The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Every Saturday and Sunday the fabulous "Fun Ships".
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dance till the wee hours of the morning to three
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00350

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
vj&risti Flcridian
t
Of Tampa
Jume 5 Number 23
Tamp, Florida Friday, Jury 1,1983
CFrrtSAoeftrt
Price 35 Cents
ver $50,000 was realized
|ng Super Foot Day which
kn with a breakfast meeting
\e Tampa Club. Twelve teams
v.. called upon over sixty
-,eits during the day. A
lhayim Time" was held at
p.m. for all the participants,
turned in their reports and
\s.
jrds were presented to
)sterweil and Doug Cohn
most money raised. Mike
and Bill Kalian were
i-d with a "Super Foot
award for the largest
^age increase and Elton
and Don Linsky received
ml for the most cards
Several "gag" prizes
the team of Jeff David-
Frank Hagelberg and to
of Greg Waksman and
tshuler.
383 campaign total now
U $920,000 with an addi-
f 120,000 in 1982 card
still to be contacted.
leadership is confident
1983 campaign and
[srael Fund will exceed
Jlion mark.
'Super Foot Day' A Big Success
A successful -'Super Foot Day' was held by the Tampa Jewish
federation on June 15. Many dedicated workers went to the business
community soliciting funds to the 1983 TJF-UJA Campaign in teams
of two^ (Standing from left) Gary Alter, Executive Director, Tampa
Jewish federation; Rhoda Davis, Director, Tampa Jewish Federation
Women s Division; Marvin Aronovitz, Gregory Waksman, Donald
Linsky, Sid Bleendes, Roger Mock, Sam Blum, Les Bamett, 1983
Campaign Chairman; Bill Kalish, Frank Hagelberg, Rochester,
B'nai B'rith District 5
Convenes On West Coast
N.Y.; Jeremy Gluckman, Larry Wasser, Gerald Susman,
Philadelphia, Pa., and George Karpay. (Seated from left) Alan Alt-
shuler, Orlando, Fla.; Michael Levine, President, Tampa Jewish
Federation; John Osterweil, Doug Cohn, Jeff Davidson, and Richard
Gordimer. Also participating in the day's event were Hope Bamett.
Blossom Leibowitz, Maril Jacobs, Elton Marcus and Howard Sinsley.
Photo: Audrey Haubenstock
' % B'rith, the world's
id oldest Jewish service
ion, will hold its
five annual convention
>rook Resort, located
>f Tampa, July 9-13
Five encompasses
p Columbia, Maryland,
rolina, South Carolina,
Georgia, and Florida
membership of 36,500
Iges and seven units. It
Btered from the District
a ted in Atlanta, Ga.
registration indicates
r 600 fUlngMf* and
ill attend, which will
lie largest convention in
and the first on
vest coast. This will be
[annual convention. The
vas formed in 1867;
no conventions were
kg the war years of WW
Th.
bgrams will feature the
be of the two highest
Officials in the Interne-
kai B'rith family. Inter-
President Gerald Kraft,
apolia, ind. will deliver
pe address on Saturday
July 9 while Dr. Daniel
>f Washington, D.C.,
bnal Executive Vice-
will be the speaker at
cade of Giving luncheon
ky. July 11. Last year at
[function, over $100,000
1 for the Youth Services
I of the organization.
?enda features work-
all aspects of lodge
(ration. Important
as will be presented, the
udget will be approved
ttrtant matter* of policy
[And acted upon. The
ction of officers will be
current officers are:
fershner, of Baltimore,
' is completing his term
pet President and who
succeeded by Louis
of Miami, who is
President-elect. Other
Include Sol A. Jaffa, of
\ N.C. as First Vice-
K Paul L. Backman, of
Kershner Hymson
Hollywood, Fla., Second Vice-
President; and Third Vice-Presi-
dent-Treasurer, Bernard Fried-
man, of Columbia, S.C. Outgoing
President Kershner will be
discharged from office by District
Executive Vice-President Arnold
D. Ellison, of Atlanta, Ga., and
Past President Bert S. Brown
will install Hymson as President
when the Installation Banquet is
held on Monday night, July 11.
The emotional highlight of the
convention will be the Testi-
monial Dinner on Sunday
evening, Jury 10, in honor of
Executive Vice-PreBident Ellison
who is retiring after 25 yeara of
Kbsskmal service to the
trict. Participating in this
program, in addition to Dr.
Continued on Page 8
In Washington, President Reagan meets with Stanley Zwaik
(right), national commander, Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A., and Harris Stone, director, to discuss issues of concern
to American Jewish war veterans.
Administration Raps Soviet Committee
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration denounced
as "patently false" the
assertion by the head of the
"Anti-Zionist Committee of
the Soviet Public" that the
majority of Soviet Jews
who desire to emigrate from
the Soviet Union have al-
ready left.
"Many thousands of Jews,
some estimates range into the
hundreds of thousands, are still
denied this fundamental right of
freedom of movement on the
flimsiest pretext," State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Alan
Romberg said. "It is particularly
deplorable that the Soviet regime
should now enlist some people of
Jewish ancestry to participate in
their anti-Semitic diatribe. '
THE SHARP U.S. rebuke
followed the claim by Samuel
Zivs, a Jewish law professor in
Moscow who heads the anti-
Zionist group, which was recently
formed by the Soviet authorities,
that all Russian Jews who
.wanted to leave the USSR have
already done so and that Zionist
groups are "juggling figures" to
show that large numbers of Jews
still wish to emigrate.
Zivs, whose claims were carried
in Tass, the official Soviet news
agency, told a Moscow press
conference that "The absolute
majority of Soviet Jews who
wanted to leave in order to
reunite with their families abroad
have left by now. The Jews left in
Russia have no desire to leave
their country except those who
have fallen victim to Zionist
propaganda which has brain-
washed them," Zivs, who serves
as First Deputy of the anti-
Zionist committee, was quoted as
saying by Tass.
According to Tass, the com-
mittee, established last April,
endorses Israel's right to exist
but is opposed to the policies of
the Premier Menachem Begin's
government and supports the
creation of a Palestinian state.
The committee is chaired by Gen.
David Dragunsky, one of the
highest ranking Jewish officers in
the Red Army, now retired.
THE STATE Department said
that "while this particular state-
ment was purported to reject
anti-Semitism, in fact the basic
thrust of this and other anti-
Zionist propaganda is anti-Semi-
tic." Komberg pointed out
specifically a statement by Dra-
gunsky who was quoted as
saying, "The time is now for us to
make more concerted efforts to
counter international Zionism
and to rebuff the anti-Soviet
campaign it mounts. The actions
of Begin and his thugs are very
similar to those of Hitler's atroci-
ties," he was quoted as saying by
Tass.
Romberg said the U.S.
" condemn (s) particularly the
statements" by Dragunsky "who
equated Zionism with Nazism.
Such anti-Semitic propaganda
under the guise of anti-Zionism or
any other cover is an extreme
distortion of the truth and is
absolutely unacceptable,"
Romberg said.
The statements as reported by
Tass by the members of the anti-
Zionist committee also drew a
sharp rebuke from Soviet Jewish
groups. The National Conference
on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ) said the
committee is the "larger compo-
nent of a new propaganda
campaign in which Soviet
authorities are trying to delegit-
imize Israel and Zionism and
make the desire for repatriation
to Israel border on criminality."
THE NCSJ, in a statement
released, said, "The propaganda
offensive takes place at a time
when the emigration of Jews has
virtually ended and an average of
100 a month are permitted to
leave. Despite the claims of the
anti-Zionist committee .
Western monitors know that at
least 300,000 invitations have
been sent to Soviet Jews to per-
mit them to take the first step in
leaving. These have not been
acted upon."



Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
s
8
F"dy. July liaa II.,
By LESLIE AI DM AN
Have happy and aafe 4th of July weekend:
When Robyn Haaa. daughter of Dr. and Mra. Robert Haw
became the bride of Richard Pekaia, son of Mr. and Mrs
Richard Pekaia. on May 29, they were royally feted by friends
and family.
There was a kitchen shower given by Mr. William KaUen
meier. of Land 0 Lakes and by Mra. Jeffrey Heck, of Gaines-
ville; there was a Miscellaneous Shower and Brunch at the home
of Bobbie Tanb, hosted by her and Rath Adrian, Elbe Piahman.
Louise Wintner, Annie Aronow; a pre-wedding party hosted by
the attendants of the bride, at the Mamott Hotel; a pre-wedding
party hosted by the bride's parents at the Commerce Club; a
BBQ for the young adults at the brides home, hosted by her
sister, Felice and Kara Haas; a Taco Party at the Marriott
Hotel, for the men in the wedding party, hosted by Brad Haas
and Fred Pekaia; after that was the Rehearsal Dinner, at the
Hawaiian Village, hosted by the grooms' parents; a wedding
brunch at the Hawaiian Village hosted by the parents of both
the bride and the groom; also, there was a pre-wedding diner at
John David's Restaurant, hosted by the Grandparents of the
bride, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Roskin; and finally, the wedding
reception and dinner dance at the Tampa Marriott Hotel, hosted
by the parents of the bride.
Virginia Gordimer and her daughter, Laura recently attended
the Bat Mitzvah of Shira Meirovich, daughter of Cantor and
Mrs. Moshe Meirovich, at Har Tzeon Synagogue in Silver
Spring, Maryland, where the Cantor is currently associated.
Before Maryland, he was the Cantor at Beth Shalom
Synagogue, in Clearwater, and during that time, Shira attended
the Hillel School in Tampa. Other friends of the family who
traveled from the Bay area to be with Shira and her family on
this joyous occasion, included Nancy Schulman and her sons,
Jeremy and Joshua, and Larry and Francee Weinfeld and their
children. Shawn, Danny, and RocheUe, all of Clearwater. These
are all Hillel families, thus they knew Shira when she was a
student there. Also at the Bat Mitzvah was Jeannie Sandberg
and her three children, there from Pennsylvania, where her
husband, Rabbi Martin Sanberg is currently practicing. Rabbi
Sandberg was formerly with Tampa's Congregation Rodeph
Sholom.
Congratulations to 23 year old Andy Hirach, son of Les and
Gail Hirach who was elected Student Bar Association vice-
president at Mercer Law School, in Macon, Georgia. Andy is in
his first year of law school, so obviously this election is a rare
honor. Andy attended undergraduate school at Washington and
Jefferson University in Washington, Pennsylvania. Three
cheers for you, Andy!
The UAHC Camp Coleman, in Cleveland, Georgia, held a
reunion, at the camp over Memorial weekend, for anyone who
was on the camp staff between the years of 1965-1975. Tampa
ex-staffers who attended included Gail Taylor and her husband
Fredrick, Marshall Pasternack (who came from New York)',
Norm* Hsubenstock. (who came from Alaska) Cathy Gardner
and Vikki Br unhild Silverman and her husband Bruce and their
baby son, Avi. Those at the reunion enjoyed services, songs,
athletic competition, and just good ole' reminiscing.
Diana Winoker has joined E.F. Hutton & Co. as an account
executive. She is a past president of the Hillsborough Com-
munity Mental Health Center and has lectured at Women's
Wednesday. ___
Trudie Harris and her husband, Gary and Harriet Seeiig, and
her husband, Mark, recently combined a business trip with a few
days of pleasure, for some summer fun. Trudie and Harriet are
co-owners of "Paper People Plus." They first attended the
National Stationary Convention in New York, then they all went
on to Atlantic City for a few days of fun in the CMJMi
Rita and Md Garya are just thrilled to share with you the
good news of their son Hal's wedding to filssti Reedy. They
were married on June 18 at Remoda Gardens. Rita, Mel and
their daughter, Felice entertained out of town guests and the
bridal party the night before the wedding at the Sea Wolf
Restaurant. Also, the bride was delighted with a pre-wedding
shower given in her honor at the Greenhouse Apartments
Clubhouse. Much happiness to all of you on this joyous event.
Congratulations to Steve Epstein, from Beachwood, Ohio,
who just graduated from the University of Tampa with a BS
degree in Business Management. He has decided to stay in
Tampa and has taken a job as a Sales Representative with
Palmer Paper Company. Steve is currently residing in Town and
Country and is very eager to meet people and become involved
in some Jewish activities. He loves all sports, especially golf and
tennis, and he likes to travel. So if you run into Steve Epstein,
give him one of those warm, winning, Tampa smiles!
On May 30. 1963, Larry Curphey, son of Mack end Dee
Curphey received a meritorious promotion to rank of Corporal.
Larry ia stationed at Camp Lejeune. North Carolina, and has
been in the Marines only since the February of 1962. He was also
made Crew Chief of his amtrack-which is a land and sea tank
which transports marines to the beach under cover of fire.
Some nice news from Congregation Schaarai Zedek.
Jeff Cohen, son of Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Cohen was awarded
the "Mack Perlman" cup as the outstanding member of the 1983
Confirmation Class.
Also, the Brotherhood, with Lou Zipkin st their helm was
awarded the "President's Cup," by the outgoing Temple presi-
dent, Stan Rosenkranz, for those contributing the most to the
betterment of the Temple during the year.
At the end of each school year, the Museum of Science and
Industry holds their annual "Science Connection" competition.
This involves 3 dsys of science competition for all students in
the Hillsborough County Public School System, according to
grade levels. There are different science related activities
planned for all grade levels, from kindergarten through high
school. Fredrick Taylor III. six year old son of Gail and Fred
Taylor competed from the kindergarten class of Roosevelt
Elementary School. He and a partner participated in and won
"tower building competition," with the tower having to be built
in 10 minutes, out of cartons, and measured in centimeters. For
having the highest architectual wonder, Frederick and his
partner received first place ribbons and a certificate.
We hear that Joanne Sampson, daughter of Judge Ralph and
Marlene Steinberg has been singing the blues with her jazz
quartet at Harrah's Casino, in Atlantic City, followed by
another eight week engagement at the Claridge Casino, also in
Atlantic City. Also, Joanne and her husband, Ron recently
produced in Tampa, Joanne's 24-track album, with many of her
original numbers. Sounds like your career is really taking off,
Joanne, and we wish you much continued success.
Dr. Arnie and Bev Grier were certainly thrilled to read a quote
in the June 6 edition of "Time" magazine from their son, Dr.
Kenneth Grier s dissertation on stress. The article in "Time"
was entitled "Stress: Seeking Cures for Modern Anxieties." Dr.
Grier is a Clinical Psychologist, in Houston, Texas, with the
Independent School System. Congratulations Ken, on the
notoriety.
Meet Dr. Harold (Hal) Sheppard who moved to Tampa in mid-
February from Washington, D.C. Though Hal was raised in
D.C. he was away from it for a number of years before going
back. He received his M.A. from the University of Chicago and
his PhD in Sociology with a minor in Economics, from the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin. Then he taught at Wayne State University
in Detroit for 12 years. In 1959 he moved back to DC to be the
Resident Director and later the Staff Director of the First U.S.
Senate Special Committee on Aging. From 1961-63 he was with
the Kennedy Administration working in the President's
Depressed Area Program in the Commerce Department. Next,
Hal was with the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research,
for 12 years. Then he was President Carter's Counselor on Aging
for the last year of his four year term. In 1982, Hal was the
Associate Director of the National Council on Aging. While
living in D.C, Hal was also active on the National Public Policy
Committees of the American Jewish Committee.
Finally, in 1983 Hal came to Tampa to be the Director of
International Exchange Center on gerontology. When Hal isn't
making career changes, he enjoys sailing, traveling, and playing
tennis. We're certainly glad you're living in Tampa now Hal.
and we hope this move will be permanent for a long time to
come-
______________ Until the next edition. .
Summer Vacations Present
Challenge To Jewish Food Bank
Summer vacations are happy
times for most people, but they
present a new challenge to the
Jewish Community Food Bank.
The recipients of the Food Bank
are not on vacation and their
basic need of food continues.
The Jewish Community Food
Bank was started by
Congregation Schaarai Zedek's
Social Action Committee in June,
1982. Since its inception other
synagogues and organizations
have begun to participate in the
program. The Food Bank pro-
vides food for people in need who
are clients of Tampa Jewish So-
cial Service.
Afr. and Mrs. Richard W. Pekak
Wedding
HAASPEKALA
Robyn Laurie Haas, of Brook. I
line, Mass., daughter of Tin-!
pans, Dr. and Mrs. Robert LI
Haas, was wed to Richard W,j
Pekaia, also of Brookline, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Pekik,
of Greenville, Penn. The weddinj 1
took place on May 29 at Tup
Marriott Hotel, with a recepua
and dinner dance following. Of-
ficiating was Judge Ralph Stein-1
berg.
The groom is a doctonl]
student at Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology, and the bride
serves as assistant manager a
New England Telephone Coo<|
pany.
Maid-of-honor was Fein I
Haas, sister of the bride, tod
bridesmaids were Kara Haas, of
New Orleans, La., Allison Mok,
of Charlotte, S.C., Sherri Murofii
of Durham, N.C., Linda Peck
ham, of Ardsley. N.Y. and Leslie |
Stoppel, of Charlotte, N.C.
Best Man was John Caccavik I
of New York. Groomsmen wen
Tracy Ballock. of Brookline.
Mass., Brad Haas, of Cambridge,!
Mass., Gregory Jones, of Alex-
andria, Va., Frederick Pekaia, of I
Buffalo, N.Y., and Thomu
Wanty, of Lakewood, Colo.
The couple will reside in'
Brookline.
Camp Safari
The JCC is pleased to an-
nounce that Camp Safari ha
been a real success through the
first session. Besides field tripe
and weekly horseback riding
instruction, the Safari campen
have been receiving counselor
training sessions with the Cbii
camp division.
Sixth, seventh and eighth
grade registration is now being |
taken for second session Camp.
Chai.
memo from
*): Tampa Bay area women on the way up
Subject The Suitor's Summer Sale
Date: Starting July 1,1983
The Suitor, a store devoted to the science of successful dressing, invites you to
participate in its ANNUAL SUMMER SALE. Save 10-75% OFF strictly business
suits and accessories. Alterations, too.
You'll want to mark your calendar because investment clothing will never be so
reasonably pneed.
Open Monday through Saturday 11 to 7, Thundav EvcninclfS
uor


Friday. July 1.1983
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
.
Page 3
Summertime Visitor
[By AUDR^ HAUBENSTOCK
1 This summer, Arts and Crafts
at Camp Chai (Jewish Com-
munity Center Day Camp), will
L, an exciting event taught by
I the sheliach (messenger from Is-
Irael).
I Orly Paturi has very definite
lideas about the "take home"
Icrafts she wishes the campers to
[make. These young campers
want something tangible to show
land tell at home. Paturi loves
^children and excells in handcrafts
[such as weaving, knitting,
crocheting, and pottery. She
worked as a kindergarten teacher
n Jerusalem.
This twenty-two year old
woman was one of 300, out of
k,00O applicants, chosen to come
Jo the United States and work
[his summer. She will live with
[he Diane and Michael Levine
nily during the eight weeks she
i in Tampa. Afterwards she will
end two months traveling
. and the United States visiting
Natives and taking a camping
our with a friend from Tel Aviv.
Orly speaks lovingly of her
family in Jerusalem. Her mother,
sther; father, Avram; brother,
fnive, who is serving in the
Knny; and her 14-year-old sister,
Mice. Because of her Iranian and
Orly Paturi
Syrian background, Paturi
speaks four languages fluently
Hebrew, English, Arabic, and
Persian. Her English is excellent
as a result of working with an
American teacher at school.
She says her family has a deep
respect for the Jewish religion,
although she does not consider
them or herself very religious.
Paturi seemed amazed at the
immaturity of the young people
here, but then realized that Army
service is a stimulus to maturity.
Her own Army experience was
a good one. She spent her years in
the service with 60 young people
who had been together since they
were 10 years old. This Young
Peoples Movement is unique in
that it keeps these friends
together all this time. These
neighborhood groups (from the
time they are ten) play, study,
and work with each other.
Women are in the Army for 2V4
years, men for 3V4 years. This
time is divided into six month
segments. Six months on a
kibbutz, usually a new one
helping to get it settled and
organized; and six months in
Army service. Orly would like to
return to the kibbutz she served
on and make her family life there.
Paturi's time here will be well
spent teaching the young chil-
dren she loves, making new
friends, swimming, and reading.
She especially enjoys reading
books for and about children,
many times she loses herself
within them.
The atmosphere at the
Levine's home has been so
comfortable that already Orly
has begun to think in English.
Says Paturi, "When I begin to
dream in English it will be time
to return to Israel."
Tew Studu Center For
rewish Perspectives
Reconstructionists Given Two Grants
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
|The Reconstructionist
I Rabbinical College in Wyn-
Icote, Pa., has announced
Ithe opening of its Shalom
[Center, which it called the
Ifirst Jewish resource in the
world devoted to the study
| and public discussion of
Jewish perspectives on pre-
senting a world nuclear
Iholncaust.
\ spokesperson told the Jew-
ish IVU^raphic Agency that the
Fhalom (enter was the only such
fnomy connected with any semi-
ry, Christian as well as Jewish,
i the United States.
Arthur Waskow, a member of
[he KKC faculty, was named di-
ctor of the Shalom Center. He
dW the JTA that the center has
wen ^i;irtiii with grants of
'25,000 each from the Emet
I mimlai ion of Los Angeles and
the Levinson Foundation of
iirookline, Mass. He said the first
kar budget for the new center is
1100.000.
IRA SILVERMAN, president
M the RCC. said the Shalom
I Center was gathering studies,
[books, pamphlets, films,
I liturgies, policy statements and
I similar materials for dissemina-
tion to the Jewish community.
I He said the center planned to
^commission special studies to
I cover a variety of areas involved
| in its goal.
He said these included the
I relevance of Jewish sacred lore
I and tradition to the issues of poa-
I session and use of nuclear weap-
ons and the impact of the
I nuclear arms race and of various
I "raw-control approaches to the
| Soviet Union.
Silverman said another study
lH' See't the experience of Soviet Jewry
^upport movements in bypassing
I soviet governmental controls to
make direct contact with Soviet
Jews could be applied to Soviet
compliance with arms control
I pacts.
, HE SAID other studies will
aeal with the economic impact on
ll!LAmerican Jewish community
wnumng from decisions on
specific weapons and research
contracts, and approaches to
conversion of weapons produc-
tion facilities for civilian pur-
poses.
"Party Makers"
Saturday Singles Dance
Every Saturday Night
at 8:00 P.M.
Beach, Patio, and Indoor Dancing
"TopMY'and "BigBand"Sound
Rocky Point Beach Resort
Courtney Campbell Causeway (Rt. 60)
Admission: $4.00 Door Prizes
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
*
WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
**
TH ANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TiVlSRAKL STOCK EXCHANGE
^^- Subsidiary oiBJ
Leumi
NASD
sank lhiw MbjM a
18 East 48th Street
New York, N.Y. 10017
Securities (212)759-1310
Corporation Toll Free (800) 221 -4838|
Tampa/UJA Florida Regional
Mission Scheduled For October
As part of a national emphasis
to give American Jewry the op-
portunity to see "inside Israel,"
the Florida Region of the United
Jewish Appeal is planning a ten
day mission to Israel beginning
Sunday, October 9.
To encourage the greatest pos-
sible participation in this event,
the Tampa Jewish Federation is
offering a subsidy of S600 per
person with a minimum com-
bined family commitment of
$1,600 to the 1984 Federation-
UJA Regular Campaign. Tenta-
tive cost before subsidy is $1,962
per person round trip from New
York to Israel. Extensions in
Israel and Europe can be
arranged at additional cost.
Participants in past UJA mis-
sions can attest to the value of
this intensive experience. During
the course of ten days, one has
the opportunity to gain a greater
indepth knowledge of political
tad social factors that make up
the Jewish state combined with
the chance to get first hand
exposure of what Federation
dollars can accomplish overseas.
Some people repeat the mission
experience whenever possible.
The October 9-19 mission is plan-
ned to appeal to first timers and
repeaters as well.
For further information on this
and any other UJA missions to
Israel, please contact the Tampa
Jewish Federation at 876-1618.
Silverman said the center was
planning religious liturgies on the
threat of a nuclear holocaust, as
well as a study of proposals for
nuclear-free zones in the Middle
East.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Jewish Floridian
of Tampa
BuainaaaOffic* 3655 Handaraoa Blvd Tampa. Ha S360S
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Editor and Publiahar Eiacutiv* Editor Aaaociala Editor
TW Jawtafc FlorMiaa Dm Nm Hamate* It* K.-krwih
Of TW Mtrraaadtat AaVfrtlaia la It I olaaia.
PublMhad Fridaya-WoaklySaptarnU ihnakjt M.,
Bi Weekly June through AufUM by Tha Jr it, f i. YHlian nl Tampa
Sacond Claaa Postage Paid al Miami. Fla ISCS 4.'! ^T^ moUnemUom '* aa.ad Mm to The Jeariafc Fiariaiaa >>.
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Town Upon Raqunt
Tha Jewiih Floridian maintain! no fraa liat People rarrivintf tha paper who have not aubsrritM)
diracUy arc aubaenbera throufh arrangement with the Jew 1 ah Fodaralion of Tampa -herein I1.30
per year deductad from their contribuUona lor 4 .ubarnpuon to tha paper Anyone wixhinK la
cancel *uch a >nhvmi ion ahould an not 11v The Jew .h f'lnndian nr The Fodaralion
Friday. July 1,1983
Volume 5
20TAMUZ5743
Number 23
New Discovery Needed
Several Israeli scientists have developed
a bio-technological product which removes
the left-over oil in tankers so that it does
not pollute the sea.
More important, the resulting mixture
can be used as fuel for power plants. These
scientists call their product Emulsan
because it emulsifies or enables oil to mix
with water. This has a vast range of
potential applications ranging from im-
provement of the flow of oil in cold pipes to
the production of cosmetics.
Very nice. But would it not be even nicer
if these or other Israeli scientists finally
found a way of making petroleum products
from whatever available source garbage
or grain alcohol or any of the other vaunted
sources of ersatz crude?
This is a dream all of us have had from
the days of the Yom Kippur War when the
free world was turned upon its ear by the
Arab oilionaires. Not only would such a
discovery do much to solve Israel's
runaway inflation, but it would also solve
the free world's victimization by the
petroleum industry's potentates once and
for all.
Tannenbaum Says Soviet
Committee is Moscow Tool
NEW YORK-(JTA)- Bernice Tannembaum, acting
chairman of the American Section of the World Zionist
Organization, said the Soviet Anti-Zionist Committee is a
palpable and blatant Soviet propaganda tool. It has been
artificially concocted by the Kremlin to counteract and
cover up condemnation of the USSR's program of Jewish
spiritual and cultural repression and the almost complete
cessation of Soviet-Jewish emigration.
"This calumny together with Soviet government inter-
ference with the delivery of mail to potential Jewish emi-
grants are orchestrated by Moscow.
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ADL Reports On W.
OPEC and Arab Power
Friday, Jury ^J
WASHINGTON. D.C. The
improved oil situation and radical
shifts in the alignment of the
Middle East power structure
"offer the United States an
opportunity for a new look" at its
Mideast policy, according to a re-
search report just issued by the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
The ADL report "Oil,
OPEC and Arab Power: U.S.
Gains, U.S. Problems" said
that with "little likelihood" of a
second Arab oil embargo and the
reduction of Arab petrodollar
income, the United States is now
in a far stronger economic and
diplomatic position in relation to
the Arab world than it was five
years ago.
According to the ADL report,
the timing is right for a Middle
East reevaluation because "bar-
ring unforeseen political
upheavals," the conditions and
actions which caused the reversal
in Arab oil and political influence
are expected to persist for some
time to come
The report added that the
Middle East remains "volatile"
and warned that unforeseen and
unpredictable political develop-
ments could yet occur which
would lead to tightened supplies.
higher oil prices and a consequent
increase in U.S. and Western
"vulnerability."
In its analysis, the League
report pointed out that any
reformulation of America's
Middle East policy must
dispense with the prevailing
"notion that Saudi Arabia is a
'moderate' and pro-Weatem'
Arab regime, that it is a 'friend'
and ally' of the United States"
and that "a very special relation-
ship exists between the two
countries."
The study declared that "the
reality was that for years Saudi
Arabia was, in effect, waging
economic and diplomatic warfare
against the U.S. and other
Western industrialized countries
and was politically undercutting
American peacemaking efforts in
the Middle East."
Emphasizing that Saudi
Arabia "is still working against
nearly all U.S. concerns in the
area," the report gave the fol-
lowing examples:
Although the Reagan peace
plan was based on the assump-
tion that Saudi Arabia would use
its economic and political support
for Jordan and the PLO to help
persuade King Hussein to enter
the negotiations, "no such thing
has come to pass";
The Saudis used their in-
fluence with Lebanon to try to
undermine peacemaking efforts
and did nothing to influence
Syria to cooperate in U.S.
mediation efforts;
Much of the Saudi funding
for both Syria and the PLO has
gone for the purchase of destabil-
izing arms from the Soviet
Union;
The Saudis cooperated with
Arab efforts to undermine the
Camp David peace process and
broke relations with Egypt afa,
the late Anwar Sadat signed the
peace treaty with Israel in 1979;
Despite the sale by the \}&
of all kinds of sophisticated am, ]
- F-15 fighters, jets, AWAC8
surveillance planes, ground radar
stations and guided missiles -
the Saudis refuse to permit the
establishment of American
military bases on their soil for the
defense of their own oil fields, the
Arabian Gulf and the Kingdom,
itaelf, although they in
threatened by nearby Iran and
Soviet air power in Afghanistan;
The Saudis put "extreme
pressure" on Oman to withdrew
permission for the U.S. to use
Omani territory for military
exercises related to the m,
defense;
Saudi Arabia objected to, aid
for a time blocked, U.S. oil our
chaaea for its Strategic Pet*
leum Reserve;
The Saudis denounced U.S.
efforts to rescue the American
hostages held by the Khomeini
regime in Iran as "American
military aggression."
According to the report,
"Washington policymakers
acquiesced to these unfriendly
Saudi acts under Democratic
and Republican administrations
alike" because all too often they
were preoccupied by "fears of
perceived Arab and Saudi oil
power and by notions that
"accommodation was
necessary to keep oil flowing and
to attract Saudi oil money to the
U.S."
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r.Julv 1.1988
Israeli Team
Open Indirect
[Negotiations
Mh PLO Reps
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
An Israeli team will
indirect negotiations
representatives of the
itine Liberation
ition in Geneva
for the release of
|ht Israeli soldiers
tured by the PLO in
)n, the Jerusalem
, Koteret Rashit,
jrted. The International
Cross will serve as go-
veen, the report said.
magazine, which credited
Cross sources for its ill-
ation, said there would be no
contact between the two
Red Cross representa-
ks would "shuttle" between
|two delegations. According to
report, Israel will be rep-
knted by a senior officer of the
Lei Defense Force and by Ann
rie Lambert who heads the
tment of humanitarian
with international
snizations at the Israel For-
i Ministry.
h Red Cross sources noted
; the fact that the third party
hese negotiations will not be a
i indicated that "both parties
ael and the PLO) gave up
of their principles to hold
le first time matter of fact
ptiations."
til*
GIVE
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Pae6
"^^^"e^sisaaaaaaaBSBaBss_ ^^ ^|^
lti^LCM!!^ti>n\COmmittee of- the TamPa JewUh federation
chaired by MarU Jacobs, continues its drive for a steady flow of cash
ZaLlZTr"?- SM*f*!p> '** Mickey Frink. Standing
N^ii'r^Tn (""*" Mtchael t*"; Bernard Bonne. UJA
National Cash Committee; Michael Kass and Ed Leibowitz.
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statewide, nationally and around the world. Through your support of the Tampa Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Appeal Campaign, it is possible.
As the 1983 Regular and Israel Special Fund Campaign enters the home stretch, those members
of the Tampa Jewish community who have not yet pledged are urged to do so. To reach our goal of
$1 million for the campaign another $80,000 must be raised in order to continue funding all
programs at their budgeted levels, locally and in Israel.
If you would like to make a pledge and have not yet been contacted, please take the time to clip
the pledge card below and return it to:
It
fl
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Name.
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UNTOD JIWtSH APPfAL CAMPAIGN
2808 Horatio Tampa. Florida 33609
Phone Number.
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In consider otion of the gifts of others and in rec-
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federation of Tornpo:
TNI SUM Oft
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If you have not been contacted or you wish to increase your commitment, please use this pledge
card. Mail it today!


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa'
Friday, July j ;
J
Richard GordimerPresident of Hillel School
By AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
Six years ago Hillel School of
Tampa opened its doors and arms
to two young children from
another community. Now their
father is becoming the next presi-
dent of the school.
Richard Gordimer assumes the
presidency of the Hillel School at
the annual meeting of the com-
bined Jewish agencies. He says
this is his way of giving some-
thing back to Hillel and to the
community. Gordimer is looking
forward to his term of office and
welcomes any increased involve-
ment from the Hillel School
Board of directors, the parents,
and the community, believing
that the school is truly a com-
munity endeavor.
He stated, "Our additions to
the Board of Directors were made
with this in mind." He referred
specifically to Maril Jacobs.
Harold Ewing, Sandy Solomon.
Dr. Paul R. Levine. Howard
Sinsley, Barbara Nathan, Larry
Weinfeld, Jeffrey Davidson, Dr.
Joyce Swarzman, and Cindy
Silverman.
Richard Gordimer is a
graduate of the University of
Ro<*heitpr, the University
of Pennsylvania Law School, and
he has a Master in Taxation from
the New York University
Graduate School of Law. He
works as a Certified Public Ac-
countant in a newly formed firm
Rivero. Roberts, and Gordimer.
Gordimer spoke of the transi-
tional phase the school is in now.
The new principal. Rabbi David
Kreutzer Hosts
United Synagogue
Council of
Presidents
The Southeast Region, United
Synagogue of America, and its
President, Franklin D. Kreutzer,
Miami. Florida, hosted the
annual Council of Regional Presi-
dent Conference of the United
Synagogue of America. Each
year the Council meets in a dif-
ferent Region of the United
States to study and analyze the
current status of the Conserva-
tive Movement.
The United States, Canada,
and Mexico is divided into 20 Re-
gions, and in conjunction with
the Central organization, the
United Synagogue of America
serves its 860 congregations.
With over l'/i million members,
the United Synagogue is the
largest congregational grouping
of Jews in America.
The Presidents met at the
Eden Roc Hotel, Miami Beach,
and had conferences, seminars,
and symposiums for a five-day
weekend. The conference began
with a bus tour of the Greater
Miami area and a dinner at the
home of Judy and Frank
Kreutzer. Thereafter, the dele-
gates returned to the hotel where
Alan Adas, Boston, Massachu-
setts, Chairman of the Council of
Regional Presidents, gave the
opening address, challenging the
participants to analyze the Con-
servative Movement as to
"Where are we? Where should we
be? How do we get there?"
The Council Steering Commit-
tee, in addition to Ades, consist-
ing of M. Milo Mandel, Los
Angeles, California; Carol Sher,
Quebec, Canada; and Franklin D.
Kreutzer, Miami, Florida,
participated in discussions rang-
ing from synagogue standards to
financing the Movement to con-
veying the message of the Move-
ment to the individual con-
gregant.
Richard Gordimer
Brusin, is expected to arrive in
August. He has been the Director
of Education at the Miles Town-
ship Jewish Congregation,
Skokie, Illinois. Says Gordimer.
"Rabbi Brusin will add his many
talents to making certain Hillel
School will prosper and grow
during the next fiscal year."
Gordimer spoke of the antici-
pated sale of the Beth Israel
building. The funds from this sale
would be utilized in enabling the
school to relocate at the Jewish
Community Center with modular
construction. They are hopeful of
being there by January 1,1984.
Gordimer mentioned tentative
plans for a kindergarten class at
Congregation Kol Ami in the
Fall.
Richard and Virginia Gordimer
live in the Bayway area of Tampa
and have two children. Andrew is
a sophomore at Tampa Prepatory
School, and Laura is an eighth
grade student at Hillel School.
Gordimer speaks with fore-
sight and pride of leading the
Hillel School Board of Directors
during this, their Bar Mitzvah
year.
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r.July 1,1983
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
From ffillel School To Oxford
Pe 7
By NINA SINSLEY
Librarian
| When Dina Shiloh enrolls at
xford University in London this
Lptember she'll be the first
lillel School of Tampa student to
[part of one of the world's most
emed institutions of higher
ning.
| Eighteen year-old Dina Shiloh
i bom in Israel. Her father Dr.
on Shiloh was at the time a
iical anthropologist affiliated
tth the Hadassah Hospital in
prusalem.
[ When Dr. Shiloh became part
| the faculty of the University of
uth Florida here in Tampa,
ua attended Hillel School. In
icing of the years 1973
ugh 1976 when Dina studied
Hillel her father commented:
appreciate the good
lucation and training Dina
L Obituaries
IINBINDER
neral services for Dr. I. Robert Eln-
er, 80. of Timpi, were hold Thura-
r June 23 fUbbl Frank N. Sundhelm,
egatlon 3cha*rsJ Zedek el-
ated Interment followed in Myrtle
I Memorial Park. A native of Rualt,
Elnblnder had lived In Tampa for
i last B8 yean. He practiced Dentlatry
\ Tampa for 60 yeara reUrlnf In ltTS.
i waa a member of the HUlaborough
^unty Dental Association,
egatlon Schaaral Zedek, Egypt
nple Shrine, Downtown Optlmlat
ub and Tampa Amateur Radio Club.
fcrvlvori Include his wife, Lillian
nUnder. Tampa; two daughters,
bara Garrett and Anne Kantor, both
Tampa; brother, Harry Darr, Long
nd and alx grandchildren. Richard
arrett. Laurie Oarrett. David
chelman, Todd Echelman, Michael
helman.
PROS,
el, of Tampa died Friday May XI.
r the part eight yeara she had lived In
Bay area She la survived by her
hter. Belle la of Tampa.
STERN ACK
|i(fuu, 88. of Tampa died Thursday
ay 28 The New York City native had
ed In the Bay area for the past 11
ara, coming from Lido Beach, Long
nd. She was a housewife. She Is sur-
ged by her husband. Michael; three
ughters, Muriel Hlrschfleld of Fort
kuderdale, Jeanne Wasll of Syracuse,
I v.. and Thelma Herman of Tampa;
V brother. Julius Krumholx of
gllahtown, N.J.; aeven grandchll-
and four great-grandchildren.
rlendu may make memorial gifts to
i Hemophilia Foundation.
(
A age TO, of 4849 Dunmore, died
ne 8. A native of Kiev Russia, Mrs.
ck had been a resident of Tampa for
| yeara and was a member of Rodeph
olom Synagogue and Past President
I the Sisterhood and Hadassah, mem
ft of Optomlsts. National Council of
ah Women and was an Interpreter
r the American Red Cross. She waa an
nator of The Interfalth Tea of
firlitiana and Jews and was recently
ored as one of the founders of Hillel
ol of Tampa. Survivors Include two
*. Benjamin and Melvui Zack. both
Tampa; three brothers, Barney
. Tampa. Jack Antonott. Tampa,
ula Antonoff, W. Palm Beach. Fla.;
'r. YetU Antonoff. Tampa, and
I grandchildren, Joel. Michael, and
orah Zack, all of Tampa. Memorials
be made to the Hadassah or Hillel
8MB, age eg, of Mil Bayahore Blvd.
* June, B. Mrs. Kartt had received
' Masters Degree In Education from
cnera College of Columbia Unlver
W A resident of Tampa for 83 yeara.
I had been In the Jewelry business
n her husband David and was a
mber of Rodeph Shoiom Synagogue
mm Sisterhood and National CouncU
rjewlah Women. Memorials may be
* to St. Joseph's Hospital Develop
" Council or Oncology CenUr.
?*" Cancer Society or Congrega
" "oOeph Shoiom. Survivors Include
husband. David; son. Michael
Wj daughter, Judith 8chwarU, all of
I! three brothers. Dr. Boloman
, Roalyn. N.Y.. Jack Oerber.
^ N J *nd Bernard Oerber,
m, Fia.; alster. Esther Otto. LINY
grandchildren.
|>NSKY
I Oerber, 84. of Tampa died Wednes
r June 8 A naUve of BUlyatoker,
"" *h came to the Bay area tt
Mo from Chicago. She was a
S"* had been a member of
Ph Shoiom Congregation since
M,*e ** also a member of the
^3\ Shoiom Sisterhood, the
2**M' Osnter of New York, the
""m of Zion in Chicago, the Jew-
^mmuntty Center. Hadassah, and
"^ by State of Israel Bond pro-
Sn* Is survived by two sons.
I. and Marshall, both of
..!!? ***>tar. French* M
1 or Tmpa; 10 grandchildren and
Dina Shiloh
received at Hillel." After Hillel
School, Dina's parents wanted
her to recieve a typically British
program of studies to supplement
her earlier learning. This is
understandable since Mrs. Shiloh
herself was born and educated in
England. So instead of High
School here Dina was sent to
Carmel College in WsJlinirford
England.
Carmel College is an Orthodox
Jewish boarding school for pre-
college level students. Dina won
honors there in English and
History. She recently applied in
the competition for admission to
Oxford as a freshman for the
class of 1983-84.
Dr. Shiloh's pride in his
daughter's academic achieve-
ments is enthusiastic, but the
gratefulness he expressed to me
about the value Hillel School
played in Dina's life is con-
tagious.
Tampa families and all well
wishers know they'll be hearing
more good news from Hillel
School's London connection.
Old World and Current Art / Fine Furnishings
SEH
EEE
Pictured from left are Marsha Sherman, Jolene Shor and Rhoda
Davit, representing the Tampa Women's Division during the recent
United Jewish Appeal Florida Region Women's Division Conference
in Palm Beach. Sherman was appointed Chairman of the 1983-84
Florida Region during the two-day conference by national chair-
woman, Harriet Zimmerman.
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ManflD Lynch
First Florida Tower
Tampa. Ft 33602
813-273-8500
Buying or Selling
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Michael Yoelson
Director of Sales
Jack Hardeo Realty Corp.
963-2100 Office
963-1629 Evening
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Markowitz Baer
B'nai Brith District 5
Continued from Page 1
Thorn, will be many of the Dia-
trict Paat Preaidenta with whom
EUieon haa aarvod and apodal
tribute on behalf of all of his
profatonal colleague* will be
made by Errol Imber, of Dallaa,
Texaa, Executive Director of
Diatrict Seven.
Paat President Tommy P.
Baer, of Richmond, Va. is the
overall convention chairman with
Paat President Jay Markowitz, of
Senator Law ton Chiles ID-Flo.) met on June 9 with Assistant
Secretary of State Elliott Abrams to discuss the plight of Soviet
Jewry. The Senator presented a mailbag of letters from concerned
f-L ndians and a petition with hundreds of signatures to Abrams, the
Administration official responsible for human rights issues. The
petition and letters, many of them written by children, were gathered
earlier this year at a rally in Miami, organized by the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Shultz's Views Shock Rabin
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former Premier Yitzhak Rabin
blames American misconceptions
for the present impasse in Leba-
non. He said Secretary of State
George Shultz relied on erron-
eous information when he in-
sisted that Syria would accept
the Israel-Lebanon agreement.
The Syrians should have been
brought into the negotiations
from the outset, Rabin declared
on a television interview. "I haa
a difficult argument with Shultz
when he was here, and asked
what made him think the Syrians
would accept an American-Israe-
li-Lebanese agreement." Rabin
said.
"He relied on information that
the Syrians were ready to do so in
principle. I nearly fell off my
chair when I heard what Ameri-
can policy was based on, and I
am still worried by their concep-
tion." Rabin said.
He was referring to his meeting
with Shultz last month when the
Secretary of State spent 17 days
in the region shuttling between
Jerusalem and Beirut in an effort
to secure the Israel-Lebanon
agreement signed May 17.
Tampa, as the local chairman. All
logistical arrangements are under
the supervision of the District
staff with Assistant District
Executive Vice-President Neil
Rosen as coordinator. In addition
to the business sessions, the dele-
gates will be able to participate in
golf and tennis tournaments.
Chairman Baer said, "This is our
first convention at a resort and
we are ready to accommodate
this record attendance. Arrange-
ments have been made for en-
tertainment and a fashion show
for the spouses while the men are
attending the business sessions."
In order to highlight the multi-
faceted programs available,
conference groups have been
organized to discuss the work of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. the Youth programs
as highlighted by BBYO and
Hillel members, the Israel Com-
mission: the Adult Jewish
Education Department. Com-
munity and Veterans Services
and a special segment devoted to
Young Leaders and general
leadership and motivational
techniques.
After the convention is ad-
journed Tuesday afternoon,
newly installed President Louis
Hymson will conduct a meeting
of his new Board of Governors.
At that time it is anticipated that
the newly appointed District
Executive Vice-President Neil C.
Rosen will begin his responsibui-
ites. Ellison will be accorded the
title of Honorary Executive V ice-
President with life membership
on the Board of Governors.
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Members of the Tampa Jewish Federation Women's I
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