The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00348

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
Klemsti Florid id ti
T
Of Tampa
ume5- Number 21
Tampa, Florida Friday, June 3,1983
(T^dSMCwr
Price 35 Cents
iommunity Agencies To Hold Annual Meeting June 23
i Tampa Jewish Federation,
Jewish Community Center,
|ampa Jewish Social Service,
ihe Hillel School of Tampa
illy invite the community to
[ipate in their joint Annual
ig and special awards pre-
lions on Wednesday, June
1:30 p.m. at the Hyatt
Hotel.
linated to head the Jewish
jnity Center for 1984 is
)avidson, she will succeed
Mock. Richard Gordimer
ad the Hillel School, suc-
Paul Pershes. Stephen
[President of the Tampa
I Social Service, and Mi-
Levine, President of the
| Jewish Federation have
lominated to serve as
\ta for another year.
ian of the evening will
\e Shear. George Karpay,
esident of the Tampa
federation will be the in-
Bfiicer. In addition to the
election and installation of of-
ficers and board members, the
annual awards to the Tampa
Jewish Federation Leo Levinson
Award, the Tampa Jewish Com-
munity Center, Bob Jacobson
Memorial Award, the Tampa
Jewish Social Service Rose Segall
Award, and the Hillel School
Maurice Levine Scholarship
Award will be given by their
respective agencies. The Tampa
Jewish Federation will also
present awards to their campaign
leadership and workers for the
1983 campaign.
A special feature of the evening
will be a premiere multi-media
community presentation which
will spotlight volunteers and ac-
tivities of all the agencies.
Reservations can be made by
calling 875-1618, or by respon-
ding with a check in the amount
of $5 per person for the dessert
buffet, to the Tampa Jewish Fed-
eration.
vine Tapped For
Second Term
linating Committee
Bounces Selections
Jacobs, Chairman of the
Jewish Federation
ig Committee has an-
the slate of officers and
IDirectors who will serve
L. Levine has been
to serve a second term
ent of the Federation,
ration operates on a
rear and the term of
from July 1 though
by-law change will
le Tampa Jewish
to have a rep-
from each congre-
member of the board
to serve as Vice
ras Howard Sins ley.
}lph will continue as
land Sam Blum has
ited as Treasurer.
irs and board of direc-
\ elected at the Annual
Meeting on June 23 (see related
story). The following have been
nominated as members of the
board of directors: Leah David-'
son, Steve Segall, Richard
Gordimer, Rabbi Kenneth
Berger, John Osterweil, Lili
Kaufmann, B. Terry Aidman,
Brian Abeles, Les Barnett, Nate
Gordon, Maril Jacobs, Dr. Steve
Kreitzer, Roger Mock, Lois
Older, Judy Rosenkranz, Herz
Swarzman, Paula Zielonka,
Marshall Linsky, Nancy Linsky,
Dr. Steven Field, Jolene Shor,
Lfnda Blum, Dr. Carl Zielonka,
Bobbe Karpay, Dave Zohar,
William Kalish, Dough Cohn,
Sharon Mock, Kay Jacobs,
Rhoda Karpay, Joel Karpay,
George Karpay, Marsha Sher-
man, Rabbi Frank Sundheim and
Charles Adler.
Serving on the nominating
committee with Jacobs were Sam
Blum, Dr. Steven Field, Blossom
Leibowitz, Lois Older, John
Osterweil, Franci R. Rudolph,
and Michael Levine, ex-officio.
(uper Foot Day' For
Federation/UJA
ieduledForJunel5
Jewish Federation
a "Super Foot Day"
ly, June 15, in an at-
rind up all 1983 cam-
Campaign and
leadership have been
as Barnett, 1983 Cam-
in, to give up one
[pair up in teams of two
id all unrealized cam-
will begin with a kick-
ist at 8:15 a.m. where
be paired off and soli-
cards distributed,
will report back at
5:30 p.m. for "L'chaim Time" to
close out the day.
The 1983 Tampa Jewish Fed-
eration-United Jewish Appeal
Campaign has realised over
$860,000 to date with another
$105,000 to $200,000 in 1982
pledges still outstanding. The
1983 campaign will officially
close on June 30 and budget allo-
cations will be made based on
the campaign results through
the end of June.
Volunteers willing to partici-
pate in "Super Foot Day" are
asked to call the Tampa Jewish
Federation at 875-1618.
Michael Levine
Sharon Mock
Paul Pershes
Richard Gordimer
Leah Davidson
Experts Flock
To Israel's Exhibit
Show Spotlights Electronic Hardware
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Over
20 Israeli industrial firms
specializing in aircraft
construction and defense
equipment ranging from
sophisticated missiles to
electronic equipment are
taking part in the Paris
International Air Show
here.
Foreign experts attending the
show said that Israel's aerospace
industries are among the world's
half-dozen most advanced in the
field of both research and
production. The Israeli delega-
tion to the Air Show, held at Le
Bourget, is headed by Defense
Moshe Arens who was invited by
the French Defense Minister
Charles Hernu.
HUNDREDS OF foreign
experts crowded the Israeli
pavilion as the show opened. The
use of highly sophisticated
Israeli-made and designed
electronic warfare equipment
during last summer's battles
when 80 Syrian planes and 400
tanks were destroyed in a matter
of days, helped spur interest
The pavilion had on display
several types of missiles, in-
cluding the world fsmous
Python-3, the third generation
air-to-air Raphael missile based
on the Shafrir-2 used in Israel's
previous wars, and the SAR-2
advanced artillery location
system which can simultaneously
handle up to 50 different fire
sources and was successfully
used in Lebanon.
Israeli experts at the air show
revealed that the Lavie prototype
jet fighter will be airborne in
February, 1986 but refused to say
when the multi-purpose warplane
will go into production. The
single-engine combat aircraft,
now under development, is
designed for short and medium
range air-to-ground missions and
is expected to become "the work-
horse" of the Israeli Air Force in
the 1990s.
THE HEAD of Israel Aircraft
Industries research and develop-
ment unit, Dr. Ben Zion Naveh,
told a press conference that "we
have by now all the American
export licenses needed for the
production of the plane."
Naveh and other IAI experts
stressed that Israel did not need
and had not asked for a tech-
nology transfer but for manufac-
tured parts. "We had no know-
how problem but one of procure-
ment," they said
Asked about American restric-
tions on the sale of the Lavie
abroad, IAI officials said "the
plane is not subjected to any
special restrictions but will have
to comply with normal American
restrictions applying to the sals
of combat planes manufactured
with American parts to third
countries. It will be s case by case
decision," they said.
THOUGH THE Lavie will be
equipped with an American-made
Pratt and Whitney jet engine,
most of its sophisticated equip-
ment will be Israeli manufactured
and designed. Its electronic
warfare self-protection system
has been designed by an IAI
subsidiary, Elta Electronics, and
will consist of a fully automatic
and power managed computer
network which will permit rapid
threat identification and auto-
matic response using various
deception techniques.
Experts said that experience
gained during the air battles in
Lebanon has been used to ensure
the Levies' future pilots' ease of
control, maximum survivability
and 100 percent mission comple-
tion.
A new version of the "Kfir,"
the C-7, destined to fill the gap
between the Kfir-C-2 and the
Lavie, will be on display at Le
Bourget and probably will take
part in several fly-overs. The new
version has a longer range, more
powerful engine and greater
operation potential.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
_rida^Jun-3 ,ijj
H
I
I
I"

.
By LESLIE AIDMAN
(Call me about your social news at 872-4470)
Lots of good wishes and love to our good friends Elaine and
Mort Stupp, who recently celebrated a milestone anniversary
. Big No. 25! We know they did some special celebrating with
good friends and family, including their two children, Gary and
Shari. Our best to both of you on such a really special occasion.
Some of our young friends have really been racking up the
honors lately, and we knew you would enjoy hearing about
them.
Robin Rosenberg, daugher of Connie Rosenberg and Seta
Rosenberg, was given the PRIDE Award in Social Studies at
Plant High School. An award instituted, supported, and
standards set by the Governors office, covers four areas of
study Each high school chooses an outstanding student in Math,
Science, English, and Social Studies to represent them in later
county competition (involving oral and written exams). Robin
placed third in the county competition and was awarded a trip to
EPCOT to hear President Reagan speak on the "Future of Math
and Science."
Janet Echdman, daughter of Dr. Gil Echebnan and Mr. and
Mrs. Bernie Kantor, was one of six Hillsborough County
students who were each awarded a $750 scholarship recently
during the 25th annual Tampa Tribune-Times Senior Honor
Student Banquet.
Alice Cohen, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Cohen, was
one of three seniors given the Civitan Club award as an out-
standing junior citizen, presented at the Tampa Tribune-Times
Senior Honor Student Banquet. She received $75 savings bond.
Todd Bass, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bass, has recently been
elected Chancellor of the Honor Court at the University of Flor-
ida. This position, which has been held by various state leaders
including Governor Graham, is responsible for presiding over
cheating cases and interpreting the University of Florids consti-
tution. Todd, who is a member of the Florida Blue Key Leader-
ship Honorary, is beginning his third year in law school, and will
be graduating next May. Todd, we think you are just terrific!
On to higher education is the direction for many of our gradu-
ating high school seniors. We would like to tell you where some
of these young people will be studying in the fall, and would like
to tell you about more if only we knew about them. So if you
do not see your name in this list and would like to, please call the
Flondian" office at 872-4470 and give us the needed informa-
tion:
Janet Echelman Harvard
Kenny Jacobs Tulane
Mark Wright Tulane
Jon Ketover University of Florida
Jeff Richman University of Pennsylvania
Larry Block Stanford University
Eric Schwartz Stanford University
David Hochberg Tulane
Elizabeth Woodrow Mercer
Alice Cohen University of the South
Tami Sbar University of Florida
Good luck kids on a really fantastic and productive coming
Rodeph Sholom High School Graduates honored!
At Shabbat services on Saturday, May 21, the following high
school graduates participated in the services and were honored
on their graduation:
^o L^riT0,, Jkkmd M*""*. Todd Mexrah. Jeff Becker,
gfefiSg** ?!ib"Eriich' K~* Cohen. Steve Cohen,
By.".'"?- A***" SWin. JfllSandier, Mark
w nght, and Kalpn Bobo.
A Kiddush Club Havurah luncheon and discussion followed
the service.
Three cheers for Mrs. Dae Btanck, who recently became a
Great Grandmother! Roth Ele. MeaJow^baby daughter of Dr.
Glenn and Lynn^Meadows, of Hampton. Virginia, was born on
May 3. She weighed 81b. 5Wox. This little miss' grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Harold Shapiro, of Augusta, Georgia Well
Great Gram, we know this is a mighty special event in your life
Our friend, Violet Malevan has been and will continue to be
one busy lady over the next few weeks. On April 11 her sixth
grandchild, and third granddaugter, Stephanie Megan Miller,
was born to Barbara and Randall Miller, of Cincinnati. Violet
was present at the birth and then stayed on in Ohio in order to
attend the weekend reunion of her Confirmation class of 1933,
from Temple Tifereth Israel, in Cleveland. This weekend, she
just took off again to attend the graduation exercises of her
oldest gnrfflchild, Michael Jeremy IsBar, of Greensboro,
North Carolina. Michael will begin his freshman year at Willfcm
College, in the fall Following that, Violet takes off for a two
week European vacation in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.
Well. Violet, I am exhausted just from writing about all of your
wanderlust. Everything sure sounds like fun thoOgh so hive
a great time!
Congratulations to Jean Gilbert who was recently inducted at
a Bar Auxiliary luncheon and fashion show, held at Avila
Country Club, as the president of the Hillsborough County Bar
Auxiliary. Serving on her board will be our friend, Trudie
Barkin. Lots of good wishes to both of you.
The Hillel School Math whiz kids are at it again. The Florida
Mathematics League, a math test open to every school in the
state of Florida has announced its results. Hillel School has
placed first in Hillsborough County in the Elementary Division
and fifth in the State of Florida. Mrs. Selma Bowman,
mathematics teacher, wishes to commend the following students
whose scores were responsible for this honor. Joshua KreUxer,
son of Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Kreitzer, whose personal score
placed him first in Hillsborough County: Jay Midhaelson, son of
Mr. aad Mrs. Stanley Michaelson; Marc Sacks, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jay Sacks; Danielle Heyman, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
Steven Heyman: and Shoshanna Kern, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Saul Korn.
Meet Barbara and Murray Lay ton who moved to Carrollwood
about a year and a half ago, from Hollywood, where they had
resided for 11 years. Barbara originally hails from Boston and
Murray from New York. They resided in Boston for 25 years,
until Murray was transferred to Hollywood by his company. He
was Vice President in charge of sales for Glenmore Distributors.
About two years ago, he retired and he and Barbara then moved
to Tampa to be near their children. Murray is now partners with
his son Neil in the real estate business. They own office
buildings together. Their daughter, Carol is an Associate Editor
for the "Good Life Guide." Our new family is a member of Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek, where Murray is a member of the
Men's Club and Barbara is a member of the Sisterhood. Murray
said that he is a great sports enthusiast. Our new friends seem to
be fitting right into their new community and we are mighty
glad that they are here to stay.
Until the next edition. .
WANTED!!
Enthusiastic Hebrew
and
Religious School
Teachers for
Congregation
KOL AMI
September 1983-
May1984
If interested,
please call:
Rabbi Rosenthal
or
Mary Kanter
962-6338
for details
Mission to Israel
Planned Oct. 9-19
The Tampa Jewish Federation
in cooperation with the Florida
Region of the United Jewish Ap-
peal will sponsor a 10 day mission
to Israel from Sunday, Oct. 9
through Wednesday. Oct. 19.
The tentative agenda includes
spending several days in and
around Jerusalem; a day in the
Negev with overnight in Beer-
sheba; Tel Aviv, the Galilee and
sleeping overnight at the home of
an Israeli family in the north.
The estimated cost of the 10
day mission is $1962. A subsidy
with a minimum commitment to
the 1984 Tampa Jewish Feder-
ation United Jewish Appeal
Campaign is being considered by
the Federation Board of Di-
rectors. For further information
contact the Tampa Jewish Feder-
ation at 875-1618.
NATION UNITED
JEWISH APPEAL
YOUNG LEADERSHIP
SINGLES MISSION
July 17-27
$1800 from New York
Contact Tampa Jewish
Federation-875-1618 for
additional information.
Having a Baby-A New
Life During Mid-Life
On Thursday, June 9 from
7:30-9:30 p.m. the Women's Sur-
vival Center at 306 S. Hyde Park
Ave. will sponsor a two part
seminar which will examine the
medical and emotional issues of
pregnancy after the age of 35.
Dr. Robert Knuppel, an expert
in the field of high risk obstetrics,
will discuss the medical aspects
involved in pregnancy after 35
and will endeavor to dispel the
many prevailing myths and fears,
Sharing the program with Dr.
Knuppel will be Lorraine
Kushner. Childbirth Educator,
who will review the emotional re^
wards and challenges as well as
the social and recreational
changes which occur during this
experience.
Admission is free but as space
is limited advance registration is
requested.
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Friday. June 3, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 3
CJF Women's Division Names
Tampa Leaders To National Women's Cabinet
Kay Jacobs and Rhoda Karpay
have been named to serve a
second two-year term on the
Council of Jewish Federations
National Woman's Division
Cabinet, it has been announced
by Phyllis Freedman of Atlanta,
Women's Division Chairman.
This Cabinet will meet at the CJF
spring and fall meetings as well
u the annual General Assembly.
The CJF Women's Division
serves to link local Federation's
Women'8 Divisions throughout
North America, developing
collective policy and direction. It
functions as a clearing house and
initiator of innovative concepts in
leadership training, Jewish
enrichment and fundraising
skills.
The CJF is the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils which
serve nearly 800 communities
and embrace over 95 percent of
the Jewish population of the
United States and Canada.
P&B Network Holds
Successful Meeting
Kay Jacobs
Established in 1932, the Council
serves as a national instrument
to strengthen the work and the
impact of Jewish Federations
through leadership in developing
programs to meet changing needs
in the Jewish community;
through the exchange of succes-
sful experiences to assure the
most effective community ser-
vices; through establishing
guidelines for fundraising and
Rhoda Karpay
operation; and through joint na-
tional planning and action on
common purposes dealing with
local, national, regional and
international needs.
Both Jacobs and Karpay have
served many leadership roles in
the Tampa Jewish Federation,
the annual campaign, and both
have served as President of the
Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division.
Over 70 women met for the
secontn^une last week for the
newly formed Jewish Business
and Professional Women's Net-
work. Guest speaker was Dr.
Michael Lillibridge who enthral-
led the group with his informa-
tive, and often humorous
presentation on "Coping For
Success A Blueprint."
Serving on the Steering Com-
mittee are: Linda Goldstein,
Margot Marcadis, Janet Ettle-
man, Rhoda Karpay, Natalie
Goldberg, Betty Tribble and
Joyce Swarzman. The Network is
sponsored by the Women's Divi-
sion of the Tampa Jewish
Federation and was formed as a
support system that would bring
these women together to meet
their personal growth and fulfil-
lment needs. The program has
met several purposes already and
has created an excitement Jew-
iahly in this new group of women;
it has encouraged new social rela-
tionships, and provided an arena
to exchange personal experien-
ces.
A June meeting is being plan-
ned. During the summer months,
it was decided not to have
program meetings, but "keep-in-
touch" meetings.
A mailing list is being com-
piled at the Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division
office anyone who would like
to be on the list for future
meetings should call the office,
875-1618.
Women's Division To A ttendFlorida Regional Conference
Members of the Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division
will attend the National United
Jewish Appeal Women's Division
Florida Regional Conference in
Palm Beach on June 1, 2.
Attending from Tampa will be
Bobbe Karpay, Jolene Shor,
Marsha Sherman and Rhoda
Davis.
Guest speakers at the two-day
conference will be Harriet Zim-
merman, U J A National Women's
Division Chairmen: Dr. Haim
Lili Kaufmann New
Women's Division President
Shaked, Professor of Middle
Eastern Studies; Dr. Rela Geffen
Monson, Associate Professor of
Sociology, and Annette Dulzin,
Journalist. Some of the work-
shops will include; Management
skills for committee chairwomen;
fund-raising; concept and reality;
foundation and endowment;
business and professional wo-
men; new gifts, etc.
Linda Goldstein, Dr. Joyce Swarzman, and Betty Tribble are shown
with the guest speaker, Dr. Michael Lillibridge, well known
psychologist and author.
Photos: Audrey Haubenstock
I.ili Kaufmann was installed as
president of the Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division
lust week at their Annual End of
the Year Awards Luncheon and
Installation. The luncheon was
held at the new Hilton Airport
Hotel.
Kaufman is married to Dr.
Barry C. Kaufmann and they
have two sons, David and Peter.
She belongs to several com-
munity organizations, and is im-
mediate past president of the Bay
Horizons ORT. She and her
family belong to Congregation
Schaarai Zedek where she is a
trustee, and former Adult Educa-
tion Chairman. She serves on the
Tamoa Jewish Federation Board
of Directors, Women's Division
Board of Directors; and is a
National Board Member for the
Council of Jewish Federations,
National Leadership Develop-
ment. Lib has also served in
various campaign positions as
well as having participated in
several past "Super Sunday"
Campaigns.
Outgoing President. Markne
Linick stated, "I feel very confi-
dent in leaving the leadership of
the women of the Tampa Jewish
community in Lili's capable
hands. She is a very dedicated,
organized lady and I know she
will continue to improve the
mage of the Women's Division
with her innovative ideas; her
Plans include education and
adership training. We are all
behind her, and! know all of
Tampa will give her the support
they gave me."
Dedication Held
JERUSALEM (JTA> -
Premier Menachem Begin and
Mayor Teddy Kollek attended
the dedication Wednesday of a
municipal garden planted near
the Prime Ministers office.
adjoming the spot where Peace
Now activist Emil Grunzweig
was killed by a grenade at the
*eb. 10 Peace Now demons-
tration.
Hostesses for the Jewish Federation Business
and Professional Women's Group meeting May
23 at the Marriott Hotel were (from left) Phyllis
Feldman, Debbi Eisenstadt, Bonnie Hayflick-
Stargardt, Amy Schener, Lois Older, Bonita
Malit, Celia Bachman, and Linda Platt.
Lili Kaufmann
The Board of Directors
of the
Tampa Jewish Federation
Tampa Jewish Community Center
Tampa Jewish Social Service
HUM School of Tampa
Cordially Invite You To Attend The
Annual
Combined
Meeting
and
Special Awards Presentation
Together...
We Make The Difference!
(A Premier Multi-media community presentation)
Wednesday, June 23,1983
7:30 P.M.
Hyatt Regency Hotel
Dessert Buffet following the program
Cost:
$5.00
RSVP:June20
876-1618


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, June3,]
Ofewish Floridian Verbal Circumciswn 'Dirty Trick
of Tampa
BuimiiOffia 3644 Hrnhrnx. Blvd Tampa. FU 3M0*
THearinii 871-44TO
Pubueatiofi Office 1*0 NE a St Miami. Pal Mitt
FRED K SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET JUDITH ROSENKRANZ
Editor and Publisher Enciiun Editor Associate Editor
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It* Jewish FVsnakaa Dm* Net Geswaatee TW lUahrath
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Published Fnckys-Weekly Septeeahrr iruuua-h May
Bi Weakly Juae laraarh Au|uH by The Jeans* FueTdien ol Tampa
Second CUmPmuit Paid si Miami FU I 'SI'S 471-910
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Baa t\Z37X Miaaai. FVanda 13101
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The Jewish Plondtao maintain, no free bat People receiving the paper arteo have not eubembed
direciiy are subscribers ihroujrti arrangement with (he Jewish Federation of Tampa srhereby OXtO
par year n deducted from their contributions for a nibampuon to the paper Anyone wi shins: la
cancel such a ubsrriptmn should so noufv The Jewish Flondian or The Federation
Friday, June 3, 1983
Volume 5
22 SIVAN 5743
Number 21
Israel's Strength is Ours
It began with Jimmy Carter's presidency
For some years now, the theory at the State
Department has been that American prestige
and influence in the Middle East were being
undermined by an overly-close relationship
between the United States and what the Arabs
themselves were calling an "intransigent"
Israel. Pretty soon, "intransigent" became the
key word in American circles too, not to
mention in the media.
At the root of all of this "intransigence," or
so went the theorizing, was Prime Minister
Menachem Begin. But the facts appear to be
just the opposite reckoned in terms of the
passing of time. Since then, the truth is that
Israel's so-called ''hardline'' has in reality
resulted in a growing sense of moderation
among the more reasonable of the Arab
nations.
Prof. Robert Tucker, writing in the May
Commentary Magazine, notes that "Rather
than having had the effects that prevailing
wisdom must lead us to expect, the actions of
the Begin Government to date appear to have
had quite the opposite effects."
Tucker adds: "A hardline Israeli policy if
such it is to be considered has not led to
Arab rejection of the U.S., but to Arab ac-
ceptance, and indeed encouragement, of an
American role in the Middle East that would
not have appeared possible only a few years
ago."
In short, the more reasonable Arab states are
all for the Israeli-Lebanon agreement and are, if
anything, only baffled by how to pressure Syria
into accepting it. Furthermore, according to
Tucker, the allegation of "Israeli in-
transigence" is now perceived in precisely the
opposite terms:
"To a degree that has seldom been ap-
preciated," he notes in Commentary, "let alone
openly acknowledged, the strength of the
American position in the Middle East has been
a function of Israel's power, just as it has been
a function of the intimacy of the Israeli-
American relationship."
ThePariah Disappearing
The upshot of all of this?
Whereas, before, U.S. policy conceived that
Israel must be brought to heel by working
toward the fall of the Begin Government, and
went out of its way to court such Labor Party
Opposition leaders as Shimon Peres, Itzhak
Rabin and Abba Eban, now that policy with
respect to these men, all of whom spoke out
against the Israel-Lebanon agreement, is just
the opposite.
The consequence is that it takes no
mastermind to see just why Secretary of
Defense Caspar Weinberger is suddenly such a
pussy cat so far as Israel is concerned.
And why Bonn is now considering setting
aside the sanctions it called into play against
Israel last June.
Observes Tucker: "The period of the Begin
Government has not resulted in the resurgence
of Arab radicalism, but in the modest
strtngtheoing of Arab moderates.' One hopes
that it is no longer we and others in our corner
who say these things. Finally. Israel's erstwhile
allies appear to be saying them too.
REPUBLICANS must make
jp with their money what they
lack in numbers. This is why they
are acquiring a reputation for
dirty tricks.
But their dirtiest trick, I sus-
pect, is an essentially intellectual
one, having nothing to do with
the most celebrated achievement
in their arsenal of trickery,
Watergate, or even the tactics in
which they are alleged to have
engaged the other night during
the national Democratic Party
telethon fund-raiser.
WHAT I have in mind is their
'assault upon the proper noun.
Democratic, as in Democratic
Party, to which 1 have just made
reference. This dirty trick pre-
cedes the Watergate affair by
years, and while no President has
been forced to resign as a con-
sequence, it is in many ways far
more insidious than its notorious
predecessor.
Democratic, actually, is an ad-
jective intended to describe a
noun in such a way as to suggest
rule of the people or, more com-
monly, free or populist. Its tran-
sition to the status of proper
noun merely proposes a name for
those who subscribe to the prin-
ciples and feelings about democ-
racy, hence Democratic or Demo-
cratic Party.
But what have the Republicans
done? They have chopped off the
suffix, "ic," meaning in this
Greek context "in the nature of"
or "pertaining to," on their ig-
norant assumption that it invests
Democratic with a unique status
which their name should not give
them, since Republicans can after
all be individuals who are also, as
adjective, democratic, that is to
say. believers in rule of the
people.
HENCE, according to the Re-
publicans, the opposition party is
Democrat, both as noun and even
when used as an adjective. For
example, Jimmy Carter was a
Democrat President, who was
elected by the Democrat Party.
Well, this sort of verbal cir-
cumcision needs treatment in
kind. Take the word, Republican.
The suffix, "an," in Latin means
"of" or "belonging to," hence
those who subscribe to a Repub-
lican form of governmentin es-
sence, rule by representation.
But this is far too distin-
guished for. say, the likes of
James Watt, who merely be-
lieves in money. Henceforth", they
are all Republics. The Republic
Party elected Richard Nixon, a
Republic President, who be-
trayed the republic when he hired
a bunch of crooks to break into
the Watergate headquarters of
the Democrat Party.
That should do it.
DID YOU know that laws on
the books today require genetic
screening for such diseases as
phenylketonuria (PKUI and
sickle cell anemia?
The idea is to reduce the inci-
dence of PKU, the presence of
which can lead to mental retarda-
tion, and sickle cell unomif a
disease that afflicts blacks, with
the hope ultimately of rooting out
entirely these unhappy genetic
defects.
Genetic screening for Tay
Sachs, the "Jewish disease." is
also a widespread practice by
now, but it is not yet legally re-
quired.
This means that teats on the
fetus for such diseases that prove
positive have abortion as their
dominant purpose.
MY PROBLEM is what the
nosy, noisy, butt-insky. so-
called pro-lifers are going to do
about all of this. If the intent of
the Laws governing genetic
screening is abortion, then how
can. aay. President Reagan con-
tinue to press for an anti-abortion
arnendment?
This is no mere.
tion because, among other
things, oodles of money are in-
volved, and for Republics, money
tips the balance in all considera-
tions, including moral considera-
tions. Remember James Watt?
For example, the genetic
screening issue has already at-
tracted the eye of the insurance
industry, which increasingly
seems disinclined to offer health
and life insurance to persons af-
flicted with the kind of genetic
diseases that the screening
process hopes to weed out.
Can you really picture
government issuing a direct
aimed at forcing the insurance
dustry to continue offering hi
and life policies to person.,
the genetic potential for PKU*
sickle cell anemia or Tay Sachs I
not with the afflictions t
selves? And at the same
that the Republic Preai^
Reagan wants abortion to be I
legalized?
SCIENTISTS themselves
the ultimate paradoxes inu
screening. Most of them arecoii
cerned, or ought to be concern*!
about the fact that the proliferJ
tion of the process into areas i\
genetic engineering we can
dream about today may in
end abandon us to
voluntary choices as to who sh
live, and who shall die.
This is more than a matter oil
Continued on Page 12
Colonel Meir Doron. Jewish National Fund Emissary to the UniU
States discusses the work of the JNF in the Northern Galilee wit
Gulf Coast Council JNF President Mrs. Bruce Epstein. Colo*,
IJoron.who attended the Council meeting at the home of Dr andMrA
irwm Browarshy, addressed the problems of security along Wi
no hern border and how the JNFs land reclamation program, tV
helping to alleunte these conditions.
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o2v\eeks
? 15 Days and 14 Nights
I Round tnp transport from
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? Concord representative will
meet you and handle your
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? Gratuities for waiter and maids
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Q Local and State Taxes
u 14 Breakfasts
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12 Cocktail Parties
vVrjIcornednnk upon arrival
ADDi
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Superior Room$595
Executive Room$640
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? Speakers. Social Programs
and Dairy Fun Activities
i-i Entertainment every mght
a Dancing to 3 orchestras
f i MormceUo Raceway Nearby
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f, June 3.1983
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 5
Honor Students
He is a three year tennis letter-
man and was voted this year's
MVP.
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
proudly honors the following out-
Landing graduating seniors from
%llsborough County for 1983.
Pamela Barhin
Forensic L League, Pep-O-Plant,
French Club. She has been active
in SchZFY {Temple Youth
Group).
JeffBecker
JEFF BECKER
Valedictorian at
H.B. Plant High School
Jeff Becker is the top student
of 510 students in this 54th grad-
ating class of H. B. Plant High
ISchool. He is the son of JoAnn
nd Robert Becker and has lived
|in Tampa three years, coming
om Fort Worth, Tex.
Self motivation was a word
lused many times during our in-
Iterview. That is certainly one of
[the reasons he has worked at the
[Museum of Science and Industry
Ifor two and a half years. He is an
[Explainer there five afternoons
leach week. As his title says, he
[explains one area of the Museum
[and does some experiments for
Dse attending. Most of his ex-
[periments are on solar energy and
|static electricity.
During the summer of 1982 he
I spent five days at the U.S. Naval
Academy in Annapolis at a Sci-
ence Seminar with 300 other high
school students. He learned of
the different science fields and
was able to concentrate on his
[ mechanical engineering interests.
Becker was president of BBYO
I from May 1982 until January
1983. He has been North Florida
i Council secretary for the past
year also. He feels he has been
greatly influenced by this youth
I organization.
At Plant High School he was
[awarded a Golden Panther in
math indicating he was the top
math student. On March 8 he was
a representative from school in-
vited to Epcot to hear President
Ronald Reagan speak to 500
math and science students from
all over the state.
Other honors include out-
standing Spanish student, Math
Bowl, Florida Math League
Award, National Merit Com-
mendation, National Honor Soci-
ety, MU Alpha Theta (Math
Honor Society), Spanish Honor
Society, I Dare You (a society for
students who have made straight
A's for two consecutive quarters),
Tribune Time Honor Student,
Gold and Black, Key Club.
Future plane are to attend
University of Texas in Austin.
He has been awarded a $5,000
scholarship and baa been ac-
cepted to the Freshman engineer-
ing honors program which will
give him all advanced classes.
Becker is excited about this
phase of his life being over and is
looking forward to his new front-
iers.
PAMELA BARKIN
Pamela Bar kin, daughter of
Trudy and Marvin Barkin, is
graduating salutatorian from H.
B Plant High School. She will
attend Duke University to
pursue a career in medicine.
High School honors include
National Merit finalist, Plant
High Hall of Fame, Gold and
Black, MVP Golf Team.
Other activities include presi-
dent Mu Alpha Theta, National
Honor Society, Kiwanettes,
Math Bowl. I Dare Ydu. National
Janet Echelman
JANET ECHELMAN
Janet Echelman, daughter of
Anne Echelman Kanter and Dr.
Gilbert Echelman, is graduating
H. B. Plant High School with
honors. Her plans are to attend
Harvard University.
Echelman s latest honor was a
$750 merit scholarship awarded
during the 26th annual Tampa
Tribune-Times Senior Honor
Banquet.
High School honors include
Editor, Pep-O-Plant; Plant High
School Hall of Fame, Fine Arts
Club, National Honor Society,
Gold and Black, Danworth Soci-
ety, Mu Alpha Theta, Who's
Who Among American High
School Students, U.S. National
Journalism Award, America's
Outstanding Names and Faces,
Student Council, Kiwanettes,
Inter Club Council. She was
active in Congregation Schaarai
Zedek Youth Group and BBYO.
Her musical honors include
winner of the Gulf Coast Sym-
phony's Young Artist Competi-
tion, Young Artist Piano Pro-
gram, Tanglewood Institute of
Boston Symphony Orchestra.
J?o6n Rosenberg
ROBIN ROSENBERG
Robin Rosenberg, daughter of
Connie and Seth Rosenberg,
graduated with honors from H.
B. Plant High School.
Her achievements include the
Pepsi Cola Award of Excellence
in Forensics, Governors Pride
Award. Double Ruby in Foren-
sics, Plant High School Hall of
Fame, Golden Panther, County
Superintendent's award in Foren-
sics in Lincoln-Douglas debate.
Other activities include Na-
tional Forensic League president,
National Honor Society district
recording secretary, and Student
Advisory Committee executive
board.
She has been active with Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek Youth
Group.
She plans to attend North-
western University School of
Speech.
Alice Cohen
ALICE COHEN
Alice Rachel Cohen, daughter
of D. Lawrence and Betty Cohen,
graduated with honors from
Tampa Preparatory School.
Cohens most recent award was
that of Citizen of the Year;
second runner-up, presented for
outstanding community service
by the Civitan Club of Tampa, at
the Tampa Tribune-Times Senior
Honor Student Banquet.
School activities include: Key
Club President, Outstanding
President of the Year Award
from State of Florida, National
Forensic League.
She has been active in Congre-
gation Schaarai Zedek Youth
Group.
She plans to attend the Uni-
versity of the South.
Greg Cohn
His high school honors include
Headmasters List (four years).
All Academic Team, Spanish
Honorary Society.
He played varsity basketball
and was captain of the team this
year. He was chosen for the All
Conference Basketball team for
Hillsborough County.
Other activities include tennis,
golf, Student Forum Secretary
of the Senior Class, Social Service
Club president, and Senior
Prefect.
He plans to attend the engin-
eering school of the University of
Pennsylvania.
Jeffrey Richman
JEFFREY RICHMAN
Jeffrey Wein Richman, son of
Sylvia Richman, is graduating
Chamberlain High School with
honors. His plans are to attend
the University of Pennsylvania,
Wharton School of Business.
High School honors include
National Merit finalist, Who's
Who Among High School Stu-
dents, Tribune Times Honor
Student, National Honor Society,
Beta Club, Quill and Scroll, Year-
book Sports Editor.
Robert Weiner
ROBERT WEINER
Robert Weiner, son of Carol
Weiner, graduated with honors
from Jesuit High School. He
plans to attend Boston College.
His high school activities in-
clude National Honor Society,
Student Council president, Fea-
ture Editor of newspaper, bas-
ketball, soccer, wrestling, and
tennis.
GREG COHN
Greg Cohn, son of Maureen
and Douglas Cohn, is graduating
with honors from Berkeley Pre-
paratory School.
Lawrence Bloch
LAWRENCE BLOCH
Lawrence Edward Bloch, son
of Dr. and Mrs. S. C. Bloch, is
graduating with honors from
Berkeley Preparatory School.
His senior honors include:
Who's Who in U.S. High School
Students, America's Outstand-
ing Names and Faces, Headmas-
ter's List, National Merit Semi-
finalist, A.P. U.S. History Book
Award, Junior Achievement
Outstanding Young Business-
man of the Year, Scholarship to
American Academy of Achieve-
ments 22nd annual salute to ex-
cellence in San Diego.
Bloch was awarded a National
Merit scholarship and a Junior
Achievement Scholarship.
His other high school activities
were French Chib, Drama Tech,
Social Service Club, Model UN
Club, Senior Prefect, Senior Class
President, Outing Club, Chair-
man, Student Forum.
He played varsity on the
school soccer and tennis teams.
He plans to attend Stanford
University.
raise The
Fun Ships"
Every Saturday and Sunday the fabulous "Fun Ships".
Carnrvale, Festrvale, Mardi Gras and Tropicale depart
from Miami and Los Angeles for exotic ports... Virtually
everything's included for the low price of your cruise:
You can feast on eight meals and snacks a day...
challenge the odds in a full gambling casino...
thrill to spectacular live entertainment nightly...
dance till the wee hours of the morning to three
live dance bands or in an authentic disco-
theque and more!
Sh%3* of Pm onortun \x& tCsYion w^jwfTv


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, June 3,19^
Hit The Road For
Hillel Bike-a-Thon
A Super Success
The first annual "Hit The
Road For Hillel" Bike-A-Thon to
raise money tor the Hillel School
was a super super duper suc-
cess!!! The participants. 34 Hillel
students, the principal and her
husband, the bookkeeper, one
parent, one teacher, and one
grandpa rode in the Bike-A-Thon
and raised $2,769.50 from 327
sponsors whose contributions
ranged from 1 cent to $5 per mile,
(expenses were only $70)
About a dozen moms and dads
and one grandpa helped as volun-
teers Sunday morning May 15 to
make the BUce-A-Thon a safe and
happy community success.
Bike-A-Thon boss Paul Gor-
man, at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom on Thursday. May 26.
presented appreciation certifi-
cates to all who participated, and
special awards.
A special plaque was awarded
to Mara Corn for most money
raised and collected ($395); most
miles ridden (36). a tie between
David Liebowitz and Robert So-
lomon: and to Kay Doughty, the
principal, for special support of
the Bike-A-Thon and an example
to all.
Prizes of bicycle accessories,
such as headlights, mirrors,
handlebar grips, reflecto ape,
and a gift certificate vere
presented. Andrew Wall sec red
the most sponsors (19) and L are
Gordimer and Allison Lewis tied
for second place with 18 spon-
sors.
These 18 students raised more
than $50 each: Shoshana Korn.
Uri Korn, David Liebowitz,
Robert Solomon. Mara Corn, Ian
Davidson. Andrew Wall. Josh
Heyman. Josh Ewen. David
Markowitz. Alison Lewis. Debbie
Zack. Mark Jacobson. Caron
Jacobson. Jonathin Mallin.
Laura Gordimer. Jordan Roos,
and Jocelyn Lewis.
The third grade had the most
students participating in the
Bike-A-Thon.
Israel's Pay Scale For Doctors a Fraction
Of Gold Mine in U.S.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) _
The Finance Ministry pub-
lished the pay scale of pub-
licly employed doctors in
advertisements taken in the
daily press. The figures
were immediately disputed
by the Medical Association
which pointed out that the
gross income of physicians
represented compensation
for more than 100 hours of
work per week compared to
the 40-45 hour week worked
by most other employed
persons in Israel.
The Finance Ministry ran the
ad in connection with the three
month strike by government and
His tad rut doctors for higher
salaries and better working con-
ditions. Virtually all doctors in
Israel are employed by the gov-
NEIL C. SPECTOR
ROBERT J. SHAPIRO
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THE OPENING OF THEIR 1.AW OFFICES
SPECTOR & SHAPIRO
THE 1'I.AZA ON THE MAU. SUITE 24
201 EAST KENNEDY HI.VD
TAMPA. FLORIDA 33808
(813) 221* 1317
ernment or the various sick-
funds. Few. if any. have a private
practice. Their salaries cannot be
compared, therefore, with the
income of doctors abroad, partic-
ularly in the U.S. Israeli doctors
earn far less than their American
counterparts.
THE BASIC salary of a newly
graduated doctor starting his in-
ternship last January was equi-
valent to S360 a month at the
prevailing rate of exchange. The
base salary of a senior hospital
director last January was the
equivalent of $637 a month. The
base salary is the means for cal-
culating pensions and other
benefits.
But it is usually tripled or
quadrupled by overtime, extra
ahifts, weekend duty, travel and
book allowances and various
other allowances, some 16 items
in all. These raise the monthly
earning of an intern to $1,000
and of a senior hospital director
to just under $3,000 before taxes.
But taxes and various other
deductions consume almost half
of the gross salaries. The work-
load and long hours at hospitals
leave senior physicians and spe-
cialists little time to accept the
few private patients willing to
pay for medical treatment or un-
willing to endure the long wait for
non-emergency operations or
other treatment.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
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r
June 3,1983
The Jewish Ploridian of Tampa
Page 7
in Brief
For Amsterdam, Another Jewish Mayor
MSTERDAM Amster-
L capital of the Netherlands
I its second largest city, will
', its third Jewish Mayor in
asion over a period of six
He is Ed Van Thijn, 48,
who will succeed WOlem Polak
when he retires next month. The
Mayors of Dutch cities are ap-
pointed by the government.
Van Thijn. like all of his
%.y



y
V*
\
' i
i- ;
ftUng from left I Esther Weiss, Betty Reed, Marie Woolf. /Seated
I left\ Eleanor Wittenberg, Marcia Riccio, and Carolyn Bass at the
lie writer machine.
Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood
Braille Graduating Class
n May 17, the city of Tampa
pived a priceless gift that
pivi'd little attention.
j"hi- Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood
lunteer Braille service cele-
Ited the graduation of five
Hist*. Carolyn Bass, Marie
olf, Reba Cook. Marcia Riccio
Kleanor Wittenberg. The
Iructors of the course were
Ity Reed, and Esther Weiss.
Although the braillist course is
free to the student, it takes a full
nine months of weekly classes
and sincere dedication to com-
plete. After submission of a tran-
script to the Library of Congress
the graduates will be eligible to
be certified.
Through their generous gift of
time others may enrich their
Uves.
predecessors since the end of
World War II, is a member of the
Labor Party (PVDA). Born in
Amsterdam, he became a
municipal councilor in 1962 and a
member of Parliament in 1967.
He was elected chairman of the
Labor Party's Parliamentary fac-
tion in 1981 and served for seven
months as Minister of Interior.
Van Thijn freely acknowledges
his Jewish ancestry. But he is not
associated with any Jewish
organization and, in recent years,
has been a strong critic of the Is-
raeli government of Premier
Menachem Begin which he con-
siders reactionary. He stated, in
an article written two years ago,
that as a Jew he feels solidarity
with all minority groups in Hol-
land and elsewhere.
Modal Heads New
Faction In Likud
JERUSALEM Bitter in
ternal disputes within Likud's
Liberal Party wing came to the
fore when a group of five Knesset
members, headed by Energy
Minister Yitzhak Modai, an-
nounced the formation of an in-
dependent faction within the
party.
The decision to seek separate
status was adopted by a large
majority of Modai's supporters in
a secret ballot. The four other
MKs in the new group are
Deputy Minister of Agriculture
Pessah Grupper, Benny Shalita.
Pinhas Goldstein and Yehuda
Perah. The Modai group is
definitely hawkish in its views. It
could, theoretically, bring down
the government over policy dif-
ferences.
It is expected to demand to be
consulted separately on all coali-
tion decisions. Grupper went so
far as to warn Premier Menachem
Begin that if he refuses, "there
will be trouble for the coalition."
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday. June 3.
BarMitzvahs

DAVID MELLMAN
David Lorenz Mellman. son of
Dr. and Mrs. Donald Mailman
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning. Jane 11. at
Congregation Scfaaarai Zadek.
Rabbi Frank Sundheun will offi-
ciate
David is in the seventh grade
at Christ the King School. He
attends Religious School at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
and is a member of the Junior
Youth Group. He plays for
Tampa Bay Little League and is
an avid tennis player.
Special out-of-town guests who
will celebrate with David and his
family include Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Mellman of Columbus.
Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Gelband. of St. Petersburg. Mr.
Allan Mellman of West Palm
Beach, and Ms. Judy Reilly.
Friends of the Mellman s will
host the Friday night Oneg
Shabbat and Dr. and Mrs.
Donald Mellman will host a
kiddush luncheon and a Saturday
evening party in their home, in
their son's honor.
JCCNews
Society for the Promotion
of Hebrew Literatare
Starting June 15, a new series
of Hebrew classes will be offered
at two locations.
The North-end classes will be
held at Congregation Kol Ami
beginning Wednesday, June 15
from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The
main branch classes will be on
Thursday evenings beginning
June 16. from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
This course will run for eight
weeks and will concentrate on
basic skills for all ages and levels.
All classes will run on the basis of
a sufficient enrollment.
The fee for this course will be
$20 for members and S35 for non-
members.
Please call Muriel Feldman at
the JCC. 872-4451. for additional
information.
Flea Market
The JCC needs donations of
furniture, small appliances,
clothing, books, toys, interesting
items that are useful, or not so
useful, old or new. The next big
flea market will be held August
28 an 29. Check your closets, at-
tics, garages and bring your
"treasures, etc." to the JCC.
L.A. Lawmakers Urge
Help for Falashas
LOS ANGELES Mayor
Tom Bradley and City Council
members have called upon Presi-
dent Reagan to press for efforts
to end the persecution of some
25,000 Jews Irving in Ethiopia.
At the same time, Bradley, at a
press conference in City Hall
several days ago, offered tem-
porary refuge to Falashas
Simcha Desta, his wife Rachael
and their child who were recently
reunited in Los Angeles after
their dangerous exit from
Ehiopia while they proceed with
their emigration to Israel.
City Councilman Dave Cun-
ningham, who had met Desta at a
Black-Jewish dialogue conference
sponsored by the Jewish Federa-
tion Council, presented the
family with a resolution on behalf
of his colleagues which expressed
their gave concern regarding the
plight of Falashas still living in
isolated villages in Ethiopia's
rural areas.
The resolution called upon
Reagan to express the concern of
the United States and its citizen?
for the human rights of Ethio-
pia's Jews including the right
to emigrate freely to "relevant
foreign governments'' and to
seek ways to assist them to emi-
grate.
ADAM SILVERMAN
Adam Louis SUverman. son of
Dr. and Mrs. Mitchell Sirverman
will be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday. June 11, 10
a.m.. at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom.
The celebrant is a seventh
grade honor student of Hillel
School of Tampa. Adam is a
member of the Kadima group of
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
He is goalkeeper for the
Interbay United under 14 select
soccer team.
Dr. and Mrs. SUverman will
host the Kiddush and Oneg
Shabbat following the services in
honor of the occasion and a
reception Saturday night in the
social hall of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom.
Special guests will include
grandparents Catherine Lipson,
Tampa: Mr. and Mrs. H.P.
Sirverman, Denver, Colorado:
and Shirley SUverman, Ann
Arbor, Michigan: Ben Krieger,
Abe Kerstein. Dr. Howard
Kerstein, Denver, Colorado.
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CHARLES KAPLAN
Charles Michael Kaplan, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Kaplan will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day. June 4, at 11 a.m.. at Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek.
The celebrant is a student in
the Temple Religious School and
a member of the Junior Youth
Group.
Charles is in the seventh grade
of M. B. Young Junior High
School. He is a member of the
Boy Scouts and plays soccer for
the Northdale Soccer Club.
Charles' grandmother Rose
Malin will host the Oneg Shabbat
following the Friday evening
services in honor of the occasion.
A Kiddush luncheon will be
hosted by Roy and Lida Kaplan
following the Saturday morning
service. In Charles' honor they
will host a party that evening for
out of town guests.
Special guests attending will
be Rose Malin, Mr. and Mrs.
Reynard. Mr. and Mrs. Gonzalez
and children, Mr. and Mrs.
Kaplan, Mr. and Mrs Fils. Mr.
and Mrs. Zolotin. Miami: Mr.
and Mrs. Juris, West Palm
Beach: Mr. and Mrs. Wunder-
hch, Mahopac, New York.
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2


riday.Jun*3'1963
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 9
Verbal Circumcision a 'Dirty Trick'
Continued from Page 4
.ortion. It has to do with the
nd of decisions, say in the Hit-
era, we called racist at the
jlnds of the Nazis.
So, those Republics committed
their pro-life principles have a
,ugh time ahead so far as
enetic screening is concerned if
_ey have an ounce of philosophy
i their souls.
T?r2r? 7XJ? 1L1,00.7 "*""** about God "Pilot of Eastern
the SidU^'e M^Ut"' Airline8 FUht neS?
tu^to^L-^Pari/nre' ^i^thedrinkbecauseofthe
^TBASi^.t ;tXtedfiTrheengr
will invite in* tK-u;.j c.___ attributed to Eastern mainte-
nance crews' casual methods.
lion
THE REPUBLIC Administra-
has been trying to return
jse Mariel criminal types to
Fidel Castro. The number of
em is mythic, varying from 750
1,100 to upward of 5,000, de-
ending upon whether you are a
epublic, a Democrat, or a Cuba,
the latter of whom have set up
Duse here and are a party all of
their own.
But all of this behind-the-
enes shuffling is being accom-
plished by the Administration in
unique way. What the Presi-
|ent and all of his men are saying
Castro is that if Castro takes
will invite into the United States
who want out of their native land.
NO PALTRY prefix-numbers
are offered here to speculate upon
as a hopeful balance to the
100,000 figure, and whether they
are to be desirable or undesirable
is yet to be stipulated. Such sig-
nificant lapses are apparently in-
tended to add to the mythos of
the situation.
This must be the new, strong
immigration policy the Adminis-
tration announced the other week
which, among other things, is de-
signed to tell Castro that it is
Washington and not Havana
that henceforeward defines
and operates our nation's immi-
gration policy.
Bully.
PEOPLE ARE still talking
Jewish Press Association
Elects Lippman President
The American Jewish Press
Association at its 41st annual
eting in Coral Springs, elected
Jerome Lippman, publisher and
ditor-in-chief of the Long Island
Jewish World, as president,
succeeding Albert Bloom, execu-
tive editor of the Pittsburgh Jew-
sh Chronicle.
Vice presidents elected were
dare Klein, editor, Philadelphia
Jewish Exponent; Vida
joldagar, editor and publisher,
outhern Israelite, Atlanta; and
Philip Scheier, editor, Jewish
Transcript, Seattle.
Reelected treasurer was Morris
1 aline, editor, Jewish Press,
)maha. Elected recording secre-
arv is Larry Hankin of the
Intermountain Jewish News
Denver, and elected corres-
ponding secretary is Dan Brin, of
the Southwest Jewish Heritage,
California.
Arie Zimuky, senior political
editor of Yediot Aharonot, Jeru-
salem, was elected liaison officer
by AJPA to the World Federa-
tion of Jewish Journalists and an
honorary member of AJPA's
executive committee.
The meeting paused in its
deliberations for a moment of
silence and the reading of the
23 rd Psalm in memory of Milton
Firestone, later editor and
publisher of the Kansas City
Jewish Chronicle, who died
several weeks ago.
In essence, these people say
that the plane was saved from
disaster because of the grace, the
glory, the power, the presence of
God on that flight Who ap-
parently neutralized the boredom
of the maintenance crews with
details and kept the plane flying
anyway.
I can only wonder why God
was going to Nassau in the first
placeit's really an incredibly
boring tourist attraction.
THIS APART, I also wonder
why other planes do manage to
crash without some outside force
suddenly butting in. Why isn't
God co-pilot of any of them? Do
the crash-bound flights go to
even more boring places than
Nassauif that is possible?
And if God denies His grace,
glory, power and presence to
them, is this to be construed as a
kind of divine punishment de-
liberately intended?
The people who talk this way
about Eastern Flight 855, es-
pecially those who were on it,
have an unduly exalted view of
themselves. They believe they
were worth saving by God's per-
sonal intervention. This suggests
that all air crash victims are evil
and beyond redemption, whom
God deliberately leaves to the
fate of missing o-rings.
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to




Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
FVidy.Jua,u
Congregations/Organizations Events
CORRECTION
Stephanie Fleischer is cor-
responding Secretary of
SchZFTY. the Youth Group
of Congregation Schaarai
Zedek. The May 20 issue
state otherwise.
CHILDREN OP HOLOCAUST
SURVIVORS
The Tampa Bay area has
organized a group of Holocaust
survivors, second generation. In
the three meetings that have
taken place, the members have
shared their own experiences and
that of their parents. The purpose
of the group is two-fold: to reach
some understanding and sharing
among the members about their
experiences growing up and those
of their parents. The hope of the
group is that once they have
some sense of their own exper-
iences, they can reach out to the
broader community with an
educational program.
The next meeting will take
place on Sunday. June 19. at 7:30
p.m. at the home of Mrs. Carol
Silk. For further information and
directions, please call Mrs. Iris
Lee at Gulf Coast Jewish Family
Service.
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Ser-
vice encourages the organization
of the Children of Holocaust
Survivors and urges all who are
m the community to become
involved.
SHALOM
BRANDON HADASSAH
Irma Andelman. regional
advisor for Florida Central
region. Hadassah. installed the
new officers of Shalom Brandon
Hadassah for the 1983-84 year.
Re-elected were Marcia Nelson,
president: Elaine Ben-Judah.
fundraising vice president:
Michelle Jones, recording secre-
tary: Sheila Kraus. corres-
ponding secretary: Rosalyn
Feldman. treasurer: Maria
Claflin. financial secretary.
New officers are Ryna Ball.
program vice president; Judy
Peters, membership vice presi-
dent; Geraldine Kendall,
education vice president.
The Brandon Chapter received
the "Super Star Award for Fund
raising" at the Florida Central
regional conference held in Or-
lando.
They also received honors for
program, Zionist affairs, region
cooperation, over subscription,
new membership, track-down and
transfer, membership, bulletin,
Soviet Jewry, education, bigger
giving, and 100 percent fund-
raising.
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
Youth Activities
This past month saw a flurry of
speeches and campaigning at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom as
both USY and Kadima elected
new officers for the 1983-84 year.
We would like to extend congra-
tulations to the following young
people and their families.
USY
President. Terri Sugar:
Executive Vice President.
Andrea Friedman: Programming
Vice President. David Kushner:
Religious Vice President. Richard
Levine; Fundraising Vice Presi-
dent. Fred Evenson: Member-
ship Vice President. Scott Blum:
Treasurer. Sheri Brownstein:
Corresponding-Recording Secre-
tary, Mia Rosenberg.
KADIMA
President. Orly Mallin; Vicf
President, Ari Golson; Program
ming Vice President, Sheri Bobo;
Membership Vice President
Elizabeth Leopold; Religious-
Vice President. David Marko
witz: Treasurer. Robert Solo-
mon: Corresponding Secretary
Seth Nelson: Recording Secre-
tary. Clay Rosenberg.
United Synagogue
Southeast Region
USY Convention
On May 13-15. ten USY'ers
from Congregation Rodeph
Sholom attended the USY
regional convention in Savannah,
Georgia. The convention was
held at the DeSoto Hilton in
downtown Savannah, where 360
Jewish teens from nine states in
the region enjoyed a weekend of
study, friendship and most of all
RUACHII1
The theme, "Today's Issues: A
Jewish View," covered a variety
of topics from Shabbat to the
study of Torah all viewed with
today's environment and social
pressures in mind. In addition to
study, our young people enjoyed
a sightseeing tour of old Savan-
nah, renewing old friendships and
making many new ones.
The Hav-ATampa USY chap
ter received two awards at the
convention: "Outstanding Reli-
gious Programming," and "Out-
standing Chapter Programming''
for their LTI Shabbat and Yom
Kippur Mincha service and
Mercaz sub-regional newspaper
respectively.
Congratulations to Hav-A-
Tampa USY for their hard work
and dedication. We are all proud
of their achievements.
Hebrew Literacy
Campaign
This past year Congregation
Rodeph Sholom sponsored a
Hebrew Literacy Campaign,
aimed at teaching adults suffi-
cient Hebrew reading ability to
follow and participate in religious
services. Small groups met once a
week for twelve weeks at a time
and place convenient to the
group.
We are happy to announce that
sixteen courageous congregants
have successfully completed this
course of study. They were led in
this endeavor by five dedicated
teachers. Rodeph Sholom mem-
bers who. being able to read He-
brew, volunteered their precious
time and talents. These men and
women gave generously of them-
selves so that others might be
able to share more fully in the
beauty of Shabbat services:
Marvin Aronovitz. Burt Bern-
We're 82 years old,
and we never looked younger!
We've come a long way
since we used to send
the horse and buggy
down to the Railroad
Station to pick up our
guests and boasted about
electricity in every room.
From the country place
that became the summer
refuge of those who
spent the other 50 weeks
of the year in crowded
city apartments, we've
grown into one of the
most pampering resorts
of the land.
Yet deep down we re-
main the same. A friendly,
welcoming stopping off
place where you can get
away from the tensions
and problems of day-to-
day living and discover
a new world of pleasure.
As we start our 9th
decade, and with a 5th
generation of hosts
warming in the wings,
we say to you just as
we've been saying these
last 82 years:
Come up to the Nevele
And enjoy yourself.
stein. Sonia Greasley, Diana
Siegel. and David Waksman.
The students involved in this
campaign demonstrated a strong
desire to learn. Their tenacity and
dedication is an admirable model
for adult education. HtnrUmtM
were: Gale BaiTon,!^;
stein, Esther Carp, Hyzl
Annie Fail!., RhoJTS!
Jackie Hamric, Jam,,
Joyce Hartman, PM n
Kelly, Claire Levin, Mkw!
wartx. Rubv Suge
Community Calendar
r, JWM 3
(Condlelighting lime 8:03)
Satuiday, Jwm 4
Congregation Kol Ami Annual Dinner-Dance 9 p.m.
Sunday, JWM 5
Tune in: "The Jewish Sound" 88.5 FM 9-11 a.m.
Teachers Workshop Conference -12 noon-6 p.m.
CA|
Monday, Jwm 6
Jewish Towers Residents Association Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, June 7
Hadassah-Tompa Closing Board Meeting 10 a.m. ORT
Horizons) Planning Conference 10 a.m. JCC Camp Sk
Orientation 10 a.m. Congregation Schaarai Zedek "tun
with Rabbi" noon B'nai B'rith Hillel Board Meeting -7-;
p.m. ORT (Tampa) Board Meeting 7:30 p.m. JewishTow_
Games 7:30 p. m. Kol Ami Jewish Singles Planning Meetin*?]
7:30 p.m. Hadassah-Ameet Portfolio Exchange 7:45 p.m >j
Hadassah-Shalom Brandon Board Meeting 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Jwm t
JCC Comp Staff Orientation 10a.m. Temple David Sisterho.
Board 1 p.m. Congregation Rodeph Sholom full board-
p. m.
Thursday, Jwm 9
JCC Food Co-op 10a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Friday, Jwm 10
(Condlelighting time 8:06)
Saturday, June 11
ORT (Bay Horizons) Theatre Party 8 p.m.
Sunday, June 12
Tune in: "The Jewish Sound" 88.5 FM 9-11 a.m.
Congregation Schaarai Zedek Annual Meeting and Installation-I
8 p.m. Kol Ami Jewish Singles Picnic at Keystone Park -11 a.m.|
Monday, Jwm 13
Camp JCC Starts 930 a.m. Congregation Schaarai Zed
Sisterhood Executive Board at 10 a.m. and open boord on
'jnch at 11 a.m. Congregation Schaarai Zedek Execuiivtl
Meeting noon Jewish War Veterans and Auxiliary Board-|
I 30 p.m. Jewish National Fund Board 7:30 p.m
Tuesday, June 14
Hillel School Executive Board-7 p.m. ORT (Tampa) Installofw]
- 7 p.m. Congregation Kol Ami Men's Club Board -7 30p.m."
Jewish Towers Games 7:30p.m. Hillel School Boara 8 p.m.
Wednesday, June 15
ORT (Tampa) Membership Tea 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Shalom-
Brandon Meeting 8 p.m.
Thursday, Jwm 16
JCC Food Co-op 10 a.m.-12:15 p.m. TJF Womens Division]
Executive Board at 10:30 a. m. and Regulor Board at noon.
Friday, June 17
(Condlelighting time 8:08)
A REMINDER
Bar-Bat Mitzveh. waddkejr awrl -,.. sw
i itt&S&Sn* ^TTSed fo~tS
Jewish tlondian office. AH bmii VT i h. iLnWeil
keligious Directory
Prtdey. ie.m.: Sature*y. lea
OONOOCGATION I
^^ *levata an in i ruin
,T:li.
mi
**: rtteajr. ..;
Prloay.lpm.
Tunpe
,-25*5- UnferW, d
a. .Mo^H*raE;,
STOAI

fcr**
van. bo* ,
T-UpiT'ta-,rM -
)


,,, June 3,1963
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Pgell


ker, Judy Zaritt, and Judy
olnick.
Lt Shabbat evening services,
y 20, participants in the He-
jw Literacy Campaign were
nored and called to the Bimah.
chers were presented with
tificates of appreciation,
Judents with certificates of
thievement. Rabbi Kenneth
Lger spoke on the importance
[continuing adult education and
aised the efforts of all involved.
| Another Hebrew Literacy
impaign is being planned for
,xt fall- Some of this year's
iidents may even be next year's
chers! If you are interested,
ntact the synagogue office.
B'NAI B'RITH
Tun pa Lodge Picnic
[ Father's Day, June 19 is the
for the Fifth Annual
ather's Day Picnic.
j Committee Chairman is Bill
lirshberg.
| The District 6 Convention will
held at Innisbrook July 9-12.
.us will be the first District 6
onvention to be held on the
^est Coast of Florida.
CONGREGATION
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Book Review
(On Friday, June 10, after
abbath Services, Rabbi Sund-
pirn will lead a book review on
\n Orphan In History," by
tul Cowan. This is an extremely
nportant personal journal of a
Dung Jewish man whose family
ere celebrities, but assimilated
and how he has found his
ots. Services begin at 8 p.m.
Annual Meeting
[Congregation Schaarai Zedek
fill hold its Annual Meeting in
Temple Sanctuary on Sun-
lay. June 12, at 8 p.m. In addi-
on to electing the new Temple
tficers and trustees for 1983-85,
he presentation of the Presi-
|ent'a Cup will be made. A
x'ipinil) will follow in the Social
loll.
The Nominating Committee,
haired by Lillyan Osiason has
Iresented the following slate of
pficers and Board Trustees for
M-85: Dr. Carl Zielonka, presi-
dent; Dr. Martin Adelman. vice
[resident; Mr. Richard Rudolph,
easurer; Mrs. Lucille (Law-
encel Falk, recording secretary;
Irs. Nellye (Herbert) Friedman,
Jnancial secretary. Board of
iistees to serve from 1983-86:
1r. John Osterweil, Mrs Judith
Stanley) Rosenkranz, Mrs.
Vudrey (Mark) Shine; Mr. Lou
pipkin; to serve from 1983-85:
from 1983-84, Mr. Joel Karpay
|nd Mrs. Midge (Zen) Paster-
fcack.
Another highlight of the
Evening will be the annual
presentation of the President's
'up to the person who has
Remonstrated outstanding
oyalty and selfless devotion to
|he congregation. Traditionally,
fhe identity of the recipient
nains unknown until the
presentation.
A reception will follow in the
Pocial Hall.
The newly elected Temple Off i
cers and Trustees will be installed
t Sabbath Services on Friday,
June 17 by Rabbi Frank Sund-
eim. This will mark the first
^>e the installation will take
ace on a Friday night and to
highlight the evening, a special
"ervice for the occasion has been
created by Rabbi Sundheim. An
eg Shabbat will follow in the
rial Hall.
Cradle Roll Program
One of the most successful
lachaarai Zedek Sisterhood Pro-
grams this year has been the
ftradle Roll Program, chaired by
P"dy Baach.
The Cradle Roll Program
[UKludes all Schaarai Zedek chil-
lwn from birth to their enrol-
ment in kindargarun, whose
mother ia a Sisterhood member.

Children receive a Cradle Roll
certificate, birthday cards for
each birthday and are invited to
participate in the holiday parties
that are held. The parties are a
celebration and learning exper-
ience for the children and their
families. Each party includes age-
appropriate holiday crafts,
stories, songs and snacks. The
parents receive home-celebration
manuals, and the children are
presented with holiday coloring
books to review and enjoy later.
This program instills in the pre-
schoolers a positive feeling
towards the temple and provides
them with a loving memory of
things Jewish.
Currently, there are 103 chil-
dren enrolled in Cradle Roll. In
addition to the holiday parties,
future plans include holiday
workshops and a forum, in
conjunction with the religious
school, on dealing with the
subject of death and young chil-
dren.
Anyone who is interested in
enrolling a pre-schooler in this
program or who wants more
information may call Judy
Baach.
Resolution on Children
of Mixed Marriages
Rabbi Frank Sundehim will
speak on the recent resolution on
the status of children of mixed
marriages on Friday, June 3 after
Shabbat services.
The Central Conference of
American Rabbis has adopted an
official stance on this subject,
and Rabbi Sundheim will explain
the resolution that evening in a
talk entitled "Who is a Jew."
Services begin at 8 p.m. with an
Oneg Shabbat following in the
Social Hall.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI
Congregation Kol Ami will
host its Second Annual Dinner
Dance on June 4. Comedian and
songwriter Lou Stevens will
provide the entertainment.
Stevens has been described as
a cross between a caustic Woody
Guthrie and a rustic Lenny
Bruce. He is an award-winning
songwriter, and has recorded for
several major record companies.
For the past three years he has
hosted his own radio talk show,
and has appeared on several tele-
vision shows.
Dinner chairperson is Jay
Fink. The gourmet dinner is
being provided by Roberto's
Creative Catering, and music will
be by the Orson Skor Orchestra.
Kol Ami's second annual Ad-
Journal is currently being
published and will be distributed
at the dinner. Chairpersons Tony
and Larry Schultz said that thus
year's Journal is dedicated to
"Furthering Education." Com-
munity response has equalled
last year's and an excellent
Journal is expected.
Dr. Steven Field, the congre-
gation's president, said, "Our
Annual Dinner Dance is an
important part of our fund raising
efforts. We are grateful to all of
our supporters who have chosen
to help Kol Ami thrive."
Members of the community are
invited to call the Kol Ami office
if they desire to attend this
important Kol Ami benefit.
Obituaries
SCHWARTZ
Marlaa, Danielle, infant daughter of
Don and Fran Schwartz of Tampa died
Tuesday. May 24,1988. She waa a native
of Tampa. She la also survived by her
paternal grandmother, Blanche Sch-
wartz of Tampa; and her maternal
grandfather, Philip Star of Tampa.
FOUR CHAPELS TO SERVE YOU
SINCE 1916
FUNtRAL HOMe
258 PLANT AVENUE AT PLATT STREET
Funeral Director* Truman H. Thomas
James E. Lawhon
Dick Stowers
Gene and Gerry Linaky (from left) were honored by the Jewish
Theological Seminary Sunday May 22 at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom. Michael Linaky Iright) presented the award for many yearaof
service to the Conservative movement and to the Tampa Jewish
community. Gregory and Maria Wakaman were the chairmen of this
event and Rabbi Kenneth Berger waa the honorary chairman. Rabbi
Allan Schranz, assistant to the Chancellor of the Seminary waa the
gueat speaker.
Photo: Audrey Haubenatock
Attempt to Fire Bigot Mayor
Keegstra Fails in Canada
ECKVILLE, Alberta (JTA) An attempt at an
Eckville City Council meeting to remove James Keegstra,
dismissed from a high school teaching position for in-
doctrinating his pupils with anti-Semitism, from his post
as Eckville Mayor, failed by a vote of 4-2 against his
ouster. Keegstra, who has been Mayor since 1978, was the
target of a proposed non-confidence motion submitted by
Councilman George Schmidt.
V?"
s New Release.
o
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday. JiumS.
Israel Plans for Trouble With Syria

By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel is drawing up con-
tingency plans for a re-
deployment of its army in
Lebanon if the withdrawal
of all foreign forces from
that country cannot be
implemented because of
Syrian opposition, a senior
government policy maker
told reporters at a news
briefing.
The policy-maker refused to set
any deadline or time limit for the
implementation of the withdraw-
al agreement. But he stressed
repeatedly that planning of
alternative deployment was
actively under way. Israel, he
noted, was not committed to
maintain its present deployment
in Lebanon.
THE POLICY-MAKER hint-
ed that the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) and-or the multina-
tional force might be moved into
any areas vacated by the Israel
army in a redeployment to the
south or into areas vacated by
Israel and the Syrians if
simultaneous withdrawal is
eventually implemented.
He noted that under the Israel-
Lebanon agreement, one
UNIFIL batallion is to remain
north of Sidon to patrol the
Sidon-Tyre area refugee camps.
This would leave five UNIFIL
batallions available for a peace-
keeping role elsewhere in Leba-
non if the UN Security Council
agreed.
The policy-maker stressed the
broad Arab world support of the
agreement, or at least of the
principle of simultaneous with-
drawal. He noted though that the
so called Arab moderates, such as
Saudi Arabia, have privately
spoken out against the "poli-
tical" provisions of the accord
which moved Israel and Lebanon
towards peaceful relations.
IN MANY cases their attitude
appeared to be: remove Israel
from occupied Arab land and
leave peaceful relations for later,
if at all, he said.
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Nevertheless, the policy-makei
continued, the Arab world's
reactions in favor of the accord
appeared to be impressing the
Soviets. While there was no open
rift between Moscow and Damas-
cus, it was plain to Israeli
analysts that "Russia is not
giving the lead" to Syrian re-
jection of the accord and refusal
to withdraw.
He said the Soviets did not
want to see "an extreme develop-
ment" in Syria. At the same
time, though, the Soviets are
solidly supporting the Syrians in
their objections to the accord.
The policymaker noted that
Damascus' objections were
chiefly to the "political" aspects
of the pact, rather than to the
specific security provisions.
President Hafez Assad and
Foreign Minister Abdel Halim
Khaddam have complained that
the pact effectively removed
Lobanon from the Arab camp in
l ho confrontation with Israel.
THE POLICY-MAKER
confirmed that Israel and Leb-
anon had not reached final agree-
ment on the status and role of
Maj. Saad Haddad. This issue
will be taken up in the Joint
Liaison Committee to be estab-
lished after the agreement comes
into effect with the exchange of
"instruments of ratification"
hopefully soon.
But it had been agreed, the
policy-maker said, that Haddad
would be integrated into the Leb-
anese army, would hold a senior
rank, and would hold no less an
assignment than deputy com-
mander of the territorial brigade,
the task which Lebanon and the
U.S. had proposed for him and
which Israel initially rejected.
Knesset Mum on Charge
Vigilantes Unpunished
JERUSALEM A motion to
discuss opposition charges that
Israeli authorities have failed to
investigate or prosecute attacks
by armed Jewish settlers on West
Bank Arabs was defeated by a
vote of 41-32 in the Knesset.
The motion striken from the
agenda was presented by
Shulamit Aloni of the Labor
Party's Civil Rights Movement
(CRM) faction. Aloni cited hun-
dreds of cases in which, she said,
Jewish settlers attacked Arabs or
damaged their property. In five
of these cases, Arabs were killed
by settlers, Aloni said, but no ar-
rests were ever made.
She noted that by contrast,
when an Israeli woman, Esther
Ohanna,, was killed by a stone
thrown at her vehicle in the Arab
town of Dahariya several months
ago, the police had no difficulty
apprehending five Arab suspects
who were swiftly tried.
Meeting in New York for second gathering of Commission*
Maximizing Jewish Educational Effectiveness of Jewish Comn
Centers are panel members from left: Esther Leah Ritz, Milwa
JWB president; Morton L. Mandel, Ceveland, commission chai.
and former president of both JWB and CJF (the Council of Ju_
Federations); Shoshana Cardin, of Baltimore; and Charlene Lo\a\
Denver. Study, a cooperative effort of JWB and its network of I
American JCCs and YM-YWHAs also is seeking expert input L
Jewish lay and professional communal leaders of Federations]
Jewish educational establishment and the rabbinate in a series oft
30community visits scheduled this year.
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