stitutional law and Israeli-
Middle Eastern affairs. For many
years he has been the co-
ord inatior of the American-Israel
Dialogue, a gathering of Israeli
and American Jewish thinkers
who discuss revelent current
issues.
Some of Baum's published
writings include treatises on anti-
Semitism in the U.S., the Pales-
tinians' use of terror, and
Nasser's persecution of Jews in
Egypt.
The Middle East Forums are
presented by the Community Re-
lations Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Israel will
transmit VOA
i N
HER FOR PASS
Her the kashruth supervision of
the nationally recognized
KO-TOURS
1123 Broadway. Room 1020
New York. New York 10010
(212)691-6633
loul ol (own can coHecll________^^^^
Rturvitions can a/o 6a md
through AMIT Travel
1121 477-4720 or 1-800-221-3117
From left, standing: Rosylyn Seidel, Sandra Ross, Sehna
Hopen, Rochelle Koenig, Helene Miller; Sitting, from left,
Eleanor Bernstein, Rona Perrotta, Bonnie Weinreb
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel
ia expected to agree shortly to a
request from the Reagan
Administration to build a 6200
million transmitter here to relay
Voice of America radio broad-
casts to the Soviet Union.
The Americans have been
pressing for this for some time
but Israel was reluctant to
further aggravate its bitter re-
lations with the USSR. Recently
the Administration reportedly
increased its pressure, after
several European countries re-
=^J jected a similar request.
LIVE-IN COMPANION
Hallandale "Snowbird"
Coming in for February & March
Would Like Pleasant, Personable
Female Companion
Prefer Driver With Car
FOR INTERVIEW APPOINTMENT
Call N. Solomon 454-5090
c
Willow Manor Retirement Home
JlT i -, Family Owned & Operated
,ri-J- ja Adult Education Programs
VI I [j I Entertainment Weekly
\| T it 7811 r--.r Visiting Rabbi
Willow
Manor
920-1988
Mary Ann Signore
Administrator
Salt-free, Kosher Style Menu
Physician and Podiatrist On Call
24 Hours Supervision
Security and Alarm System
Hairdresser and Barber
Semi-Private or Private Rooms
Nurses Aid On Duty
Intercom-Alarm and Sprinkler System
In Each Room
New Addition Currently Under Construction
Visitors Are Welcome Anytime
129 S.W. 2nd Avenue ______
Dania, Florida
Give yourself
the life you deserve
You've worked hard, and you want your retirement years to be happy.
You want to maintain an independent lifestyle in an atmosphere of elegance, comfort
Then you should know more about The Florida Club, a new kind of congregate living
apartment resort community. **.^m
Conveniently located in a beautiful section of North Miami, The Florida Club offers many
unique features: ,
Traditional meals served in a beautiful Clubhouse Dining Room. (Two meals a day included
in the rent.)
Scheduled transportation and private limo service by appointment.
Free cleaning and housekeeping. Lakefront balcony views.
Recreationaland social programs. 24-hour medical security. Pool, sauna, fitness Spa.
Many other support services and safety precautions.
Perhaps the most startling thing about the Florida Club is that a// of these features are
included in the monthly rent. And there is no membership fee whatsoever.
A life of independence and happiness is the life you want, and the life you deserve. To make
sure you don't miss out, return the coupon today or in Dade County, dial 652-2910; in Broward
County, dial 522-8244. Other areas, call TOLL FREE ^800-343-CLUB.
Ask about TREE
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Directions: from 441, take 191st St. east to Third Ave. North on
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The Florida Club n currenlly in the process o< applying lo the licensing authority lor an Adult Congregate living Facility Ik erne Irom the state ol Florida.
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? Please send me more informa-
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living at The Florida Club.
? I am interested in inspecting
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The Florida Club, Dept. |FH
NE 3rd Avenue and Sierra Dr.,
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City
State
Zip.


Page 10 The Jewiah Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1.1986
Q&A on Medicare
Q: My husband needs to stay I
in a nursing home. However,
Medicare wouldn't pay for any of,
his stay. They say he receives
"custodial care." Can you explain
why they won't pay for the
services provided to a sick person
who obviously cannot function
normally?
A: Unfortunately, Medicare
will only pay for the services
which are considered "skilled
nursing and-or rehabilitation," or
services, which are performed or
supervised by professional per-
sonnel, such as a registered nurse
or a physical therapist. These
services must be provided on a
daily basis On the other hand,
Medicare will not pay for so-
called "custodial" care (e.g.
assistance in dressing, bathing,
eating and going to the toilet).
Generally, Medicare will pay only
if the following conditions apply:
1) Only professional personnel
can "safely and-or effectively
perform or supervise skilled
services."
2) Skilled services should
result in a medical improvement
of a patient. However, if such
improvement is not possible,
skilled services should at least
prevent a patient's condition
from getting worse. For example,
a patient who had a stroke may
not have potential for recovery.
However, he-she may still require
skilled nursing care.
3) Sometimes, special medical
complications and preexisting
conditions of a patient will
require the attention of a profes-
sional specialist to perform
sevices which are generally consi-
dered nonskilled," or
"custodial." For example, chang-
ing a plaster cast on a leg is "cus-
todial" service. Still, if a patient
has a preexisting acute skin pro-
blem he-she will need an assist-
ance of professional personnel.
Keep in mind, that Medicare
will consider any of the above
three conditions valid, only if
skilled nursing care" is provided
on a daily basis.
Inter-faith luncheon
The Inter-Faith Council of
Greater Hollywood will feature
Congressman Larry Smith at
their annual Brotherhood lun-
cheon Thursday Feb. 14 be-
ginning at 12 noon at the
Orangebrook Golf Club in H< lly-
wood.
Also appearing at the luncheon
will be Hollywood Mayor David
Keating, the founding President
of the Inter-Faith Council.
The Orangebrook Golf Club is
located at 450 Entrada Drive,
across from the Hollywood Mall.
The tax deductible cost of the
lunch is $7.
The lunch is being presented
by the Inter-Faith Council in co-
operation with the Greater
Hollywood Ministerial As-
sociation, the Hollywood City
Larry Smith
Commission, the Jewish Feder-
ation of South Broward, the
South Broward Council of
Rabbis, and the South Broward
Deanery of the Archdiocese of
Miami.
For invitations call Raquel at
Jewish Federation, 921-8810.
Q: / had a prostate operation
in November 1983. My surgeon
billed me $1,800. Medicare al-
lowed nothing. Lashed to review
my case, and in February 1984
they advised me that my "claim
for procedure code 62601
which is once-in-a-ufetime proce-
dure has been reviewed," and
denied! What can I do?
A: You've made the right deci-
sion by calling Medicare
Information Service for help. We
have carefuly reviewed your case,
and found out that you had a pre-
vious prostate surgery in 1981.
At that time, Medicare allowed
payment for your claim in full
(Note: the same procedure code
was used). No one at our service
has ever heard of a term "one-in -
a-lifetime procedure." However,
after a little research, we found
out that Medicare has a special
procedure code 62630 to desig-
nate surgery which deals with the
regrowth of a prostate after one
year. Having collected the neces-
sary evidence, we requested a
hearing on your case. As a result
of this hearing, Medicare took the
correct procedure code into consi-
deration, and you were allowed
$1294 for your last prostate
surgery. If you have any doubts
about your Medicare payments,
call Medicare Information
Service for help. Identifying the
correct procedure code may mean
additional money to you!
Jewish Family Service is a
recipient agency of Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
Jewish Federation of Greater
Fort Lauderdale and the United
Way of Broward County. If you
have a Medicare question or
problem, CALL Medicare
Information Service of Broward
County at 966-0956 in Holly-
wood, 735-3394 in Fort Lauder-
dale, and 427-8508 in Deerfield
Beach.
0
Candle Lighting Time
Feb. 1 5:46
Feb. 8 5:51
Religious directory
ORTHODOX
Congregation Levl YlUcfcok Lubavltch. 1296 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd
Hallandale; 488-1877. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaua. Daily services 7:66 am 20
minutes before sundown; Sabbath service*, 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath morning )
o'clock; Sundays. 8:30 a.m. Religious school; tirades 1-8. Nursery scnooi,
Monday through Friday.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877 Rabbi Edward 1
Davis. Dally services, 7:30a.m., sundown; Sabbath services, one hour before
sundown; Sabbath morning. 0o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
CONSERVATIVE
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 484-9100. Rabbi Carl Klein.
Dally services. 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning.
8:40 a.m.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-6111 Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Dally services, 7:46 a.m., sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15
o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9 o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten-*
Temple Beth Ahm- 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 431-6100. Rabbi Avraham
Kapnek. Services dally 8a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning 8:46 am.
Religious School- Nursery, BarMltzvah, Judalca High School.
Temple Israel of Mlramar 6920 SW 36th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi Raphael
Adler. Dally services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath. 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:49
o'clock. Religious School: pre-klndergarten8.
Temple Slnal 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1677. Rabbi Richard J.
Margolls. 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 9 a.m. Religious school: Pre-
klndergarten-Judalca High School.
REFORM
Temple Beth El 1361 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 920-8226. Rabbi Samuel Z
Jaffe. Sabbath evening 8 p.m. Sabbath morning 11 a.m. Religious school:
Grades K-10.
Temple Beth Emet Pembroke Pines General Hospital auditorium. 2261
University Drive, Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspoa
Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m. Religious school: Pre-klndergarten10.
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989-0206 Rabbi Robert P.
Frazln. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 10:30 o'clock.
Religious school: Preschool12.
RECON8TRI (TIOMSI
Kamat Shalom 11301 W Broward Blvd.. Plantation: 472-3600. Rabbi Elliot
Skldell. Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m. Religious school: Pre-klndergarten-8.
/lO

z_b

Another good reason you should attend services
at temple or synagogue this week.
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Friday, February 1,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Bro ward- Holly wood Page 11
He had lost his self-confidence
Mr-
mr S appeared on time for his
-t appointment. He was neatly
sd and began his conversa-
n by saying that he really did
M want to be here, but he was
idling qu'te confused and did not
L0w where else to go.
[ As our session continued, Mr.
began to unfold his immediate
Lst He stated that seven
Laths ago he separated from his
. and two children, ages five
a seven. He had been married
m the last eight years and was
try happy until two years ago.
It that time he began to feel
Jepressed, lost confidence in
tmself. and just became con-
Led. He was not sure what
bused this depression and
Jasn't quite sure what to do
bout it. His relationship with his
rife was deteriorating. He could
ot talk to her, he was uninter-
in sex and began to with-
hw from her. After experi-
encing this mood for about one
tear and three months, he
JE
decided the best thing to do was
to leave his wife. He felt badly
about bringing his family down
with him, so the best alternative
was to leave.
Since he left he said that he
was still feeling low and confused
but that at least he was not
hurting his family.
After a few sessions, we began
to uncover some important in-
formation. Mr. S had always been
a pleaser, he swallowed his
feelings and deprived himself of
pleasures and desires. He was
unable to have a relationship and
include himself and his needs and
wants. He had always come
second. It was obvious that his
depression and apathy was a
Israel's cost of living
rises only slightly
TEL AVIV (JTA) The cost-
kf-living index in Dec. rose by
|nly 3.7 percent, the lowest
onthly increase in 18 months
nd the lowest for Dec. in six
tears.
The figures, released by the
t'entral Bureau of Statistics,
pere immediately hailed by the
overnment, His tad rut and the
.lanufacturers and Employers
Association as a vindication of
I three month wage-price freeze
package instituted last
November.
Fine Wine. A new Israeli white
wine, the Sauvignon blanc of
Yarden Wineries in the Golan
Heights, recently enjoyed a rave
review in the wine columns of the
Los Angeles Times. In the ar-
ticle, published on Dec. 6, the
writer states that the Yarden
Sauvignon blanc "can take its
place alongside some of the best
of the variety from California and
France.
A
message
for those
who didn't believe
we could lower
funeral costs
by as much as
25%
without
reducing services:
Believe it.
We're doing it.
Sinai &
Funeral Home /Inc.
*k
Orthodox Conservative Reform
100 South Dixie Highway/Hallandale/456-3900
Serving Broward and surrounding counties
direct result of low self esteem.
He felt very unsure of himself,
did not know how to commu-
nicate and identify how he was
feeling. He lacked self knowledge.
Without his sense of self he was
having great difficulty satisfying
relationships.
Therapy became a process of
self exploration. As this con-
tinued the depression lifted and
self assurance replaced the con-
fusion. He was feeling more moti-
vated, interested and felt more
capable of making decisions.
Community
Calendar
FEBRUARY 4-7
Brandeis University National Women's Committee, Hollywood
Chapter, has their annual used book sale at Hollywood Mall. Proceeds
go to the university library. Call 966-2484.
FEBRUARY 4
Sandpiper chapter of American Women's ORT holds monthly meeting
at Broward Federal Savings, 10050 Pines Blvd., 12 noon. Call 431-
5141. Lunch included, program on diet and nutrition.
Hillcrest Chapter of Hadassah monthly meeting at noon, at the
Hillcrest Playdium. Greta Fleissig entertains. Call 966-2024.
FEBRUARY 5
Hillcrest Hadassah "Hands of Healing" luncheon, 12 noon, Turnberry
Isle Country Club. Proceeds benefit Hadassah hospitals in Israel. Call
961-1548.
FEBRUARY 9
Hunter College alumni and anyone who ever attended Hunter College
are invited to the annual birthday luncheon at the Diplomat Country
Club, 501 Diplomat Parkway. Call 454-1984.
FEBRUARY 10
B'nai Zion Rishon Chapter sponsors a trip to Israel from April 24-May
10. Orientation scheduled today at 1 p.m. at Sunrise Savings and
Loan, 1110 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., and 7 p.m. at Broward Federal
Savings, 5518 W. Oakland Park Blvd. A film will be shown. Call 484-
3446 or 940-3069.
A full-day conference on Florida Jewish drug and alcohol abuse
presented at the Tamarac Jewish Center and Temple Beth Torah,
9105-15 57 St., Tamarac. The $10 registration includes lunch. Call
748-8400.
Radomer Relief club and Holocaust survivors of Greater Miami's 40th
anniversary of liberation, 6:30 p.m. at the Carillon Hotel, 6801 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach. Kosher dinner, dancing. Members S22.50 per
person, guests $25 per person. Call 932-8870,920-1595.
FEBRUARY 12
Dania Hadassah meeting, 12 noon, Frost Park recreation center, 300
NE 2nd St., Dania. Program explains FPL's "Help" program.
FEBRUARY 15-19
New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, Israeli Ambassador Benjamin
Netanyahu, and former Supreme Court Justice Arthur Goldberg
address annual national mid-winter conference of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation in Miami Beach and Hollywood. Open to general public,
call 462-5740 or 531-8702 for reservations.
FEBRUARY 16
Broward national conference of Christians and Jews Brotherhood
awards dinner-dance at the Omni International Hotel in Miami, 6:30
p.m. Featured speaker is Diane Sawyer of CBS News. Call 739-6226
for reservations.
FEBRUARY 17
Hollywood Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens, 6:30 p.m., event stars Sammy Davis Jr. at
the Diplomat Hotel. Call 458-2864,456-3040 for reservations.
FEBRUARY 18
South Broward Chapter of the American Society for Technion,
Women's Division meets at 12 noon at Galahad North, 3001 S. Ocean
Drive, Hollywood. Program includes a handwriting analyst. Refresh-
ments served. Call 920-0761.
Mr. S decided that he did not
want the kind of family life he
had before. However, if his wife
would agree he would be willing
to enter marital therapy to begin
to discuss their previous relation-
ship and make positive changes.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact us at:
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd., Hollywood, FL
33021. Telephone: 966-0956.
Hours Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.-
5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3500 North
State Road No. 7 Suite 399. Fort
Lauderdale. FL 33319. Tele-
phone: 735-3394. Hours
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, Thurs-
day 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 West
Hillsboro Blvd. Suite 214, Deer-
field Beach, FL 33441. Tele-
phone: 427-8508. Hours -
Tuesday. Wednesday, and
Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday
9a.m.-9p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Bfoward County is a beneficiary
Agency of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Fort Lauderdale, the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward and The United Way of
Broward County.
_HOTLfNE__
TO JERUSALEM
In time of illness, surgery or
crisis, special prayers will be
recited at the Western Wall and
at our Yeshiva in Jerusalem
CALL 24 HOURS
(718)871-4111
A FREE PUBLIC SERVICE OF
The American Rabbi Neir
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I
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday. February 1,1986
NO OTHER
COUNTRYC4N
IVWKE
THIS OFFER.
JERUSALEM. FOR 6 Q4YS.
Or Tel Aviv. Choose one. Only Israel offers the timelessness of
Jerusalem. And the pulsating excitement of Tel Aviv. But you must
flv now. An offer this good won't last forever.
Until Februarv 28,1985 El Al Israel Airlines gives you its
"Sunsation" vacation package to Israel. Package price includes
round trip airfare from Miami, six days/five nights in a first class
hotel, including breakfast and a Hertz Rent-A-Car for five days.
And El Al is the only airline that flies direct from Miami to Tel Aviv.
Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra $100, the
deluxe Laromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hilton.
Yon can always add extra days. (Fackage not available 12/14/84 thru
1/5/85.)
$111.* EL AL GIVES YOU EILAT.
Just $111 and we'll give you round trip airfare from Tel Aviv
. to the beautiful Red Sea resort of Eilat.
Plus three nights at the fabulous Laromme Hotel. V\fe also
include two sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious conti-
nental breakfast. Plus a complimentary drink on arrival. This spe-
cial package is available thru March 15,1985. (Not available 1224/84
thru 1/5/85.) The deluxe Sonesta Hotel is also available for $144.
$249* ISRAEL AND CAIRO.
An El Al exclusive thru March 15,1985. Now the airline of
Israel flies vou round trip from Tel Aviv to Cairo to spend three fab-
ulous davs in Egypt at the beautiful Ramses Hilton. All for only
$249.
This package also includes being met at the airport by English
speaking representatives and transfer to and from the Ramses.
Now you can have it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip.
Only Israel and El Al can make these offers, but only for a
limited time. Don't miss out, call today.
For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at
1-800-223-6700.
For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al
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"1
Name
Address.
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The airline of Israel.
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ILL^J.-Llllllll IllJliehlllllWII) m\ym\ftr>U>Miln..lt (rfUmnnliKhiifnjppK (.^u.1mrl.j^*rf>l,FIAIk>c

Friday, February 1,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Honywood Page 13
Red China, Israel: A friendship watting to be discovered
By MERRIL SIMON
Israel Today
As absurd as it may seem, the
Imad, mad geopolitical world of
the 1980s will force nations to
seek new and perceptibly strange
alliances as the 21st century
approaches. The never-ending
quest for national security
creates a search for survival from
the dangers generated by an
uncontrolled global arms race
land a worldwide economic crisis,
developed from commodity
pricing based on political factors
| and not on market conditions.
From Israel'8 perspective, the
I world contains four power centers
- the eastern bloc of nations led
by the Soviet Union; the western
European nations led by Ger-
many, France, and England; the
United States; and mainland
I China. The absence of natural
) resources and a credible military
infrastructure diminish Japan's
Cole as a fifth power center;
[despite its gigantic industrialized
I economy.
If the Soviet Union, western
I Europe, and the United States
continue to tighten the political
noose around Israel, each country
doing so for different reasons, Is-
rael will need to establish ad-
ditional national alliances to
counterbalance and neutralize the
political strangulation attempted
by both her "friends" led by the
I United States and western
Europe and "enemies" led by the
| Soviet Union and the Arab
1 nations.
As early as 1944, U.S. Presi-
I denl Franklin D. Roosevelt com-
mented, "The trouble with this
country is that you can't win an
election without the oil bloc and
you can't even govern with it." If
Roosevelt's statement was true
in 1944, how much more ap-
propriate would that statement
be if made today by President
Reagan? Roosevelt's observation
was made when oil was a cheap,
abundantly available commodity.
But this is the mid-19808, and oil
i is now an expensive, perceptibly
[scarce resource priced by political
factors and not the economics of
the marketplace. A cloud of
paranoia has reigned over the
entire free world since October
1973 the fear of being cut off
rom the available oil supply and-
or prices strangling their
economies.
This obvious worldwide
paranoia has led to the tran-
sferral of a significant portion of
the world's monetary reserves to
a handful of medieval-style,
Arabian shieks, princes, and
sultans in exchange for the
promised of oil. The control of
this valuable commodity has
enabled this small group to wield
' immense influence over the major
I oil company executives, the
international banking com-
munity, and the western foreign
policy communities. The
judgments of all western
politicians are obscured by the
narrowly prejudiced needs for
power of these Arab elite at
the expense of compromising
issues of fundamental economic
and political concern to western
security.
i Western leaders, since the 1973
Yom Kippur War, have failed to
Publicly recognize or react to the
threat to their national interests
that has been created by the
bitter inter-Arab and intra-Arab
rivalries. Western policymakers
refuse to understand the real
strength of the non-Arab forces
within the so-called Arab domain.
Many polky failures, both of
omission and commission, have
Permitted a series of events to
occur which now place the Middle
kast on the brink of disaster and
anarchy. Western policy-makers:
* Have ignored the unsta-
buizing impact that the sudden
>> wealth has created in what
are, essentially, feudal societies.
Have been blind to the rise of
Islamic fundamentalism and
were incapable of projecting its
effect on the area's fragile
regimes, (e.g., fall of the Shah of
Iran, rise of the Shiite political
power in Lebanon, the threat to
internal security to both Sauid
Arabia and Bahrain from Shiite
fundamentalists).
Have declined to focus on the
essential stabilizing nature of Is-
rael's growing military power and
not appreciated the need for an
American military presence in
the region to offset the unreliable
character of local surrogates.
Have neglected to properly
assess the risks of indiscrimina-
tely selling large-scale weapons
to the Middle East or the effects
on the peace and stability these
sales have on the region.
Despite these experiences, the
United States and western
Europe have chosen to cater to
the elite of the Arab world. A
perceived mutuality of interests
have prevailed between the west
and the Arab elite. The west has
pursued policies that have
satisfied the interests of the
Arabs but have undermined their
own economic well-being.
To placate and pacify the Arab
oil bloc, American decision
makers have found it necessary
to view Middle East insecurity
and instability within the
narrowsly defined contest of the
Arab-Israel dispute. They have
focused on the "just rights" of
the Palestinians as the core issue,
to the complete exclusion of all
other disputes within that region.
In addition, the United States
continuees to pursue a policy of
"selling pieces" of Israel to the
Arabs in return for a piece of
peace, which has created a public
atmosphere of Israel being an
international pariah.
England and western Europe
since 1973 continue to pursue a
policy of politically deligitima-
tizing the state of Israel. Since
the assumption of the 1919
mandate over Palestine, England
pursued a policy of foiling the
development of a Jewish state
until the very eve of Israel's
Independence on May 15,1948.
Of all the nations in the world,
England should have the best
understanding of the Middle
East since she had the greatest
influence and the longest
presence of any western nation.
The Arab national movements
and power were figments of
British imagination. It was
Britain's Lawrence of Arabia who
created the Arab myths that
have come to plague the free
world. British leaders, who
should know better because of
their vast experience with and
presence in the Middle East,
seem to be guided in their at-
titudes toward Israel by a
combination of anti-Semitism
and a need to punish Israel. They
cannot forget that they perceived
that it was the establishment of
the state of Israel that began the
swift decline of the great British
Empire.
Since 1973, western policy-
makers have viewed their
nations' relationships with the
state of Israel as an embarras-
ment. They have behaved as if
their continued support of Israel,
at even the smallest level, assists
in dividing the Arab world. They
perceive the conflict between Is-
rael and the Arab nations keeps
the Middle East from uniting
with the west in a concerted drive
to contain the Soviet influence
and presence in the region.
The Soviet Union, however,
views Israel's existence as a
stabilizing force that acts as an
impediment to the Arab revolu-
tionary forces forces which the
Soviet Union supports in an
effort to radicalize the Middle
East. To the Soviet Union, the
destruction of Israel would
strengthen these Arab revolu-
tionary movements enough to
bring about the collapse of the
Arab ruling elite now in power
and thus establish the kind of
change over which the Soviets
would exert an influence.
But Red China views Israel
and its role in the Middle East
from an entirely different per-
spective. Unlike the Soviet
Union, China is not now in
conflict with the western
Euopean nations or with the
United States. Unlike western
Europe and America, Red China
does not have any short- or
medium-range interests in the oil
or wealth of the Middle East.
China possesses vast known oil
reserves which she is in the
process of developing. To China,
what makes Israel the most
valuable power in the Middle
East is that it is the only force
blocking the Soviet Union from
undermining and establishing
control over the existing Arab
elite. Israel's military presence
has reduced the threat of direct
invasion of the Arab elite regimes
by the Soviet Union or radical
Arab countries. To Red China,
only the military presence of Is-
rael and Pakistan block the
Soviet Union's total encirclement
of Red China from the shores of
the Mediterranean to the Persian
Gulf to the Indian Ocean. In the
interests of the Chinese and of
the security of their country, Is-
rael's presence provides Soviet
exclusion from the Middle East.
Now the west, with the exception
of England, has reached the same
conclusion as the Chinese about
Israel's essential contribution to
blocking increased Soviet in-
fluence in the Middle East. The
Lebanon debacle (the failure of
the multi-national force in 1983-
1984 to stabilize that country)
and the decreasing role of the
Middle East oil are the eye
openers for the west.
Based on the present state of
Israel's relations with the west,
and on China's understanding of
the need for Israel's military
presence, China can become an
important ally of Israel. This
relationship, as we approach the
21st century, cold help Israel
withstand the political onslaught
expected in the late 1980s to
erode Israel's political position in
the area vis-a-vis the Arab world.
It is quite apparent that
mainland China and Israel share
a number of mutual interests.
Irving Karten, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.
Arthurs. Rubin, M.D., F.A.C.O.G., F.A.C.S.
Alan A. Neuman, M.D.,
F.R.C.S.(C), F.A.C.O.G., F.A.C.S.
Diplomates American Board
Of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Announce their association for the practice
Of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility.
Emerald Village Professional Plaza
3866 Sheridan Street Telephone
Hollywood, FL 33021 (305) 432-2100
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Every aspect of The Court at Palm-
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From the vital difference between
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward- Holly wood / Friday, February 1.1986
Dollars and sense
Difficult to increase
GIFT OF STOCK
FROM A CLOSELY
HELD CORPORATION
By ALAN
ROSENFELD. ESQ.
Member of Legal &
Tax Committee, The Foundation,
of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward
A creative alternative to
making an outright gift to a
charity is available to the holder
of shares of stock in a closely held
(non-public) corporation. The
donation of closely heid stock will
enable a donor to make the same
dollar value gift to charity at s
much lower after tax cost thai
would otherwise be possible.
Consider the following
example:
THE BERKOWITZ
CORPORATION
Mr Berkowitz's Ownership,
100 percent of the shares of
Smith Corporation. Cor-
poration's Value, $1,000,000.
Capital Not Needed For the
Operation Of the Business.
SI 00,000 Cash.
Issue: If Mr. Berkowiu wants
to withdraw one hundred
thousand dollars ($100,000) from
the corporation, he will be faced
with the problem of taking it out
of the corporation either as a
dividend or as salary and the
associated adverse tax conse-
quences.
Instead. Mr. Berkowitz can
donate 10 percent of his shares to
charity. He has then made the
same one hundred thousand
dollar ($100.0001 gift for income
tax purposes. Furthermore, the
transaction can be structured so
that the corporation then
redeems the 10 percent interest
held by the charity for one
hundred thousand dollars
($100,000). After the redemption,
the charity will have one hundred
thousand (100.000) in cash. Mr.
Berkowitz will still own 100
percent of the outstanding shares
of the Berkowtiz Corporation,
since the shares which were
redeemed from the charity will no
longer be outstanding.
Mr. Berkowitz has thereby
made a one hundred thousand
dollar ($100,000) gift to charity,
has obtained an income tax
deduction for that amount, and
at the same time, he has utilized
the one hundred thousand dollars
($100,000) of the corporation's
money without having to legally
receive it and pay income taxes
on it.
Of course, for the desired re-
sults to be obtained, the transac-
tion must be structured and
executed very carefully. This is
just one example of the many
vehicles available today for indi-
viduals and corporations to take
advantage of the tax laws, plus
have their gifts to charities sub-
sidized by income tax (or estate
tax) savings. You should consult
your tax professional or the
Federation for further details.
Israel aid, says Lugar
Investment Management seminars in Beach area
The first in a series of seminars
on investment management and
financial planning was held on
Jan. 9 in the Aquarius building
on South Ocean Drive. This
seminar, entitled "Investment
Strategies for the 80s.'' focused
on investment vehicles and estate
planning. It was sponsored by
the Endowment Department of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. The objective of these
programs is to offer information
on the management of one's
financial affairs, and to educate
the community about the nature
of the Federation's Endowment
Program.
Mark Berkowitz. Endowment
Director of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward. introduced the
guest speakers and commented
briefly on the importance of the
Federation's Endowment
Program. He noted that com-
munity members may become
participants in the Endowment
Program by using a variety of
legal vehicles. Mr. Berkowitz also
explained the role of an Endow-
ment Program in our community.
Its primary function is to be a
community resource when emer-
gencies arise and to fund new and
innovative community projects.
Marvin Bornstein of the law
firm of Marvin Bornstein, PA
emphasized Charitable Rem-
ainder Trusts as an effective tool
Israel Bond News
Temple
Beth Ahm
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek,
chairman of Temple Beth Ahm's
Night for Israel, announces that
Milton B. Senfeld will be Honoree
at the event, to be held Sunday
evening. Feb. 3, 8 p.m. in the
Social Hall, at 9730 Stirling
Road. Hollywood. Mr. Senfeld.
currently Temple Beth Ahm's
Gabbi. and steadfastly com-
mitted to Jewish communal
causes over the years, truly de-
serves the approbation of his
friends and neighbors as he is
presented with the prestigious
Israel Scroll of Honor. The event
is sponsored by the Temple Beth
Ahm Israel Bonds Committee.
Danny Tadmore, popular Israeli
entertainer will spark the even-
ing's festivities. Refreshments
will be served, and everyone is
welcome.
Oceanview
Towers
Chairman Israel Somach
announces Oceanview Towers
will honor Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Kurzman at an Israel Bonds
Reception Sunday, Feb. 10. 4
p.m. in the Social Hall at 401
Golden Isles Drive, Hallandale.
For their deep commitment to
Jewish communal causes, the
Kurzmans will be presented with
the prestigious Israel Scroll of
Honor. Guest speaker will be Sol
Robinson well-known author,
just returned from Israel. The
event is sponsored by the
Oceanview Towers Israel Bonds
Committee. Refreshments will be
served, and everyone is welcome
Milton Senfeld
of estate planning. Through
using this vehicle an individual
can receive a current income tax
deduction and shelter his estate
from estate taxes. The donor can-
receive a current stream of in-
come in the form of an annuity or
fixed percentage of the trust's
assets for a period of years. At
the end of the term of years, the
trust corpus reverts to the
Federation's Endowment Fund.
This vehicle allows a community
member to both more effectively
plan his personal affairs and to
provide a gift for the future of the
community. The feasibility of
establishing this vehicle should
be explored with the prospective
donor's professional advisor and
the staff of the Federation's
Endowment Fund.
In addition to Mr. Bornstein,
Charles Austin of Advest Capital
Advisors was featured on the
program. Mr. Austin, a Senior
Vice-President with Advest,
offered a perspective on the out-
look for the economy in 1965, and
on specific investment oppor-
tunities.
These sessions provide the
community with information on a
Federation program, and on
persona] financial management.
In fact, the exciting business of
philanthropy is connected with
personal financial management.
For further information about
these programs, interested
persons are invited to contact
Mark Berkowitz at the Federa-
tion office.
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. Richard Lugar (R. Ind), the
new chairman of the Senate For-
eign Relations Committee,
stressed that it will be difficult to
increase aid to Israel and Egypt
as well as other countries because
the United States is dealing with
"our own budgetary con-
straints."
There is "strong support" in
both Congress and the Reagan
Administration for aid to Israel
and Egypt, Lugar said in
response to questions by foreign
corresondents at the Foreign
Press Center here. He noted that
aid to the two countries are
"related" and account for about
half of the total U.S. foreign aid
budget.
Lugar said the request for in-
creased aid for the two countries
comes at a time when the Admin-
istration and Congress are
"grappling" with efforts to
reduce the large U.S. budget
deficit. He said there is a "poig-
nancy" when members of
Congress discuss foreign aid pro-
posals with their constituents at
a time when those constituents
face elimination or at "best a
freeze" of programs benefiting
themselves.
He noted that Congrea
the Administration is considerim II
freezing every domestic prognZ
including the military budw
and is even discussing a freeze 3
the cost of living increase for
social security recipients.
Lugar said that because
these problems it will tt,
several weeks before a decision L i
made on the foreign aid proposil
for 1986. He indicated that whOe
Israel will probably receive the
increase if wants in military aid
there may be difficulty in the I
economic aid proposals.
Israel has asked that military I
aid be increased by $700 mi
to $2.1 billion in 1986 and .,
economic aid be increased
$700 million to a total of lj
billion. Israel is also asking form
$800 million emergency appro
priation for the current year it I
economic aid in addition to $1.21
billion it is receiving this year.
The Senator noted that the ]
U.S. is aware of Israel's "awe-
some financial difficulty'' and has
offered "friendly advice" that it
believes reforms have to be made
in the Israeli economy. He said
while some improvements have
been made, "It does not appear
enough has been done."
million
A YIDDISH MUSICAL direct from broadway
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MARY
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$836.
(Airfare, hotel, and a car included.)
Announcing El Al's Sunsation Plus Vacation to I
Imagine getting six sunrises, and five sunsets, in
Israel for only $836.
Including round-trip airfare. A superior hotel in
Jerusalem or Tel Aviv, including breakfast.
And a complimentary Hertz Rent A Car. yours for
five days.
Who can do this for you? Only El Al. the Airline of
Israel.
Throw in an extra 8100. and you'll get our deluxe
packageaccommodations at Jerusalem's Hilton or
Laromme Hotel, or the Tel Aviv Hilton.
And if six days just aren't enough, and you want
to extend your stay (who wouldn't?), we can arrange
that too.
See your travel agent, or call El Al at
1-800-223-6700 and ask about our exclusive
Sunsaiional Plus Tour. But hurry, this package is
available until February 28.198-5.
Print per peraon double occupancy One HarU car par doubt*
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Package price baaad ea Miami-Tel Aviv round-trip only. For
priree from your area, contact a travel agent or El Al.
iSqm^jt
The Airline of Israel.


Synagogue News
Fridav. February 1,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 15
TEMPLE BETH EMET
On Sunday, Jan. 27, at 11:30
I a.m.. Temple Beth Emet of
Pembroke Pines held ground-
breaking ceremonies at the
Temple's land site, 10801 Pem-
broke Road. As. Southwest
Broward's only reform congrega-
tion, the Temple has been serving
the communities of Rock Creek,
Cooper City, Davie, Miramar.
iollywood, Pembroke Pines, and
Miami Lakes since early 1977. Its
new location, which is on four
acres of land about a mile east of
Flamingo Road, will be easily
| accessible to these areas.
Rabbi Bennett Greenspon has
served as Beth Emet's rabbi
since the fall of 1978. Rabbi
Greenspon is responsible for dir-
ecting and guiding the Temple's
many religious and educational
programs.
The new Temple building, with
a scheduled completion date of
September 1985 was designed
by the Coconut Grove architec-
tural firm of Tilden, Tachi and
Pales. S.A. Weisberg is the
I general contractor for the 10,000
sq. ft. structure, which will house
a 250 seat sanctuary, a multi-
purpose social hall with kitchen
facilities, administrative offices,
classrooms, a 5,000 volume
library with audio-visual facili-
ties, and a main lobby featuring a
memorial alcove.
Temple Beth Emet, with a
' membership of approximately
200 families, offers a full range of
religious, educational, and social
programs. The new facility will
make it possible for all services
and activities to occur under one
roof. In addition, the Temple
plans to offer a ore-school early in
February.
On Sunday, Feb. 17, the Heart
Association and Temple Beth
F.met will sponsor a community
run and walkathon in Pembroke
i Pines. The purpose of this, event
|is two- fold: 1) to educate the
public concerning the Heart
Association, with the assistance
of Dr. Joseph Morgan, a Pem-
broke Pines cardiologist; and 2)
to raise funds to assist both
| organizations.
Free t-shirts will be given to
those who pre-register. There will
be an opening ceremony, refresh-
ments, and prizes.
Join us for a walk or run
through the Pembroke Pines,
Pembroke Lakes area. For
further information and sponsor
packets call Anita at 431-3638.
With your cooperation, this event
will surely be a success.
HALLANDALE
JEWISH CENTER
Hallandale Jewish Center has
gained a reputation of being the
Center for those who appreciate
good entertainment.
Its "Festival of Shows" is
proud to present an outstanding
Cantorial Concert on Sunday,
Feb. 17, at 7:15 p.m. with its own
Cantor Zvi Adler and the Adler
family, and Cantor Emeritus
Jacob Danziger, singing liturgial
Hebrew and Yiddish music in
concert. Among the five cantors
who will perform will be 19 year-
old Moshe Adler from Israel who
is considered a very gifted per-
former.
The key to this Show Series'
success is the extensive expe-
rience and knowledge the Center
has acquired in selecting the
caliber of entertainment the
public welcomes and appreciates.
Tickets for this performance in
Hallandale Jewish Center's
Auditorium (416 NE 8 Ave., at 4
Ct.) are $10 (all seats reserved
and can be purchased at the
Temple office or make your
reservations by calling 454-9100.
Choice seats are still available.
On Wednesday, Feb. 6, at 7:30
p.m., Rabbi Howard Messinger
will deliver a lecture at the
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE
8 Ave., Hallandale on the ex-
tremely interesting topic: "The
Jewish False Messiahs."
Rabbi Messinger has served as
a chaplain in the United States
Armed Forces in the U.S. and
Germany. He received the
degrees of Master of Arts and
Doctor of Education for the
Yeshivah University from which
he also received his Rabbinical
Ordination.
He has served Congregations
in the U.S. and in Canada, and
for 15 years has been a teacher
and principal in Jewish educa-
tion, as well as on the collegiate
level here in the Miami area.
Last year, Dr. Messinger
delivered three lectures at the
Hallandale Jewish Center on
"Great Jewish Historians" that
were warmly received by his au-
diences.
The above lecture is part of the
HJC's 1984-85 Program of Adult
Jewish Eduction and is also open
to the general public. Those who
have registered for the program
need only show their cards; all
others are requested to contri-
bute $1 at the door.
TEMPLE BETH EL
"Our Throw-Away Society"
will be the subject of the 1985
Charles And Ruth Doppelt
Memorial Lecture at Temple
Beth El, 1351 S. 14th Avenue,
Hollywood, on Sunday, Feb. 10
at 8 p.m. The guest speaker,
Rabbi W. Gunther Plaut, is one
of the foremost Reform Rabbis of
North America.
Most recently, Rabbi Plaut
was the Senior Rabbi of Holy
Blossom Temple in Toronto,
Canada from 1961-1978, and is
now its first Senior Scholar. Pre-
viously, he held pulpits at the
Washington Boulevard Temple
(now called Oak Park Temple) in
Chicago and at the Mount Zion
Temple in St. Paul, Minnesota.
Currently, Rabbi Plaut is also
president of the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis and
vice-president of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
and vice-president of the Govern-
ing Board, World Union For
Progressive Judaism, two im-
portant branches of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregation.
Presently, Rabbi Plaut is best
known for his work on the newly
completed The Torah: A Modern
Commentary, for which he was
the Editor and to which he
contributed four of the five
books. He is also the author of 15
books, including scholarly works,
an autobiography and a collec-
tion of short stories. He has been
an editorial contributor to
Canadian newspapers and
periodicals and he is the editor of
"Affirmation," a human rights
newsletter.
Dr. Plaut has been a lecturer at
Haifa University, Israel, and a
Fellow at York University,
Toronto. In addition, he has lec-
tured extensively throughout
Canada and the United States, in
Europe, Israel Australia, New
Zealand and Africa.
The Doppelt lecture is open to
the public and there is no charge;
however, admission is by "tickets
only," which are available at the
Temple office and the supply will
go quickly.
prove his innocence. His trial is a
spiritual triumph.
Wednesday, March 20, 7:30
p.m. Next Stop, Greenwich
Village a color film in English,
starring Lenny Baker and
Shelley Winters. It is a story of a
young man who tries to cut his
roots and lose his Jewishness by
becoming a part of the "Beat-
nick" Greenwich Village of the
1950's. Shelley Winters is the
stereotypical Jewish mother in
the humorous study of a Jewish
family in transition. Tickets at
the door $2 each. Tickets can be
purchased in advance at. the
Temple office.
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Films of European Jewish Life
American Jewish Life
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 7:30 p.m.
The Fixer, a color film in English.
The film stars Alan Bates as an
ordinary Jewish handyman Who
becomes a moral hero to his
people. He decides to pass a
gentile to make his life easire in
anti-Semitic Kiev during the
Czarist era in Russia. When his
true identity is revealed. The
Fixer is framed, imprisoned and
tortured. In this intolerable
condition, he discovers an inner
strength and demands a trial to
&&*&

El Luncheon Meeting will be held
on Tuesday, Feb. 12, at noon, in
the Tobin Auditorium of the
Temple, 1351 S. 14th Avenue,
Hollywood.
The program will feature Garry
Silver, popular club entertainer,
in a presentation of Broadway
musical melodies, all-time
favorites, and international
songs. He will be accompanied by
his wife, Sharon, on the electric
piano.
Garry has appeared in night
clubs in Toronto, Greater Miami,
Pompano and Fort Lauderdale,
and performed for social, condo-
miniums and religious groups in
Continued on Page 18
Federation Calendar
February 2
Shalom event for newcomers to the community, at the home of Merle
Lundy, Cooper city.
February 3
Breakfasts: 9:30 a.m. at Hallandale Jewish Center; 10 a.m. at Clifton
Cocktail party, 4 pxa., Olympus.
February 5
Community Relations Committee Middle East Forums features Phil
Baum, 8 p.m. at Temple Sinai.
February 7
Women's Division B'not Shalom, 9:30 a.m. at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour features private art showing by artist Theo Tobiasse.
February 9
Western Young Leadership meeting, 8 p.m., 11705 Spinnaker Way,
Cooper City.
February 10
Breakfasts: 10 a.m. Fairways Royale, Galahad III.
Cocktail party 4:30 p.m., Colony Point, home of J. Gaaaen, 901 Colony
Point Circle, No. 301, Pembroke Pines.
February 12 m
Senator Robert Packwood, R-Ore., speaks at two functions: 12 noon
meeting of the Community Relations at Federation; 5:30 p.m. Shanna
buffet reception at the Hollywood Beach Hilton.
February 13
South American mission meeting, 7:30 p.m. at Federation
February 14
Metro Jewish Awareness meeting, 8 p.m. at home of Bruce Hollander,
3149 N. 39th Avenue, Hollywood.
JEWISH EDUCATOR
Conversant with Judaic/Hebraic curricula. Afternoon
religious school. Assume principalship/youth leader.
If capable, serve as auxiliary Rabbi. South Florida
Traditional/Conservative congregation. Resume, salary
requirements, references to Box JEC, c/o Jewish
Floridian P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101, Or call
981-6112. Collect call* unacceptable.
.. -.



Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Friday, February 1. 1985
***
Jcc
JEWISH COMMLMTY
CENTERS Of
SOUTH BROWARD
28J8HOU.TWOCOBLVO MOUYWOOO fLOBCA 3 iOlO
921-6511
David Brenner,
Galgalim at Sunrise
On Wednesday, Feb. 6 Sunrise
Musical Theatre will be the
netting lor a JCC of Sooth
Breward fundrawing event.
Comedktn David Brenner will
hi-lite the evening along with the
Galgalim, who will take the
audience oa a wonderful musical
trip to Israel pclocated in the
exciting performance* of Brynie
and Moahe. Combined together
with a Broadway-like presen-
tation. Their perfonnancea glitter
and touch everyone |
The stage production features
a uaique ase of film dip*
projected oa a huge screen behind
the pufui lasts. This special
media effect tranforms the
GeJgalhn into a theatrical setting
where the audience is enveloped
hi the emotions and aspirations
of the two dynamic stage per-
sonalities. Several costume
changes sad the use of life saw
puppets enhance the visual
richaess of the show.
Tickets for this terrific evening
are available by calling Mark
Sherman at 921-6511 or at any
Basa ticket outlet
Eighteen dollars regular ad
issjna sad $60 patron east
(mdoding a Viennese table after
the performance) to benefit the
JCC of Sooth Browsed.
RACQUETBALL
TOURNAMENT
Where: Racqostball West
Racquet Club
Date: February 16 and 17
Time: Saturday, 6 p.m.;
Sunday. 12 pa.
Fee: S25 1st Division, $10 2nd
dally for 17 children who were
able to attend camp only through
generous donations of individuals
and organziations such as ORT,
National Council of Jewish
Woman. Hsdasaah and B'nai
B'rith. Over $3700 was received
and distributed by the JCC. This
year the need is even greater for
without the added dollars there
are children whose families could
not afford to give them such a
memorable Jewish experience
Any contributions toward the
JCC Camp Scholarship Fund will
be greatly appreciated.
Any individual or organ ration
who contributes a minimum of
$600 will be honored at the JCC
Installation Dinner.
Call 921-6511 or send your tax
deductible contribution payable
to the JCC of South Broward,
2838 Hollywood Blvd., Holly-
wood, Florida 33020. attention
Mark Sherman, Assistant Exec-
utive Director.
NEW INSTRUCTOR AT JCC
The Jewish Community
Centers of South Broward, 2838
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, is
proud to announce new fissure
starting in January with Shani
McManus. The milti-talented
Ms. McManus is a choreo-
grapher, journalist and freelance
writer.
On Monday evenings we will
be teaching beDydancmg (6:30-
7:30 p.m.) and Broadway Tap
and Jaxr (7:304:30 p.m.). On
Wednesday evenings Creative
Writing from 7-9 p.m.. Do you
love to dance? Do you have a
book in you? Your memories
could make you money! Call
Dene for information on these
classes today 921-6511.
CHORAL GROUP
The JCC of South Broward is
holding auditions lor a new uJ
exciting Choral group at the jr?
m the evening. The group ^
led by Bea Harris and will.
diverse repertoire of Israeli J-,
ish and modern songs. Com'e a.
u^datreand^Sl
Yiddish CUaa-
Conversation and More!
The JCC of South Broward j,
happy to annouce the retorn of
Helen l instructor. Come enjoy this dm
on Monday evenings at 7-y'
pjn.-9 pjn. Cost S25 for me*
bars, $30 for non-memberi
Conversation, sayings, poem
and even a play! Join us. dj
Dene to register.
Continuing Yogs Class
Come to the JCC of South
Broward on Monday evenings a
Division; Juniors: $15 1st
Division, $5 2nd Division
Diviaions: Men's A, B, C,
Novice, 40-50; Women's A. B, C,
Novice; Juniors Boys'* 18 sad
under
Contact: Jeff at 921-6511 for
further information
STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL
The Jewish Community
Centers of South Broward is
offering an exciting 3 day trip to
the west coast of Florida's
famous "Strawberry Festival,"
March 5, 6 and 7. Torn- includes
Cypress Gardens, Ringling
Museum, Country Dinner
Theatre, Dinner Show At Laai
PurceU's sad morel Coat: JCC
members $190 per person, doable
room occupancy; non-members
$200. Call Dene today far more
information at 921-6511.
SPONSOR A JCC CAMPER
The summer of'84 was a happy
time for campers who attended
the JCC's Camp Kadima,

...?.
PASSOVER AT BROWN'S
Passover at Brown's. Our own personal blend of warmth and
tradition. A beautiful Sedar and religious services. Luxurious
accomodatkxis, great sports facilities and 3 gourmet meals a day
that have become a tradition at Brown's. Beauty, warmth and
tradition. Now, that's a special Passover.
Special Holiday Show Starring
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WOLUN
m SwwtaK Choir
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7 p m. for our continuing Yoga
Lasses with Karla GoMatein.
I Join this aucceasfcQ dan to took
and feel better! I^arn yoga,
I coordinated breathing, with
[movement stretching and
relaxation. Call Dene to register.
BASKETBALL
A program designed to teach
the basic skills and strategy in
I basketball.
Place: T.Y. Park
Day: Wednesdays
Time: 4-6 pin.
Ages: 6-8 yeara old
Fees: members $60 non-
nembers $76
Sessions: 10 weeks
Contact Jeff at the JCC of
South Broward 921-6611.
Ftoor "Ice" Hockey
I A class designed to introduce
I kids to the skills and game of ice
I hockey. The game is played on
| the blacktop.
Place: T.Y. Park
Day: Wednesday
Time: 4-6 p.m.
Ages: 5-7 years old
Fees: members $60, non-
| members $76
Sessions: 10 weeks
i Contact Jeff at the JCC of
| South Broward 921-6511.
Beginning Gymnastics
and Tumbling
An introduction to the
I beginning and basics of tumbling
and gymnastica. Lessons will
include work on the tumbling
I mats and apparatus such as
[balance beam and mini-
| trampoline.
Place: JCC Pre-School at 1896
|Taft St. and 122nd Terr, in
I Pembroke Pines.
Day: Thursdays
lime: 3:15-4:15 p.m.
Ages: 4-6
Fees: members $60, non-
| members $75
Sessions: 10 weeks
Contact Jeff at 921-6611.
Contact Jeff at 921-6511
T-BALLI
Friday, February 1,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 17
.v.
A class for the child who wants
to learn the basic skills of hitting,
catching and throwing.
Place: T.Y. Park
Day: Thursday
Time: 4-6 p.m.
Ages: 4-5 years old
Fees: members $60, non-
members $76
Sessions: 10 weeks
Contact Jeff at the JCC 921-
6611.
T -Ball II
A class for the advanced child
in the basic skills Game
situation and play.
Place: T.Y. Park
Day: Tuesday
Time: 4-5 p.m.
Ages: 6-8years old
Fees: members $60, non-
members $75
Sessions: 10 weeks
Contact Jeff at 921-6511
Soccer I
A class for the beginning
soccer player working on the
basic skills
Place: T.Y. Park
Day: Monday
Time: 4-5 p.m.
Ages: 4-5 years old
Fees: members $60, non-
members $76
Sessions: 10 weeks
Contact Jeff at 921-6611
i *
Beginning Ballet
Jazz Combo
A ballet program to teach the
|basic dance steps and rhythms.
Place: JCC Pre-School at 1896
iTaft St. and 122nd Terr. In
1 Pembroke Pines.
Day: Mondays and Tuesdays
Time: Mondays 4:15-5:15
[p.m. Ages 6-8 years old;
Tuesdays 3:15-4:15 p.m. Ages
19-12 years old
Fees: members $60, non-
| members $76
Sessions: 8weeks
STflV 5 DRYS
PAY POR 4
The fair is open to the public on
both days.
Legal Rights
Starting the first week in
February, simple legal concept
and rights. The Southeast Focal
Senior Center is offering a course
in Street Law for seniors
sponsored by Nova University,
this is a 10-week course with two-
hour class sessions. NO
CHARGE.
Street Law for seniors is
designed for practical advice.
This course will be structred as a
course to enhance one's
knowledge of the law and our
legal systems.
Street Law covers such topics
Bs Criminal Law, Fraud and
Scams, Burglary, Social
Security, Housing, Medicare,
Insurance.
This course will include a jail
tour, a courtroom trial, etc. Pre-
registration required. Limited
space, for more information call
Marty or Bonnie, 921-6611.
Creative Writing
Creative Writing with Shani
McManus Do you have a book
in You? Learn different writing
markets and how to approach
them your memories could
make you dollars! Classes start
Feb. 8. Time: 1-2 p.m. Cost: $3
per class. Pre-registration
required. Limited space. Contact
Marty or Bonnie at 921-6511.
Belly Dancing
Belly Dancing with Shani
McManus Have fun and learn
the ancient art of belly dancing
and firm up too. The Southeast
Focal Point will offer this classes
Monday afternoons beginning
Feb. 4 from 1-2 p.m. Cost: $2.50
per claaa. Pre-registration
required. Space limtied. For more
information call Bonnie or Marty
at 921-6611.
Disney World
Epcot and Disney World
Vacation Package Date: Feb.
22, Price: $172. Join us for a
special value three days and two
nights trip. The weather is
perfect. We depart Friday at 8:30
1 a.m. in a modern air-conditioned
bus and return on Sunday af-
ternoon. Accommodations are at
the beautiful Quality Inn on the
Plaza.
The price includes buffet
breakfasts, deliciouis dinners and
a special dinner theater show.
Also included are three day
passes to explore and enjoy
Epcot and Disney World. For
more information contact Bonnie
or Marty at 921-6611.
Instruments Needed
ALL instruments needed
The Broward Pops Orchestra is
looking for musicians of all ages.
For further information please
call Orchestra Manager at 944-
7964.
PASSOVER 1985
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All rooms feature color T.V., stereo & refrigerator
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Synagogue services
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Soccer II
A class for the advanced soccer
player. Class will consist of skills
and game situations.
Place: T.Y. Park
Time: 4-5 p.m.,
Day: Monday
Ages: 6-9 years old
Fees: members $60, non-
members $75
Sessions: 10 weeks
Contact Jeff at 921-6511.
. SOUTHEAST FOCAL
^:^po1^i^TOk|wx^v;
Health Fair
The second annual "La
Chairo" Health Fair will be held
at the Jewish Community Center
- Southeast Focal Point Senior
Center on Feb. 18 and Feb. 19
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The purpose of the fair is to
promote wellness, to encourage
everyone to live healthier lives
and to provide information about
health services available in this
community.
We will provide various health
screenings including vision,
hearing, blood pressure, height
and weight. There will also be
nutritional counseling and many
other enjoyable and educational
exhibits.
'*.''
GREEK
FESTIVAL
(under the Big Tent rain or shine)
--------FREE ADMISSION--------
February 8, 9,10, 1985
Fii. ft Sat. 11 a.m. to midnight / Sun. 12 noon to 11:00 p.i
AUTHENTIC GREEK DINING
Music... Qreek & American Dance Band... Shlsh Kabab...
Qreclan Chicken... Loukomades and variety of Qreek Pastries..
Gyros ... Feta Cheese... Qame Booths
j&y GREEK COFFEE &>
Food Ente
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TO BE HELD AT
Saint George Greek Orthodox Church
425 Morth 58th Avenue, Hollywood. Florida 33024
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HOTEL
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Enjoy 5 nights at the
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Sabbath elevator
133 air condition)
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2340 S.W. 32nd Avow* 2 Blocks South Of Coral Way


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1.1986
Synagogue News
Continued from Page
our area. He is a very versatile
entertainer with a large reper-
toire.
Deadline for reservations.
Friday. Feb. 8. Please call Anna
Wolfe. 927-0876 and Renee
Tropp. 454-8593. Donation: *4.
For members only.
Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth El, Holly-
wood, was a recipient of the Rab-
binical Award at the General As-
sembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations which was held re-
cently in Toronto. Canada. Rabbi
Jaffe received the Rabbinical
Award for his service to the
Jewish community and to the
State of Israel.
TEMPLE SOLEL
The Lettie Beth Horwitt
Scholarship Luncheon will be
held on Wednesdayk Feb. 6. at11
a.m. For further information
contact Diane Hoffman. 967-
4223.
The Independent Singles
meeting will be held on Thur-
sday. Feb. 7. 1985 at 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE
ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR
Friday Evening Services on
Feb. 1 will begin at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Raphael C. Adler conduct-
ing and Cantor Joseph
Wichelewski chanting the
liturgy. The Gimmel Class of the
Hyman Drooker Religious School
will participate in the services.
Sabbath Morning Services will
begin at 8:45 a.m. with Rabbi
Adler and Cantor Wichelewski
officiating. This has been desig-
nated as Scout Sabbath and a
representative of the Boy Scouts
of America, Mr. Edward Zaback.
will address the congregation.
Mrs. Helen Lohman will chant
the Haftorah.
Sisterhood's Birthday Meeting
will take place on Sunday, Feb. 3
at 10 a.m.
Brent Cohen, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Louis (Eileen! Cohen, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah at morning services
beginning at 8:30 a.m. on
Thursday, Feb. 7. Brent is a
member of the Hay Class of the
Hyman Drooker Religious
School.
There will be a Men's Club
Meeting on Thursday evening at
8 p.m.
Fridav Evening Services on
Feb. 8 will begin at 8 p.m. with
Rabbi Adler and Cantor
Wichelewski conducting. Mr.
Harry Rosen will speak to the
congregation about his recent
mission to Israel. Denmark and
Holland.
Craig Nadler. son of Mrs.
Barbara Nadler of Miramar, and
Mr. Douglas Nadler, will become
Bar Mitzvah at Sabbath Morning
Services beginning at 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi Adler and Cantor
Wichelewski will officiate as
Craig chants the Haftorah and
addresses the congregation.
Presentations will be made to
Craig by an officer of the Temple
Board and various auxiliary
representatives. The Kiddush
will be sponsored by the Nadler
family in honor of Craig who is a
7th grader at Perry Middle
School and a member of the Hay
Class of the Hyman Drooker
Religious School.
The Temple Board will meet on
Tuesday. Feb. 12 at 8 p.m.
Jonathan Parmet, son of Mrs.
Beverly Parmet of Hollywood
and Mr. David Parmet, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah at services on Thursday,
Feb. 14 at 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AHM
Sabbath Evening services will
be held at 8 p.m. Friday, with
Rabbi Avraham Kapnek officiat-
ing and Cantor Abraham Koster
chanting the Liturgy.
During Services our Religious
School children will be particip-
ating celebrating Family Service
evening.
On Sunday, Feb. 3 at 8 p.m. we
are having "A Night for Israel"
honoring Mr. Milton Senfeld.
Entertainment will be Mr. Danny
Tadmore. Refreshments will be
served.
On Sunday. Feb. 10, at 12 p.m.
there will be a Camp Chai reunion
with pre-registration. For more
information call Ellen Heilig, 431-
5100.
Sisterhood is having a Nifty
Fifties Sock Hop on Saturday,
Feb. 16 at 8:30 p.m. To make
reservations and for more in-
formation call the Temple office.
There will be no Hebrew School
or Early Childhood on Monday.
Feb. 18.
Sisterhood is having a Nifty
Fifties Sock Hop on Saturday,
Feb. 16 at 8:30 p.m. To make
reservations and for more in-
formation call the Temple office.
There will be no Hebrew School
or Early Childhood on Monday.
Feb. 18.
Sisterhood is having their
General Meeting on Tuesday.
Feb. 26 at 8 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Friday evening services begin
at 8 p.m. with Rabbi Richard J.
Margolis and Cantor Misha
Alexandrovich officiating. At a
special ceremony during the
services, the following new mem-
bers who have joined our temple
family during this past year, will
be welcomed and installed:
Heiainc Anhait. Jared
and Donna Anton. Rick ApsetoH, Sol
Bernstein. Lon and Eileen Blake. Alan
and Ruth Borenstein. Samuel Boren
stein. Delia Borr. Eunice Brill, Samuel
and Millicent Broadwin, Harry and
Bessie Brownstein, Jacob an Ruth
Caplan. Norman and Miriam Cogan.
Harry and Lillian Davis. Scott and Kim
Deutsch. Joseph Dozoretz. William and
Naomi Dreyer. Esther Dutka. Irene
Edwards. Michael and Andrea Eiler.
Robin Fasbinder, Ira and Denise
Federer. Blanche Freund. Gertrude
Ckensburg, Milo and Lillian Ginsburg,
Vivian Goldberg. Jacob and Alizla
Gredinger, David Herman. Shiffie
Holzman, Abraham and Etta Hyman,
Mary Jacob, Peter and Madeleine
Kadish. Maurice J. Kahan, Mildred
Kahan, Max and Frances Kalman. Alan
and Karen Kameron, Jacqueline
Kameron. Constance Kaplan. Orly
Kimelman, Michael Koenlg, Charles
and Rose Kohn, Craig and Dana
Konhauzer. Louis Krakower, Ben and
Cris Kramer, Sydney Krause. Edward
Kravitz. David Krell and Celia Mark.
Morris and Evelyn Krovetz, Philip and
Bemice Krupp. Charles and Donna
Lasker. Janet Lasker, Joel Landres.
George and Dorothy Marcus, Jonathan
Marcus. Sherman and Ellen Markowitz.
Melissa Martin, Julius Maslin, Renee
Mason. Dr. Myron and Sylvia Minin-
berg. Harry Moskowitz, Herman and
Rose Neuman, Lynn Pitted. Scott
Pitted. Louis and Debra Rappaport,
Bruce and Patti RatlcoH. Morris and
Rosalind Ratner, Amle Roberts, Joseph
and Jean Rosenberg, Scott Rosenberg,
Leigh Rosenthal, Sandra Ross. Joseph
and Esther Roth, Sam and Sabina
Sabin. Frank and Helen Schaeffer, Ben
and Sally ScWck, Nattta/ and J*arl
Schlok, Ate* and Dorothy Sctmrtf, Sol
and Etta Schulman, Nellie Shanler,
Richard and Erica Shea, Morris and
Eda Silberman. Morris and Ruth Sklar.
Murray and Mattie Soiarsh. Irving and
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
Presents. ..
THE FEIDMAN PHENOMENON
World renowned clarinetist
GIORA FEIDMAN
and Ensemble
in concert
From
Gershwin
to Joplin to Klezmer.
he stands without
a peer today."
Zubin Mehta
SATURDAY EVENING
FEBRUARY 23. 8 p.m.
BAILEY CONCERT HALL
Broward Community College
3501 SW Davie Rd.
$25, S1750, S1250
Group rates available
For ticket information call:
Michael-Ann Russell JCC
932-4200 or .vs ,
Bailey Concert Hall <$>/&.
475-6884 &/j**
Only
South Florida
Appearance
ffl
Fanny Sorkow. Dolores Solomon. Harry
and Rhode Stahl. Dr. Joseph and Sylvia
Stein, Wyman and Gloria Strachan.
Barton and Sarah Strock. Harry and
Anne Studner, Richard and Ellen Sures.
Lynn Teger. Gene and Sara Teibloom.
Lisa Thaler. Billie Tillim, Ira and
Penny vernon. Jessie Wahrman, Paul
and Evelyne Wed. Alan and Betsy
weiner. Leon and Idede Welsbrod.
Donald and Gail Weitzman. Peter and
Fran Whiting. Dawn Zack. Ralph and
KateZabitsky.
Temple Sinai
Ethiopian
Gordon Lelanti
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
Our new members wjii i I
presented with a gift from
temple and honored at a snJS!
reception and Oneg Shabbat f
Monday Feb. 11 at 12 0000,
the annual Torah Fund Lund*!
^Tt^A Dorothv KisC
Sisterhood past president. Mini
Feldman is chairman of 21
event.
absorption
When Temple Sinai con-
gregation members were asked to
do their part to support the
absorption process for Ethiopian
Jews into Israel, they responded
with $20,000 collectively a few
Shabbat mornings ago, and more
checks are still coming in, said
Rabbi Richard Margolis.
Emphasizing the plight of
Jews in that country were Habt-
nesh Ezra, who grew up in
Ethiopia but left seven years ago,
her sister Sara Ezra, and first
cousin Mesfin Gebyehu.
"The stark reality of seeing
those who had experienced the
refugee camps first hand made
quite an impact," Margolis said.
Mesfin and Sara spent a few
months in the camps before gain-
ing passage to the United States
to live with Habtnesh.
"We are saddened by the inter-
ruption of the airlift which means
that not all will get out of
Ethiopia," he said. "But we were
pleased that we could do some-
thing for those that did get out."
SHELDON WILLENS DPM
BARNEY A. GREENBERG DPM
Podiatry Associates
ar plaaaad to announco tho
relocation of tftatr Hollywood oftics
to tho
PODIATRY CENTER BUILDING
2651 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.
NEW NUMBER 923-1800
for tho comprohonaivo treatments of all foot problsmi.
Help Wanted
Sexton Ritual Director
Conservative/Traditional synagogue in So. Fla.
Usual duties. Must have excellent references.
Retiree acceptable. Call Broward 981-6112 or
Dade 949-0501. Do not call collect.
THE AMERICAN FRIENDS
OF THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
Cordially Invite You To Attend
A Dinner
In Honor Of
United States Representative
E. CLAY SHAW, Jr. I
As He Is Awarded
THE TORCH OF LEARNING
And As We Establish
In Perpetuity
THE CLAY and EMILIE SHAW
SCHOLARSHIP FUND OF THE
HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM
Thursday Evening February 21,1985
at the exciting new
Marriott Harbor Beach Resort
3030 Holiday Drive
Ft. Lauderdale
Black Tie Optional

Cocktails at 7:00 P.M.
Couvert $150 Per Person
NORMAN BRAMAN HERB KATZ
ROBERT E. LOCKWOOD DAVID RUSH
Co-Chairpersons
For Reservations and Information Call:
In North Broward 428-2233
In South Broward 94S6644
In Dade-868-7600
There Will Be No Solicitation Of Funds
isaB-isss n-mun-.-rrrui
THf HIBHIW UNIVBHSIT V
I j. I I. | I .


Friday, February 1,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 19
wmmmmmt-
IDESOTO PARK CONDOMINIUMS held their annual UJA-
Federation campaign breakfast January 20 and listed to guest
speaker Al Effrat. From left, co-chairman Sid West; Master of
Ceremonies Bea West; Speaker Al Effrat; Chairman Joe
I Kleiman.

AT HILLCREST BIG GIFTS DINNER from left, Gert
Kronovet, Gert Entin, Lil Koffler, Sylvia Hassenfeld (speaker),
Gloria Hess, Eleanor Lerner, Shirley Kravitz.
Sol Entin, longtime commu-
nity leader, is acknowledged
at the recent Hillcrest Big
Gifts event
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 1-635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)___
HILLCREST LEADERSHIP ACKNOWLEDGED Harry
Smallberg, chairman of the Hillcrest campaign, is shown
recognizing some of the Women's Division leaders who par-
ticipated in the Jewish Federation of South Broward Shomrai
Lion of Judah
METRO JEWISH AWARENESS GROUP held its first event
January 10 at the home of Louis and Carole Morningstar.
Guest speaker was Dr. Abraham Lavendar, who led a
discussion on the topic of American Jewish ancestors and our
culture has developed. From left, Dr. Lavendar, Louis Mor-
ningstar, Sumner Kaye, Dina Kaye, Richard Topolski, Michael
Hannan. Dave Kaplan, Dale Hannan, Mary Cohen.
YUM!
IT TOOK 3500 YEARS
TO FILL THIS BOTTLE
HERE'S WHY:
Geologists report that the pure and
delicious spring water emerging from the
Mountain Valley epr'irtg today in -Het > I
Springs, Ark., first entered the ground as
rain about 3500 years ago. Salt free.
Moderately hard. Delivered to your home
or office.
Dade Broward
696-1333 563-6114
(^Mountaiq,^
PAC-MAN is a big macher with all the kids' So they'll really gobble up
PAC-MAN shaped pasta in spaghetti sauce with cheese flavor
It's delicious and it's packed with goodness From Chel Boy-ardee!*
twiMM< wo ncm,imm.hu c n#,MM
CHRISTIE'S PAINTINGS
SPECIALISTS ARE COMING
Charles Courtney Curran. Chrysanthemums, oil on canvas.
Sold for $88.0O3onJune 1.1984.
Christie's Paintings experts will be visiting Miami the week
of February 11. These experts will be pleased to give
free verbal appraisals and to advise you on the auction
process. For a confidential appointment, please contact
Christie's Palm Beach office at 305/833-6952.
A group of Christie's experts will also be in Palm Beach at
Christie's annual appraisal event sponsored by the First
National Bank in Palm Beach as a service to the
community. For more information,
please call Helen Stedman Cluett or Lucy Ullman
at 305/655-7111, ext. 218 or 219.
CHRISTIE'S
I
Manischewitz
1985 PASSOVER RECIPE GUIDE
Includes 400 in couppns!
Our new 1985 Passover Recipe Guide is more beautiful than ever! And we at
Manischewitz hope it will make your holiday celebration more beautiful than ever,
too. Our Guide features two menu suggestions plus special recipes for dishes like
Honeyed Chicken, Carrot Pudding, and Banana Nut Sponge Cake.
You'll also find a 15e coupon for delicious Manischewitz Matzo Balls and
Broth and a 25c coupon for any Manischewitz Cake Mix. Send for yours now
and have a very happy and Kosher Passover!
COUPONS EXPIRE APRIL II. 1965
Mail coupon to: RECIPE GUIDE, P.O. BOX 484A, JERSEY CITY, N.J. 07303
Please send the Manischewitz Passover Recipe Guide to:
-
Name
Address
City__
Stato-
Zip-
One Recipe Guide Per Request
Request will not be processed without up code
Otter good while supply lasts
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY



Page20 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1,19i6
High School In Israel
In 1972, just 13 yean ago.
Rabbi Morris A. Kipper, former
rabbi of Temple Judea in Coral
Gables, and a group of South
Florida educators met to organize
a program that would help Jew-
ish teenagers discover their roots
as Jews and forge their link to the
State of Israel.
Rabbi Kipper stumbled upon
the idea when, during his
teaching experience in Camp
Coleman. he found that
"youngsters get so wrapped up in
their studies that they learn a lot
more in a short period of time in
intensive study than if they
study that topic over a long
period of time.''
Thus the idea of a High School
in Israel was bom. With the
wholehearted cooperation of the
Ministry of Education in Israel
and the Department of Education
of Tel Aviv University, a
curriculum was formulated to
attract 11th and 12th grade
students in the public and private
schools The motivation of these
teenagers to attend is to improve
their study skills in preparation
for college level work and to
provide them with experiences
that will foster Jewish identity.
The school is located at the
Mosenson Regional High School
in Hod Ha Sharon, our Project
Renewal city. It is a non-profit
organization and fully accredited
school.
There are five eight-week
sessions during the course of a
one-year period. The enrolees.
generally 100 American high
school students, participate in
what is probably the toughest
and most demanding learning
experiences they have ever
known. With Jewish history, as
the core subject, from Ancient
and Biblical times to the modern
era. the present state of Israel in
particular and the Middle East
area in general, the course delves
into and develops the elements of
literature. archaeokvv car-
tography, geography, c. ipara-
t ive religion, philosophy and
political science.
The 48 class days are divkk '
into two halves About 2t
sessions are spent on campus in
investigative work. reading,
discussing and writing essays on
the different periods of Jewish
history. The remainder of the
sessions are spent in the field,
visiting the various sites where
these historic events took place
and even acting out the roles of
the people they are studying. AU
the work is done in English
In addition to the regular
course of study, individual in-
struction is offered in
mathematics, science and foreign
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation
Fri April 5-Sat April 13
Cantor
Lawrence Tachinsky
and the Nevele Symphony Choir
conducted by
MarieTia
Services Scdarim
Dr. Charm
Israel Etrog
wiD offer a program of
lectures arid conduct
seminars during the holiday
nivsu
Elenviie NewKxfc 12428
Hotel 914-647-6000
S \bur Travel Agent
language. Those students
requesting such help are asked to
bring their text books and class
plans along from America.
The teaching staff is composed
of American-trained teachers
with graduate degrees par-
ticularly in history, social
sciences and allied disciplines.
They are engaged five months
prior to taking on a full teaching
load. For two and one-half
months they are crash-trained by
the curriculum and staff
supervisor. For the following two
and one-months, they team-teach
with veteran teachers.
Although telephones and tele-
visions are not provided in the
dormitories, the social side of
high school life is not neglected.
Social get-togethers with their
Israeli contemporaries are
arranged. They are also invited to
spend weekends in Israeli homes,
thus providing them with an
insight into the life style of Isra-
eli teenagers.
The following are direct quotes
from some of the students who
attended sessions of the High
School in Israel and their
parents:
From students:
"Through experiencing history
as the living account of a people,
rather than a dry collection of
facts to be memorized. I felt as if
I ware a participant of history."
"I spent two months of my
senior year in the High School in
Israel program, living in a college
dormitory athmosphere,
studying 4,000 years of history.
The experience was important to
me because it gave me new
perspective on history, religion,
group living, self-reliance and
friendship."
"It helped me budget my tine,
gave me exposure to a college
type atmosphere"
From parents:
"The junior and senior years in
high school are a time of
adolescent insecurity and tur-
moil. This program definitely
catalyzed their intellectual and
emotional growth."
"The academic demands
sharpened their ability to
organize and retain a large body
of knowledge in a short period of
time."
For further information on this
program, please call Judy Arm-
strong. Director of Admissions.
Breward County, at 921-8810.
Passover
at the Concord
Fn April 5-Sar April 13
Oursronding leode^
from Govemmenr. Press
rhe Arrs ond Lirerorure
Greor films Musk day and
nighr vy^ekdoys Special
proqrom for rors. rweeoers
ondreens
Robbis Cohen ond
Mazur oversee consronr
Koshrurh supervision ond
Dierory Low observance
CONCORD
XMAJORCREDiTcards \_y
HOW (914) 794-4000
To* Free 800-431-3850
East of me Maa (except NYS)
TWX 510-240-6336 latex 323637
See tour Travel Agant
OurRaaevationPnoneAreOpBn7 0ayiVM
The obseivonce of rrodi-
rion. rhe rnognificence of
rhe Sedonm. rhe beauty
of rhe Services, rhe bnl
tionce of rhe Holiday
rVooramming
Contor Herman
Molomood. ossisred by
rhe Concord 45-voce Sym-
phonic Chorale, direaed
by AAorhew Lozor ond
Don Vogel. ro
officiore or rhe
Services ond
5ed"n RESORT HOTEL
**2#.-, Kiamesha Lake MY 12751
whefe shopping is o pleosure 7doys q week
PuMx Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at PubHx Stores with
Frash Daiweh Bakeries Only.
Freshly Baked
French Bread
69*
\ r
Available at PubNx Storaa with
Frash Daniah Bakariaa Only.
Topa for Taste
Raisin Bagels
6-99*
at Pubfa Storaa with
Only.
Sour Cream
Loaf
79
aach
at AM Pub* x Stores
A Beautiful Decorated Assortment
Valentine Cookies........ ^ $329
Serve with a Hot Cup of Coffee
Danish Butter Ring.........chM69
Fresh from the Oven
Zucchini Muffins........6 to, $1M
16-cL
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Vt*r>Vr*,L
Americas
'Favorite
Dinnerware.
Now Available At Publix.
LiywcwMI
Snnyi
EM09"*.
Prices Effective
Jan. 31st thru Feb. 6th. 1985
Quantity
Mghts Reserved


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FILES


Friday, February 1,1986/The Jewish Floridian of South Brpward-Hollywood. Page5
The Hollybrook Women's
Division First Annual Luncheon
will be held Wednesday, Feb. 27
at the Emerald Hills Country
Club. The Hollybrook Division is
a new yet formidable entity
spearheaded by chairwoman
Jackie Levine together with a
committee of determined and
hardworking women.
The special guest speaker will
be Vicki Agron. She is presently
the Director of the United Jewish
-Appeal Young Women's Leade-
' ship Cabinet, and the Director, in
the office of the President, of the
National Chairman and Chair-
man of the Board of Trustees.
Since her induction into the
Jewish civil and professional
arena in 1975, Ms. Agron has
demonstrated a tremendous level
of commitment, tenacity, skill.
Hollybrook Women's Division luncheon
and leadership abilities.
Ms. Agron has an impressive
list of service activities. She was
the Chairwoman of the United
Jewish Appeal Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet, an officer
and executive committee member
for the UJA, a participant and
leader for the UJA Missions to
Israel in 1974, 1980, 1981, and
1982, a Delegate to the United
Israel Appeal Jewish Agency
General Assembly in 1979, an
executive committee member for
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions Women's Division, an
officer for the Allied Jewish
Federation of Denver, and the
winner of the Mo Katz Young
Leadership Award in 1975. Vicki
has done speaking engagements,
fundraisers and training sessions
at conferences in communities
Hellman to speak at Malaga
|V Chairman Mel Lazerick of the
Malaga UJA-Federation 1985
campaign announces a cocktail
party Sunday Feb. 17 beginning
at 4:30 p.m. in the building social
hall.
Featured guest speaker will be
Yehuda Hellman, one of the
country's foremost authorities on
the events of the Middle East.
Hellman is Executive Director of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations.
He was one of the first Amer-
ican Jewish leaders to see Presi-
dent Anwar el-Sadat in Aswan
following Mr. Sadat's historic
visit to Jerusalem.
Lazerick, formerly of Cleve-
land, is chairing the Malaga
campaign for the third year. He
has been active in philanthropic
work both in South Broward and
in Cleveland. He is a member of
the national board of Big
Brothers-Big Sisters, and is
Jacqueline Levine
throughout the United States
and Canada from 1975 to the
present.
We feel confident that this first
Annual Hollybrook Luncheon
shall set a high standard for
years to come. For more informa-
tion, please contact Carole Roth
at the Federation, 921-8810.
HOLLYBROOK WOMEN'S DIVISION From left, standing:
Edna Cohen, Frieda Master, Miriam Kasan, Evelyn Goldstein,
Amy Marshall, Ruth Goldberg, Sheryll Hirschberger, Rhea
Krieger, Rosella Grossman, Jacky Levine; Sitting, from left,
Celine Slot nick, Raisie Karp, Gerry Weinstock. Not pictured,
Sylvia Holtz, Harriet Trepner, Ella Jay, Edith Barron, Dorothy
Frank, Joyce Binstock, Ann Cohen, Roberta Fixell, Lil Weil,
Laura Fromberg, Ida Kane, Sylvia Stein, Mary Jaffee, Lil
Ducoff, Claire Wexler, Rosalie Zeldow, Natalie Gohib, Rose
Ariel, Julia Leff, Ann Barish, Mae Kahan, Myra Kahn, Shirley
Silberberg, Kay Hirschberg, Thelma (Axelrod) Levine, Libby
Meyers, Jeanne Metzger, Esther Leno.
Quadomain breakfast Feb. 17
Mervin Lazerick.
married to his wife, Ina, and has
two daughters, Carol and Beth.
There is a $100 minimum
commitment to the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
campaign necessary in order to
attend this event. For further
information, please call the
Federation at 921-8810.
copacabana
AMBvSSADC* BEACH
California
RIVIERA
HILTON noil i
Pawn Springs
THENEwrorror
Newport Bracti
SHF RATON SAVANNAH
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVER TOURS **.
Mluwcst
LAKE GENEVA RESORT
Puerto Rico
PALMAS0ELMAR
Spain
PEZESPADA
St.Maartan
GREAT BAY BEACH
HONTAWEBlAUHItTON
HNGBXXX RESORT
SHERATON BA1HARIOUR
Bal Harbour
SANSSOUCI
N.Y.Araa
TAMMENTKESORT
PoconoMC.PA
HOST FARM CORRAl
Unuster.PA
Hawaii
SHERATON MAKAHA
ATLAS AMBASSADOR
RUI
HYATT REGENCY
TOUK
The Quadomain 1985 UJA-
Federation campaign will hold a
complimentary breakfast Sunday
morning Feb. 17 at 10 in the
building social hall, according to
chairman Harry Kaplan and co-
chairmen Sam Koffler and Isador
Zaroff.
The event is sponsored by the
King David Lodge B'nai B'rith.
Special guest speaker will be
Yehuda Hellman, Executive
Director of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations. A former
newsman for the Jerusalem Post
based in Arab countries, Hellman
was once imprisoned on the
charge that he was sending press
AIPAC
conference
The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC) will
sponsor a one day, statewide
Political Action Workshop to
teach the pro-Israel community
the nuts and bolts of the political
process on Sunday March 31 at
the Marriott Hotel, 17th Street
Causeway, Fort Lauderdale, from
9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information, contact
Melissa Martin at the Jewish
Federation, 921-8810.
See your travel agent or call toll-
free: 800-223-0888 (in New York
State: 800-522-5455 or 212-841-1111)
* P.P..D.O., Daily
On room only. From 1/1 'til 2/28.,
Subject to 15% service charge.
Not available to tours and groups;
payment must be made directly to
the hotel.
Right now is the ideal time, for
planning a trip to Israel. The weather's
perfect: the season's in full swing;
and the rates are so low! Israel's
two leading 5-Star luxury hotels,
the elegant Laromme Jerusalem,
overlooking the Old City, and
the smart beachfront
Tel Aviv Car I ton offer you the
incredible buy of the year.
Stay at one hotel. Stay at
both. Come for a minimum
of 5 nights or as long as
you like. And one child (no age limit)
stays absolutely free in the same room with
you. Both hotels are fully kosher and have
complete Sabbath facilities.
Laromme eicat hotel.
For only S20 per p.p.do.. daily, soak ******
winter sun at Laromme Eilat right on tneKea
Sea with its own pool and secluded beach.
Swim, scuba dive, windsurf. Marvelous way to
top off the perfect Israeli vacation.
W taromme hoteLS (int'L) Lto.
(From left to right): Sam Koffler, Harry Kaplan, Isadora
Zaroff.
dispatches unfavorable to the
Arab cause. He has become one
of the top authorities on current
events involving the Middle
East.
Leaders Kaplan, Koffler and
Zaroff have been longtime parti-
cipants in the Quadomain camp-
-a
aign. They have been working
harder each year to make this
event a large success and expect
the highest turnout ever this
year.
For more information con-
cerning the event, please contact
the Federation at 921-8810.
AUTOLOG. the leading transporter of privately-
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood / Friday, February 1,1986
Thejewish
m
FflEDSHOCMET
Editor and Publisher
ol South Broward
Publication No (USPS 864-500) (ISSN 07*8-77371
f'FndSKoclft
ART HARRIS
Associate Editor
SUZANNE SMOCMET
Executive Editor
Published Bi Weekly Second Class Poitege paid at Haliandale, Fla.
MOLLVWOOD FORT LAUOEROALE OFFICE. 8366 w Oakland Park Blvd.,
Fort Lauderdaie. FL 33321 Phone 746-6*00
Abraham B Hakeem. AdvertattM tyesrvleor
Main Olllce 6 Plant 120 NE 8th St Miami. Fla 33132-Phone 1-373.4605
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Jewish Federation ol Sooth Broward ollicers President Of Philip A Levin. Vice Presidents Or
Saul Singer. Ted Newman and Nat Sedley. Treasurer Or Howard Barron. Secretary Olio
Stieber, Executive Director Sumner G. Kaye Submit material lor publication to Art Harris.
associate editor. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Florida 33020
Member JTA. Seven Arts. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area 13 50 Annual 12 Year Minimum 7), or by membership Jewish
Federation ol South Broward. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Fla 33020 Phone 921 8810
Out ol Town Upon Request
Friday, February 1,1985
Volume 15
10 SHE VAT 5745
Number 3
A first Chanukah
for Ethiopian Jews
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Imagine witnessing a young
Jewish child seeing a d re idle for
the first time, watching in wide-
eyed wonder as the Chanukah
candles are lit. symbolizing an
historical religious event that
was never part of his known heri-
tage. So it was for Kehilat Eshel
Avraham, the Masorti (Con-
servative! synagogue in Beer-
sheba. which invited the Ethio-
pian Jewish community from a
local absorption center to a
Chanukah party on the second
night of the holiday.
Fifty new immigrants from
Ethiopia joined Eshel Avraham
in the congregation's small syna-
gogue, located in a local air-raid
shelter, for an evening of tradi-
tional Chanukah songs and
games.
Traditions of the Ethiopian
Jewish community originate only
from the Torah the five books
of Moses and until their aliya
to Israel, the Ethiopians had no
tradition of celebrating the vic-
tory of the Maccabees over
Antiochus. "For many of the
Ethiopians, it was their first
Chanukah celebration ever," said
Rabbi Jonathan Perlman, the
Baltimore-born rabbi of Eshel
Avraham.
"One older man who was
identified as a spiritual leader,
spoke with the help of a tran-
slator on behalf of all of the im-
migrants present. He told us it
was a privilege to come to Israel,
to the promised land, to be to-
gether with the rest of the Jewish
people."
The Ethiopian guests heard
Perlman explain about the light-
ing ot the "Chanukah' candles
and other holiday customs. The
children, who go to school and are
learning Hebrew, warmed up to
the children of Eshel Avraham
over games of dreidle and "Pin
the Shamash on the Chanukah
menorah."
"I brought our youth group se-
veral times to the local absorp-
tion center to visit the new im-
migrants, entertain them and
play with the children there. I
was approached by a number of
young adults who were anxious
to learrr about Judaism since
their traditions include none of
the Oral Law (Talmudic) tradi-
tions, and I have been tutoring a
number of them." Perlman said.
Congregation Eshel Avraham
held a meeting a week before
their Chanukah party to hear a
lecture on the Ethiopian com-
munity by the regional Educa-
tion Ministry Supervisor. He
suggested ways in which the
synagogue could begin "cultural
exchanges" so as to help ease the
transition of the new immigrants
into Israeli society.
"I think that the Ethiopians
were very happy to be invited by
veteran immigrants and Israelis
to such a gathering," Perlman
said. "The older people enjoyed
seeing the children adapting so
quickly and enjoying themselves
with the synagogue children. If
we can break the language
barrier, we will have much to
offer the Ethiopian community in
Beersheba. I hope that our syna-
gogue will be a leading force in
helping their absorption."
S. American
Mission
Continued from Page 1
present meetings with top
political and community
leaders, and will feature
home hospitality which
offers the opportunity to
view Jewish life in South
America from a highly per-
sonal perspective.
The mission will be based
in first-class hotels, and all
flight and land arrange-
ments are included in the
total package for this sti-
mulating travel experience.
For reservations or more
information about Mission:
South America, return the
form below or call Debbie
Brodie Suckno at Federa-
tion, 921-8810.
RETURN THIS FORM TO:
Jewish Federation of South Florida
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
l/we wish to receive more information about the
March 17-27 Mission: South America program.
l/we wish to register for the March 17-27 Mission:
South America program. Enclosed is a check to
cover our deposit ($200 per person).
NAME
What we learned from Habtnesh
They are Jews. Jews in trouble.
A11 of us have known about the problems
of life for Jews in The Soviet Union; in
Arab countries; in Eastern Europe. What
we didn't know much about was life for
Jews in Ethiopia.
In fact, it's only been a couple of months
that most of us in the community had even
known that Jews lived in Ethiopia. So
many of us ask, "Who are they? Where did
they come from? and really the most ob-
vious question, the one we quietly ask,
"How come they are black skinned?
Last month, the Jewish Federation of
South Broward sponsored appearances by
three Ethiopian Jewish refugees in the
area. We learned as much about them as
everyone else did. The leader of the
Ethiopian family, a 28 year old woman who
carries the seemingly un-Jewish name of
Habtnesh, brought her sister and first
cousin whom she had personally rescued
from the refugee camps within the last
year. The sister grew up with the very
Jewish, very Biblical name of Sara Ezra
a name which reminds us of a great Jewish
matriarch and a prophet of Israel.
Are they really Jewish? Theories to their
origin are numerous. According to whom
we talk with, Ethiopian Jews are either
descendants of the Lost Tribe of Dan
one of the ten tribes of Israel which
disappeared after the Assyrian conquest
2,700 years ago:
Or are they descended from King
Solomon and the Queen of Sheba? The
progeny of Moses and an Ethiopian queen?
Of Solomon and one of Sheba's hand-
maidens?
Habtnesh told us that there are no
definite answers; it depends on who's
talking. But what is indisputable is that
the Ethiopian Jewish community has
remained intact and largely unchanged as a
religious Jewish entity for at least 2,000
years. They are a fascinating study of
ancient Jewishness.
Then there is the racial question. We
know our surprise at finding the existence I
of black Jews, and seeing some of them
here, as we did recently. Imagine their
surprise, about a hundred years ago, at
sighting their first white Jews. Believing
that they are descended from the tribe of
Dan, which we believe to be a lost tribe
they must have thought that all the other I
tribes were lost they knew where theS
were the whole time. Perhaps the tribes
that later were spread over the continent* I
of Asia and Europe which we descend fron
were originally black skinned too. All we
can do is speculate.
All this adds up to the fact that the
Ethiopians are real Jews. We learned that!
in addition to famine in Ethiopia, the
political situation there is untenable fort
Jewish minority. They are kept extret
poor, are unable to own land, and risk
political police actions from an unstable
government.
As we learned, the people are highly
intelligent, motivated, and learn quickly.
They are also handsome and proud and
have Biblical facial features. The state of
Israel has opened their doors to thousand^
of refugees, ready to absorb them fully inti
an already multicultural society. This will |
take a tremendous effort on the refugees'
part. It also will take a tremendous effort
on the part of the Israeli government,
existing Israeli society, and American
Jewry, which is being counted on to help
pay for much of the absorption effort. Wh
needs to be done is to teach these people
Hebrew, work skills, and generally, bring
them into a 20th century society.
Everyone has their responsibilities. We |
must fulfill ours.
-A.H.
Contributions to Operation Moses, the
Ethiopian resettlement effort, may bei
through the Jewish Federation ofSouth^
Broward.
Wallenberg remembered
ADDRESS
PHONE*.
Congressman Tom. Lantos,
(D-Calif.) is the first and only
survivor of the Holocaust to be
elected to the United States
Congress. Born in Budapest on
Feb. 1, 1928, Lantos was an
active member of the anti-Nazi
underground by the time he was
16. He was also a leader of the
early post-war anti-community
student movement in Hungary
before he came to the United
States in 1947 on a B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation scholarship.
By TOM LANTOS
Forty years ago on Jan. 17,
1945 Swedish Diplomat Raoul
Wallenberg was seized by Soviet
troops in Soviet-occupied
Budapest, Hungary. In these 40
years, only his Soviet captors and
a few of his fellow prisoners have
spoken with him. But he is not
forgotten. The tens of thousands
of Hungarian Jews he saved from
certain death in Nazi extermina-
tion camps who lived to raise
families and who love life cannot
forget Raoul Wallenberg. My
wife Annette and I are two of
those he saved.
The outlines of Raoul Wallen-
berg's story are well known. A
well-educated young man, born
to a wealthy Swedish family,
Wallenberg sacrificed his future
in order to undertake a high-risk
effort to save the lives of
thousands of people marked for
extermination. In 1944 he arrived
in Budapest armed with Swedish
diplomatic status and funds from
the American War Refugee
Board. He carried out one of the
greatest humanitarian efforts in
modern history. Displaying
remarkable courage daily,
Wallenberg printed Swedish
passports and passed them out to
thousands of Jews. Single-
handledly he approached
deportation trains and literally
pulled people out ot the cattle
cars destined for extermination
camps. He purchased or rented
dozens of buildings, which he
designated Swedish territory,
and filled them with Hungarian
Jews to protect them from Nazi
round-up squads. Through his
efforts, Wallenberg saved an
estimated 100,000 Hungarian
Jews from the "final solution."
In January 1945, when the
Soviet military drove the last
Germans troops from Budapest,
they arrested Wallenberg as an
"American spy" in complete dis-
regard for his diplomatic status.
He was imprisoned first in
Hungary and then in the Soviet
Union. The Soviets initially
acknowledged that Wallenberg
was being held in "protective
custody" by the Red Army, but
soon they changed the story to a
complete denial of any knowledge
of his whereabouts. In 1967 the
Soviets flip-flopped once more
when the Deputy Foreign Min-
ister Andrei Gromyko acknowl-
edged that he had been taken pri-
soner in Hungary, but said he
died of a heart attack in 1947.
Kremlin leaders cling to this
story to this day, although eye-
witness reports from released pri-
soners documented the survival
of Wallenberg in the Soviet
Gulag throughout the 1960s, 60s,
and 70s.
Wallenberg, who would now be
72 years old, may still live within
the shadowy half-world of Soviet
prisons. As we mark the 40th
anniversary of his disappearance,
it is important that we renew our
determination to secure from his
captors his release or a full ac-
count of his fate. Just as he did
not give up hope in the face of
overwhelming odds, likewise we
must not give up any effort that
may help him.
Thanks to the persistence
my wife Annette, who orgi
the first international
Wallenberg Committee,
other committed individu.
President Carter, Presid
Reagan, and other world leadsfl
agreed to pursue Wallenberg'
fate in meetings with the So
I have sought to put p
on Moscow at every opporti
to release Wallenberg. Two y
ago I urged the Swedish gov::
ment to hold the crew of a Sovi
submarine that ran aground I
Swedish waters until the Soviet
government released Wallenba,
or provided convincing evidenam t
of his death. Another avenue mm
we are now trying is filing suit !
the U.S. courts to force thil
Soviet Union to produce infornl
tion on Wallenberg. Will thesjl
actions break the decades |
silence and deception practie^ip
by the Soviet Union in thecas.
Raoul Wallenberg? Perhaps not
but as he did not give up, sol
must continue our effort to j
his freedom.
With each passing day, hwj
ever, the possibuity that WalW-l
berg is still alive diminishes m
we mark the 40th anniversary"
his disappearance, it is import*?!
that we remember his deed'%
the unspeakable horror ol ur
Holocaust one of mankmaj
blackest nights the con
and humanity of Raoul wa
berg was shining beacon of no
The tens of thousands he y"
- and their children and u?
grandchildren will **"*S
memory die. Wallenberg bM
his mark on mankind. Alnl
two thousand years ago tMPV
Hebraic sage Hillel put this H
context: "He who saves a WJ
as if he saved an entire wor
How much more so for the ro
who has saved tens of thousand