The Jewish Floridian of South Broward

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Running title:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 13, no. 23 (Nov. 11, 1983)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for July 7, 1989 called no. 11 but constitutes no. 13.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statement conflict: Aug. 4, 1989 called no. 14 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44513894
lccn - sn 00229542
ocm44513894
System ID:
AA00014306:00014

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


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Full Text
Thejewish
,r lorfatan
of South Broward
Number 12
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 8, 1984
f'aSfmcnti
Price 38 Cents
friends
(tic triumphs
>pen every
/e're
to report
uand new
Kiribati, a
53 islands
ith Pacific,
tlished
[with Israel.
|h decision,
we're
a couple
|nts; one
lone who's
to go, and
Ml
rho's
Sab-
kr back in
MS,
it was
,ision.
urage
might
before
Israel's
is
*%not
>r April.
Israelis, local congressmen show
serious reservations over Stinger sale
Reaction from supporters
of Israel over the Reagan
Administration's sale of
400 Stinger anti-aircraft
missiles to the Saudi
Arabians has been loud in
opposition.
In Israel, Premier
Yitzhak Shamir told the
Cabinet that Israel is op-
posed to the sale of
advanced weapons to Arab
confrontation states. He
said the shoulder-fired
Stingers could easily fall
into terrorist hands.
Reportedly, Shamir said
the Saudis have been
accumulating weapons for a
long time and the only time
they were being used was
when they were transferred
to Arab armies fighting
Israel.
However, there is serious
concern in Israel that if
they oppose the further sale
of Stingers to the Saudis, it
could trigger a hostile reac-
tion in the U.S.
The law requires a 30 day
period for Congress either
to veto or allow such mil-
itary sales to go through.
But the law also allows the
President to waive the 30-
day rule on national
security grounds.
In this case, the
Cong. Smith
President decided to use
the waiver because of the
threat to Western oil sup-
plies by Iranian and Iraqi
air attacks on Persian Gulf
shipping.
Cong. Larry Smith, D-
H oily wood, reacted angrily
to the President's decision.
"The Saudis can't protect
the Gulf with Stinger mis-
siles," he said.
"Stingers only have a
range of about 3 kilometers,
and the Gulf is 20 miles
wide. They have other anti-
aircraft systems for that,"
he said.
Smith said he believes
the threat of the Iranian air
Cong. Shaw
force to hit Saudi Arabia
has been overexaggerated.
So far, he said, the
bombings of ships have
been near the Iranian coast,
not near Saudi Arabia.
Besides, be said, the
Saudis have many other
anti-aircraft weapons that
have more range than the
hand-held Stingers.
"What Stingers are
going to be used for is a
mystery to me," he said.
The possibility of the
weapons finding their way
into PLO hands is real,
Smith said, and if they were
used against the Israeli air
force as a terrorist weapon
they would have a "trem-
endous negative effect."
Smith said the
administration realizes the
possibility that the
weapons may reach PLO
hands, but chooses to de-
emphasize it.
Rep. Clay Shaw, R-Ft.
Laud., agreed that the mis-
siles could possibly end up
in PLO hands.
"I'm sure the
Administration got all the
safeguards they could get
on this subject," he said,
"but there is no way any-
body could say they
definitely won't get into the
hands of terrorists."
Shaw added that while he
wasn't a weapons expert,
he wasn't sure exactly what
the Saudis needed the
Stingers for in light of other
defensive weapons they
now have. But he wasn't
able to oppose the
President on this issue
because he felt "there are a
lot of things we (in
Congress) don't know
about yet."
"I'm very concerned
every time we give a
sophisticated weapons
svstem to the Saudis or anv
Continued oo Pag* 5
oroccan king may encourage new peace Initiative
PA) -
members
Ithe first
national conference of
Moroccan Jewish commu-
nities which ended here last
^N

:''%^jS^:
-AL POINT SENIORS enjoy a cookout
' by the JCC of South Broward. The
* constituent agency of the Jewiah
nth Broward. Prom left Mark Sherman.
Jack Tirnauer; Beth Straahun, activities
aand.
week, expressed cautious
optimism that the even
could herald a new Middle
East peace initiative en-
couraged by King Hassan
of Morocco.
The conference drew
some 500 participants and
observers representing the
Moroccan Jewish commu-
nity and Jewish communit-
ies in the United States,
France and other countries.
They included a 35-member
Israeli delegation, of which
11 are members of the
Knesset representing both
the Labor Party and the
Likud-led coalition govern-
ment.
The Israelis were invited
with the express permission
of Hassan, the first time a
group of Israeli parliamen-
tarians have visited an
Arab League member-
state.
According to Meir
Shitreet of Likud, the most
important result of the con-
ference could be to pave the
way for a new peace initia-
tive. It would be welcomed
by Israel if it came from
Morocco, he said, adding
that King Hassan's
prestige will be enhanced in
the U .S. and among Jewish
communities all over the
world for having the con-
ference in his capital.
Yossi Sarid. of the Labor
Continued on Pag* It-
Copenhagen, Amsterdam,
Israel Mission set
South Broward is going
to Scandinavia this year.
That is, if you're part of
the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's com-
munity leadership mission
to Copenhagen,
Amsterdam, and Israel,
between October 14-28.
The JFSB's second
mission, for Young Leader-
ship, covers Israel only
between October 20-31.
That mission is partially
subsidized, and is intended
for up and coming leaders
of the Federation and
constituent agencies.
This will be the first time
a delegation from South
Broward will have visited
Scandinavia. Scheduled are
visits with local Jewish
leadership in both
countries, and a historical
and cultural tour of Juda-
ism there that will include a
trip to Anne Frank's home
in Amsterdam, the Danish
Museum of Holocaust
Resistance, and centuries-
old synagogues.
You will find a thriving,
if small, Jewish community
living in peace with their
Continued oa Page S

Ps88a?gS|38fe


Page 2 The Jewish Ftbridian of South BrowardHollywood friday. June 8. 1984
Elisha shows how Project Renewal works
By MARILYN GRANT
Project Renewal Coordinator
Some people in this world of
ours give far more than their fair
share.
Twenty-one-year-old Eliaha.
dressed in his IDF uniform, stood
before a group of young men from
Florida, a Young Business
Leadership Mission who had
come to visit their community in
Israel Hod Hasharon's two
Project Renewal neighborhoods,
Giora and Gil Amal. We were in
the Ellie and Herb Katz Youth
Club in the Giora neighborhood
and Elisha was telling us about
the activities which take place for
youngsters from 5 to 20. It was
indeed an impressive program,
ranging from sports, arts and
crafts, all kinds of interest
groups, a small library and a very
extensive tutoring program.
What is Elisha's part in all of
this? And why do we single him
out? He works with marginal
youth, those kids who neither
work nor study, and for many of
them, visits from police and
probationary officers make up a
good part of the week's activities.
Elisha is a big brother, an inter-
ceding friend, an enabler. a doer,
an example.
Elisha was doing his regular
three year army service and was
stationed with his unit in
Lebanon. There he was seriously
wounded After his long period of
hospitalization. he was told that
hr should continue his recupera-
tion at home. But Elisha had
other ideas. He wasn't going to
til at home.
And so. Elisha. from a middle
class Ashkenazi family from
Jerusalem, found his place in
Giora working with the kids and
making an impact greater than
anyone could have imagined.
The M ission. made up of young
men not much older than Elisha
saw a great deal in Israel They
saw Project Renewal at work and
came away impressed. But the
example of Elisha. who is giving
Tile
nmaasj iwuinnn rvjon
PROJECT RENEWAL
far more than his share, will happens, the neighborhood will
perhaps leave a greater impres- be richer from his having chosen
sion. We all wish Elisha a speedy Hod Hasharon as the place to
recovery. No matter what recuperate rather than his bed
Florence Scott, of Pembroke Pines, wbo is on a
Study Mission to Israel, visits the therapeutic pool in the
Rehabilitation Center of the Hadassah University Hospital
on Mount Scopus, Jerusalem. The Mission took place while
the 9th International Congress on Rehabilitation, dealing
with revolutionary new approaches to the problems of victims
of war, road accidents, stroke and heart disease was being
held in Jerusalem.
Ift Easy to feel Like a Iffion
Without Spending a Dime
At first glance, it's just a living room
filled with furniture. Or maybe its
a garage filled with foofc Or a closet
filled with clothes
It might not be worth much to you,
but to us its worth millions Its worth
medicine and medical supplies tor
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital tor the Aged
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible Of course, we will be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience A licensed
appraiser is available upon request
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets
It's that easy And you'll feel like a
million without spending a dime
751-3968 (Dad)
981-8245 (Broward)
In
In
5713 NW 27th Ave
3149 Haliandale Beach Blvd
IrvwigCypen Chairman ol me Boars
Harwd Beck President
Aaron Kravrtz Chairman Thrift Shop
Comrmitee
Fred D Hi* Executive Director
Community Calen6atf
June 10
T.mole S>noi bowling night ot the West Hollywood Bowl.ng
lones 6 pm Coll Florence Rosenthol 989-1434 Temp|,
Smoii Berthas Boutique" < doling shop for the summer
Childrens clothes, kitchen oppliances. designer opparel. e1c
Bargoms
June IS
Temple Solels Sisterhood Officers and Board of Directors will
be installed dunng Worship Service. 8: '8 p.m.
June 16
Temple Beth Ahm Installation Cocktail Party, 8:30 p.m. Call
431 5100 for rese'vo'ions _____________
Your Commun.ty Calendar welcomes news of your Jewish orien-
, Joroamzation All meetings, times and their locat on. should t*
SrMIMI te Art Hams, associate editor, at the Jewish Federation
otTouVh Broward. 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Calendar Information must
be received at least two weeks before publication date.
^m
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The problem with
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The GUARDIAN PLAN" Insurance
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r, June 8, 1984 /The Jewish Floridian of SouthiBrowanT]
rare
>age 3
Jiyah: One who's preparing to go.
Ion July 2- wUI depart JFK
liraort for Tel Avlv ^"'PP**1
B whatever baggage flight
Ttffcfll allow .. and a one-
* ticket
L word that I am leaving my
ll.ljved but fulfilling career at
LFxoonent -lowly gets around,
torker* in the Federation
riding manv of whom I barely
Z approach me. "I hear you
, making aliyah." they say.
Letimes admiringly, some
* incredulously. I always
Mt with n smile, partly for
nriftneu with which rumors
- and partlv fr the automatic
Lmption that because I am
ing to Israel. I am making
aliyah.
"Perhaps someday I will," I
reply. "But for now, I'm just
going. Mavbe 111 be back in a
year and maybe I wont: only
time and my heart will
tell."
For the strangers in the Fed-
eration building, this is a suffi-
cient response. But for those dear
to me my parents, grandmoth-
ers, sister and brother-in-law, my
boyfriend and other special
family and friends, it is not such
an easy answer to swallow.
Leaving those I love for an
indefinite period is without a
doubt the most difficult part of
my leaving. Even though I try to
tell them it will be "just a year"
until I decided whether or not
Israel is where I want to make
my home and I may well be
back by then those who know
me well remain unconvinced.
They have listened too often to
my impassioned pleas for under
standing to believe that all my
unresolved questions could be so
quickly answered.
"Wouldn't you like your kids,
when you have them to have an
aunt to visit in Israel," I once
asked my sister in an attempt to
look on the bright side. To which
she responded, somewhat sar
do rurally. "I'd rather that they
know who their aunt is."
Of course. So would I, and so,
too, would I prefer to live less
than 6,000 miles from my family
and friends. Yet this is my
dilemma: Should I abandon my
dreams and beliefs and try to put
the longing for Israel out of my
mind? Should I become like most
American Jews a supporter
and observer of Israel, rather
than a Zionist? Should I send my
children on a summer tour or a
college semester in our homeland,
all the while desperately praying
they don't become too attached
for fear they will decide to per-
manently settle there?
After all, I could place the
blame for the inner turmoil I am
experiencing on my parents.
They were the ones who en-
couraged me to to for a summer
"experience" when I was 16 and
then again somewhat lees
.and one returning on Sabbatical,
who knows Israel is home
enthusiastically for a semester
in college.
But how could they have
known that the strong Jewish
identity with which they had
raised me suddenly fit together in
the Jewish state in a way it never
had before?
How could they have known
that it wasn't until I experienced
Israel that it became possible for
me. for the first time in my life, to
intellectualize why I had so often
felt like an outsider in the
primarily WASP Rhode Island
town where I grew up?
I wonder whether, given the
opportunity to do it again, my
parents would permit me these
experiences. Knowing them and
knowing their eternal support
and encouragement of my in-
Continued on Page 10-
Tami Lehman-WiUif is a
jMf oj V. u York u ho made
fyak in 1977 In Israel, she
dints as a fnclance writer
tKiahzmti in aili rrtising and
MIk relations She is in the
minted State) this year while her
muband is on sabbatical.
|b?TAMI l.KHMAN WILZIG
Fwm The Philadelphia
Jeuish Exponent
I The flight *H scheduled for
Eidnight Destination: Israel.
fith choked Mines, both sets of
rents implored us to call the
pmite we arrived at Ben-Gurion
port, while aunts and uncles
tempted to keep a stiff upper
Finally my mother-in-law
pdout a question How long
lull sabbatical?"
v\ replied my
I again the
d up
i- \ ivid as if
sterday; in
Israel took
years ago Over
| rani Atlantic
iged b) our
n garding my
ii Perhaps
wouldn't take
1 ademic perk
wouldn't have
*'Jl"' i one-year stay in
Jifcntii t,. convince us that we
derredinour move.
I often questioned our
during the first half
(W Like tnosl \mencans, I
Ppmenced a multipronged
fur* shuck \\h> .lid I have to
* an entire morning standing
t. 'me at the bank? Because
F"ak the teller had to know
"* each customer's family was
[K the ultimate in personal
*inK' I was amazed to find
*n making purchases "on
. fl" at the local grocery and
F"*d over the general
pHcratic paper chaw
IJjutthehumunin ot the people
*me ping \\ hen we finally
w mw. our apartment, our
"ror,. ne,ghbor came
**'ng five minutes after we
'down the suitcases. While
Wh? L" S,h"W me "o*
^Khhorhoodandaskedifwe
to an>' ""Stance. I stood
RL ''* Yorkw rarelv
Kv' SUch Pfiousne".
Id Jer. i our mden voyage
"lust as we reached the hilly
ill moLtorisl9 Pulled over
,Wveu helping hand.
Mel r 8uch incidents is
fcw s"?08^ of them, I now
Dsiir fLn,-^ed sta
nih Israel,, the pl^e for
[The
JT5 ans
uv' *e are not back in
the "Big Apple," but rather are
residents of Silver Spring, Md.,
an area known for its haimish
Jewish community. Unfortun-
ately, I found that New Yorkers
haven't cornered the market on
being reserved.
No one came to greet us when
we moved into our rented house.
After three days, I felt compelled
to introduce myself to our next-
door neighbors. They smiled
"hello" but have yet to come
knocking. When looking for play-
mates for our 3-year-old son. I
called people who had children
the same age. "Oh yes." they
replied, "we've seen you walking
around "
Could it be bad breath? Ring
around the collar? Hardly. When
we met other American-Israeli
academics also in the area for a
year. I realized that my expe-
rience was not exceptional Sara
and Meir Kdelman are back in the
United States for their second
aabbal leal Sc\ i'ii \ ears ago. they
spent a year in Brookline. .Mass.
"Do you know," Sara confided
in me. "in Massachusetts, the
only way our neighbors casually
socialized was when they walked
their dogs'" This time around,
she and Meir are not surprised
that none of their new neighbors
came to greet then, and to this
day they remain, anonymous.
"As opposed to Israelis, Amer-
icans live in and with their cars.
Their house, too, is more vital to
their existence. They're indoors
more, and in turn, more wrapped
up in themselves," Meir
explained.
Sadly, I have found that life
here has a domino effect all its
own. Because Americans are
indoors msot of the time, the
informality I have come to enjoy
in Israel doesn't exist. "The
American way is. Don't drop in.
call first.' Sara cautioned me.
So I did and found myself fast
becoming a social secretary for
our 3-year-old son.
In Israel, playmates are always
available. Here. I have to "book
time" two weeks in advance with
another child's mother. Not only
do I find it disconcerting, but
from my Israeli perspective, it's a
rather warped existence. The
Kdelmans. who have older
children, agree with me, but their
problem is even more acute. As
Sarah notes, "Besides the fact
that my kids have to book
appointments with their friends,
they have to be driven every-
where as well. And the
distances!"
Why is it that American
parents end up aa child
shepherds, whereas in Israel
mothers never give a second
thought to tatting their
daughters and sons visit friends
by themselves? "Because life
over here is scary," comments
Julia Basch, who, with her
husband, Heehy. moved to Israel
in 1970. Julia's remarks rang
true: my nerves had just short-
circuited from the barrage of
media reports and TV shows
covering the latest in American
criminal fashion kidnapping
children. "Scary," I told her.
"was an understatement."
Thus, I have now instructed
my husband to always hold our
son's hand whenever they are out
together, regardless of the venue.
For us, this development is both
disquieting and unnatural. While
Israel has acquired a reputation
for being a country wrought with
security problems, the safety
factor primarily affects border
settlements, not the inner cities
where life is quite laid back.
When a little boy was kidnapped
during our third year in Israel,
the entire country was shocked
and up in arms. Such events
happen once every few years
not i \ arj few days.
Since the kidnapping issue has
become a major fear factor, it's
little wonder parents chauffeur
their time away. So we return to
the domino theory. With all the
car pooling necessary' for school,
not to mention the hours getting
to and from work. American
mothers and fathes. are loathe to
spend an excess amount of time
setting appointments and escort-
ing their offspring around. It's
littk' wonder that most people
spend a hefty number of hours
indoors And once the kids are
inside, then what? The great
American baby sitter takes over.
"There has definitely been a
culture shock in terms of TV
viewing," verifies Julia, who at
times finds it difficult to tear her
children away from the television
set.
The kids are not the only ones
who become devout media
followers. Soap operas aside,
American adults like their
counterparts in Israel spend a
fair share of time listening to the
radio. The difference is in the
programming. Having examined
the coverage provided by all-
news stations, I understand why
Americans can be so wrapped up
in themselves. Apart from the
stock tips, traffic and weather
reports, the blitzkreig of fitness,
diet, medical and food
contamination stories can drive
anyone, not just hypochondriacs,
to the nearest hospital.
I asked Shimon Glick, head of
the Department of Internal
Medicine at Beersheva Univer-
sity's Medical School and
currently a visiting scientist at
the National Institutes of Health,
if I was off the mark. An Amer-
ican who moved to Israel in 1974,
Olkk admitted that one of his
few criticisms about America is
the tendency of "people in
general to be obsessed by health
and physical needs."
Am I playing the part of Alice
peering through the looking
glass? Certainly Wonderland is
not as marvelous as I once
thought. Nonetheless, there are
definite positive aspects here that
Israel has yet to duplicate. First,
efficiency in America is a way of
life, and it is a joy to accomplish
so much over the phone.
Paradoxically, as reserved and
insular as Americans are on the
social front, their courteousness
and eagerness to please in the
public and commercial spheres is
of a different order entirely.
Second, while Israel is not a
cultural backwater by any
means, it is too small to offer the
cultural diversity of this country.
Even though our son is only 3, we
are cashing in on every chance to
enrich his little mind and
Washington. D.C., is a gold mine
in this respect.
Finally, there is the shopping
a factor one tends to forget in
Israel. When I spoke to Julia
Basch about this aspect of
Americana, her reaction was
unabashed. "I love the sales:
there's nothing quite like them in
Israel. I also like going into a
store and sampling perfume or
choosing from a selection of 18
dresses as opposed to two.
Everything is convenient here.
You just have to go to one
shopping mall to make all your
purchases. In Israel, you have to
go to 10 stores to get 10 items."
While I agreed. I asked her if
this would entice her to move
hack. "This may be the land of
good and plenty." she replied.
Iiut that's all. I like my life in
Israel. People are closer." But it
was Sara who really pinpointed
the whole difference. "In Israel,
people sense deep down that
they're all pulling for the same
goal, and so they feel a deep
kinship for each other. The
American reserve, on the other
hand, creates an element of non-
involvement."
And so it is that I find myself
somewhat of a stranger in a
familiar land or is it a former
native in a now-strange land? I
sure don't mind being here for a
year and stocking up on all the
goodies that America has to
offer. But as far as the good life
Israel is the only place for me.
Aliyah Center shows off
new kind of Israel settlement
By DOUG CHANDLER
NEW YORK The Israel
Aliyah Center's settlement desk
is beginning a major campaign to
acquaint North American Jews
with the concept of the commu-
nity village, or k'far kehilati. a
relatively new type of Israeli
settlement.
For American Jews unfamiliar
with the term and that prob-
ably includes most American
Jews the k'far kehilati is a
name for a number of already -
existing settlements, such as
Tekoa in Judea, Ofra in Samaria,
and Yuvalim in the Galilee, as
well as a number of villages still
in the planning stages.
Some of the characteristics
these settlements have in
common include their sute.
limited to 300 families at the
most; and the degree of parti-
cipation in community Ufa, with
each settler, or member of the
community, having a vote on all
issues that come before the
village.
Unlike the moshav or kibbutz,
all housing and employment are
matters of private concern, but
assistance is available to help
inhabitants find employment and
build their homes.
Like other settlements, some
community villages are religious
in make-up while others are
mixed, or open to religious and
non-religious families.
Letting American Jews know
of these opportunities will make
up a large part of the settlement
desk's current efforts, according
to Nir Gur. head of the settle-
ment desk, a native Israeli, and
himself a resident, with his
family, of K'far Adumim one
of Israel's community villages.
Activities will include the
sponsorship of seminars in the
U.S. and in Israel, lectures and
informal social gatherings, all
geared around the concept of the
community village.
In addition, the settlement
desk will continue working with
existing garinim, including
Mishol BaGalil, a group of rel-
igious and non-religious families
and individuals bound for
Eschar, to be established this
summer in the Segev Region of
the Galilee: Garin Galil, a group
of mostly young families, af-
filiated with the Reform move-
ment, who will establish Har
Chalutz near Haifa; and
Shalhevet Had alii, a religious
garin destined for Hoshaya in the
Lower Galilee.
Families and individuals who
would like further information
about any of these activities or
about settlement possibilities in
Israel should contact Mr. Gur at
the Israel Aliyah Center, 615
Park Avenue, New York. NY
10022,(212)752-0600


Pgg 4 The Jewish Ftoridkn of Sooth Broward-Hollywood /Friday. June 8. 1984
/

FREDSMOC-E-
Editor ana Putxt**^'
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ART HARRIS
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8 SIVAN 5744
Number 12
Friday. June 8. 1984
\ olume 14
Helms asks Reagan to
move embassy to Jerusalem
NEW YORK (JTAI Sen
Jesse Helms (R. N.C.I has urged
President Reagan to recognize
Jerusalem as Israel's capital and
as "a first step in this process
move the U.S. Embassy from Tel
Aviv to Jerusalem.
Helms made this appeal to
Reagan in a letter on May 17 in
which he also stated his opp-
osition to legislation move on
grounds that it constitutes an in-
fringement on the President's
power to conduct foreign policy
He described the legislation
which has wide support in the
Senate and House, but is opposed
by the Administration, as
"mischief."
Helms' letter to the President
was made public by Rev. Jerry
Falwell. leader of the Moral
Majority, who delivered the key-
note address at the 1984 national
convention of Americans for a
Safe Israel here. About 300
persons are attending the con-
vention.
Helms wrote. "An undivided
Jerusalem must be the ultimate
aim of our policy. We should
never pursue any plan that en-
visions a separation of the West
Bank from Israel. An undivided
Jerusalem is the indispensable
basis of a Solomonic solution for
the problems which face us in the
Middle East. The U.S. as a
nation should recognize Jeru-
salem as the capital of Israel."
After explaining his objections
to the Congressional moves
toward that end. Helms wrote to
the President. "I strongly urge
you to consider pre-empting the
mischief which this legislation
might do by acting now to recog-
nize Jerusalem in the context 1
have described. The moving of
the Embassy obviously would be
the first step in this process."
Falwell, expounding on his
own views, told the convention.
"Not only because I am a faithful
Christian, but because I am a
faithful and loyal American. I
find myself a supporter of
Israel." Concerning the West
Bank, he said those areas
"should be as non-negotiable as
Jerusalem itself.'' adding: "I
believe the conservative. Bible-
reading Christian is Israel's best
friend. Their convictions cross all
kinds of political barriers."
New Pacific Nation
begins tie with Israel
JERUSALEM IJTA) Israel
has established diplomatic rela-
tions with Kiribati, a new nation
composed of 33 islands in the
southwest Pacific, with a popula-
tion of about 60.000. it was an-
nounced here The islands, part of
the Gilbert and Ellice group, were
a British protectorate untU five
years ago when they gained
independence. Israel's Ambas-
sador to Australia. Issachar Ben-
Yaacov. will be the non-resident
Ambassador to the Micronesian
island republic.
Guliside Getaway
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Compel colleges to disclose
gifts from foreign sources
NEW YORK (JTAI A
nationwide effort to get state
legislatures to enact laws
compelling colleges and univer
sities to disclose large gifts from
foreign sources has been
announced by Theodore Mann,
president of the American Jewish
Congress.
Such legislation is needed
because Arab countries have ini-
tiated a major anti-Israel propa-
ganda effort on American
campuses, the AJCongress said
The first such disclosure law was
passed in Illinois last year
Similar legislation is currently
being considered in some eight
other states
Under a model bill drafted by
AJCongress. both public and
private colleges and universities
would be required to disclose
public gifts and contracts from
foreign sources that exceed
$100,000 in value per year The
disclosure requirement would
also apply to registered foreign
agents and corporations doing
business in the U.S. whose
principal place of business is
located outside this country
The model bill would give
schools receiving grants or
contracts 120 days to submit
information to state educational
authorities on any conditions
imposed by the giver, such as the
right to name professors, as well
as the name, title and qualifica-
tion of any person or group whom
the grant is to benefit. The dis-
closure provisions would be
administered by the state agency
that licenses institutions of
higher education.
Eight states are currently
considering such legislation:
California. Florida, Mas-
sachusetts. Michigan. New
York. Ohio and
the AJCongress
Jersey. New
Pennsylvania.
said
Will Maslow. general counsel
of the AJCongress. said univer-
sity disclosure laws are an effec-
tive way to deal with "crude
attempts by some Arab govern-
ments to bring improper
influence to bear on academic
teaching and research on Mideast
problems."
He said huge gifts by pro-Arab
interests are endangering
academic freedom and distorting
the educational process. He cited
Arab grants to Georgetown
University to set up an Arab
study center as an example of
efforts to mount an anti-Israel,
pro Arab propaganda campaign
(...irgetown subsequently
decided to return funds for the
study center that it had received
from Libya.
Saudi Arabia. Maslow
cancelled a major contract tot
Massachusetts Institute
Technology when the univerjit
demanded Saudi assurances tin.
there would be no discrirruruUol
against Jewish faculty member!
The Saudis refused to give suchj
pledge.
These gifts or contracts of)
include provisions that give i
Arab donor the right to die
academic curricula or dete__
who is to work under the grant o
contract. Such conditio
Maslow said, represent
"unacceptable intrusion"
institutional autonomy,
most effective weapon
such interference with
objectivity is to require
university to disclose the recap
of large grants and the conditio
under which they are given,
stated.
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Friday, June &, 1984/The Jewiah FWidian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 5
Israel's inflation rate
20.6%-for April
Congratulating Dr. Maury Marcus (right) on becoming the
;;iih FOUNDER of the Miami Jewish Home are (left to
right! Sylvia and Sol Bloom; Bertha and Manny Fass; and
Mrs Maury Marcus.
Miami Jewish Home
group ends season
POUNDERS of the Miami
[jrwish Home and Hospital for
the Aged and their guests eel-
lebrated the conclusion of a
I successful season at their May
[ah dinner meeting held at
| Douglas Gardens.
Summing up the year's accom-
Stinger sale
Continued from Page 1
Pother Arab nation which
has shown opposition to
llsrael." he said.
"Hut this may be one of
Ithe most dangerous situa-
tions we have had in the
[Middle East," he said,
[given that "both Iran and
Ithe Saudis are extremely
I irrational.
Democratic Presidential
I hopeful Walter Mondale
[said that he opposed the
hale because he felt that
terrorists who wanted to
Ishoot down commercial air-
Icraft might he the ultimate
pcipientsol the Stingers.
I he marginal increase
|ir- security that could be
[obtained through the
[supply o| Stinger weapons
Ik my opinion does not ap-
proach the danger of letting
[those things get into the
Jands 0f terrorists.-'
Mondale said.
plishment, Past President Lila
Meatier announced that 174
people have joined FOUNDERS,
representing $11 million pledged
for the capital expansion of the
Miami Jewish Home. "We still
have a long way to go to reach
our $21 million goal, but we have
made a marvelous beginning."
FOUNDERS, each of whom
has committed $50,000 or more to
the future of the Home, was
formed as a group in November
1982 with a core membership of
32 individuals.
TELAV1VIJTA)- The cost-
of-living index in April soared by
20.6 percent, the highest increase
ever for that month and the
second highest monthly increase
in Israel's history, according to
figures released by the Central
Bureau of Statistics. Economists
warned that if the present trend
continues, the inflation rate for
1984 will reach an unprecedented
406 percent.
The cost -<>f-living index rose by
263 percent during the past 12
months. In April. 1983, it was
13.3 percent. The all-time record
increase was registered last
October when the cost-of-living
roe by 21.1 percent, triggering a
sharp reversal of the Likud
government's economic policies,
including a 23 percent devalua-
tion of the Shekel and drastic
reductions in subsidies for food,
fuel and other basic commodities.
V\ ith elections less than two
months away, the government
and opposition each blamed the
other for the alarming rise last
month which was much higher
than Treasury and bank officials
had forecast. Finance Minister
Yigal ("ohen-Orgad said the
increase was largely due to the
fuilure of 11 istadrut to agree to an
economic package deal.
11 istadrut and Labor Party
spokesmen charged that failure
of the government's economic
policy was responsible for the
runaway inflation. Finance
Ministry sources said the
increase was also due in part to
the government's efforts to
balance Israel's foreign trade
deficit and foreign currency
short-fall, efforts which they
claim are showing success.
The record inflation rate for
April apparently forced the
government to reverse its earlier
rejection of H istadrut demands
for payment of a special cost-of-
living allowance with May
salaries, due on June 1. Deputy
Premier David Levy said tonight
that Cohen-Or^ad has agreed, at
his urging, to an advance
payment. But by the time the
workers receive the payment,
their salaries will have lost one-
fifth of the original value.
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Continued from Page 1
surroundings, proud of
Jw countries prior to and
'frough the occupation by
'ermany.
After three days in both
Copenhagen and
Amsterdam, the trip con-
l* on to Israel. There.
ou WQI meet with top
'waeh leaders who wUl give
i g> their insight on the
IssSeS^10- h the
lJ,nU" /'x'H'r*nce the
SS u ***** at the
d "'(altl,t..andtakein
,|('t.v of Jerusalem.
mm ,':,d 8* "nd our
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Pfagg 6 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward- Hollywood fYiday. June 8, 1984
Alexander Grass installed
as UJA National Chairman
NEW YORK Alexander
Grass of Harrisburg, Pa., waa
installed May 19 as National
Chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal at the annual UJA
National Leadership Conference
in Washington, D.C. He succeeds
outgoing Chairman. Robert E.
Loup of Denver. Colo., who will
now serve as Chairman of the
UJA Board of Trustees.
Grass assumes responsibility
for directing the UJAs 1986
campaign, which raises funds in
partnership with more than 600
Jewish communities nationwide.
The campaign supports educa-
tional, rehabilitative and human-
itarian programs in Israel, in
American Jewish communities
and in Jewish communities in 30
countries around the world.
"I am honored to take my
place beside Robert Loup." Grass
said, "who led us in 1983 to raise
well over $600 million, and in
1984 to what will be the greatest
peacetime campaign in our
history."
"I accept in good faith, the
challenge of meeting and with
your help surpassing this
fundraising achievement," Grass
told an audience of 500 Jewish
community leaders.
Citing statistics which point to
a decline in Jewish population in
the United States since 1972,
Grass called on American Jews to
pursue far-reaching fundraising
goals.
"To retain our numbers, to
encourage active life-long affilia-
tion and involvement in
American Jewish life in the 1980s
and beyond, we must pay
attention to building local
communities." he said
"Yet," he added, "we cannot
do that at the expense of Jews
overseas, because we understand
the centrality of Israel and our
familv ties to world Jewry. The
only solution is a capacity
campaign that will meet our
commitments to the people of
Israel and at the same time -
provide a fair share for the crea-
tion of a strong Jewish commu-
nity at home."
Senators Arleo Specttr of
Pennsylvania and Frank K.
Lautenberg of New Jeraey. a past
UJA National Chairman, in-
troduced Grass at a poat-
installation session, lauding his
record of service in Jewish
communal affairs and noting his
deep concern for the quality of
Jewish life in Israel and at home.
Senator Specter called Grass a
national chairman of sterling
character, a leader in Penn-
sylvania and a dynamo in com-
munity service."
According to Senator Lauten-
berg. Grass is "a man with skill,
understanding and heart a
man who is deeply involved with
shaping the character of the
Jewish community."
Grass brings to his new posi-
tion almost 20 years of leadership
experience in Jewish organiza-
tions and the business pers-
pective of a chief executive officer
for one of the nation's most
successful retail operations.
Grass founded the Rite-Aid
Corporation in 1962. and serves
as its President and Chairman of
the Hoard He is also Chairman of
the Board of Super Rite Foods,
Director of Hasbro Industries
and Superdrug. Trustee of the
National American Wholesale
Grocer's Association,
Trustee and Treasurer of
National Aaaociation of
DrugStoree.
Currently a member of
Board of Governors of tht Je.
Agency, the Board of Directonl
the United Israel Appeal and,
UJA Board of Trustees,
has also been Chairman of
Budget Committee of UJA ajl
National Vice Chairman.
Since the mid-1970s, he _
been involved as Chairman oft,
Board and former President
the Israel Education Fu
UJA's capital fundrtis
program for cultural, educiti
and community facilities
Israel.
In addition to his work
behalf of the United Je
Appeal. Grass has been Gene
Chairman of the Israel Bo
Campaign of Greater Harrison,
and a former Vice President I
Temple Ohev Sholom He
served on the Board of Dir
of the Jewish Home for the Ag
of Greater Harrisburg, as
Trustee of the Friends of
Jerusalem Institute
Management, and a member |
the Board of Governors of
Friends of I srael Center for!
and Economic Studies
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
United Jewish Appeal Natioanl Chairman Alex Grass of
Harrisburg, Pa. (center) greets Senator Frank R. Lautenberg
(D-NJ, left) and Senator Rudy Boschwitz (R-Minn.. right) at
the recent UJA National Leadership Conference in
Washington, D.C. The conference attracted 500 Jewish
community leaders to discuss the 1985 Campaign Plan and
the human needs in Israel, at home and around the world to
be addressed by UJA's nationwide fundraising effort.
ABC s& 123 s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
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Not since Noah's time has
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4,
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Friday, June 8, 1984 /The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 7
Tarnopolsky specifies Ms torture In letter from labor camp
was
In a moat remarkable letter
,ent from the Labour camp at
fhju on the Mongolian border
where he is serving a three year
,entence, Yury Tarnopolsky, the
Kharkov Doctor of Chemistry.
announced that he intended to
start his second hunger strike
ADril 26, in protest against the
^inued cancellations of visits
from his if' <%. whom hM
not been allowed to see since the
JJeof his trial on June 29. 1963.
In the same letter Tarnopolsky
reminds the authorities that he
had never committed any crime,
and that he was being subjected
to what he describes simply as "a
refined form of torture."
It was in November 1983 that
Olga Tarnopolsky was turned
back from the camp gates after
making the 4.000 miles four
day train journey from Kharkov,.
Yury then threatened that he
would go on hunger strike on
February 1. if he was not allowed
to see his wife and 13 year old
daughter Irina by then. The
officials refused to make any con-
cessions and Yuri carried out his
threat
In his letter he writes:
The conditions at work are
such that I did not feel well there
even when I was not on hunger-
strike The crowded room was
heated by a red-hot iron stove
while our feet were freezing. I felt
suffocated because of the heat
and lack of air and was forced to
outside, where the weather
freezing. I constantly told
the doctors about my having felt
ill at work
"On -I February I was sent to
the punishment cell (solitary con-
finement! for allegedly refusing
to go i" work The term of pun-
ishment was seven days. I was
held in the punishment cell all
alone and I continued my hunger
strike The cell is a small concrete
room with a concrete floor. An
til) powerful heater heated
he air to an unbearable tempera-
ture Then- was absolutely no
inflow ot fresh air. During the
' heating was turned off
turned into a
I hiring those days
i rature fell to -39
I he wooden bunk was
during the night for
. i Ine could only sit on
d pedeatalt con-
trucled in that way in order to
lira omfortable to sit
ould only lie on the
layer of icy air. Warm
underwear wai taken away from
me (although it was not taken
.'.!> from other prisoners) and I
M only wearing a pyjamas'
type shirt I was thus held in the
exact kind of conditions which, as
the doctor! knew. I found es-
pecially hard to bear and which
were detrimental to my health.
Since the first day of my in-
carceration in the punishment
<* I periodically felt that I was
going to faint and was forced to
w down on the cold concrete
"oor. waiting for my hearheat to
Ko back to its normal pace. I was
then beginning to freeze and had
to sit down until the moment
*nen the weakness of my heart
"ude me lie down again. This
continued during the night aa
** as the hot air I had to
n*athe when lying on the
*ooden bunk made me suffocate.
fvery day 1 had to fight for the
nght to Ket hot water and for the
"P for drinking which the
Wards tried to take away from
Yury told the doctors that for a
"n on hunger strike, keeping
" m such conditions was delib-
erate torture. His letter went on:
.1 wa subjected daily to pay-
"OjOgkaj pressure Oy repre-
sentatives of the administration,
"consisted mainly of threats.
JTl n 8 F*ruary the director
in, j mP and >ther man **>
"troduced himself as a
Procurator talked to me and the
conver8ation ended by the
*W| threats that they'd
or8anize a beating for me by the
prisoners. The procurator sup-
ported the threat.
Yury ended the strike when he
was released from solitary con-
finement. He writes:
"I ate a piece of bread as other-
wise I could not have left the cell
I had no more strength left and
was lying on the floor most of the
time. I was allowed to leave the
punishment cell in the evening.
Prisoners did all they could for
me; they helped me wash and
shave (I could not do this
myself), they prepared clean
clothes and bed-clothes for me,
they collected some food for me
and even some sweets."
However he was now suffering
from stomach pains, nausea and
back pains and having difficulty
in passing water. He was
admitted to the prison hospital
on February 27 and kept there for
two weeks. He was discharged
with "second degree hyperten-
sion."
Dr. Tarnopolsky sent a further
statement to the procurator, in
which he writes:
"Everything that has happen-
ed to me since 1979, when I sub-
mitted my application for emi-
gration completely contradicts
legality, humanism and common
sense and is a series of cruelties,
arbitrariness and absurdity. This
cruelty is now threatening my
health and mv life.
"If the question of my meeting
with my wife and child is not re-
solved by April 25, I will resume
my hunger strike."
Although we have had no con-
firmation whether or not Dr.
Tarnopolsky is now on hunger
strike, a close friend of the family
reported: "Knowing Yury, it is
virtually sure that he is."
46 My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's Mustard
Vegetable Fritters
W tup butler of rrur(jfmr
rwfcrd. of a* rnWrd
i tup lirteh (hopped K (up finely (hopped
mushrooms
CHARUF. CILDEN
-. < up shf-Wed >Atrt*\
h tup rhoppcd onion
cup (Urn sour cream
J uMe-*poom UiMrni $p*y
B"*m MusUid
2 beJen efgs
3 tibtrspoofu (ornstarrh
It's his recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious! 99
Spinach-Stuffed Mushrooms
1 pound Iresh spinach on I parhafr
|10 cas I Irujrn (hopped spiiuKh
thawed well drained
pound Irrsh mushrooms (Jbool I*
medium sivdl
3 tablespoons twllrr melted
I cup tKOlU cheese
4 Iraspooes Gulorn\ Sccv Brown Mustard
Pinch crushed oirgano
Vtoh. clear! spin* h. slum in covered
slillet In* minutes Remow drain and
chop Remove mushroom slf ms and linen
ckop Saute sirens and spiuch in one
UMr spoon batlrr Combine spinach
miituir wilh icnuininq in.rrdienls
Spoon inlo dps Place on rookie sheet,
brush ilh remwninq buttrr bake d SOT
IS minulrs or until heated Ihinueh Makes
about It

This Shevuoth
make low cholesterol Wintzes wilh
Fleischmann's*Maigarine and Egg Beaters?
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I
LOW CHOLESTEROL
APPLE BLINTZES
I Makes Sixteen I
I container 11 <:upl
rllm'
I teaspoon s.ili
L ( up skim milk
1 cup flour
FkiKhmannV Margarine
2 medium apples peeled c ored
and chopped
Mj cup chopped walnuts
I tablespoon honev
*- teaspoon ground cinnamon
kill Krr Beaters* and salt alter
natelv mum skim milk and flour
until smooth
l.iRhtls grease a him h skillet
with Kleisi hnnnn'i* MarRanne.
hrat skillet POUI 2 tablespoons
bailer into skillel. lilt pan to dis-
tribute evrnls (.Kik until batter
blisters Tum out onlo wax paper
Repeal lo makr In usinR more
margarine as needed
Mix apples, walnuts, honey and
cinnamon Place one tablespoon
mixture on earh blinti Kola in
sides lo form squares Melt 3
tablespoons margarine in large
skillet Brown square* on both
side* Serve hot with mock sour
cream or vour favorite topping
KorMtX.kSOl'RCRKAM puree
>. cup low (at cottage cheese.
1 tablespoons skim milk
2 teespoons lemon |uu I
Makes one cup
rlUNirwi>IWd> Ins
115*
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15*
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood /Friday, June 8, 1984
Two high-level former Nazis working in science,
medicine in Buffalo, historian says
BUFFALO (JTA) A histor-
ian of the Holocaust charged that
this city had provided refuge for
two accused Nazi war criminals
who, he said, "may be considered
of major rank."
Charles Allen, Jr., who has
been investigating and writing
about Nazi war criminals in the
United States since the 1960's.
said that the Justice Department
had targeted a member of the
medial facility at a Buffalo-area
university for possible denatur-
alization proceedings for having
allegedly "concealed his compli-
cities in the persecutions of Nazi
Germany."
According to Allen, charges
against this professor of
medicine, whom he declined to
identify to avoid hampering the
Justice Departments investi-
gation, "indicate his involvement
in medical experiments carried
out on inmates at a Nazi concen
tration camp." The Justice De-
partment's Office of Special In-
vestigations (OSI), charged with
prosecuting suspected Nazi war
criminals in the U.S., has been
working on the case for more
than a year, Allen said.
Allen said he first came across
the charges against the medical
professor during his research on
physiologist. Dr. Hubertus
Strughold. In the mid-1970s,
Allen uncovered evidence that
Strughold helped formulate some
of the scientific concepts that
were carried out by others in
medical experiments against
Russian POWs and Jewish
prisoners in the Dachau concen-
tration camp from 1941 to 1942.
Strughold. who came to the
U.S. in 1947 and was naturalized
in the early 1950's. Allen said,
became the chief medical
scientist of the U.S. Air Force, a
JFS holds annual meeting
The 22nd Annual Meeting of
the Jewish Family Service of
Broward County was held on
May 16. at the Jewish Commu-
nity Center in Fort Lauderdale.
Dr. David Sachs. Chairman of
the Nominating Committee,
presented the report of the
Nominating Committee.
Proposed slate for Board of
Directors: Joseph Berkovits, Ben
Dantzker, Peter Deutsch, Dr.
Robert Dolgow, Lee Dreiling, Dr.
Mark Drucker, Jerome
Engelman, I.ibo Fineberg, Mark
Fried, Norman Friedman, Jerome
Gevirman, Bemice Goldstein, Dr.
Warren Graditor, Fred P.
Greene, Rabbi Bennett Green-
spon, Dee Hahn. Steven Hersh.
Janet Krop, Lynda Levin, Rabbi
Richard Margolis, Merle Orlove,
Charlotte Padek, Israel
Resnikoff, Ivan Rubin, Dr.
Steven Schacter, Reuben
Schneider, Brian Sherr, Andrew
L. Siegel. Felice Sincoff. Dr.
Joseph Stein. Florence Strauss.
Herb Tolpin, Philip Weisberg.
The officers nominated: Sheldon
Polish. President; Dr. David
Sachs, 1st Vice President;
Norman Ostrau, 2nd Vice
President. Steven Fayne.
Treasurer; Elaine Pittell,
Secretary. The entire slate was
unanimously accepted.
The Esther Lowenthal
Community Service Award was
presented to Sheldon Polish for
his outstanding community
dedication.
Sherwin H. Rosenstein,
Executive Director, spoke of
"Chaniring Jewish Family
CTUDI0 ;
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Continental
Cuisine
FREOJOSSI
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Agencies" and how they are
moving in new directions as
dictated by the needs of the com-
munity.
consultant to the National Aero-
nautics and Space Administra-
tion during the Apollo moon
shots, and worked as an infor-
mant for the CIA.
Allen said the charges against
him were made originally by pro-
fessional colleagues in the
medical field who alerted Allen to
his activities in Buffalo.
Allen also said that long-time
Buffalo resident, Walter Dorn;
berger. had been a former Nazi
Wehrmacht General and opera
tional commander of the German
rocket scientists at the infamous
slave labor tunnels of Dora-Nord-
hausen where the V-l and V-2
missiles were built under condi-
tions which survivors called "a
hell worse than Auschwitz."
Dornberger at first was consid-
ered a major war criminal by the
British, according to Allen, but
he was given over to the Ameri-
cans under a program called
Project Paperclip which brought
the Nazi General to the United
States along with Werner von
Braun to create the U.S. program
for space travel. Allen said Dorn-
berger came to the U.S. in 1949
and was naturalized in the early
1950s.
Allen gave the Nazi Party. SA
and SS affilliations of von Braur.
and contended that both he and
Dornberger were effectively war
criminals in every respect and
that the glamour and honors
placed on both Germans were
part ot the Cold War hype thil
enable the United States to ^1
Nazi war criminals and collabor I
tors to fight Soviet!
Communism.
Dornberger became "an al
ent and influential members
the military-industrial complex "|
noting his directorships in
Aircraft Company. Northrop"!
Lockheed and other defense carl
porations. "Dornberger and vonl
Braun created the Nazi V-l
V-2 programs on the backs
some 60,000 slave laborer,"!
nearly 47,000 of whom
worked to death"in the projects"
Officer who tried to kill Hitler
elected to German presidency
BONN (JTA) Baron
Richard von Weizsaecker, who as
an officer in the Wehrmacht was
implicated in the failed attempt
to assassinate Hitler in 1944. was
overwhelmingly elected as the
sixth President of the West
German Federal Republic.
Weizsaecker. 64. a member of
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's ruling
Christian Democratic Union
(CI)UI and a former mayor of
West Berlin, received 832 votes
in the Federal Parliament to 68
for his only rival, author Luise
Rinser. who was backed by the
minority Green Party. He suc-
ceeds President Karl Carstens in
is largely a ceremonis]!
rep.
amongl
what
office.
Weizsaecker, a captain in 1944,1
was one of the few named in con'l
nection with the attempted I
military coup against Hitler to|
survive. Nineteen of his
mental colleagues were
the officers executed.
He studied law after the warl
and helped defend his father,!
Baron Ernst von Weizsaecker,!
who was convicted by the!
Nuremburg war crimes tribunal!
of involvement in the deportation!
of Jews, for which he served two|
years in prison.
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Friday, June 8, 1984/The Jewish Floridian of South BrowardHollywood Page 9
Wiesenthal to keep pressing Vatican regarding Raufff
i nfW YORK UTA) The
Simon Wiwenthal Center said
m it will continue to press the
i into church-related activities
R* C** Walter Rauff
hi Nazi war criminal and
Mentor of the mobile gas vans
Eehis death at the age of 77
| iChile of a heart attmck.
It does not put the matter to
I--." said Gerald Margolis,
Jeter of the Los Angeles-based
Wiesenthal (enter. He said the
I fetiter will continue to urge Pope
John Paul II to open Vatican
I irchives and investigate what the
Ugter alleges was church aid to
I Rauff aft" the war and help for
kirn in fleeing Europe to safe
I hiven in South America.
The Center recently released 43
j^s of documents, some of
\jtm previously classified by
I'S government intelligence
uencies. which provide addi-
uonal information linking Rauff
to important figures in the
Catholic church in Italy during
and after the war. Rauff told the
Chilean Supreme Court in 1962
that he was provided aid and
shelter by the church.
In Israel, the reaction to
Rauff's death was a sense of
frustration that war criminals
continue to remain free without
being brought to justice for their
mcrimes "It is a pity that this
man will not be brought to
justice. aid Avi Pasner,
spokesman for Premier Yitzhak
Shamir it is shameful. We hope
that other war criminals who are
till hiding will not escape their
punishment."
Gideon Hausner. chairman of
Yad Vashem and prosecutor of
Nazi war criminal Adolf
Eichmann at his 1961 trial,
expressed similar frustration that
Rauff never was brought to
justice. He said Rauff was one of
the privileged war criminals to
nive died in his own bed,
escaping justice for many years.
Rauff is held responsible for
the death of an estimated 200,000
Jews in Europe w ho were killed in
the mobile gas vans he designed
which chanr'lled exhaust fumes
hack into the air-tight vehicles.
Known as black ravens," the
vans were sometimes disguised
as Red Cross vehicles. They were
used primarily in the early stages
of the Holocaust before the
construction of Auschwitz and
other death camps which carried
t Hitler s final solution on a
after scale
Rom in Kothen, Germany, on
June 19. 1906, Rauff joined
Hitler's Nazi police at the age of
B. He moved up to the rank of
onel in the SS and later served
"Tunisia and Italy before being
JpUd in Milan where he was
police chief in the war's last
ps He was sent to the Rimini
I attention center, but soon
ped and at the end of 1946
*H to Naples In testimony
.Wore the Chilean Supreme
| WJt, Rauff said he was aided in
"Tft his escape from Rimini
y "Catholic priest and sheltered
convents of the Holy See" for
I*81* 18 months.
JJ *M reunited with hit
% nd travelled to Svria.
IS11 Ecuador in 1949'and
SfiSflf' where *,ived
SSL*?1 He >">tained hie
ctrnc'liz*nsniP- In 13. tne
*!ri ,or hls "tradition from
ChTe. u ny on the DMia ^
IZkJ^ >"r ltute of lirnita
r*"despired.
Gordon Leland
"aster Piano Craftsman
Tn'ng-Rtptl(, Rebuilding
20 yr member
nano Technicians Guild
?327247
Rauff, who suffered from lung
cancer in recent years, had lived
primarily in Santiago and was
rarely seen in public. Last
February, Beate Klarsfeld. the
formed Nazi-hunter, waa arrested
outside Rauff's home in Santiago
during a demonstration urging
the Chilean government to
extradite Rauff to West
Germany. Israel also sought his
extradition.
But despite the international
efforts to have Rauff brought to
justice, Chile President August
Pinochet would not act on the
requests. He maintained in an
interview last March that "the
highest court in the land decided
Rauff could stay." While he said
he regretted Rauffs actions
during the war, Pinochet said:
" But that was a long time ago. I
can't do anything about it once
the courts have decided."
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-HoUywood/Friday, June 8, 1984
Ally ah: One who's preparing to go
Continued from Pane 3
dependence, I think they would.
But that does not make my
leaving any easier.
Most people cannot under-
stand my motivations (or going.
How can you leave the comfor-
table (i.e., material) lifestyle you
have always known? How can
you contemplate living in a
country fraught with strife and
conflict both internal and
external? Aren't you afraid of the
violence that disrupts everyday
life?
It is not only Americans who
think I m crazy. On the other side
of the ocean, most of my Israeli
friends understand even less.
They just cannot fathom the
notion that I, a comfortable
American, could possibly want to
give all this up for the "difficult"
lifestyle I will surely encounter in
Israel.
Only those who have also been
"cursed" by the "Israel bug" can
understand that there is no
simple explanation. It is more
emotional than rational, and
perhaps that is why, I must con-
fess, I am often unsuccessful in
explaining my motivations.
It is more than just running
away from Christmas trees and
the blatantly Christian society in
which Jews live here in America
although this is one aspect.
And it is surely not the threat of
anti-Semitism, which, though I
believe it to be very real, is some-
thing I have never directly en-
countered.
Much more important is that I
am running to something: to an
incredibly beautiful land where
my very roots lie; where I don't
have to be an observant Jew to
live a Jewish life: where it is
never possible to let Shabbat just
slip by the closed stores,
stopped buses and a general
Shabbat serenity serve as con-
stant reminders.
To a land where school
vacations revolve around Pesach
and ( hanukah. not Easter and
Christmas: where children learn
Jewish historv as a matter of
course; and where people, though
seemingly rude and arrogant are
for the most part open and warm
and without pretense.
Since I began engaging in the
intense study of the history of
Zionism following my college
semester in Israel. I have become
convinced that as a committed
Jew. I must at least ask the
question whether I belong in the
Jewish state. Too many Ameri-
can Jews avoid the question com-
pletely. Whatever the ultimate
answer and each individual
must determine that for herself or
himself I believe the question
must be confronted by each and
every one of us.
So in less than two months. I
will be off. My destination is
Jerusalem, where I shall study in
an ulpan. with learning Hebrew
my top priority. I shall also try to
do some freelance writing,
explore job opportunities and
maybe even engage in an intense
Jewish studies program.
Pretty much everything, in-
cluding where I am going to live,
is up in the air. All I can hope is
that I will be able to conduct a
"normal" life.
Of course I wonder whether
that is possible, whether I can
live with the constant strife, the
internal struggles religious,
political, social and economic
that abound so freely and seem to
be tearing apart the country I
love.
With no illusions about the
problems that exist in Israel, the
question remains: Can I live
there or more precisely, can I
not?
Strictly D*t.ry Laws
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pod. nun*. whirlpool free tennis
day night) Special discounts at Walt
Disney WorM championship go*
counes Superb restaurants and
stat to Insure your tan-fated
Bargain Break *
fo make reservations for your
6a/gam Break, contact
your travel Agent or CALL
TOU-fUI I-800-432 2920
or 305 B2 8 2828
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axx o> o*wf ipnul pnym
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Rabbi, 2 soldiers charged in
connection with Jewish terrorism
Friday, June 8, 1964 /The Jewiah FToridiaai of South Bro ward-Hollywood Page 11
JERUSALEM (JTA) RbW
lUmK Waldman, head of the
C arreaud for quertiorung in
lvctn with the Jewish
ISSt underjrround. Wak*n.n
BTeSw." for the KMMton
ILliit of the ultr.-n.tion.li8t
|T*iy Prt> He occupiea the
llourthspot
The institution he head. i. a
veshivat header" where
I observant soldiers combine rei-
Lo^ studies with military
Mining. It'. the ,8raeh neW8
L-nn- said that Waldman was
hounded m custody for 48 hours
liter being questioned. He is
I msperted if having had prior
] information about alleged acti-
vities of the Jewiah underground
for which 26 suspects were
ndKted yesterday.
Another Kiryat Arba rabbi,
Moahe Levingar, who now livt.
in Hebron, waa ralead from
custody in Jerusalem after 11
days' detention. Levinger, a
leader of the Gush Emunim, waa
questioned about the terrorist
underground but no charges were
brought against him.
The State Attorney, mean-
while, filed charges againt two
more suspects in the terrorist
underground case, bringing to 27
the number of persons indicted
for a wide range of criminal
offenses against Arab civilians on
the West Bank. Both are soldiers.
One is accused of having used
his position as an officer in the
civil administration on the West
Bank to supply information to
Jewish terrorists who planned
the car bombings that maimed
two Arab mayors in June, 1980
and blinded a police sapper.
The other suspect is accused of
* Guaranteed income and
charitable deductions
failing to warn the authorities of
the car bombings of which he had
advance knowledge and failing to
alert the sapper, Suleiman
Hirbawi, an Israeli Dmze, who he
accompanied to the garage of
Mayor Ibrahim A-Tawil of El
Bireh to defuse a bomb planted in
the mayor's car. Hirbwai was
permanently blinded when the
bomb exploded. The suspect was
unharmed.
The El Bireh mayor escaped
injury but his colleagues, Mayors
Bassam Shaka of Nablus and
Karim Khallaf of Ramallah were
severely injured by bombs
planted in their cars by alleged
members of the terrorist under-
ground. All of the indicted
suspects are expected to remain
in custody at least until next
Wednesday at which time the
State Attorney is expected to
request that they be held without
bail pending the outcome of their
t rials
The courts have banned ident-
ification of the suspects to
protect their families.
Browarr. County Commission Chairman Nicki t. Uross
accept. Distinguished Public Service Award conferred by
Florida Friend, of Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, at
recent dinner in her honor; from Maurice Berkowitz (left),
chairman, Florida Friend, of Cardozo; and Monroe E. Price,
Dean, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. The Benjamin N.
Cardozo School of Law, which opened in 1976, ia the neweat
addition to the Yeahiva University family of fifteen
undergraduate, graduate and professional schools
Would you like a guaranteed
[fiied income for life? Could you
use a deduct ion to reduce the bite
| of federal income taxes? If you
I inswered yes to either of the
questions above, vou can utilize a
ICHARITAHLK KF.MAINDER
I ANNUITY TRUST.
A charitable remainder
| innuity trust is an agreement
between John and Jane Contrib-
utor and the Jewish Federation of
I South Rroward. Legacy and
I Endowment Fund. Mr. and Mrs.
I Contibutor transfer $1 to the
legacy and Endowment Fund
and receive an immediate tax
deduction. This SI is placed in
the annuity trust. The Contri-
butors and the Federation specify
that the Contributors will receive
a 9 percent income (or t.09 in our
example) on an annual basis for
their lives. Payments can be
made quarterly or semi annually
if Mr. and Mrs. Contributor so
desire.
For more information, tele-
phone the Legacy and Endow-
ment Fund at 921-8810.
The
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward- Holly wood /Friday, June 8, 1984
National UJA Hatikvah Mission
for Singles departs for Israel July 22
JTn
NEW YORK The Fifth Na-
tional UJA Hatikvah Mission for
single men and women between
the ages of 22-40, will visit Israel
July 22-Aug 1 for a specially
planned encounter with the
country and people of Israel. The
mission is expected to attract
some 500 young adults from
across the United States.
The mission is a unique oppor-
tunity for participants to share
the experience of visiting Israel
with other singles, broaden their
understanding of Jewish needs
and strengthen their commit-
ment to Israel and the Jewish
community.
Participants will receive brief-
ings by representatives of UJA's
beneficiary agencies the
Jewish agency for Israel and the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee and have an
opportunity to see first-hand the
social welfare programs and facil-
ities funded bv UJA-communitv
Kutsher's <
a Summer f-
Olvmoics *
MIDWEEK GOLF TOURNAMENTS ALL SUMMER!
Each Week's Winner Awarded FREE 2 Night Holiday For Two1
GRAND CHAMPION WINS TRIP FOR TWO TO H/WMI
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CALL TOLL FREE: (800) 431-1273
Ma/or Credit Cards Honored
What every
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In a nutshell, it is simply
"owning" tor a tew days
or a whole summer, the
most vacation lor the
money you could pos-
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A great Summer Pack-
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health club, swimming
Summer tun in a summer
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breezes Nights serenaded
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Talent Dancing And fun
Special programs lor tots
to teens And if relaxation
is what you want, you
couldn't pick a nicer
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The Concord Summer
$77
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Let us tell you about our
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Highlights include visits to a
Project Renewal neighborhood,
an overnight stay on a kibbutz,
and visits with new immigrants
at an Israeli absorption center A
special feature of the mission will
be discussions with Israelis
prominent in politics, business
and education, as well as single.
Israeli professionals.
The mission itinerary will also
include a walking tour of the Old
City, a Shabbat celebration at the
Western Wall, and an ascent up
Masada In addition, panic
ipants will visit Jericho, the
artist colony of Safed. Old Jaffa,
and the Dead Sea. Special
interest tours of the Knesset.
Israeli industry and archaeolog-
ical digs will be offered.
A variety of travel options are
available, including a premission
visit to Paris and its Jewish com
munity Mission participants
may also extend their stay and-or
stop-off in Europe before their
return to the United States. Total
cost of the basic mission package
is $1,984. including airfare (mm
Miami, land-costs and first class
hotels. For further information.
contact Debbie Brodie at 921-
8810.
Travel the world the Jewish wc
WITH
Kesher Kosher Tours
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FOR MORI IMTORMATIOM CALL
your tra vn. agent
KESHER KOSHER TOURS
1S01BROADWIYNY NY 10036
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ft*
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(far$f$s M,
Every Del Monte* canned fruit
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labels will reflect this fart. But
until they do, please accept the
Del Monte* shield of quality
as your assurance of kosher
Deimontc
certification:
C1MJ0M Mom. Co.***.
...Rabbi Jacob Cohen


Friday, Jm,, 8, 1984 /The Jwih FToridian of South Bmwrd-Hollywood Page
13

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fage 14 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood /Friday, June 8, 1984
Ask the Rabbi
Byl
ROBERT P. FRAZIN
Temple Sold
Hollywood
My dear friends, I visited a
temple one Shabbat, one
Sabbath, a visit that bears
retelling. I entered the sanctuary
of that temple as the service was
beginning. I listened to the
music: it was music that sensit-
ized the soul of my being. I heard
the leader of the service speak
about the challenge of Judaism
and the stake each Jew has in
preserving the future of our faith.
Members of that congregation
were active participants in the
community of man. in fact, the
world was their community,
earth their habitation, peace their
priority. This was a group of
Jews who had assimilated and
activated the most important
values of congregational life:
study, prayer and community. It
was a group of Jews who were
very much alive in our Judaism
and who spelled out the future of
our faith. It was our kids, our
teenagers. To share in a Shabbat
experience with them, whether on
a retreat, or at a convention, or at
a camp, is to witness a moving
expression of their hopes and
aspirations through Judaism.
But what happens when our
teenagers leave home, when our
teenagers go to college? Quite
often there is so little with which
our Jewish youth can identify on
the college campus. O, yes, there
are many fine courses in Judaic
studies, and the B"nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation does as much
as it possibly can to bring a living
Judaism to our youth, but still,
that does not seem to be enough.
Where can we find the
answers? Perhaps in the torah
portion of this week.
Behaalotecha (Numbers 8:1-
12:16) which tells us of the
kindling of the Menorah in the
sanctuary of the Lord.
Light is a very important
symbol within our Judaism.
Light is the symbol of God. Light
is the symbol of the soul within
each and every human being.
Light is the symbol of learning,
of enlightenment. Light is the
symbol of the mission of the Jew
to serve as an Or L'Goyim. a
light unto the nations of the
world. And we must, through our
own efforts in our temples. In our
community, through our Federa-
tion, bring a special light from
which our youth of South
Broward can draw inspiration
and identity in experiencing
Judaism on the college campus
Our college youth must have
the opportunity to question and
share in meaningful ritual and
seek answers to the moral and
New peace initiative
Continued from Page 1
Alignment said he was con-
vinced that the Moroccan
King could play a key role
by inducing Palestinians
and Jordanians to join the
peace process. He saw the
presence of Israelis in
Rabat as a first step toward
peace in the Middle East
and the promotion of a dia-
logue between Arabs and
Jews.
! -* r^ CandlrliirhthinK 1 im June 8-7:54 p.m.
1 ^ June 15-7:56 p.m.
III 1 <
FJeliciious directory
ORTHODOX
CongTriratlon L**1 Vlurfaok Lubvltch. 1S K Hallandaie Beach Blvd
HalUndale. 450-1877 Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus Dally services 7 56 a m 20
minutes before sundown. Sabbaln services 7 30 p m Sabbath morning t
o ciock. Sundays 30im Religious school. Grades 1-8 Nursery school
Monday through Friday
Young Israel of Hollywood 31 Stirling Road 96*7877 Rabbi Kdward
Davis Dally services. 7 30a m sundown. Sabbath servicea. one hour before
sundown. Sabbath morning 9 o clock. Sunday.8am
co>skr\ Ti\r.
Hallandale Jewish (eater 416 NE 8th Ave 454 9100 Rabbi Carl Klein
Daily services. 8 30am.5 30pm Sabbath. 8pm. Sabbath morning 8 45
am Sabbath afternoon. 6 o clock
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N 48th Ave Hollywood. 981 6111 Rabbi Morton
Malavsky Dally services 7 45 a m sundown. Sabbath evening. 8 It
o clock. Sabbath morning. 9 o'clock Religious school Kindergarten8
Temple Beth Am 9730 Stirling road. Hollywood 431 5100 Rabbi Bernard
H Sholer Services Sunday. Monday and Thursday. Sam. Sabbath 8pm.
Sabbath morning. 8 45 o'clock Religious school Nursery Bar Mltxvah
Judaica High School
Temple Israel of Mlramar 8930 SW 35th St.. 961 1700 Rabbi Raphael
Adler Dally servicea. 8 SO a m Sabbath. 8pm. Sabbath morning. 8 45
0 clock Religious School pre-kindergarten8
Temple Slnal 1201 Johnson St Hollywood 930 1677 Rabbi Richard J
Margolis Dally services 8 36 a m 5 p.m Sabbath. 8pm. Sabbath mor
rung 8 S8o clock Religious school Pra-klndergarWn Judaica High School
REFORM
Temple Beth El 1361 S 14th Ave Hollywood. 930-8336 Rabbi Samuel Z
Jaffe Sabbath evening 8pm Sabbath morning 11 a m Religious school
Grades K 10
Temple Befc Emet Pembroke Pines General Hospital auditorium 22C
1 niveralty Drive. Pembroke Pines aSl-MSB Rabbi Bennett Greenapon
Sabbath servicea. 8 16pm Religious school Pre-klndergarlen10
Temple So lei 5100 Sheridan St Hollywood 96*4006 Rabbi Robert P
Fraxln Sabbath services. 8 15 pm : Sabbath morning 10 30 o'clock
Religious school Pre-school -13
RXCOSSTEt CnONMT
Ramal Shalem 11101 W Broward Blvd Plantation 473-MO0 Rabbi MM
Skidell Sabbath servicea. 16 pm Religious school Pre klndergartan-S
ethical dilemmas of our world,
which are part and parcel of our
Kphetic heritage. We cannot
p our college students loyal to
Judaism through a juvenile
presentation of our heritage or
bible tales retold for the
umteenth time. We cannot keep
our college youth by preaching
commitment to them or by
enjoining them to be good Jews
or by chastising them for their
alienation.
And so. I believe we must give
them ourselves. We must remind
them that Judaism does speak to
the pressing issues of our day
We must help our college kids in
their times of stress on the
campus. We must enhance their
belief in God. so that they will
continue to worship the Lord. VN e
must make them aware that we
who congregate in our temples in
this community continue to
worry about nuclear war and
poverty and economic dislocation
and trie emptiness that pervades
much of modern life
Through correspondence,
through college newsletters
prepared through our Federation,
through rabbinic visits to the
campuses our South Broward
kids attend, we can show them
that they are as important to us
as the most adorable child in our
nursery schools, and we can bring
an end to their alienation
isolation.
This we must do. This we i
do. This is our obligation u",
brighten the future of our faith'
When the World was
3500 Years younger
it *>
It rained over Hot Springs. Arkansas, 3500 years ago.
That rain is rising in the Mountain Valley spring today,
geologists report.
No wonder Mountain Valley Water is so pure. It has
never been touched by man-made pollution.
Yet long before we knew this, Mountain Valley was the
only water to earn nationwide popularity. It's sodium-
free, naturally hard, excellent to taste. Have it delivered
to your home and office.
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563-6114
Novv's your chance to get an early bird's look at the community
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An affordable monthly rental payment includes your apartment, traditional
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is available to take you to ,md trom The (lub The Florida Club. Who could ask
tor amthing more'
For a personal tour, tall Herb Goldstein: in Dade County, dial 652-2910;
in Broward, dial 522-B244. Or 1-800-343-CLUB
FLORIDA^? CLUB
'i.TrTh LTH,','9h,S,'!,E* ^Avenue North on Th.rd AverHie.o Th.-FkKidaClub
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T
H
E


Joe
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
,gj8M 921-6511
JCC nominating com-
chaired by Ron Rotha-
immediat* past JCC
lent proposed the following
of' officers and board
; for the 1984-85 fiscal
,_)ait Brenda Greenman;
indents: Michael Orlove,
Ahfin Shapiro. Jewel Smith;
Brian Berman; Trea-
'Ed Hoffman; Past
jnts: L> Samuel Feline,
dJ Rothschild.
nominees: Marty
am, Nancy Atkins, Nancy
Dr. Ed Fellows, Dr.
Glazer. Isadora
w; Jack Goldstein. Ethel
M Avi Lwy. Merle Lundy.
' Pritsker, Dr. Richard
, Rabbi Samuel Rothberg,
SmigeJski. Jerome
. Bob Wolf.
committee members
Roberta Weitx. Joyce
n, Brian Berman. Joann
Don Samuels, Bob Wolf.
fl984-85 Board of Directors
It* elected by our member-
|ii our annual installation
dnce held on June 3 at
brook Country Club.
ccordance with the JCC
is. any other nominations
be made in writing by
Jty-five membtrs in good
ng provided that such
jtions arc received by the
an nf the t brporttion at
fifteen da\s before such
ilmeeting '
JCC SINGLES
CC SngiM 20-40 dance
day June Hth 9 pm, at
Country Club. 4600
st Drive. Hollywood. Caah
bar, music, prizes. S3 for
members, $5 for non-members.
Aerobic clssses will begin at
the JCC of South Broward.
Classes start: Monday evening,
June 11 at 7 p.m. Schedule of
classes Monday and
Wednesday 7-8 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday, 8:30-9:30 a.m. for 8
class sessions.
Sea Escape overnight cruise
for JCC Singles Friday June 29-
Saturday June 30. Call for
reservations 1140 for members,
$146 for non-members.
The Southeast Focal Point
Senior Center offers on
Thursday, 10:30 a.m.. Lecture
series. All lectures are open to the
public. This month aeries are:
June 14, Salma S. Dhanji
Demo of Rug Weaving.
June 21, American Red Cross
Film on "Breath of Life."
June 28, Eve Perkel Flower
Arrangement Demo.
A Seminar on Defensive
Driving, a Stop Smoking Clinic
and the formation of a Senior
Bowling League will be taking
place at the Southeast Focal
Senior Center.
Men's Basketball League
The JCC of South Broward is
forming a Men's Summer
Basketball league at the South
Florida Racquet Club, 5555
Ravenswood Rd, Ft. Lauderdale.
starting May 30. The league will
meet every Wednesday night at 8
p.m. For information and
registration call Jeff at 921-6511
RETIRE TO FLORIDA
IN LUXURY
*
dot*
T^oyoM^U(C
FREE INFORMATION BOOKLET
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SPACE IS LIMITED
Friday, June 8, 1984 /The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Page 15
Temple Beth El Religious School awards
At the closing school session
awards were presented for
scholastic achievement in the
Temple Beth El Religious School
and in the Hebrew Department:
Kindergarten: Joshua Karren;
Firat Grade: Jennifer GlanU and
Melissa Barton: Third Grade:
bather Rosenbaum and Joshua
Nathanson; Fourth Grade: Kelly
Hannan; Fifth Grade: Andrew
Finegold and Monique Fogelson:
Sixth Grade: George Soriano and
Stacy Gordon; Seventh Grade:
David Chazin and Mami Karren;
Eighth Grade: Steven Miller and
Terri Gold fine; Ninth Grade:
Sara Selia; Hebrew Level I:
Christopher Kanarick and Brian I
Lerner; Hebrew Level II: George I
Soriano and Joey Abruzzino; I
Hebrew Level III: Monique I
Fogelson and Jeniffer Sonkin.
Amy Finegold. daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Ira Finegold, waa
presented the Jodi Sandier
Memorial Award for being the
outstanding Confirmand for a
superior job in Confirmation
studies this year.
The President's Award, ini-
tiated by Mr. and Mrs. Milton
Forman, for outstanding
achievement which encompasses
scholarship, attendance and
character, was presented to
Steven Miller, son of Mr. and
Mrs. James Fox Miller.
One of the highlights of the
Synagogue year is the Confirma-
tion Ceremony which waa held on
Shavuot and commemorates the
season of the giving of the Torah.
This inspiring and beautiful cer-
emony links the generations and
serves as the vehicle for Jewish
survival. Confirmation marks the
formal completion of religious
instructions of students at the
10th grade level. The students
Confirmed were: Amy Beth
Finegold. daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Ira Finegold, Emily Klein,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Rubin
Klein, Meredith Ellen Levin,
daughter of Dr. Alan and Janet
Roberts; Lorraine Lyon,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James
Lyon; Robert Passon, son of Rick
Paason and Mrs. Pat Passon;
Karen Beth Sher, daughter of
Myles Sher and Phyllis Sher.
TIMESHARE FORECLOSURES
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Jews In Cuba
got Pesach
supplies
from Canada
MONTREAL (JTAI The
Jewish community of Cuba has
sent a telegram to the Canadian
Jewish Congress thanking the
"entire Jewish community in
Canada" for Passover supplies
which the Jews of Cuba received
in time for the holidav.
The telegram from Dr. Jose
Miller, president of the Commis-
sion Coordinadora de las Socie-
dades Religiosas Hebreas de
Cuba, the representative body of
Cuban Jewry which maintains its
full membership in the World
Jewish Congress, stated:
"The Cuban Jewish commu-
nity extends warmest greetings
and wishes for peace and happi-
ness to the CJC (Canadian
Jewish Congress) and the entire
Jewish community in Canada on
the occasion of Passover. We are
pleased to inform you that the
Passover supplies arrived in time
and were distributed before
Pesach."
The l.OOO-member Jewish
community in Cuba continues to
maintain five synagogues and a
Jewish public library. However,
the community has had difficulty
in meeting its own needs for
several decades. After the United
States severed its relations with
Cuba in 1960. the CJC has looked
after the needs of Cuba's Jews.
This year, more than $30,000
worth of religious supplies,
including kosher meat, tee,
matzoa, and prayer books were
sent to the Jewish community in
Cuba.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
& Monument, Inc.
S. ''V.is' ?n Phone 7591669

Great News For Floridians
When Florida gets hot and humid (in July and August)
Do you have a summer home up north? No?
...Well, Now You Will! Where?
At BEAUTIFUL CIRCLE LODGE
ON SYLVAN LAKE
The Summer Resort Of The Workmens Circle
Consider These Advantages:
There is no investment
You are f rrr of responsibility (or upkeep A maintenanre
Food shopping? None.
There is no rooking2 meals per day
Your choice of private or non-private arromodations
Discount of 5". for I or 4 week stay
\0"c discount for 5 or more weeks
Sports activities
Folk dancing
Entertainment
Yiddish culture
Split up your visit: spend a few weeks at the Circle Lodge, leave to visit
friends relatives and return for a few weeks of more of that special
Circle Lodge brand of good times.
For choice rooms register now
Golf available nearby
PRIOR TO JUNE 15. MAIL TO;
CircleLodae.45E.33St..
New York. N.Y. 10016
Tele: (2121 Hr800
AFTER JUNE 15. MAIL TO: u
Circle Lodge. Bo 164-RDI
Hopewell Junction. NY .12533 I
(212) 564-1077 or (941) 221-2771
iagaaamawmmmmmmamamwmmaMmmammamamaBmaMwW
DDn no^n Ton
DR.YALEWASSERMAN.eTeDeT
CONSULTANTS TO THE MEDICAL. DENTAI PROFESSIONS. HOSPITALS.
INDUSTRY. INSURANCE COMPANIES AND GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES
OFFICIAI U S HOSPTTA1 MEDICARE Two Books-83-S4-2S6p PROTECT your
loved ones ProphaH Crass! SSPl 9821 468 DRG All Law* Info Knou rhefocf*' Thins
Ihe PORTEND AND PORTEMT. tha PROPHETIC indication and significance that
loreshedow* the future of Mil Ml Al PRACTICE MEDICAL DENTAL AND LEGAL
PROFUSIONS will recogni/r this NEW MHJICAKI HOSPITAL IN PATH NT PR(X,KAM
AS THE CLASSIC HIS TORICAL DOCUMI NTS Of THI TWENTIETH CENTURY
fhn Boo* Moy Sot* Your life jjS
1984 PHYSICIAN S FEE REFERENCE II
Tht Trroturr House
Thesaurus for all discipline* Madame ft Surgrry 9600 Procedures Thjt private
THESAURUS research hat nevat before been ottered since HIPPOCRATES, the Father of
Medic me m the 5th Century. B.C E ^
NEW Original Fourth Edition
IfM Nanonal Denial Advisory Sense*
AU PROCEXWES AND 1984 PRICES Sec ret* of Success and Making 8JG MONEY
AND GETTING WEALTHY THIS BOOK MAV SAVE VOU UFE.' We have
researched wiiPhD level Ihe anatomy, rackotogy. kmesaotogy. bwkmehc. and functional
the hand unit THI ML DrCAl I EGAl. conspiracy of ulen. eon dislocations and fracture* of
the H ind Unit has been compfctefy e uptored and a available to our c sent* on a private basis
III M9
IB.SOO Satisfied Client* Smce IWI'
EVERY PROFESSIONAL AND HOME SHOULD HAVE OUR BOOKS FOR
REFERENCE Special for our ckent* only We offer dedicated, ongmal research of the
SACRED PRAYERS BY OUR BELOVED JEWISH CANTORS FROM 1890 1930 The
magrahcent and the ultimate beauty of e pre*ion piety, devotion and passion of the soul
revealed m musical c ho-ale This tare generation it revered and to be remembered forever m
Jewish Hrsiory 414 3276854
P.F.R 3036 S 92nd St. Weil Alhs. Wl 53227
PWawWnd Dl 3 D'H Inclosed!
Nome -
Addies,
Cat
Saaal
Zv


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South Broward-Hollywood Friday, June 8, 1984
Norton Tire Company is not only Florida's
largest Michelm dealer, largest BF Goodrich
dealer and largest Penlh dealer, but offers 13
more reasons why their stores are the best
place for you and your car
"^roie*
1

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
That's not just words, we put it in writ-
ing (read our 30-day money-back
guarantee) And if you re not satis-
fied with any purchase from us, we'll
do our best to make it right
EXPERIENCE AND INTEGRITY. You'll like the
way we do business And our experience and integrity will save
you money
CERTIFIED MECHANICS. To better service you and your car, we have
expert mechanics, trained and certified by the National Institute for Ser-
vice Excellence, available at our stores
LOWEST PRICES. Our tire prices are the lowest anywhere, anyplace,
anytime!
FREE 10-POINT SAFETY CHECKUP No purchase necessary Drive in
anytime and we'll check your tires, alignment, balance, brakes, shocks,
idler arm. muffler, battery, belts and hoses Free
COURTEOUS TREATMENT. You can count on always receiving excel-
lent, prompt, courteous service at any of our stores
NO BAIT AND SWITCH. We carry complete inventories of all tires The
low prices we advertise are always backed up by an ample supply of the
tires m our ads
WE SOLVE PROBLEMS. If you have a problem with any purchase, con-
tact the store manager where the purchase was made If he can't come
up with a solution, ask him for our special customer service department
number Every possible effort is made to keep our customers happy
CLEANLINESS. We offer clean, air-conditioned waiting rooms for the
convenience of our customers
HI-TECH EQUIPMENT We have modern, up-to-date equipment includ-
ing the latest in hi-tech computer balancing, hi-tech alignment and spe-
cial tire changing equipment for protecting mag wheels
CERTIFIED TIRE SPECIALISTS. Our stores are staffed with tire special-
ists trained and certified in the various features of each manufacturer's
tires and each automobile's specifications
PURCHASING POWER. With 35 stores throughout Flor.da, we have the
strongest purchasing power of any tire company m the state That's how
we are able to offer you the lowest prices
SIXTY YEARS UNDER THE SAME FLORIDA MANAGEMENT. Since
our first store opened in 1924, our management policy has always been
the same Give our customers quality products and keep them happy.
YOU GET MORE THAN JUST LOW PRICES AT
MICHELIN f
IRELLI
SAFETY CHECKS BRAKES EXPORTS
CERTIFIED MECHANICS WHOLESALE
COMALQAM.CS
B-d I Douglas Road 44-8i0i
NORTH MAM
3360N* 7tf.Aw 661-8541
N. MAM BEACH
i'OONE i63rdSl 945-?454
MAMKACH
1454 Mo* Road 6"? 5353
SOUTH OAOC
9001? :*<> 66* 7575
CUTLER moot
2039CS >*"> 233-5241
HIALEAM PALM !
i2754nSi 822 2500
MAMAMPORT
* 25 St & M*am D*ry Rd 593-1191
WEST MAM
Bwd 6 Gaaoay Ros 55*6656
KENDALL DRJHKXATE SQUARE
38": 5 86m Si 38'0i28
W.TAMAM TRAIL
12520 swan si 5511141
HOMESTEAD
30100 S tedK*Hw> 24-1622
HOLLYWOOD
49" S S*ate Rd 96"-0450
BTOoodrich YOKOHAMA
ALIGNMENT BALANCING SHOCKS
FRONT END SERVICE LUBRICATION
ALL STORES OPEN 7:30
MM
SI Rd 84-. > 4-3-4-00
FTLAUOEROALE
i*40 $w-v?.v; 463-'VM
,-. *-**TAT10N
& Suuac if 2i*j
"oodBvd vsiray.i*. y 435.13&3
TAMAflAC
& \wrlM *35-2"2
TAMARAC
* un,v 0' 4 McMaORd 721-4700
ROMRANO BEACH
3i5m 'ed DEE AFIELD BEACH
2265* HiiHooroBMj 4?7 6800
OSLRAVBEACH
iLWonStvd 272-1022
QREENACRES
3838jooRfl 968-1014
WEST PALM BEACH
515 Soul" 0i> 832 4161
LAKE PARK N PALM BEACH
332 N .4<8mJ 848-2544
TEOUESTA
Bridge Rd lOtdDoutHwy 746-9215
FT. PIERCE _
2604 Soul" 4in SI 464-8020
VERO BEACH
755 21H SUM 567-1174
OAVTONA BEACH
907V0lu*U*vt 255-7487
NAPLES
20651 TammwTr 774-4443
FT MYERS
15135 McG*QO<8*d 482-8880
MASTERCARD VISA AMERICAN EXPRESS. DINERS CLUB WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


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