The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00346

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Full Text
w-^ The Jewish ^j y
FloridiaN
OF TAMPA
Volume 10 Number 12
Tampa, Florida Friday, June 10, 1988
A*
Price 35 Cents
Board and Officers
Installation
Women's
Tuesday, June 14, 7:30 p.m.
at the Sheraton Grand Hotel,
Maril Jacobs, past president of
the Tampa Jewish Federation,
will have the honor of
installing the 1988-89 Board of
Directors and Officers of the
Tampa Jewish Federation, the
Jewish Community Center,
Tampa Jewish Family
Services, the Hillel School and
the Women's Division of the
Tampa Jewish Federation.
Among the installees at the
June 14 Combined Annual
Meeting are Walter H.
Kessler, Charles Weissman
and Louise Eatroff, who are
incoming Presidents of the
Tampa Jewish Federation,
Jewish Family Services and
the Jewish Community
Center, respectively.
the Year (Hillel); and the
Laura H. Kreitzer Education
Award.
Division
Surpasses Goal!
Walter Kessler
Louise Eatroff
In addition to the installation
of officers, agencies will honor
their outstanding volunteers
through award recognition.
Among the awards to be given
are: the Leo Levinson Award
(Tampa Jewish Federation);
the Rose Segall Award (Tampa
Jewish Family Services); Bob
Jacobson Award (Jewish
Community Center);
Outstanding Board Member of
Charles Weismann
Mark Talisman, Director of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions' Washington, D.C. office
is also scheduled to speak.
Aida Weissman, annual
meeting chairman encourages
the community to attend this
very special evening of
congratulations to all the
volunteers who worked so
hard for a successful year.
Please RSVP to the Tampa
Jewish Federation, 875-1618,
to guarantee your reservation.
The Women's Division of the
Tampa Jewish Federation is
proud to announce that they
surpassed their $300,000 goal
for the 1987-88 Campaign. "In
September, our Women's Divi-
sion Cabinet met and decided
to ask each and every woman
for a 20% increase,"
commented Campaign Vice
President Laura Kreitzer.
"While not every woman
increased their pledge, we
thank every single woman who
made a contribution this year,
for without their support our
goal wouldn't have been
reached," Kreitzer concluded.
The success of the Women's
Division campaign is due to the
loyal contributors, the new
gifts, increased giving, and to
the hard work put fortn by the
campaign workers and division
chairmen. The women of the
Young Adult Division and the
Business and Professional
Women's Network are
applauded for their
outstanding efforts which
enhanced the overall Women's
campaign. "We had a real
team effort this year, and it
paid off," Kreitzer remarked.
Under the guidance and lead-
ership of Women's Division
President, Ann Rudolph,
Women's Division set their
sights high and worked dili-
gently to achieve their goals. If
a woman has not had the
opportunity to make her gift
yet, she is invited to share and
participate in this year's
success.
May 31, 1988
TO: The Entire Tampa Jewish Community
YOU ARE INVITED .
If you were a stockholder in a major corporation and you and your family's future
depended upon the outcome of the annual stockholder's meeting, wouldn't you want to
be there?
Well, you are. And it does!
Your community is holding a special meeting on Tuesday, June 14 For you the
stockholders of the Tampa Jewish Federation and our community agencies. As a member
of the Tampa Jewish Federation, by virtue of your contribution to the annual Tampa
Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal Campaign, you are a very important
stockholder in the Tampa Jewish community.
The "Stockholder's Meeting" is the Annual Combined Meeting of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, Jewish Community Center, Tampa Jewish Family Services, Hillel School of
Tampa and the Tampa Jewish FederationsWomen's Division. This year it will be held on
Tuesday, June 14, 7:30 p.m. at the Sheraton Grand Hotel. A special highlight will be a
presentation by Mark Talisman, Director of the Washington, D.C. Council of Jewish
Federation office.
This is your opportunity to elect the leadership of your community for the ensuing year
as well as an occasion to show our gratitude to the men and women who have provided
leadership during the past year.
Why miss this opportunity? Show your support for your community. Just pick up the
telephone and call the Federation office, 875-1618, and say you will be with us.
Sincerely,
Douglas B. Cohn, President
Tampa, Jewish Federation
united Jewish Appeal
1968 Campaign update
goal............................................$umjm
1968 ReSUltS 1/1/88.........................1,641,182
1967 ReSUltS 6/1/87...........................615,616
V!fc::::*:::ra^^
Israel to Start
Trading With USSR
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel and the
Soviet Union will commence trading
with each other shortly, using West
German business agents to facilitate the
transactions, Maariv reported.
According to the newspaper, a dozen
Israeli factories are preparing for the
Germans' arrival here to sign agree-
ments on behalf of Soviet importers.
Israel will export clothing, women's
stockings and disposable diapers,
Maariv said. The Soviets will export a
special cloth fabric.
The Israeli products will carry German
patents and a code denoting the Israeli
factory that produced them, but no other
sign indicating country of origin.
The products will start arriving in the
USSR at the beginning of August, the
newspaper said. Soviet goods will be sent
to Israel under a reciprocal agreement
utilizing West German agents.

>


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, June 10, 1988
New B&P Board
Chamberlain Standout Chamberlain graduating
senior Sharon Renee Chudnow has been chosen by fellow
students as the "Most likely to succeed" and honored by
her teachers by being selected to the Chamberlain Hall of
Fame. And that is just a start of this young lady's
accomplishments! Sharon has been class president for
three years, a member of the Beta Club where your
average has to be 3.85, Student Council representative,
Principal's steering committee, school representative to
the State Senate in Tallahassee, First place in state
forensic league debate, Young Leadership Conference
representative from Chamberlain, Homecoming Queen,
cheerleader, swim team, participated in a tour of Israel,
and Burdines Teen Board member. Sharon plans to attend
the University of Florida and major in Broadcasting and
Communications. Very proud father is Joel Chudnow.
What an incredible list of credits! Congratulations,
Sharon!
A rising star Damian Josef sberg, son of Mitch and
Stephanie Josefsberg, has been very busy this past year.
Taking drama at "A Class Act" has led to a number of
exciting events! Damian has been used as an extra in the
film F.B.I. Murders, shot here in Tampa. Most recently,
he has auditioned for the New Mickey Mouse Club. His
sister Storm and all his friends and relatives wish him
the very best!
The Ganderson glow Lots of happy news and
congratulations in the Ganderson family. Colonel
Martin Ganderson has been appointed as Chief of Staff
of the U.S. Military Committee of the U.S. Mission to
the United Nations as of last month. Col. Ganderson is a
1961 graduate of the United States Military Academy.
He is a former Assistant Army Attache at the U.S.
Embassy in Tel Aviv. He is also a member of the Jewish
War Veterans. He is the father of Nora and Celeste
Ganderson of Tampa.
Celeste'8 graduation from Barnard College is another
reason to celebrate. She just received her degree in
Philosophy. Following graduation, Celeste will spend
the summer in Amsterdam, Paris, Rome and Athens
making videos for CTV (Columbia TV, Columbia Univer-
sity) where she has been a CTV Station Manager since
September, 1987. Proud mom is Bonnie Boyle
Ganderson.
Honored The Tampa Tribune has, for the past 30
years, recognized graduating seniors who have achieved
scholastic excellence in their high school. Each student
has attained at least a "B" average, made high scores on
standardized tests and been nominated by teachers and
principals for academic achievement and participation
in school affairs. Each student is in the top three
percent of his or her graduating class. Charla Sarah
Silver, a graduate of Gaither High School, has been
honored. She is the daughter of Larry and Arlene Silver.
Charla plans to attend the University of Florida. From
Plant High School there were four seniors selected. Lisa
Rachelle Kahn, daughter of Barbara and Martin Port
and Michael Kahn, plans to attend Washington Univer-
sity in St. Louis. Francie Nicole Linsky has decided to
go to the University of Pennsylvania. She is the
daughter of Michael and Karen Linsky. Marcy Lynn
Solomon is Valedictorian of her class! She is the
daughter of Martin and Maxine Solomon. Her college
plans are to attend Lehigh University. Robert N.
Schwartz, son of Michael and Judy Schwartz, plans to
attend Hofstra University. Congratulations to all of you
for this terrific honor!
A very special baby to tell you about... On May 9th,
Matthew Evan Linsky was bom! He weighed 7 lbs. 10
ozs. and was 20 inches long. Thrilled parents are Elaine
and Mark Linsky. Excited grandparents are Alvin and
Roslyn Dembsky from Nashville. This is their first
grandchild. Matthew is the sixth grandchild for Mark's
parents, Marshall and Loretta Linsky, of Clearwater.
Lucky to have great-grandmothers, Matthew has two!
Rose Green, of Clearwater, now has ten great grandchil-
dren!! Blanche Dembsky, of Nashville is a first time
"great." A bris was held May 16th at Elaine and Mark's
home. Dr. Jack Mezrah performed the bris and Rabbi
Kenneth Berger and Cantor Hauben led the ceremony. A
wonderful, happy time in your lives! Much love to all of
you!
The Business and Profes-
sional Women's Network of
the Tampa Jewish Federation
is a group of women from a
broad range of occupations
with a variety of personal
interests. Although, the 1988-
89 Board of Directors demon-
strates that diversity, it main-
tains a common link, that of
being a professional Jewish
woman. The 1988-89 Board of
Directors has been selected to
represent those broad interests.
Congratulations go to the
following individuals who will
serve on the 1988-89 Board of
Directors...
Executive Committee:
President: Susan Swift
Mihalik; Vice President,
Membership: Alicia Tellis;
Vice President, Program:
Bethann Johnson; Secretary:
Lois Greenbaum; Women's
Division Liaison: Deborah
Albert; Ex-Officio: Amy
Doktor.
Board of Directors:
Cathy Gardner, Eileen
Greenspan, Ora Harris,
Debbie Hoffman, Valerie
Jacobs, Valerie Klein, Sandra
Saviet, Cindy Spahn, Gloria
Shephard, Marilyn Zabaldo.
Honorary Life Members:
Rhoda Karpay, Joyce
Swarzman.
The new Board will be
meeting with the old Board in
a "Brain Storming" session to
identify the direction which
the organization will take in
the coming year. We look
forward to an even greater
involvement from our
membership.
For more information about
this exciting group and to "get
involved" contact the Tampa
Jewish Federation at 875-
1618.
Young Adult
Division Board
The Young Adult Division is
proud to announce the newly
approved Executive
Committee and Board of
Directors for 1988-89.
Congratulations go to these
individuals who, over the past
year have supported the
Young Adult Division in its
various activities and have
been recognized for their
efforts by their selection to the
new Board of Directors.
Executive Committee:
President: Cindy Spahn;
Program Vice President:
David Anton; Leadership Vice
President: Karen Schilit;
Campaign Vice President:
Rick Myers; Public Relations
Vice President: Cynthia
Linsky; Public Relations Vice
President: Mitchell Linsky;
Secretary: Susan Kessler; Ex-
Officio: Mark Carron
Board of Directors:
Social Committee
Chairmen; Jim Fried, Jim
Bernatsky; Education
Committee Chairmen: Toby
Mendelson, Mike Shapiro;
Social Action Committee
Chairmen: Steve Shear, Julie
Schecter; Publicity Committee
Chairmen: Philip Metlin,
Sylvia Benatsky; Membership
Committee Chairmen: Fred
Hoffman, Debbie Hoffman
Super Sunday Liaisons:
Richard Chad, Lori Karpay;
Special Campaign Event: Ron
Levine, Jim Fried; Members at
Large: Dan Albert, Valerie
Jacobs, Keith Schilit, Dede
Jacobs Tkatch, Don Weinbren
Special appreciation goes to
the Nominating Committee
which was chaired by Dede
Tkatch.
Menorah Manor
Executive Resigns
Edward W. Vinocur has
resigned as Menorah Manor's
executive director to take a
similar post at The Montefiore
Jewish Home in Cleveland,
Ohio.
"This was an extremely
difficult decision to make,"
said Vinocur. "Menorah
Manor is a very special place,
and certainly has become a
large part of our lives. Cleve-
land though, presents a great
A nationwide search has
already begun for a replace-
ment, under the chairmanship
of Dr. Philip Benjamin. Also
serving on the committee are
Barry M. Alpert, Dr. Sidney
Grau, Ida Michels, Irwin
Miller, Frank L. Rosenblatt,
Marion Samson-Joseph,
Leonard Seligman, Karen
Sher and Ted Wittner.
"We are sad but also very
excited about Ed's new
appointment," said Manor
Chairman Irwin Miller in
response to Vinocur's resigna-
tion. "We feel that his pres-
ence here has given us a foun-
dation from which he has
grown, and from which
Menorah Manor also has
grown."
Vinocur joined the Menorah
Manor family during construc-
tion of the facility. He was
instrumental in the completion
of the building, policy-making,
getting staff and management
on board, and encouraging
community involvement. Prior
to joining Menorah Manor in
1984 as its first executive
director, Vinocur was admini-
strator at Heritage Village in
Columbus, Ohio.
Norman N. Wigley ithphoas: ms)87H878
** 4218-4220 W.Koiily Blvd.. Tampa. FL 33609
Edward W. Vinocur
professional challenge, plus
will allow Debbie and the chil-
dren to be much closer to our
families."
The current Montefiore
Home is one of two Jewish
home s
land Jewish community. The
current facility is over 60 years
old, suffering from the many
problems of an old facility.
Under Vinocur's leadership,
the home will embark upon a
$20-million campaign to
construct a new 240-bed home.
HOLD THE DATE
SUNDAY, AUGUST 7
Menorah Manor's
Next Generation
Second Annual
Sunset Cruise


Friday, June 10, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Repercussions:
The March of The Living
By AIMEE JILL RAPAPORT
The Holocaust was a terrible
event in history in which
Six Million innocent Jews were
mercilessly killed.
So say our ttachers, our
rabbis, our relatives, our
friends. We hear lectures all
the time. What are the
responses? Same old story. We
got the picture. It'll never
happen again.
Or, how about these? It's in
the past, so leave it there.
History repeats itself so why
try to stop the inevitable? It
never happened. They like to
tell stories.
Well, I'll tell you stories.
Those that have haunted me
for almost a month. When I
drive home from school every
day on 1-95, I pass a train of
boxcars. To me, these are the
boxcars that I crawled through
in Poland, which were used to
haul millions of my people to
gas chambers and cremator-
iums. But that's impossible.
This is my home. Then again,
wasn't that their's?
Last month 1,500 teenagers
from the United States,
Canada, Europe, South Africa,
New Zealand, and Latin
America flew to Poland to
participate in the "March of
the Living," specifically refer-
ring to a walk from Auschwitz
to Birkenau on Holocaust
Memorial Day. I was a partici-
pant in this program. What I
have witnessed has changed
my life, my goals, my values,
and my ideals. My purpose in
writing this is to change yours.
First of all, don't even think
that it can't happen again.
Polish teenagers mockingly
laughed at my friends who
were sobbing over a mound of
Jewish ashes and bones.
Adults in the streets sneered
derogatory idioms for "Jew"
in reaction to the sight of
Kippot. A South African
participant understood a state-
ment made by a Polish gent-
leman which roughly trans-
lates into: "I thought that we
got rid of all of them." I have
no doubts that, given the
opportunity, there are Poles
who would not object to a
re-Holocaust.
To those who question
whether a Holocaust can
happen, I have witnessed the
truth. I have seen and heard
and touched and smelled the
ovens that are just long
enough to shove human beings
into, the scratches on the walls
of the gas chambers from my
people struggling to escape,
the blackened ceilings of the
crematoriums where my
people were turned to ashes,
the rooms full of hats and
clothes and utensils and
glasses and hair and all of the
things which were taken from
my innocent people.
I am a witness to the innum-
erable atrocities. The irony
is, though, that the whole set-
up seemed like such a conven-
ience. Train-tracks, mostly
built by Jews, arrived at the
death camps from almost
every town in Europe.
Boxcars jammed with my
people, screaming from
tortuous hunger and suffoca-
tion, crossed through popu-
lated towns where it was
impossible not to see what was
happening. It was as close as
the same boxcars that I gaze at
daily, by my home. Luce the
homes of the Poles who lived
an eye's distance from the
crematoriums, from which
thousands of lifeless bodies
were hauled at any given time.
I know those people saw the
death from their windows,
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AU LETIERSWILLS^SIEti
because I could see their
windows from where I stood,
right outside the crematorium.
Whether people would let
matter. The point is that it
could happen again.
When I walked into a gas
chamber in Auschwitz, a
feeling of terror came over me.
One after the other, my
friends silently entered the
room as the color drained from
their faces. The chamber
slowly filled with people.
Nothing looked antique or
even old. It was as if gas
pellets were about to be
dropped in. I was terrified that
someone was going to shut the
door on us. But we are the
fortunate ones. We walked out
as freely as we entered.
I experienced the best
feeling in the world during the
actual "March of the Living:"
1,499 Jewish youths from all
over the world and I left
Auschwitz and walked out of
Birkenau energized with the
spirit of life. The country of
Poland, where the Jewish
youth population amounts to
zero, has without-a-doubt seen
that there exists an interna-
tional army of Jewish youth
that is seeing to it that a
Holocaust will never happen
again.
Forty years ago my family
was forced to march to death.
Today we march for'life.
Aimee Jill Rapaport
this happen because of hate,
out oi a fear of getting
involved, or simply because
they don't care, it doesn't
University Announces Name Change
NEW YORK (JTA) Israel's Everyman's University
has changed its English name, and from now on will be
known as The Open University of Israel.
The 14-year-old institution combines independent study
with extensive tutorial services.

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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, June 10, 1988
Now More Than Ever
Food Bill Not Kosher
Visit Israel
By TOM SAWICKI
Mr. Sanricki is on the staff of
the Jerusalem office of the
Anti-Defamation League.
Take a cue from Richard
Dreyfuss. Upset about the
reports from Israel? Then
come to see for yourself what
is really going on. The actor, a
long-time supporter of the
Jewish State, was an early
critic of Israel's actions in
quelling the West Bank and
Gaza disturbances, as shown
on television. Today he is
touring Israel, driving up and
down the country, talking to
people, and feeling perfectly
safe and undisturbed by
anyone, except maybe by some
fans or the Israeli driver.
Not all the figures are in yet,
but it appears that many tour-
ists are staying away from
Israel because of the recent
events, especially Jews who
normally account for about
three-quarters of American
visitors to Israel each year.
Last year some 1.3 million
tourists came to Israel. This
year, a drop of about 20% is
expected, representing a loss
of over a quarter of a billion
dollars to Israel's economy!
How can one impress on old
and potential new friends the
importance of their visiting
here especially at this time?
The Israelis know that holi-
days in their country can be
enjoyed without any fear or
danger. Now they need to get
the message out to others.
A recent visitor, Sheriff
John Carpenter from Santa
Barbara County in California,
who came to Israel with the
Anti-Defamation League
mission for U.S. law enforce-
ment officials, says in a letter
to the Santa Barbara News:
"... travel in Israel is much
safer than in most American
cities there were 28 U.S.
cities with a population of over
100,000 or more that had more
murders last year than all of
Israel. Jerusalem is a city of
over 400,000 people where you
can walk and shop day and
night. In what U.S. city of
comparable size can you do
that?"
This is not to ignore a very
difficult reality Israel faces.
The country may be entering
the most critical juncture in its
40-year history. Is it therefore
the right time to stay away
from Israel? Since 1948, the
Arabs have tried to isolate
Israel while Arab terrorism
has aimed to place Israel off-
limits, to make it appear
unsafe. Let's not give terror-
ists a victory they cannot win
on the battlefield.
Those who base their view of
the situation in this region
primarily on television broad-
casts cannot ignore the
media's main interest: a report
with as much violence as they
can dig up.
The televised reports on
Israel's main tourist attrac-
tion, Jerusalem, for example,
have shown riots, confronta-
tion, tear gas. The trouble
lasted a few minutes only, but
it leaves an indelible impres-
sion.
There was not a single item
article or broadcast about
the Israel Museum course for
art teachers from Gaza, which
had perfect attendance during
the months of February and
March, or about Arab Jerusa-
lemites continuing to shop in
West Jerusalem during the
commercial strike in the city's
eastern sector. Nor was there
any mention of 1,200 mayors
and city councillors from all
over the world who gathered
for a Twin Cities Conference
in Jerusalem recently. Few
expect coverage of the Israel
Festival about to begin in Jeru-
salem with hundreds of artists
and performers from dozens of
countries, including Eastern
Europe, arriving for a month
of music, theater and dance.
Tell Our Advertisers,"/ Saw It
In The Jewish Floridian."
In order to keep our records up-to-date, we would appreciate
those persons returning to the North for the summer months, to
notify the Jewish Federation office of their summer address.
The colorful hustle and
bustle associated with the Old
City's Arab shuk is not there
for the moment. But tourists
still walk the alleyways,
visiting the ancient and holy
sites undisturbed. And from
time to time, usually nearer
dusk, the iron gate covering a
store window will come
slightly ajar and the tourist
will be offered a bargain the
likes of which have never been
known in Jerusalem. The shop-
keeper will also offer his view
of the events: "if only we did
not have the politicians ..."
Those staying away from
Israel should ask themselves:
Are we making a political
statement? Are we helping
anyone? What has the intifada
(uprising) gained for the Pales-
tinians, apart from attracting
world attention and turning
some people against Israel?
Has it brought them closer to
peace or greater control over
their lives? Has all that atten-
tion made them more
accepting of Israel?
Now more than ever every
effort must be made to bring
people to Israel, to show them
that the country is safe. Those
who could not get here fast
enough in the summer of '67
must again make the effort,
and bring along their children.
You will have more fun today
than 21 years ago, you will not
have to rough it so much, the
food will be so much better.
So, think of the many events
and festivals, cultural
performances and other enter-
tainment planned for the next
few months in Israel. Think of
the country's climate and
unique landscapes, the nature
reserves and beaches, the
desert and the kibbutzim.
Think of the archaeological
and historical sites, many only
recently restored and opened
to the public. Think of Israel as
a place to spend a vaction or
holiday.
"Jewish Floridian
Of Tampa
Hirtw OOor zwmi Horatio Street. Tampa. Kin MM
Telephone S72-44TO
Publication Office: \2<> MB Si Miami Fin HIS
KREDK.SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET AUDREY HACBENSTUCK
Kditnr and Publisher Executive Editor Editor
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deducted from their contributions for a subscription to the paper Anyone wishing to cancel such a
suliscripiion should notify The Jewish Floridian or The Federation.
Friday, June 10,1988
Volume 10
25
SIVAN 5748
Number 12
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Legislation that would have
created a statewide kosher
food enforcement mechanism
appears to be a dead issue, at
least for this session,
according to the sponsor of
House Bill 1186.
State Rep. Alberto Gutman
said the bill passed several
hurdles, including obstacles
placed by members of House
committees who did not know
what kosher food was, yet ran
into opposition from several
Jewish members of the House.
"I personally believe there's
no consensus in regards to how
people want to regulate the
kosher markets," Gutman told
The Jewish Floridian
Tuesday. "And there's some
people who don't believe it
should be regulated. And some
are (House) members of the
Jewish faith."
With the regular legislative
session scheduled to end
and no companion bill in
the Senate, Gutman said the
bill appears doomed this year.
But Gutman added that he
intends to revive the issue next
legislative session with
increased support from
members of the Orthodox
community.
Gutman, who is Jewish, said
he doesn't practice
kashruth but has several
friends who do. The bill was
born out of an informal conver-
sation that took place between
the legislator and Rabbi
Pinchas Weberman, spiritual
leader of Ohev Shalom
Congregation. Gutman said he
asked Weberman what could
be done to better serve the
Jewish community. He called
Weberman an "expert" in the
area of kosher food because
Weberman's family is in the
kosher catering business.
The bill was initially filed
April 6 as the Rabbi Pinchas
Weberman act, but when it
limped out of the House
Appropriations Committee
with a narrow 12-10 victory,
the measure was minus
Weberman's name.
"I don't know why,"
Gutman said. Gutman added
that Representatives Elaine
Gordon and Michael Friedman
had objections to the name
appearing on the bill, but did
not support it after
Weberman's name was
removed.
Friedman and Gordon could
not be reached for
comment. Kathy Elsaesser,
Gordon's aide said the repre-
sentative does not believe bills
should be named after people
who are not "extremelypromi-
nent." The aide says Gordon
also agrees with rabbinical
authorities that the state
should not have power to
control kosher food busi-
nesses.
Weberman said kosher food
inspection laws are in effect in
Tennessee, California, Mich-
igan, New Jersey and New
York and have already
survived constitutional chal-
lenges. The issue is a "simple
case of fraud not religion,"
he said.
Kosher products such as
chicken are more costly than
their non-kosher counterparts,
Weberman said. "There's so
much temptation for an
unscrupulous businessman" to
substitute the less costly non-
kosher products for kosher
products, he said.
The bill would have provided
for the state to inspect
kosher establishments, which
would pay $200 for an annual
license. The license fee for the
approximate 2,000 kosher
establishments would support
the costs of the inspection
program. Local governments
such as Miami Beach, which
already have municipal
enforcement of kosher indus-
tries, could retain their kosher
laws if the state bill had passed
if the local laws were as strin-
gent as the state measure and
a quarterly report of findings
were issued to the state.
"If it was up to me the bill
would have passed," Gutman
said. "It's a good bill and it's
not a religious bill. It's a
consumer advocacy bill. You
know people are out there
(thinking they are) eating
kosher food and they may not
be eating kosher food."
Gutman said the measure
will not succeed as long as
Continued on Pajre 12
Hillel School
H Of Tampa
Our Students Learn Better
After all that has been said about our innovative bi-cultoral program, one thing is
still most important Our students learn better.
In recent national testing, Hillel School students finished between 1-4 years above
their grade level in every category.
HILLEL SCHOOL OF TAMPA
California Achievement Tests (CAT)
GRADE EQUIVALENTS MAY 1987
Grades
1
6
8
Total Battery
2.5
4.0
5.8
8.5
8.7
10.8
12.9
12.9
Reading
2.5
3.8
6.3
9.1
7.4
10.3
12.9
12.9
Lang. Arts
2.5
4.5
6.6
10.0
11.9
12.9
12.9
12.9
Math
2.3
4.2
5.8
7.3
8.1
9.7
12.9
11.2
Science
6.3
7.3
10.1
12.9
10.3
S.S.
4.9
5.5
7.8
8.8
10.1
12.9
10.3
For more information call 8758287 or write: Hillel School of Tampa, 501 S. Habana
Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33609. H


Bj GARY S. ALTER
Executive Vice President
Tampa Jewish Federation
A Salute To Our Volunteers
Sometimes we take a lot for
granted. We have a very active
Jewish community in Tampa,
and rarely do we stop to think
about the many ingredients
that go into making our
community a better place to
live. Rarely do we have an
occasion to pay honor and
tribute to those individuals
who give so much of them-
selves to our community.
On Tuesday evening, June
14, 7:30 p.m. at the Sheraton
Grand Hotel, we do have such
an opportunity to recognize
and say thank you to the
hundreds of volunteers who
have served our Tampa Jewish
Federation and its constituent
agencies. One does not realize
the effort that is expended by
our leadership. The countless
hours of meetings, discussions,
negotiations, appearances,
telephone calls, family and
business interruptions, are
routinely handled by our
volunteers. They are in the
forefront to be called upon
continually to give financially
to the many worthwhile causes
that they are involved in. They
are the people that the profes-
sional staffs look to for counsel
and advice, and in many cases
to implement and carry out the
programs and activities of the
organization.
The Annual Combined
Meeting of the Tampa Jewish
Federation and its agencies
provides the mechanism to pay
Honor and tribute to our lead-
ership. Every member of our
community owes a debt of
gratitude to the many who
have said "yes" when called
upon to lead our organizations.
The least we can do is to be
present on June 14 and show
our appreciation and let our
leadership know that there is
support for their activities.
Please join me on June 14 to
express our gratitude to Doug,
Alice, Audrey, George, Ann,
Amy, and Mark. Let's show
Walter, Louise, Charles,
George, Ann, Susan, and
Cindy that we are with them in
their efforts for the coming
year.
TJFS Welcomes
New Staff Member
Tampa Jewish Family
Services welcomes Lynn
Schoeneberg as a member of
their professional staff as a
clinical therapist.
Ms. Schoeneberg, who is a
Florida native, grew up in the
St. Petersburg and Orlando
areas and has resided in
Tampa for the past five years.
She is the wife of Rabbi Steven
Kaplan and the mother of a
five-year-daughter and a
seven-year-old son.
Lynn recently completed her
PhD in Clinical Psychology at
the Florida Institute of Tech-
nology. She has worked at the
Florida Mental Health Insti-
tute where she was involved in
a grant for severely emotion-
ally disturbed children. She
also interned at the Northside
Center in Tampa during the
86-87 academic year where she
worked with families thera-
peutically.
Lynn begins her professional
duties at Tampa Jewish
Family Services by providing
both clinical individual coun-
seling and by facilitating coun-
seling groups.
JNF Offers New 800 Number
The Jewish National Fund
recently announced that it now
has a new 800 number for
individuals who would like to
order trees. The new number
is 1-800-347-8889. The office
address remains the same at
14502 N. Dale Mabry
Highway, Suite 227, Tampa,
Florida 33618. The regular
telephone number is 813-960-
LAND.
According to Executive
Director Larry Wasser and
Associate Director Marvin
Blitz, "the new service is made
available so that individuals
throughout the area will be
able to order trees directly
from the office." For over 85
years the Jewish National
Fund has been serving the
Land of Israel. It is the organi-
zation responsible for the
afforestation land redemption
and road building.
Dutch To Restore Polish Cemetery
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The Jewish cemetery at
Pyskowice in Poland, not far from Kattowice and
Auschwitz, will be restored, thanks to a Dutch initiative
and with money raised in Holland. Twenty-five thousand
dollars has been raised, which will be sufficient for the
restoration of this small cemetery and for its maintenance.
Optimum Fitness
Feeling great in 88 is what optimum Fitness
can do for you. Personalized exercise instruc-
tion in the convenience of your home with
Brian Grant world Champion 1986.
Call NOW 935-9191
Israeli Delegation
Headed for Moscow
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Soviet Union was to issue visas
to a five-member Israeli
consular delegation immedi-
ately after last week's Reagan-
Gorbachev summit meeting,
the Foreign Ministry
announced here.
The ministry said this was
promised by a ranking Soviet
diplomat to an Israeli official
at a meeting in Geneva.
The delegation will be the
first Israeli diplomatic mission
to the Soviet Union since
Moscow broke ties with Israel
21 years ago.
A Soviet consular delegation
has been in Israel since June
1987, but the Soviet author-
ities had refused until now to
allow, a reciprocal visit by
Israeli representatives.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
welcomed the breakthrough.
"The presence of our delega-
tion (in Moscow) will be of the
greatest importance," he said.
According to the Foreign
Ministry's announcement, the
participants in the meeting in
Geneva were Nimrod Novick,
a close political adviser to
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, and Vladimir Terasov,
deputy director of the Middle
East department at the Soviet
Foreign Ministry.
The two had met in Helsinki,
Finland, six months ago to
work out details of the agree-
ment. As it emerged, the
Israeli delegation would be
handling only minor matters in
Miscow.
Terasov said the visas were
held up because Israel had
insistec that its delegation be
given the right to issue Israeli
visas to Russian Jews seeking
to emigrate. Apparently, that
will not be permitted.
Nevertheless, Shamir
considers the development
significant.
"We have always wanted
friendly relations with the
Soviet Union, both because of
its superpower status and
because millions of our
brethren live in the Soviet
Union, and we want to talk
with Moscow on their fate," he
said.
The Likud leader has always
been wary of Soviet intentions
and opposes any role for them
in the Middle East peace
process.
Friday, June 10, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
#:SW:#Wft:%:::Wra
Letters To "Dear Janice"
DEAR JANICE:
I suddenly realized yesterday that time is passing by
very quickly, and that the school year is almost over. That
means that my son and daughter will be home until the end
of August, but I will still be working, except for a
two-week vacation which I have due me. All year, it seems
to be a rat race trying to get everyone up every morning
and out on time for school and work, taking the kids in car
pools for Hebrew, sports, etc. And now, when I should be
happy that I don't have to hassle the kids any more, I'm
worried instead about what they're going to do with all
their free time. I'm afraid that they will have so much
freedom that they may get in trouble with the wrong
friends. I'd like your ideas on this.
SCHOOL'S ALMOST OUT BLUES
DEAR BLUES:
While your kids do need more freedom now, as a change
of pace and to lighten their responsibilities over the
summer, you can still offer some structure to their time.
Summer camps and summer clubs can break up the
monotony of a long summer with two- or four-week
programs, so your children needn't feel that they have to
attend something all summer long. You say you have a
two-week vacation, and you might consider spending part
of your vacation just relaxing with your children. Week-
ends also offer you a chance to get to know your children
better by spending leisure time together at the beach or
sightseeing, or simply lazying around in the yard. How
about going to see that art or science exhibit that you
always promised yourself you would take them to see? This
is a perfect time to improve your communications with
your children since you don't have any need to "nag" them
to complete homework, etc. So instead of worrying about
what can happen, be pro-active and do something positive.
And enjoy the kids while you have them at home.
sa* [i
inner is Celebrated.
Was it the French champagne? The dinner?
The salmon was flown in from Norway. And
that cream sauce... heavenly. It just happen-
ed. I looked across at him. Saw light in his
eyes. And all my resolve melted away.
Dinner celebrated Monday through Saturday.
Lunch Monday through Friday.
Reservations suggested. 884-4366
4010 W WMra A*. Tamp* (I Mock o( Dale M*x
Let Marriott Cater To
Your Every Kosher Need
Be it a Wedding, Bar Mitzvah or any special occasion,
Marriott expertise in Kosher preparation and party planning
will make you the star.
Let us handle the worries, while you enjoy the applause !
* Complete Kosher China and Silverware
* All food purchased and prepared by Marriott
Chefs under Rabbinical Supervision
* Creative Consultants
Free Covered Parking
For additional information call
Sandra Sesko 813/879-5151, extension 6139
TAMPA
AIRPORT
^\ttrriott

Tampa International Airport, Tampa, Florida 33607 (813) 879-5151
UNDER RABBINICAL SUPERVISION OP RABBI THEODORE BROD


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, June 10, 1988
MAIN BRANCH:
2808 Horatio St.
Tampa, Fla. 33609
872-aasi
Jewish Comm
Jewish Community Center
For All Children Regardless of Race, Color, or Creed.
PreKindergarten
This class is designed to
give our four year olds
die experience and activ-
ities that are necessary
for kindergarten
readiness.
Please Call 872 4451
for further information on
this program and all our
other programs for PlayTots
through PreKindergarten.
Main Branch, 2808 Horatio, Tampa, Florida 33609, 813/872-4451
North Branch, 3919 Moran Road, Tampa, Florida 33618. 813/962-2863
1
J.C.C. PRESCHOOL POSITIONS
We are now accepting applica-
tions for the positions of teacher
and assistant teachers for the
1988-89 school year. Full time and
part time positions available. If in-
terested, please contact Claudia at
962-2863 or 872-4451 j
iCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXi
The J.C.C. extends heartfelt thanks
to Manny Garcia and Carrollwood Pools
for their generous donation of materials
and 3 days of hard work in order to
beautify the Center's pool.
A camp scholarship has been
established in his honor, along with
our deepest appreciation.
XC
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
UMMERCAMP
M
Tf T
Meet Our Directors of Summer Camp
Sandie Ivere, our Camp Director, has recently been appointed the Assistant
Executive Director of the J.C.C.
The past year, Sandie has been our Youth/Adult/Camp Director. Before
moving to Tampa almost 2 years ago, Sandie and her family lived in Toledo
Ohio where Sandie worked at the JCC for 6 1/2 years as the Assistant
Pre-School and Camp Director. Sandie and her staff are looking forward to a
fun-filled Summer Camp '88.
Janis Heustis is our Early Childhood Assistant Camp Director. Janis is
originally from San Francisco but grew up in Detroit, where she studied
Education at Eastern Michigan University. There she was involved in an
experimental Preschool program for disadvantage^ children which later
became Project Head Start. After moving to Tampa in 1974 she began
teaching at the J.C.C. where her son was enrolled. She has taught all of our
age groups at one time or another before "settling" with the twos. Jams is
anticipating an exciting summer as Assistant Camp Director for Camp
K'Tonton!
Robyn Barde is our Assistant Camp Director for Camp Chai. Robyn has a
Physical Education degree from the Portland State University in Portland,
Oregon. She was the Assistant Athletic Director at the J.C.C. in Portland,
and she was very involved in the J.C.C. Day Camp, P.E. and Gymnastics
programs. Robyn was also the Assistant Director and Coach at the B nai
B'rith Resident (Sleepover) Gymnastic Camp at the Portland J.C.C. and the
Assistant Camp Director at the Scottsdale J.C.C. Day Camp. She is currently
a PreSchool and Second Home teacher for our J.C.C. in Tampa, where she's
looking forward to an eventful Summer in Camp Chai! __________^^
I MM JEWISH COMMUN/TY CENTER\
SUMMERCAMP
penQfouse
F L 0
I D
North Branch
3919 Moran Road
Friday. June 17th
911 A.M.
For Campers attending the
North Branch Meet the
counselors and see your room.
Main Branch
2808 Horatio bt.
Sunday, June 19th
12-2 P.M.
For Campers attending the
Main Branch Meet the
counselors and see Campers'
rooms.
?
?
?

t
t
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Also-
North Branch and Main Branch
Campers & Families, Join Us For a
Family Picnic During Sundays Open
House.
The Early Childhood Committee Will
Be Selling Back-Packs, Camp Shirts:
and Camp Shorts as a Fundraiser.

JMake the JCC the Center"!
of Your
!
\
TAMPA JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER i
I
LIFE Tl
Main
2868 Horatio
Tampa, FL SMH
872-4451
North
Sill Moran Rd.
Tampa, FL SM18 =
M2-28JSJ
ITS MORE T*
irSANADVEl
THE J.C.C. BEFOR
M0N.,JUNE1S-FR
9-5
M0ND
SUNCOASTSEABIRDJ
TOUR OF JOHN'S?
TUESD
SAILING INSTRl
"WEST COAST WA'
ON CLEARWAT
WEDNES
C APT. MEMO'S P IF
CLEARWJ
THURS1
SEA WORLD OF FL01
FRIDi
EXPLORE OLD FT
"SHELL ISLAND* SI
PLEASE SEND NOW
ft T,
REGI
FEESSH
NAME:
ADDRESS:
PHONE NO.:
EMERGENCY:
BIRTHDATE: _
GRADE IN SEPTEMBER:
FULL CAMP: MEMBER $814
DAILY FEE: MEMBER-
I WILL NEED DAY CARE: 7:1
DAY CARE MAIN Bl
I Will Need Transportation, IM F>
AM ONLY
JUNE1M7
IGIVEMYCHILDj_
PERMISSION TO PARTICU ATI
PROGRAM AND ALLOW HIM) IEI
ON FIELD TRIPS CONNECTS 'WI
PN
SIGNATURE
Board of Directors I
Alice Rosenthal, outgoing! resi
Directors, has announced th<
Community from the outgoii g b
Noting the deteriorating ndi
the Center pool, board me nb<
sufficient funds to repair th< do
lay new (beautiful) sod in tin* foi
camp season.
It was, the president, expfeint
the entire Board of ^^^.u0.1
to our generous and thoughtful
!


imunity Center
D
Friday, June 10, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
IE THAN FUN!
^VENTURE!!!
^FORE-CAMP CAMP
S-FRL, JUNE 17,1988
9-5
I0NDAY
BIRD SANCTUARY AND
HNS PASS VILLAGE
UESDAY
INSTRUCTIONS AT
STWATER SPORTS"
RWATER BEACH.
DNESDAY
OS PIRATE CRUISE,
EARWATER
IURSDAY
IF FLORIDA, ORLANDO
FRIDAY
)LDiFT.DeSOTOAND
ND,* ST. PETERSBURG
)NO$PENDING MONEY
GISTR ATION FORM
S SHOULD ACCOMPANY FORM.
NON-MEMBER-JIM.H
NON-MEMBER-Hl.il
7:JM:HA.M____J:H4:HP.M.
BRANCH ONLY
VAILABLE, From KOLAMI:
PMONLY ___ BOTH
IS, 14,15, II, 17
riCll ATE IN THE JCC'S VACATION
HlM/rlE R TO LEAVE THE PREMISES
CTEI i WITH THIS PROGRAM.
ctoi s Beautifies Center
oiriL
inced
utgoilg
mg
d
lir
ntimf
th
DATE
igf resident of the J.C.C.*s Board of
the receipt of a gift to the
board.
ndition of the area surrounding
me nbers voluntarily contributed
dormant sprinkler system and
for the onset of the 1988 J.C.C.
, expl lined proudly, truly a gift from
tctors to the Community. Many thanks
oughtful board members!
NORTH BRANCH:
3919 Moran Road
Tampa. Fla. 33624
962-2863
**w>***^'
JW JEW/SH COMM UN/TY CENTER
UMMEMAMP
TAMPA- FLORIDA
%=/
The J.C.C. will be selling nylon back-
packs and gym-shorts to raise money
for our PreSchool programs. Back
packs will be available in pink, purple
and royal blue and will be imprinted
with the J.C.C. logo and personalized
with your camper's name. All bags will
be large enough to easily hold a lunch
box, towels & swimsuits.
! !Order Now For Best Color Selection!!
Orders can be placed in advance (with
the form below), at either North or Main
Branch offices, or at the Summer Camp
Open House on June 19 Main
Branch Only!

Camp J.C.C. shorts & Bag Order Form
3 Parent's Name__________________________
Address_______________________________
Phone No.
Please circle the size and color your wish.
Quantity Item Color Selection Price
Shorts White Only
S M L Adults: S M L
f?+???????????
_____Back Pack
Pink, Purple,
Royal Blue
$5.00
$10.00
Personalize my pack backs with the following
name(s) (Please Print & State Item & Color)
1.__________________________________________
2.__________________________________________
3.__________________________________________
4._________________________________________
Make check payable to J.C.C
Mastercard or Visa Accepted (circle one)
Total Enclosed: $____________________________
Card no.___________________________________
Exp. Date
Signature

| FORMING BAND AND
ORCHESTRA FOR THE
FUN OF IT
Do you play a Trombone, Trumpet. Baritone. Sax.
Clarinet. Flute, Piccolo. French Horn. Piano. Violin
and other String Instruments, or Percussions (Drums.
Etc.)?
Here s Your Chance to Join a fun group of musicians.
retired or otherwise, for the formation of a
band or orchestra.
"
::
We have a place to get together to enjoy this
fellowship of musicians at the
Jewish Community Center of Tampa. 2808 Horatio.
DUST OFF THAT OLD
INSTRUMENT IN YOUR
CLOSET, YOU GUYS AND
GALS. LETS GET MUSICAL!
CALL HERB (831-5648)
OR J.C.C. (872-4451)
ON JUNE 13TH AT
THE J.C.C.
MAIN BRANCH
AT 12 NOON
COME MEET AND HAVE
LUNCH WITH
RABBI CHANA TIMONER
This will be a Brown Bag and we will provide
Soda. Coffee 3? Dessert
Rabbi Ghana Timoner comes to us from Woodbridge. Connect-
icut. Her pulpit is in Wallingford. Conn.
She is married to Julian Timoner. a Chiropractor, and has two
children. A viva (who is 16) and Samson (who is 13).
Please R.S.V.P. to 872-4451
LET'S GO FISHING
PASS-A-GRILLE FISHING
ON SUNDAY, JUNE 26th
3/4 DAY FROM 10-4 P.1V1
BRING YOUR
OWNLUNCH
ALL FISHING EQUIPMENT FURNISHED <$p~
COST: $30.00
"the fishin's great*'
Please R. S. V.P. by June 17th
Make Checks Payable To The J. C. C,
2808 Horatio, St, Tampa, FL 33609
For Further Information Please Contact
Lil Singer, 831-5648


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, June 10, 1988
Business Beat
Health Care in Crisis
By BARBARA GORMAN
Exquisite dining in
Tampa??? Yes!!! You'll find it
at ARMAND'S at 4010 W.
WATERS AVENUE.
Open for only five months,
ARMAND'S is receiving great
reviews. JOHN HAINES,
chef, and ARMAND DAUBY
have been partners for 15
years and were co-owners of a
fine restaurant in Belgium.
They recognized the fact that
the Tampa Bay area was
getting more and more cosmo-
politan and decided this was
the time to present their
specialty elegant dining,
perfect service and cuisine to
satisfy the most discriminating
palate.
ARMAND'S celebrates
dinner Monday through
Saturday and lunch Monday
through Friday.
ARMAND will be delighted
to take your reservation when
you call him at 884-4366.
Closets have always been a
problem. Even in the most
fashionable homes, they often
become stacked, strewn and
cluttered.
TOP DRAWER CUSTOM
CLOSETS has the answer.
They can custom design, with
built-in flexibility, any storage
area where things seem to pile
up against your better inten-
tions. The TOP DRAWER
solution is a complete storage
system that can be used
throughout your home, be it in
the master bedroom, the kids
room the linen closet, utility
room home office or garage
and workshop.
A call to STU SMITH, TOP
DRAWER closet specialist, at
247-1448 will get you a free
estimate, on how you can
double or even triple your
existing storage space.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli injured in a traffic or
work accident, or who falls out
of a window, has a heart attack
or needs surgery for cancer, is
assured of rapid and first-rate
dvance date, fund and is, indeed, the second
d time largest h>
asToo" far in the future. country. Many
iriven an advance date, ^f'"T7 7rT
because the anticipated time largest health fund _.nhe
"rTrr. *__ ; fk ft,t,ir country. Many Histadrut
This situation has given rise
to a "gray market" in surgery,
under the officially approved
sharap (private medical
service) system. Patients
members prefer it to their own
"general Kupat Holim," which
they must join to be members
of the trades union federation.
Maccabi operates through a
treatment in an Israeli govern- service) system. "" _v_tp_ of ..famiiv doctors"
STSsJTS--. irrcSrr^Ti st^^s
needs "elective" surgery for a J* ., treatment system of specialist clinics a
cataract or prostate or hernia ^^l^^Z system theTeneral fund has
operation. The State Comp- jan payment of sought to emulate by adding
troller's Report on the health J^f^ *7 "private" "family doctors" to its clinic
services discloses that as of f"".,e K doctors
ffi beTntaltifg'for ffS Israel has no government Like the MatcaM Sick Fund,
three years for elective health service, though the which today has no connectaon
surgery at government hospi- Likud-led governments would with any poht.cal party the
takT like to introduce one.
Kupat Holim patients, The country's public health
waiting to see a doctor at one and hospital service is based
of the hundreds of sick-fund on the pre-state Histadrut
labor federation's Kupat
Holim (sick fund) program. It
clinics for even the most minor
ailment, must spend most of
the day sitting in a chair in the was adopted as an official
corridor, awaiting his or her system by the pre-state Vaad
.bi' *
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turn for the minute or so of
consultation talk or examina-
tion by a doctor.
Reducing the long wait for
elective surgery was the
ostensible reason for recent
strikes and work sanctions by
the Histadrut and government
hospital doctors though
many patients charge that this
was only an excuse for
demanding higher incomes.
The doctors have long been
complaining that using the
operating facilities only in the
morning hours was a waste of
expensive equipment. They
said that using those same
facilities in the afternoons and
evenings, on a two- or even
three-shift basis, would consid-
erably reduce the lengthy wait
for surgery.
Anesthetists have also been
demanding the training and
employment of more of their
colleagues, to be able to
provide adequate care for all
surgery patients.
The comptroller's report
noted that in addition to the
over 37,000 patients awaiting
elective surgery, another
10,000 had not even been
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Leumi) and the Jewish
Agency, which served as an
operational parliament of the
Yishuv (Jewish community of
Palestine) prior to 1948.
As most national leaders
were then automatically
members of the Histadrut at
that time, they accepted the
Kupat Holim as the natural
and only way to operate a
health service.
Revisionists who could not
accept the socialist theory
behind the Histadrut's plan
established their own small
"national sick fund,"which
still exists but has never been
an important factor.
The general Zionists
and non-socialist liberals also
established their dwn Maccabi
sick fund and Maccabi Sports
Club, in competition with the
Histadrut's Hapoel Workers
Sports Club.
Maccabi still exists as an
important and popular sick
Maccabi Sports
dropped its party affiliation.
Fans of Maccabi Tel Aviv
basketball team, the current
and for many years the
national basketball champion,
almost certainly do not know
of its original political affilia-
tion.
Likud's attempts to intro-
duce a national health service
have always been fiercely
fought by Labor, which sees
the attempt as a way of
breaking the power of the
Histadrut trades union federa-
tion. Many members join the
Histadrut for its Kupat Holim
benefits. To offer an alternate
government health system
would almost certainly mean
the desertion of many Hista-
drut members.
Despite the drawbacks of the
Eresent public health and
capitalization services, which
are beset by frequent strikes,
work sanctions and treatment
delays, Israel can be proud of
its record of one physician for
every 340 members of the
public. That is one of the
highest ratios in the world, and
there is a 16 percent increase
in new physicians a year,
higher than the population
growth.
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WHAT'S HAPPENING
Friday, June 10
Csndlelirhtinr time 8:06 p.m.
6:30 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Retreat and Early Service
Sunday, Jane 12
12:30 P.M. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles 40's Isn't Fatal
Jesse's Landing, Seminole
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5FM 11 a.m. -
1 p.m.
2 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Softball Tampa
JCC
Monday, June 13
JCC BEFORE CAMP BEGINS
12:15 P.M. Schaarai Zedek Executive Board meeting
4:30 p.m. Mary Walker Apartments Board meeting
4:30 p.m. Menorah Manor Foundation Board meeting
6:30 p.m. Menorah Manor Executive Board meeting
Tuesday, June 14
10 a.m. ORT/Bay Horizons Board Planning meeting
6:15 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/B&P Women's
Network Board meeting
7:30 p.m. ORT/Tampa Chapter Installation meeting
7:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation Annual Meeting
Wednesday, June 15
Jewish Community Food Bank
5:30 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Happy Hour
Mako's, Tampa
Thursday, June 16
5:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/Budget and Alloca-
tions Committee
Friday, June 17
Candlelighting tine 8:08 p.m.
8 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Installation of Officers
Sunday, June 19
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5FM 11 a.m.1
S.m.
CC CAMP OPEN HOUSE
10 a.m. Jewish War Veterans Membership meeting
Monday, June 20
JCC CAMP BEGINS
1:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board meeting
8 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Board meeting
Tuesday, June 21
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Board of Education meeting
Wednesday, Jane 22
Jewish Community Food Bank
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
5:30 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Happy Hour
Brothers, Tampa
Thursday, June 23
11:30 a.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/Personnel
Committee
1:30 p.m. Jewish Towers Resident/Management Associa-
tion meeting
5:30 p.m. TOP Annual meeting
ADL of B'nai B'rith Speaker's Bureau meeting
Friday, June 24
Candlelighting time 8:10 p.m.
Friday, June 10, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Reform Zionists Oppose
Chief Rabbinate In U.S.
ARZA the Association of
Reform Zionists of America
has called on Israeli Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres to
reject a plan to station a
permanent representative of
the Chief Rabbinate of Israel
in the United States.
Rabbi Charles Kroloff,
ARZA president, assailed as
"misguided and dangerous" a
proposal by Chief Rabbi
Avraham Shapiro to assign a
representative of his office to
the Israeli consulate in New
York.
The major function of this
emissary, Kroloff charged,
would be to evaluate conver-
sions of individuals intending
to immigrate to Israel and
urge those whose conversions
failed to meet Israeli Orthodox
standards to delay immi-
grating until an Orthodox
conversion could be arranged.
The Chief Rabbinate's repre-
sentative would also have
responsibilities relating to
divorces and other matters of
personal status.
"The Chief Rabbi is
attempting to impose Israel's
monopolistic religious system
on American Jewish life,"
Kroloff said in a letter to
Foreign Minister Peres. He
continued:
"If the proposal is adopted,
it will deter Reform and
Conservative converts from
immigrating to Israel.
Furthermore, it would amend
the Law of Return by circum-
venting the Knesset, where
Israeli legislators have consis-
tently blocked attempts to
delegitimate (sic) conversions
performed by Reform and
Conservative rabbis."
The Reform Zionist leader
recall
opposition to amending the
Law of Return and called on
him to deny consular status to
the Chief Rabbinate's repre-
sentative, should one be
appointed.
In a separate statement,
Rabbi Eric Yoffie, executive
director of ARZA, noted that
"efforts to import Israeli stan-
dards of Orthodoxy into U.S.
Jewish life have been opposed
in the past by all elements of
the American Jewish
community including
Orthodox leaders who do not
accept the authority of the
Israeli Chief Rabbinate to
judge the acceptability of
Orthodox conversions
performed in the United
States."
Yoffie rejected Shapiro's
claim that he had secured the
agreement of America's
Orthodox rabbinate to his
proposal. Both American and
Israeli Orthodox leaders,
Yoffie said, have expressed
their opposition to the Chief
Rabbi's views in letters and
articles in the Israeli press.
In Jerusalem, the ARZA-
sponsored Israel Religious
Action Center also expressed
opposition to Rabbi Shapiro's
proposal. The Center defends
religious pluralism and the
rights of Reform Jews in the
Jewish state.
CONGREGATION BETH AM (Reform)
Religious School Teachers Needed For
ALL GRADES :
JUDAIC STUDIES / HEBREW
Begin in September Sundays 9:00 11:30 a.m.
Please call Vickie Silverman for more information
968-8511 949-1909
SGOOOOOOOOOC
Likud Gives Up
Bid To Move
Election
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Likud appears to have given
up its efforts to advance the
Knesset elections from
November to August.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
said on Voice of Israel Radio
that he does not intend to
initiate a move in Parliament
for early elections. Apparently
the party lacks support for the
move within its own ranks.
Cabinet members Ariel
Sharon, David Levy and
Yitzhak Modai were said to be
opposed.
There was little enthusiasm
for an early date in the
Knesset. Lab
Xee to elections in August,
m many of its voters wUl be
vacationing abroad. The reli-
gious parties and the far-right
wing Tehiya Party, which
usually support Likud initia-
tives equivocated on this issue.
Labor, by contrast, showed
its strength in the 59-45 vote
in the Knesset to hold munic-
ipal elections separately from
the national elections. Until
now they had been held
concurrently, which Likud
believed was to its advantage.
The next Knesset elections
are to be held Nov. 1, when the
term of the present Knesset
expires. But that is not a fore-
gone conclusion. Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, leader
of the Labor Party, said that
he would consider advancing
the election date to late
September or early October,
right after Yom Kippur.
"These elections are very
decisive and we need time to
explain our views. I will only
support early elections if we
have sufficient time to hold a
proper information
campaign," Peres said.
Most Israeli politicians
expect the next Knesset elec-
tions to be a referendum on
the divergent Labor and Likud
policies with respect to the
peace process and the future of
the administered territories.
STEPHEN M. KREITZER, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.C.C.P.
DAVID H. GOLDSTEIN, M.D.
LEONARD Y. COSMO, M.D.
PULMONARY MEDICINE INTERNAL MEDICINE
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, June 10, 1988
COMMUNITY EVENTS
B'NAI B'RITH
Brandon
The Brandon Unit of B'nai
B'rith will hold its June
meeting on Sunday, June 5, at
10 a.m. at CDB'S restaurant in
Oakfield Plaza (Lumsden and
Kings). The cost of the break-
fast is $5 per person, which
includes juice, eggs, bagels,
danish and coffee.
The speaker for this month's
meeting will be from Travel
travel in Brandon. They will
show a tour film of Israel and
answer any questions on vaca-
tion planning. Plan to attend
this meeting and find out what
activities are planned for the
coming months.
For further information call
685-8586.
CONGREGATION
BETH AM
Annual Picnic
Offering more fun and food
than ever, Congregation Beth
Am will hold its third annual
picnic on Sunday, June 26,
starting at 11 a.m. at White
Sands Beach, 11613 Carroll-
wood Drive, Tampa.
Singles, couples and families
are urged to join in the swim-
ming and variety of outdoor
activities. These activities are
offered for their instrinsic
enjoyment or for a conscien-
tious resource to offset the
calories freshly delivered
pizza, bountiful salads and
desserts-near-decadence
inflict.
So quickly, before you think
about it, call Betsy Singer at
962-6091 or Bruce Silverman
at 949-1909 to make your
reservation! The cost is $5 for
adults, plus a dessert or salad,
and $3 for children ages three
through 12; there is no charge
for children under three years
even those with big appe-
tites.
Rabbi Janet Liss, who
recently was appointed Beth
Am's first full-time rabbi, will
be in Tampa preparing to offi-
cially begin her duties July 1.
She has promised to attend the
picnic and is looking forward
again to meeting congregants
and prospective members.
The annual picnic is truly
"back by popular demand."
Community members are
cordially welcome to join this
pleasant gathering and meet
the members of Beth Am,
North Tampa's Reform
congregation.
CONGREGATION
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Yipples Picnic Supper
(Young Innovative People
Planning Interesting Events
from Schaarai Zedek)
The Young Singles Group
(those with children and
without), and the Young
Couples Group from Congre-
gation Schaarai Zedek, are
planning a picnic supper at
Lowry Park, on Sunday, June
26, from 3:30 p.m. until .
Those attending are asked to
bring their own picnic supper,
but the drinks, snacks, and
dessert will be provided. In
addition, bring your own
sports equipment for yourself
and your children. This prom-
ises to be a terrific get-
together so don't miss it.
BBYO
Volunteer Advisors
Are you outgoing? Do you
like to work with Jewish teen-
agers in a leadership capacity?
If you are, this is the place for
you. B'nai B'rith Youth Organ-
ization is looking for volunteer
advisors to supervise our AZA
and BBG chapters in several
areas throughout Florida;
including Jacksonville, Tampa
and Clearwater. If interested
in this rewarding opportunity,
please call Ellen Silverman at
(813) 872-4451.
RECRUITMENT
CAMPAIGN
For Women's American ORT
Women's American ORT
launched its new SPARC
campaign this spring with
special recruitment activities
in every chapter across the
country.
In Tampa a lovely Fashion
Show was held at Guest
Quarter.
SPARC stands for Spring
Ahead Recruitment
Campaign. It will run through
June 30. This is an opportunity
for women of all ages to join
this activist grass-roots organ-
ization which supports the
worldwide ORT network of
vocational schools and courses.
For first time members the
dues are $15.
For further information
please call Barbara Glasser at
973-1174.
ALBERT ARONOVITZ
Ladies Auxiliary No. 373
At the past General Meeting
of the Jewish War Veterans,
Ladies Auxiliary, it was voted
unanimously to nominate
Helen Males for "Woman of
the Year" award and Sadie
Wahon for the "Bertha Lach
Award."
On June 10, 11 and 12, the
Department Convention will
take place at Sabal Park,
Tampa. Delegates attending
from the Auxilliary will be,
Anne Spector, PAP; Selma
Cohen, PAP; Minnie Posner,
PCP; Belle Nemeroff, Senior
Vice President, and Esther
Piper, PAP.
Editors Accused of
Complicity
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Two
editors of the shut-down leftist
newspaper Derekh Hanitzotz
were formally charged in Jeru-
salem district court with
membership in a terrorist
organization.
Ronni Ben-Efrat, 35, and
Michal Schwartz, both
mothers of two children, have
been in custody since they
were arrested along with
Yaacov Ben-Efrat, who is
Ronni's husband, and Hadas
Lahav.
All were members of the
editorial staff of the news-
paper, which was ordered
closed by the security author-
ities three months ago, on
grounds it was funded by
terrorists.
The two women also were
charged with having contact
with a foreign agent and
membership in an illegal
organization. The accusations
were based on testimony by
state witnesses, including two
senior police officers and six
members of the General
Security Services, known as
the Shin Bet.
If the charges are proven,
the accused would face prison
sentences of from five to 15
years. The state asked that the
suspects be held pending the
end of legal proceedings. That
request will be renewed when
the court reconvenes on June
12. The suspects will remain in
custody until then.
A fifth suspect, Assaf Adiv,
who is listed as publisher of
Derekh Hanitzotz also was
arrested.
According to the charge
sheet, contact with the terror-
ists began between the end of
1983 and the beginning of
1984.
At that time, Ronnie Ben-
Efrat and her now estranged
husband, Yaacov, met in
London with Salah Rafat, a
prominent member of the
Democratic Front for the
Liberation of Palestine, a
Marxist-oriented, pro-Soviet
terrorist group headed by
Nayef Hawatmen.
Yaacov, 38, though
mentioned in the charge sheet,
has not yet been formally
charged. He is Argentine-born
and was chief editor of Derekh
Hanitzotz. The others accused
are Israeli-born.
War Crimes
Inquiries
Great Britain's War Crimes
Inquiry is appealing for
evidence about war crimes
committed during World War
II by people who are now
citizens of or residents of the
United Kingdom.
The Australian government
is also undertaking a criminal
investigation of any of its
residents who were involved in
war crimes on behalf of Nazi
Germany.
The British Inquiry is
already examining lists of
suspected war criminals.
The Australian investigation
focuses on the murder of Jews
in and around the city of Libau
(also known as Liepaja or
Libava) in Latvia, and in and
around the villages of
Kurzeniec (also known as
Kurenets) and Krasnoye, in
Beyelorussia (pre-war Poland).
Information about these in-
cidents or about the activities
of the Latvian Security Police,
Latvian Political Police or Lat-
vian SD in Libau and the
Vorschutz-kommando, the
local police force in these
villages, should be sent to the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, attention Elliot
Welles, 823 United Nations
Plaza, New York City 10017.
The information will be
transmitted to the Australian
authorities.
Evidence for the British in-
vestigation may be submitted
to: The Secretary, War Crimes
Inquiry, c/o The Home Office,
So Queen Annes Gate, London
SW1H 9AT.
Collective Guilt
Dismissed at
Mauthausen
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) Chancellor
Franz Vranitzky of Austria re-
jected the idea that Austrians
must bear the burden of collec-
tive guilt for the crimes of the
Nazi era.
Addressing more than
15,000 persons attending a
memorial gathering at
Mauthausen on the 43rd an-
niversary of the liberation of
the concentration camp by
American troops, Vranitzky
said more Austrians suffered
Nazi persecution than is
generally known abroad.
Austria, therefore, ought
not accept the thesis of collec-
tive guilt, even though Austria
was hardly unfriendly to the
Nazi regime, said Vranitzky,
the leader of the Socialist
Party.
Deaths
He stressed that the suffer-
ing of Hitler's victims can be
traced back to the guilt of in-
dividuals. More than 120,000
inmates died at Mauthausen.
"One can never deal enough
with the past," the chancellor
said. "We received our identi-
ty through the resistance
against the Nazis. The
Austrian state is the antithesis
of the National Socialist
regime of injustice," the
chancellor added.
But Vranitzky castigated
xenophobic tendencies in
Austria today, which he called
new forms of anti-Semitism.
The memorial gathering was
attended by the U.S. am-
bassador to Austria, Henry
Grunwald, and the Israeli
charge d'affaires, Gideon
Yarden.
WASSERLAUF
Morris Wasserlauf, 66, of Miami and
formerly of Tampa, died Tuesday, May 17.
A native of New York, he moved to Miami
where he lived for 25 years. He was a
retired clothing salesman and was a
member of Temple David in Tampa. He is
survived by his wife, Sonia; two sons, Jay
and Tom, both of Miami and one grandchild
BACKMAN
Maurice Backman, 82, of Tampa, died
Monday, May 23. A native of Canada, he
had been a winter resident of the Tampa
Bay area for 10 years, coming from Canada.
He was a member of Congregation Rodeph
Sholom. He is survived by his wife Fay; a
son, Howard of Canada; a daughter, Susan
Mabo of Cincinnati; three sisters, Dolly
Wolfe of Charlotte. N.C., Nellie Pollinger of
Florida, and Rose Cooner of Canada; four
grandchildren and a great-grandchild.
GLASSER
Fannie Glasser, 89, of Tampa, died Tuesday,
May 24. A native of Russia, she had been a
resident of the Tampa Bay area for 11
years. She was a homemaker. She is
survived by two sons, Paul of Rockledge and
Leonard of Wayside, N.J.; a daughter, Joan
Stillman of Lutz; a brother, Lou Rifkin of
Hallandale; 10 grandchildren and five great-
grandchildren.
COBEN
Carl G. Coben, 59, of Tampa and New
Jersey, died Thursday, May 26. A native of
Massachusetts, he was an attorney prac-
ticing in New Jersey and Florida. He it
survived by his wife, Barbara of Tampa and
New Jersey; three sons, Lawrence J.,
Harlan and Craig, all of Livingston, N.J.;
and a sister, Evelyn Roaeman of Massachu-
setts.
NOBEL
Sidney Nobel, 70, of Sun City Center, died
Thursday, May 26. A native of New York,
he moved to the Tampa area 14 years ago.
He was a retired assistant principal for the
New York City Board of Education. He was
among the founders of the Sun City Center
Jewish Congregation and president of the
Sun City Center Jewish Club and the
Bedford C. Condo Association. He was
founder of the Kings Point Library. He is
survived by his wife, Rose of Sun City
Center; a son, Joel of Long Island; a
daughter, Ellen Nocera of Queens; a
brother, Leo of Inverness; and four grand-
children.
FROMET
David B. Fromet, 93, of Tampa, died
Friday, May 27. A native of New York, he
had been a resident of the Tampa Bay area
for over 13 years. He was the owner and
operator of a printing company in New
York, a volunteer employee of Hillel School
of Tampa, a member of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom, and a member of Knights
of Pythias in New York. He is survived by
his wife, May; a grandson, Michael Roth
burd of Tampa; and three great-
grandchildren.
Jiuntn *Junt*al JJdicf.'if
Providing Dignified Services
to Our Jewish community
Charles D.Segal
Funeral Director
*
Jonathan A. Fuss
Funeral Director
87*3330
555 G*en Avenue Soutn


Bar/Bat Mitzvah
EDWARD (TED) GORMAN
Edward (Ted) Gorman, son
of Eda Gorman and Robert
Gorman will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, June 11 at 11 a.m.
at Congregation Schaarai
Zedek. Rabbi Richard Birnholz
will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Schaarai Zedek Religious
School and is active in the
Junior Youth Group. He
attends 7th Grade at Coleman
Junior High School. Ted has
played football for the West
Tampa Boy's Club team for
four seasons. He has been
awarded trophies as best
offensive lineman, best defen-
sive lineman, best defensive
player, and the Coach's
Sportsmanship award.
Eda Gorman and Robert
Gorman will host the Kiddush
luncheon following the
services in honor of the occa-
sion and a reception Saturday
evening at the Temple. A
Shabbat dinner and the Oneg
Shabbat Friday evening will be
hosted by Ted's grandparents,
Barbie and Paul Gorman.
In addition to family and
friends Ted's three great-
grandmothers Mary Gorman,
Ann Mosher, and Edna Combs
will share in the joy of the day.
has achieved a green belt
ranking.
Mr. and Mrs. Mel S.
Jacobson will host the Kiddush
following the services in honor
of the occasion and a dinner
dance Saturday evening at the
Palma Ceia Golf and Country
Club.
Robert's grand-
mothers, Mrs. Victoria
Jacobson and Mrs. Milton
Lange will host a Shabbat
dinner. The Oneg Shabbat
Friday evening will be hosted
by Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Jacobson and friends of the
family. A Sunday brunch will
be held at Robert's home for
out of town guests.
meet qualifier on the YMCA
swim team. As a hobby he
builds scale size model cars.
Mr. and Mrs. Mann will host
the Kiddush luncheon
following services in honor of
the occasion at the Beth Am
meeting place, Community
Masonic Lodge.
DANIEL MANN
Daniel Mann, son of Mr. and
Mrs. James Mann will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday, June 11 at 10:30
a.m. at Congregation Beth
Am. Cantor Vicki Silverman
will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Beth Am Bar Mitzvah
class. Daniel attends 7th
Grade at Oak Grove Junior
High School where he partici-
pates in the Advanced Talent
program and the Junior Honor
Society. He is a champion
MARGARET McKAY
Margaret Elizabeth McKay,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marc
Perkins will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday, June 11 at 9:45 a.m.
at Congregation Kol Ami.
Rabbi H. David Rose and
Cantor Sam Isaak will offi-
ciate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Kol Ami Religious School.
Margaret attends 8th Grade at
Pine View Middle School. Her
interests include art, music,
and horseback riding.
Mr. and Mrs. Perkins will
host the Kiddush luncheon
following the services in honor
of the occasion and a reception
Saturday at the Avila Country
Club.
Special guests will include
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Perkins,
Mrs. Kathleen Kistler, and
several very special friends.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++*+++*++++++j
Friday, June 10, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Astrology
in Judaism
By RABBI THEODORE BROD
Rabbi Hanina said to his
disciples: Go tell the son of
Levi, not the constellation of
the day, but that of the hour is
the determining influence:
He who is born under the
sun; the planet wields its
influence on man and he will
become outstanding, a leader
with a brilliant future, he will
be handsome but his secrets
will be uncovered, if a thief, he
will not be successful.
He who is born under Venus
will be wealthy but immoral.
He who is born under
Mercury will be wise and have
a retentive memory.
He who is born under the
Moon will be one to suffer,
building and demolishing,
keeping secrets. If a thief he
will be successful. (Just like
the moon which waxes and
wanes, has no light of its own
but merely reflects the sun's
light.)
He who is born under Saturn
will have his plans frustrated.
Others say, all designs against
him will be frustrated.
He who is born under
Jupiter (Zedek) wil be a
zadkan, a right-doing man.
Rabbi Nahman B. Isaac said,
he will be right doing in good
deeds, charitable.
He who is born under Mars
will be a shedder of blood.
Rashi said, either a surgeon,
thief, slaughterer, or a mohel
(a circumciser). Rabbah said, I
was born under Mars and am
none of these. (Talmud, Shab-
bath 156a)
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ROBERT JACOBSON
Robert Conway Jacobson,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel S.
Jacobson, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, June 18 at 11 a.m.
at Congregation Schaarai
Zedek. Rabbi Richard Birnholz
will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Schaarai Zedek Religious
School and is active in the
Junior Youth Group. Robert is
in the 7th Grade at the Hillel
School of Tampa where he is a
high honor student and serves
on the student government.
He was selected for the Duke
University Talent Search
Program. Robert actively
participates in Judo where he
Bernice Gilman
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Susan L. Greenberg,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
William Greenberg of Merrick,
New York and Steven A.
Haubenstock, son of Mr. and
mrs. Alfred Haubenstock of
Tampa, were married May 29,
1988 at the Oceanside Jewish
Center, Oceanside, New York.
The bride's attendants were
Ilene Fallas, of Massapequa,
New York, matron of honor;
and Gail Osnos of Cleveland,
Ohio; Karen Haubenstock of
Denver; Norma Haubenstock
of Fairbanks, Alaska; and
Susan Robinson of Tampa.
The groom's attendants
were Eston Crowder of
Tampa, best man; and ushers
David Anton and Mark
Robinson of Tampa; Joey
Pallas of Massapequa, New
York; and Sam Osnos of Cleve-
land.
After a wedding trip to Nova
Scotia the couple will live in
Tampa.
U.S. Envoy
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan intends to
nominate career diplomat
William Brown to replace
Thomas Pickering as U.S.
ambassador to Israel, the
White House announced.
The announcement did not
disclose the new assignment
for Pickering, who has been
ambassador to Israel since
1985.
Brown, 57, currently ambas-
sador to Thailand, served as
deputy chief of mission at the
U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv
from 1979 to 1982. During
more than 30 years with the
State Department he has
otherwise concentrated on Far
Eastern and Soviet affairs.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, June 10, 1988
Pippert's Israel:
A Daily Page One Story
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
As senior Middle East cor-
respondent for United Press
International, Wesley G.
Pippert wrote dispatches that
were published around the
world from 1983 to 1986.
Back in the United States
Pippert two months ago
published a book about Israel
called, "Land of Promise,
Land of Strife."
Other journalists have
written about the Middle East
and Pippert similarly, has
detailed Israel's "problems
without" terrorism, its
Arab neighbors and he has
written about the "problems
within," its struggle among
religious factions, internal
policies. ..
A dimension that may be
different from that written by
other correspondents, he
concedes, is his use of religious
undertones and history, which
greatly color his perspective.
He firmly points out, however,
that, "I didn't find any conflict
being a religious person
covering a story. I was a Chris-
tian and my colleagues (in the
office) were Jews with varying
degrees of observance. All of
us covered stories as objec-
tively as we could that's all a
matter of discipline and
training."
Pippert is a Methodist and
self-described "committed
Christian." In South Florida
last month, he explained how
he got to Israel as a journalist,
a story which was not included
in his book.
Pippert, who had worked
with UPI beginning at age 20,
covering such beats as the
Carter Administration, was at
a farewell party for a UPI
bureau chief in Washington. A
UPI executive asked him if he
wanted to go overseas. "I said
yes," Pippert recalls. "He (the
editor) said Moscow. I said
Jerusalem."
Except for a period in 1964
in which Pippert went on an
archeological dig in Israel, the
correspondent had not spent
any great length of time in
Israel.
"I didn't know much about
the Middle East," he says.
"But I knew about the Bible
which gave me an immediate
affinity, and affection, for the
land Eretz Israel."
He didn't have much time to
sightsee when he arrived in
Israel journalist's equip-
ment in tow. "I arrived on
Shabbat and next day was the
first Israeli withdrawal from
Lebanon. That same week,
Menachem Begin announced
he was going to retire."
Pippert left Israel before the
Palestinian uprising.
"It did take me by surprise,"
he says. "It took many people
by surprise. I would guess the
number of casualties in three
years was about 25 and in five
months, a couple of hundred.
People knew that there was an
unresolved Palestinian quest-
ion but the fact that it erupted
in such ferocity is what
surprised us."
Asked to point a finger of
blame, Pippert states: "I'd say
there is fault to be found on
both sides."
"I think in the hearts of all
people there's a hunger for
peace and justice," he begins
in preface to the accusations.
"You take the PLO, which has
been designated by Arabs as
their sole representative. The
PLO refuses 40 years later to
even acknowledge that Israel
exists and is still committed to
a full-arms struggle, which is a
euphemism for violence and
terrorism. And the PLO still
has not made clear that if it
were to take over the West
Bank and Gaza, that would be
enough or would the PLO use
it as a base to get more. That's
where I point the finger at the
Palestinians.
"I point the finger at Israel
for saying that, in every refer-
ence that I ever heard the
PLO is terrorist. That defeats
dialogue. Israel refuses to deal
with the PLO in any way. So
Yet a cycle of killing
continues, one which Pippert
says is usually initiated by the
Arabs who, in turn, face what
he terms as "massive retalia-
tion" by Israelis.
"A lot of people are under
the impression that there have
been more Jewish victims of
Arab terrorism," Pippert says.
"The reverse is true. There
have been more Arab victims
of Jewish violence. Here's
what occurs in a typical attack:
A PLO group sets off a road-
side bomb that hits an Israeli
bus and kills five, for instance,
and wounds 20. Then the PLO
calls up the news agencies and
takes credit for it boasts
credit. Two days later the
Israeli Air Force bombs a PLO
base in southern Lebanon,
killing 25.
Wes Pippert in private conversation with Israel Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir.
there's mutual refusal for each
to recognize the other. And I
think that's defeating."
Pippert returned to America
"with tremendous affection
for all the people Jew and
Arab alike."
He describes Israelis as
"boisterous, energetic, lively,"
a people who possess "an
honesty and genuineness there
in what you see is what you
get. ...
"On the other hand, if you're
shopping in East Jerusalem in
the Arab section, they are
courteous, charming, really go
out of their way to please. But
the d-ark side of that is you
don't always know what's
behind the smile."
Pippert tends to lay fault
with the leadership of both the
Arabs and Israelis, not the
average resident with whom
he broke bread and shopped.
He notes how the various
embassies in Israel would hold
parties on occasions such as
the Fourth of July by inviting
the Arabs and Jews to
separate parties.
"My wife said to the British
consul, "Why don't you have
one party for both Palestinian
and Israeli. She said it just
wasn't done. Well, it was done,
by Americans, several years
ago. One year had a majority
or Israelis and few Palestin-
ians. The last year you could
see some Israelis and Palestin-
ians talking to each other.
That made me proud of the
U.S."
Pippert said he and his wife
were entranced by the "rever-
ence for life" in Israel.
"Israelis love babies, they
love life, they love children.
One reason, they lost so many.
A crying baby is not a problem
in Israel."
"On Yom Kippur in 1985,
three Israelis were killed by
Palestinians in their yacht on
Cyprus and again a terrorist
organization took credit for it.
A few days later the Israeli Air
Force bombed PLO head-
quarters in Tunis and killed 60
or 70. That's why there prob-
ably have been more Arab
victims than Israelis."
Pippert admits that foreign
press sympathies despite
professionalism have
changed from a romantic
picture of Israel to the favor of
the Palestinian cause. While
news reporters strive to be
accurate and fair, the "select-
ion" of their stories may be
questionable, he admits.
The key to the "unyielding"
however, stems from what
viewers see on their TV
screens, according to Pippert.
The unyielding would end,
Pippert suggests, if the Pales-
tinians and Israelis would each
say to each other, "You have a
right to a home, you have a
right to be treated justly and
fairly.
"What the sorrow is from
Israel's point of view," he
adds, "is Israel was founded as
the light unto nations. What's
been happening in the last few
years, particularly since the
invasion of Lebanon, is there is
a chipping away of the
emotional support that most
Americans always felt for
Israel. And not only that, but I
think Israel finds itself doing
things it might not have done a
few decades ago. Brutality
leads to brutality, and who
does brutality really hurt. If I
hit your face it stings for a
moment. When you enagage
injustice and brutality the
greater harm is done to your-
self."
Personally, Pippert calls his
Middle East assignment the
best three years of his life. "I
care about justice, I care about
the Bible. It was a time of
great romance and meaning
and I came home with a
daughter."
And, he says, he had a "page
one story" everyday.
"The main reason why Israel
is important, I think, is not
because it is in the Middle East
and the Middle East is the
crossroads of the world. It's
not important because oil's in
the Middle East. Israel's page
one story for 40 years in the
United States (is because)
there are about six or seven
million Jews and 50 to 60
million Conservative Chris-
tians as well as uncounted
millions of Moslems elsewhere.
All look to that land as the
cradle of their beliefs.
"To the Christians, Jesus
walked to Jerusalem. To the
Moslem, the prophet
Mohammed started his night-
time celestial journey. The
Western Wall where
Mohammad did this is on top of
where the (Jewish) holy
Temple stood. And you walk a
quarter of a mile down and you
come to the Church of the Holy
Sepulchre."
It is "a complex battle with
very strong religious roots,"
Pippert concludes.
Pippert says his views of
Israel did not change by the
end of his assignment, where
one of his first decisions was to
relocate the UPI's bureau
from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
"My basic opinions did not
change. They were reinforced.
I love Israel. I also love justice
and peace. And I think one
way to love Israel is to call it to
justice (which he found
lacking, not generally, but in
its treatment of Palestinians).
I don't think love of Israel
means I have to hate the Arab,
or to love the Arab means I
have to hate the Israeli."
Pippert is hard-pressed to
call an outcome of the Pales-
tinian-Israeli conflict. "I don't
see much hope that there's
going to be much flexibility on
both sides," he says. Yet he
says the "main villain" in the
Middle East is "the West,
particularly the British and
French for deceitfully with-
holding Arab independence
after World War I, and now,
the Soviet Union and the
United States for turning the
region into an arsenal of
death."
Food Bill
Continued from Page 4
Jewish members in the legisla-
ture are not united on the
issue.
"Let me tell you what the
most ironic thing about this
is," he said. "When I first
introduced the bill and brought
it to the Agriculture
Committee, I had such a diffi-
cult time explaining how come
we need to assure people that
kosher food is kosher and what
kosher food is.
"It was very difficult
educating the northern Florid-
ians about kosher food and
that was the hardest thing in
my eyes. As soon as I educated
them what kosher food is, the
obstacle was no longer them.
All of a sudden, the bill didn't
make it because of the Jewish
members of the House."
While Gordon's office was
lobbied unofficially by
clergy, Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
executive vice president of the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, said his organi-
zation has not taken a formal
position on the issue. "The bill
did not come to our attention,"
Schiff said. But, he added,
"We're all for kosher."
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