The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00331

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
^Jemsti Floridi3 n
Of Tampa
Volume 9 Number 23
Tampa, Florida Friday, November 13, 1987
*
Price 35 Cent*
Tampa Jewish Federation Adopts
1988 Campaign Goal$1,370,000
Walter H. Kessler, General
Chairman of the 1988 Tampa
Jewish Federation/United
Jewish Appeal Campaign has
announced the adoption of a
$1,370,000 goal for the 1988
campaign.
According to Kessler, the
1988 campaign goal was arriv-
ed at through a goal setting
process that provided for input
from the major campaign con-
tributors. After hearing the
local, national and overseas
needs for the coming year,
there was unanimous agree-
ment that a 18 percent in-
crease in the campaign was
realistic and feasible.
The recommended increase
was also adopted by the
Federation Executive Com-
mittee and approved at the Oc-
tober meeting of the Federa-
tion Board of Directors.
Walter H. Kessler
Major Gifts Campaign Event
Planned With Pinellas Dec. 7
The Tampa Jewish Federa-
tion and the Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County have joined
together to sponsor a major
gifts dinner event on Monday
evening, Dec. 7 at the
Westshore Hyatt Regency
Hotel. Walter Kessler, 1988
General Campaign Chairman
has appointed Ronald Rudolph
to head the major gifts portion
of the Tampa campaign. The
minimum commitment to the
.1988 campaign to be eligible to
attend is $10,000. The Jewish
Federation of Pinellas County
has selected Marion Samson
Joseph as their major gifts
Ronald Rudolph
event chairman, according to
Sidney Werner, Campaign
Chairman.
The guest speaker for the
dinner which will get under-
way at 6:45 p.m. is the former
Ambassador of Israel to the
United States, the Honorable
Simcha Dinitz. A special effort
is being made to encourage
major gift contributors to br-
ing as their guests their adult
children and their spouses to
the dinner program. For addi-
tional information please con-
tact the Tampa Jewish Federa-
tion at 875-1618.
Women's Division
Adopts $300,000 Goal
The Women's Division of the Tampa Jewish Federation
recently adopted a $300,000 goal for their 1988 campaign.
Under the capable leadership of Laura Kreitzer, Campaign
Vice-President, the division hopes to obtain a 20 percent
per card increase to meet the demands of growing Jewish
needs locally and aborad. Local agencies need additional
funds to guarantee quality service delivery, and Jews
abroad are also in need. Many Jewish women have aspired
to be philanthropic and to make a commitment in their own
name. The Women's Division campaign is already under-
way and the leadership understands the rewards and fulfill-
ment of raising 25 percent of total community dollars. To
date, Women's Division has raised almost $56,000.
In addition to the Women's Division Holding an in-house
training program, many board members participated in a
regional training workshop, chaired by Lili Kaufmann.
Aida Weissman also worked closely with Lili and Laura
Kreitzer to recruit individuals to participate in the regional
swing.
Two campaign events are scheduled for future dates to
given individuals the opportunity to make their commit-
ment to the 1988 TJF/UJA campaign. Wendy Katz will
chair the main event and Blossom Leibowitz and Lee
Kessler will plan a special Lion of Judah event.
The Women's division campaign cabinet consists of:
Blossom Leibowitz and Lee Kessler, Lion chairmen; Jolene
Shor, Emerald chairman; Betty Shalett and Sue Forman,
Diamond chairmen; Harriet Seehg, Ruby chairman; Bert
Green, Jewish Towers chairman; Helaine Katzman, Super
Sunday liaison; and Wendy Katz, Main event chairman.
The cabinet is working closely with Women's Division
President, Ann Rudolph and her board to ensure the most
successful year ever.
Hillel School Prepares For
'Gift of Gold' Nov. 21
i
;
INFORMATION
ON TAMPA'S PARTICIPATION
IN THE MOBILIZATION
FOR THE REAGAN-GORBACHEV SUMMIT
IN WASHINGTON IS AVAILABLE
FROM THE TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE
AT 875-1618
Lights! Camera! Action!
Tickets, not scripts, are being
written and sold. Costumes
and sets are being designed
and created. The stars will be
the members of the Parents'
Association, Board of Direc-
tors, staff, and friends of the
Hillel school of Tampa. The big
event is the 1987 Gift of Gold
benefit, on Saturday evening,
November 21, at 7:30 p.m.
when "Hillel Goes Hollywood"
on location at the Tampa Air-
port Marriott Hotel.
The Gift of Gold is Hillel's
only major community-wide
fund-raising event. Through
the efforts of parents and
board members, and the
gracious Support of many
friends, the project has provid-
ed essential revenues for the
extension and enhancement of
the school's educational
programs.
The Hollywood party will be
the culminating event and will
feature music, champagne, a
Kosher dinner buffet, and the
awarding of the grand prizes
of $5000, $1000, and $500.
Guests are encouraged to
dress as their favorite movie
stars or characters ap-
propriate to the theme.
All interested friends are in-
Continued on Page 3
^/\/"WS*/\^*-'\/^Ny,wv^>^w\*^\/i
<*>*>
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Inside
Menorah Manor Don't Leave Your Money to
Chance.. .Page 5
In Whose Name, Amen.. .Page 7
Tom Dine to Address Tampa bay Community.
. .Page 3
Friedman Is Nathan I. Gordon
Scholar-In-Residence At Schaarai Zedek
Nationally famous family
therapist and psychotherapist,
Dr. Edwin H. Friedman, will
speak as the Nathan I. Gordon
Scholar-In-Residence, at Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek on
the weekend of Nov. 20-22. Dr.
Friedman, who is also a Rabbi,
lectures extensively on the
Jewish Family and on the
Jewish tradition as an impor-
tant element in healthy human
development.
He believes, for example,
that doors which have been
closed for generations can sud-
denly open, or the opposite,
normally open passageways
can suddenly close for years as
a result of the way a family
chooses to celebrate the major
nodal events like birth, death,
marriage, divorce, and
Bar/Bat Mitzvah.
Friday night, Nov. 20, at 8
o'clock, he will speak on
"Necessary Losses" The
Jewish Life Cycle With Em-
phasis on the Final Days.
On Saturday, Nov. 21, at 11
be
a.m., his topic will
"Necessary Beginnings"
Birth, Baby Naming, Brit
Milah and Bar/Bat Mitzvah,
and the "Myth of the
Shiksha."
On Sunday morning, Nov.
22, from 9:15 to 11 o'clock he
will speak on "Necessary Bon-
ding and Separation"
Jewish Marriage and Divorce.
Dr. Friedman is the author
of the book, Generation to
Generation Family Process
in Church and Synagogue.

Dr. Edwin H. Friedman


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, November 13, 1987
f
I
By LYN MEYERSON
Laughing, all the way to court Sally Axelrod, of
Axelrod Publishing of Tampa Bay, recently contracted
with Stetson University College of Law and Attorney/car-
toonist Steve Rushing for the publishing of a witty collec-
tion of over 100 courtroom cartoons that are sure to suit
everyone's "legal" funny bone. There will be two separate
editions one for Stetson University alumni, the other for
the general public. Common Sense Religion for America:
A Guide, by Rabbi Jan Bresky will be ready for publica-
tion by Axelrod in late fall.
Truth or .. Judy Z. Schwartz will be a contestant on
televisions Truth or Consequences Thursday, November
19! The show airs on WXFL at 9:30 in the morning. Judy
wins money by writing on a bald person's head! The show
was taped in September, and while Judy and her husband
Max Schwartz were in Los Angeles, they also took a mini
cruise to Mexico. Stay tuned!
Money talks Some of Tampa's financial advisers are
among the best in the business, according to the latest issue
of Money magazine in their special anniversary issue. The
publication recommends 709 brokers, planners, accoun-
tants and money managers in metropolitan areas around
the country. Recipients of Money accolades for "the best
tax practitioners" are Richard Gordimer, Rivero Gor-
dimer and Bivelle; and Charles Weissman, Darby Sheahan
Weissman and Morgenstern. The selections were based on
a variety of factors, including peer recommendations, track
records, interviews and willingness to take on new clients.
The St. Petersburg Times also reported on this
prestigious recognition for Richard and Charles. Definite-
ly impressive! Congratulations!
The first of many to come. Rodeph Sholom's first an-
nual Celebrity Roast was held October 24 at the Tampa
Airport Marriott Hotel and was a great success! The
Roastee for the evening was past President and Ritual
Committee Co-Chairman, Sam Bobo. The evening
featured an elegant dinner-dance and five "roasters." Con-
gregation Rodeph Sholom wants to thank all those who
participated and helped make the evening as special as it
was. See you next year!
Sneak Preview Over 800 people attended the 5th
Annual Mayor's Partnership breakfast, held recently at the
downtown Hyatt Regency. The breakfast is sponsored by
the City of Tampa and the Private Industry Council, who
have a partnership between' business and government with
a goal to provide a job opportunity for anyone who wants
one. This awesome task was highlighted by a premiere
presentation of the video "Tampa Works When People
Work." The producer/director of this production is Linda
Goldstein. Linda works in Public Relations and Video Pro-
ductions and has won state and national awards for her
presentations. Way to go!
An Affair in Autumn .. This theme of this year's
fundraiser-fashion show sponsored by Schaarai Zedek
Sisterhood will certainly be a day to remember. Barbara
Goldman and Betty Kopelman are co-chairman of this gala
event, which features furs and fashions from The
Boulevard and the latest in children's clothes from The
Golden Egg. Diane Goldfeder and Leslie Osterweil are in
charge of the lunch, which is always delicious; Lukie
Brown is creating the decorations; and Cathy Gardner is
responsible for the design of the beautiful invitations.
Models include: Trudy Barkin, Merilyn Burke, Helen
Gordon Davis, Rena Firestone, Rhoda Karpay, Saundra
Mendelson, Carol Osiason, Franci Rudolph, Stephanie
Saunders, Bobbie Taub, and Marilyn Zabaldo. Children
modeling are: Erin Bar at, daughter of Johanna and
Sheldon Barat; Jill Bentley, daughter of Karen and
Mitch Bentley; Lauren and Matthew Bloom, children of
Jan and Jeff Bloom; Jessica Boas, daughter of Bev and
Bill Boas; Lindaey Goldman, daughter of Barbara and
Alan Goldman; Tracy Brauner, daughter of Judy and Bob
Brauner; Danny Haelsig, son of Ginny and Ken Haelsig;
Michael Hyman, son of Lynne and Larry Hyman; Eric
and Josh Maltzer, sons of Bonnie Saks and Mark
Maltzer; Jill Meyerson, daughter of Lyn and Barry
Meyerson; Jenny and Ariel Novick, daughters of Cindy
and Stuart Novick; Matthew Preiser, son of Babs and
Douglas Preiser; and Lesley Rudolph, daughter of Franci
and Richard Rudolph. The community is welcomed to at-
tend; call the Temple for reservations. Proceeds from the
fashion show serve the community as well as the Temple
and Sunday School. See you there it sounds terrific!
Babyline Amanda Hope Aron was born at 8:35 a.m.
October 19, 1987 to thrilled parents Faith and Leslie
Aron. Congratulations to you all on this long awaited bun-
dle of joy! Amanda was 5 lbs 7 oz. and 18" long. She is nam-
Continued on Page 16-
Wedding Announcements
MOUCH-KURTZ
Michelle Ruth Mouch and
Timothy Michael Kurtz were
married Saturday, October 10
in the atrium of the Lincoln
Hotel-Westshore. Vows were
exchanged beneath a mirrored
chupah set amidst a
background reminiscent of an
elegant art-deco garden.
Michelle is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J.
Adrian of Tampa and Mr.
Joseph A. Mouch of Calumet
City, Illinois. She is the grand-
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Y. Conney of Clearwater. Tim
is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
William Paul Kurtz of Griffin,
Georgia.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her two fathers in a
double ring ceremony co-
officiated by Rabbi Arthur
Baseman of Clearwater and
the Reverend Canon Walter
Cawthorne of St. Petersburg.
The day chosen for this
ceremony was also the 61st
wedding anniversary of grand-
parents Celia and Leo Conney.
The bride's sister, Catherine
Adrian of Tampa, served as
maid of honor with
bridesmaids Jill Kalaf of
Brookline, Mass., Mindy
Morley of Tampa, and Caroline
Shapiro of Chicago, 111.
Tim's cousin, Robert Stuart
Ogletree HI, served as best
man with groomsmen Kenneth
Morley of Tampa, Dana Taylor
of Piedmont, S.C., and Van
Turner of Warner Robbins,
Ga. Ushers included Steven
Adrian of Tampa, Jonathan
Kurtz of Griffin, Ga., and Jef-
frey Mouch of Kansas City.
Lynda Kurtz of Griffin, Ga.,
attended the bride's book and
Katzi Bozeman of Senoia, Ga.
distributed the corsages and
boutonnieres.
Many friends and relatives
entertained for the couple,
beginning with the engage-
ment party hosted by Ed and
Ruth Adrian at their home.
Showers included one hosted
by Mindy Morley at her home;
one hosted by Norma Felsen-
thal and Na Levinson at the
Levinson home; and one
hosted by Priscilla Adelman,


Lois Haas, Kay Jacobs, and
Bobbie Taub at the Avila Golf
and Country Club.
The week of the wedding in-
cluded the bridesmaids' lun-
cheon held at the Embassy
Suites Hotel; the rehearsal
dinner hosted by Tim's parents
at the Columbia Restaurant;
the wedding reception and din-
ner at the Lincoln Hotel-
Westshore; hosted by Ed and
Ruth Adrian and Joe Mouch.
Out ot town guests and family
were entertained at a post-
wedding brunch at Avila Golf
and Country Club hosted by
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Baron,
Dr. and Mrs. Robert
Greenberger, Mr. and Mrs.
William Gruman, Dr. and Mrs.
Michael Mendelsohn, Mr. and
Mrs. Walter Modarelli, and
Mr. and Mrs. Lester
Schreiber.
Following a honeymoon in
Ocho Rios, Jamaica, the couple
will live in Tampa.
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Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Dine To Address Tampa Bay Community
Tom Dine, Executive-
Director of the American
Israel Public Affairs Commit-
tee will provide a confidential
briefing on the current state of
U.S.-Israel relations, the situa-
tion in the Middle East in
General, and the status of pen-
ding legislation affecting the
on-going American-Israeli
alliance at an AIPAC fund-
raiser on Monday night, Nov.
23rd at 6 p.m. at the Hyatt-
Regency Westshore.
AIPAC is not a partisan
politician organization nor is it
a political action committee. It
does not raise or distribute
campaign funds. AIPAC is an
information resource for vir-
tually every candidate for
federal office in the United
States. It monitors each
Senate and House campaign,
and makes sure that every can-
didate, Democrat and
Republican, is sensitized to the
views of the pro-Israel com-
munity and receives factual in-
formation about the
U.S.-Israel relationship.
AIPAC is not a foreign
agent. It receives no financial
support from the State of
Israel. It is a domestic
organization, supported each
year by the contributions of its
individual members who are
American citizens. The
Presidents of virtually every
major American Jewish
organization sit on its ex-
ecutive committee, as do the
leadership of the pro-Israel
community from across the
United States.
AIPAC was established in
1954 by leaders of the
American Jewish community,
who recognized that the help
Israel would need from the
United States was beyond the
scope of what Jewish philan-
thropy could accomplish alone.
They recognized that there
was a critical need for political
organization. They created an
advocacy group capable of lob-
bying on behalf of the organiz-
ed Jewish community. In fact,
they created what has become,
according to many commen-
tators, the best, most effective
lobbying group in all of
Washington. For over 30
years, AIPAC has made the
difference on the most fun-
You Can Make A Wish Come True
By CAROLYN WAYNE
And SANDY TURKEL
Members,
Soviet Jewry Task Force
Are you aware that last year
Hillel
Continued from Page 1-
vited to participate in the Gift
of Gold with a $100 contribu-
tion or fractional portion
thereof. Tickets and informa-
tion are available from
parents, board members, and
the school office, 875-8287.
The 1987 chairmen of the
benefit are Susan Forman and
Laura Kreitzer. Diane Frank
is in charge of additional
prizes, and Laurie Hanan and
Jan Wuliger are creating the
decorations. Party reserva-
tions at $20 per person may be
made by calling 286-8133 or
286-8276.
945 Jews were freed from
Soviet Russia. This year to
date, there have been 4,000
Jews freed. At first glance this
new number appears stagger-
ing in fact, reading this
huge improvement one pats
oneself on the back and sighs a
huge sigh of relief. But, can we
allow ourselves to become
complacent just because the
numbers have improved? In-
deed not! There are still too
many Jews in the Soviet bloc
who are waiting waiting for
their taste of freedom. Indulge
us, as you read on.
Imagine if you will, the
thoughts of a young Jewish
child in Russia whispering: I
have tastes, but no appetite, I
smile but seldom laugh, I have
expectations, but no hope. I
have wit, but no humor, I
cultivate intelligence but have
no chance to learn, I am bold
but cannot act alone, I wish to
pray openly and to celebrate
my Bar Mitzvah, but I am lock-
ed in a society which will never
allow me freedom of religion,
freedom of choice, just to be
free, free of mind, free to pray
to my G-d.
Not only are these the
wishes of a child these are
the wishes of all of those Jews
less fortunate than we.
Remember those thousands of
Jews who are still waiting!
You can help to pave the
road to freedom for Soviet
Jews by writing letter to your
Congressmen to explain
American Jewish policy on
human rights and by speaking
out publicly.

A
$s&*
>

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#

damental issues affecting
Israel and its relationship with
the United States: First,
securing vital U.S. financial
aid for Israel; Second, com-
bating sales of sophisticated
weapons to Israel's enemies;
Third, improving U.S.-Israel
trade relations; Fourth, enhan-
cing strategic cooperation
with Israel, and Fifth, helping
to develop sound U.S. anti-
terrorism policies.
AIPAC's record speaks for
itself. This past year, for ex-
ample, AIPAC's efforts meant
an all-grant $3 billion aid
package for Israel, and
AIPAC's work on Capitol Hill
resulted in the withdrawal of
an almost $2 billion sale of ad-
vanced weapons to Jordan in
1986. In 1987, AIPAC's ef-
forts were paramount in the
withdrawal of the sale of 1,600
Maverick-D missiles to Saudi
Arabia.
Whatever the issue affecting
the U.S.-Israel relationship,
AIPAC is intensely involved.
It is vigilantly attentive to the
events in congress and the ad-
ministration. Its staff attend
every hearing, every session,
the mark-up of every bill.
AIPAC provides Congress and
the administration with timely
information including
monographs, news, assistance,
and responses. Building a
stronger, more vibrant
U.S.-Israel relationship is
AIPAC's top priority.
An advisory committee of
sponsors for the Nov. 23rd
event include Charles
Rutenberg, George Karpay,
Reva Kent, and Blossom and
Ed Leibowitz.
Members of the reception
committee are: Herb Swarz-
man (chairman), William
Kalish, W. Keith Schilit, Rabbi
Ira Youdovin, Dr. Ron Pross,
Ted Tench, Dr. Gordon Saskin,
Dr. David Wolstein and Dr.
Carl Zielonka.
Anyone who has not receiv-
ed an invitation who wishes to
attend may call Rabbi Ira
Youdovin (813) 347-6136 in St.
Petersburg, Dr. David Wols-
tein (813) 734-3034 in Clear-
water or Herb Swarzman (813)
962-1930 in Tampa for details.
Young Adult Division
YADAD It's For You
The Young Adult Division of
the Tampa Jewish Federation
will be holding its first event of
the season on Sunday, Dec. 6
from noon to 4 p.m. at the
Tampa Jewish Community
Center at 2808 Horatio Street.
YADAD (Young Adult Divi-
sion Athletic Day) promises to
be a day of free fun and frolic.
Join us for a day of mixing
and mingling, sporting events
and board games. Bring your
friends, family and a picnic
lunch and we will supply the
drinks and noshes and a big
screen TV. Child care will be
provided and if there are
enough participants, a kiddie
Olympics will be held.
Come and meet new people,
make new friends, and find out
what YAD is all about. Contact
the Tampa Jewish Federation
at 875-1618 for additional
information.
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BRUCE H.
DOKOR
JonfWV
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Dohorftupp*
(, Burn. PA
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MOOCRATOR
0. TERRY AIDMAN
Ponnw
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CHorwoit.

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MENORAH MANOR
FOUNDATION
AND
JEWISH
NATIONAL FUND
8*
TOPIC
CHARITABLE
GIVING-
AHORNOF
PLENTY"
PRESENT
Don't Leave Your
Money To
CHANCE
PLACE: SHERATON GRAND HOTEL
(FORMCN.Y LINCOLN HOTEL)
4660 Kennedy Blvd. West
ot Wesfshcxe
DATE: TUESDAY. DECEMBER 1. 1967
TIME: 5:00 PM.
EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR (No Solicitation)
SPEAKER
SANFORD
SHER
Pannx
Lovvnitiol
OHorwolh
TOPIC
"A
PREMIUM
RETURN
FOR
YOU
SPEAKER
STANLEY J.
ADRAMS
Ktn Koymwti
iraion \nc
TOPIC
A GIFT
YOU CAN
GIVE AND
RECEIVE"



Page 4 The Jewish Floridiari of Tampa/Friday, November 13, 1987
Classes Under Way
At The Gratz High School
By DIANE TINDELL
There were no marching
bands, tickertape parades or
fanfare to mark the opening of
the High School Division of
Gratz College. There were,
however, students who were
anxious and excited to par-
ticipate in the Community
High School. But for many,
this symbolized the realization
of a dream.
The first night of class and
the beginning of the first
semester was on Monday, Oc-
tober 19. Once the initial ac-
tivity subsided, there was time
for reflective thought. Mrs.
Rochelle Lewis, principal, felt
that the beginning was a very
positive response on behalf of
many parents who want their
teenagers to continue their
Jewish education on a higher
level.
She commented, "We are
looking forward to the ongoing
commitment of these
teenagers, and the expansion
of our program to include
many more students who
qualify for our program."
To those unfamiliar with
Gratz, it offers a place to learn
and socialize for today's youth.
It can provide them with
answers to questions they will
face as they become informed
Jewish adults.
What makes this program
Book Review
unique is twofold. First the
curriculum has been prepared
and taught by professionals
after quite a bit of research.
Gratz insists that the "fixed
curriculum" be adhered to,
will monitor it, and assure that
the students will participate in
a successful program. Second-
ly, "The affiliation with a na-
tionally recognized institution
will definitely have obvious ad-
vantages," states Mr. Joachim
Scharf, representative to
Gratz College.
Karen Malter is a parent
who encouraged her son to
continue his Jewish education.
"It was not an issue that we
wanted to force, but felt that it
would offer a different aspect
of his Jewish education."
The classes in the north
branch are taught by Rabbi
David Rose and Cantor Vicki
Silverman. The teens are
presently separated into two
classes, 8th and 9th, and 10th
through twelfth. Learning ses-
sions are 40 minutes long with
a break in between. Cantor
Silverman's class is based on
the study of "comparative
religion." Rabbi Rose leads his
class in exploration of Jewish
theology through our prayers.
"For 10 minutes I let them
ask questions and provide
answers from the siddur. It's
the kids opportunity to ask
whatever they want and get
answers," said Rabbi Rose.
"The students who came
were testing out the program
. and they're coming back
which is a wonderful sign!"
At the south end campus,
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and
Rabbi Richard Birnholz are
teaching a course on the cycle
of the year, from a Jewish
perspective. This course is cur-
rently meeting in Rabbi
Berger's study at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom.
Why did the students come?
Lauren Kanter initially came
because her parents made her.
She found the class to be en-
joyable and the teacher
presenting material in an in-
teresting manner. "It will be
more fun if more people go,"
said Lauren.
"The courses are good and
it's very well organized," com-
mented David Lancz. "I learn-
ed some new things, and I like
the opportunity to ask the
Rabbi questions!" He too is
anxious for the school to ex-
pand "We need more
time."
Congregation Kol Ami will
be providing snacks for the'
students during the break bet-
ween classes. Federation
President, Doug Cohn, is
scheduled to visit the new pro-
gram in the coming weeks.
The Holy Land, Israel From the Air
By BARON WOLMAN
By
AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
Israel is many things to
many people and Baron
Wolman, Photographer-pilot-
publisher presents a
photographic tour of Israel
from above this geographically
diverse and beautiful country.
The juxtaposition of the an-
cient and the new is always in
evidence, the overlay of
history is everywhere.
There are 150 exceptionally
beautiful photographs which
capture the country from the
air. You are treated to a glimp-
se of history and also of
modern day life.
The photographer had
chosen the early morning and
early evening natural light to
make this much more than a
documentary journey into
TMI
Israel. The soft light of those
hours give the pictures a
glorious glow.
Wolman takes you from
coast to coast, from the sparkl-
ing blue water of the Mediter-
ranean Sea; to the salt forma-
tions of the Dead Sea; the ex-
traordinary clear water at
Eilat on the Red Sea; and stop-
ping for a time over the lush
agricultural land that sur-
rounds the Sea of Galilee.
When seen from above you
can visualize the Western Wall
being located precisely in rela-
tionship to the Temple Mount.
From above it becomes clear
how this stone remnant from a
distant past was such an in-
tegral part of the two great
Temples.
The stunning photograph of
Masada makes history. come
alive with an excitement of
'Jewish Floridian
Of Tampa
Buunees Office: 2808 Horatio Street. Tampm. FU. U6OT
Telephone 8724470
Publication Office: 110 NE 6 St.. Miami. FU. UIS2
r'KKDK BHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
Editor and Publiahrr Eneutiv* Editor Editor
OMMmM
TW Jewish FlsrMiaa Dm* Not (riuraatee TW KaaaraUi
Of TsM Mirrtiaain Adrrrtiaoa la Its Cotis
Published Bi-Wcckl) Plui I Additional Edition on Januan 31. IM6 by Thr Jewish Floridiar, of Tampa
Second CUaa Poatage Paid at Miami. Fla. ISPS 471410. ISSN 8750-50S3
POSTMASTER: Scad AtMrew change* to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. FU. 33101
S( BS( KIPTKIN RATES: (Local Area) 2-Year Minimum Subarription 17.00 Annual U.M))
Out of Town L'pon Request.
The Jewish Floridian maintain! an "free Mat." People receiving the paper who have not abarribsd directly
are aubacribsri through arrangement with the Jewish Federation of Tampa whereby J2.20 per year ia
deducted from their contribution! for a aubarriptkm to the paper. Anyone wishing to cancel such a
aabacnption should notify The Je U Floridian or The Federation.
total understanding. These
pictures are able to draw your
eye into the perspective of
history.
Flying over the desert you
see a land easily traveled over
by car or by Bedouin shepards
still moving their herds along
ancient paths. It is a sun and
sand swept desert, a desert
rich in agricultural bloom, and
a desert of parks and ar-
cheological finds.
Traveling to Jerusalem the
view is impressive, focusing on
the Old City, 2,500 feet above
sea level. Everything is seen in
reference to this tiny area,
which has been inhabited for
nearly 50 centuries.
This book is for those who
have been to Israel, those plan-
ning a trip to Israel, and those
who are only dreaming of far
off places. The author, Baron
Wolman, brings to life Israel
for everyone whose spiritual
roots spring from there. It
deserves to share your cocktail
table, it is a feast and a delight
to the eye.
The book is available at the
Schaarai Zedek Judaica Shop.
Friday, November 13,1987
Volumes
21HESHVAN5748
Number 28
Rabbi Rose Teaching Gratz Course on Tefillah (Prayer).
Readers Write
Editor's Note: The documents
discussed in this letter are in
the Jewish Floridian office. If
you would like a copy please
call 872-U70.
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
The enclosed documents,
contain some detailed informa-
tion about the case of Jonathan
Pollard. I hope you can find
the time to read them. Even if
you do not read them the
following brief remarks may
be helpful.
Sgt. Lonetree spied for
Russia (our obvious enemy)
and probably caused the death
of several of our agents
operating in Russia. For this
crime he was given 30 years
and may be out in 10 years on
parole.
Mr. Pollard passed on infor-
mation to Israel, a country
that is our ally and friend. The
information that he passed on
should have been given freely
to Israel. For this Mr. Pollard
received a life term while Sgt.
Lonetree will be out in 10
years. Is this justice, or do
Hitler's disciples still rule
supreme in our courts?
I respectfully suggest that a
more reasonable term for Mr.
Pollard would be a 10 year
ATTENTION: MEDICAL PERSONNEL
sentence with the possibility of
parole in five years. This is ob-
viously justified when com-
pared with Sgt. Lonetree's
sentence.
Please do whatever is in
your power to see that Mr.
Pollard's sentence is reduced
to what is just and proper. A
life term in solitary confine-
ment for giving information to
our friend and ally is utterly
ridiculous.
You might phone or write
the judge who sentenced the
Pollards and ask him to reduce
their sentences. He is: Judge
Aubrey Robinson, Chief
Judge, U.S. District Court,
Washington, D.C.
You might also write your
own letters to various con-
gressmen. I have personally
written about 15 such letters,
enclosing the same documents
that I am sending to you.
I will certainly appreciate
any effort that you make to
help the Pollards. Reducing
the sentences of Jonathan and
Anne Pollard has become my
number one priority. Anne
Pollard, who is extremely sick,
should be released at once.
Sincerely yours,
DR. A.W. GOODMAN
i
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1
The Tampa Jewish Federation
Health Professionals Division
0
Presents a Breakfast Forum
"The Non-Sexual Transmission
of AIDS in the Clinical Setting"
(Three CME credits approved by USF College ol Medicine)
Sunday, December 6, 1987
930 a.m. 12:30 p.m.
Airport Marriott Hotel
Registration Fee S25.O0
(After November 22nd S3O.O0)
Faculty
Robert a. Good. PhD., m.d
J^Tessor and Chakmon. Department nf Pedlaries
i 9 lofcsje ol *B*dn ?
I

;

Arthur J. Forman. M.D
PsychkMnsi
<
Ronald M. Ptoss. D.M.O.
ocmim
Jerry Katzman. M.D.
OpMhalmofcjgtti
Barry B. Bercu. M.D.. Moderator
Professor of Pediatrics
USF Cotee* Of Mfrtrw

Send check payable tot Taapa Jewish Federation
2808 Horatio Street
Taapa. Fla. 33609
^^*^*^**V>*M*


BSBBBBBSSSSSl
asasaaia


SE
CJF General Assembly Forums
Feature Domestic, Concerns
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
Menorah Manor Foundation,
JNF Wffl Show You
How To Save Money
NEW YORK, N.Y. -
Transmitting Jewish heritage,
commitment and values to the
next generation and ensuring
a bright future for Soviet
Jewry are among the issues to
be explored in forums by the
more than 3,000 delegates ex-
pected to attend the 56th
General Assembly of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations. The
General Assembly is scheduled
for Nov. 18-22 at the Foun-
tainebleau Hotel in Miami
Beach, FL.
Twenty forums, consisting
of formal presentations by ex-
perts and panelists followed by
question-and answer sessions,
will deal with a wide range of
domestic and overseas con-
cerns. Several forums will
focus on Israel-Diaspora rela-
tions, to commemorate Israel's
40th anniversary.
Domestic issues center on
four basic themes:
Transmission. Involving
the next generation in cam-
paign and leadership and
reaching out to inadequately
involved Jews, such as singles,
the elderly and the disabled.
Unity and diversity in the
Jewish community. The ques-
tion of "who is a Jew" and a
unique trialogue with Or-
thodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis to discuss areas
of commonality.
Jewish education.
Strengthening our educational
institutions, supporting adult
Jewish education and
enriching veteran leadership.
COUNCIL
cr
III II UU N\
M I
M I
Jewish mobility. Retool-
ing Federations in order to
cope with the change from a
local to a continental society.
A number of forums will
feature overseas concerns,
including:
Soviet Jewry. A discus-
sion with prominent
refuseniks about the current
situation, the role of Federa-
tions and future trends.
Jewish communities in
distress Ethiopia, Syria and
Iran.
The Third World. The
JDC role in helping developing
countries.
World Jewry. Building
Jewish community and con-
tinuity globally, discussions
with leaders from Latin
America, Great Britain, Den-
mark and Australia and the
situation in South Africa.
In the context of Israel's
40th anniversary, several
forums will consider some of
the nation's significant
relationships:
The United States. Israel
as a strategic ally in the Middle
East.
Federations. Expanding
the relationship between
Federations and Israel.
The Jewish Agency.
Deepening the partnership.
In the media. Journalists
discuss how Israel and the
Diaspora perceive each other.
In addition to the forums,
hundreds of other sessions
have been scheduled for this
year's General Assembly. Dur-
ing the Opening Plenary on
Wednesday evening, Nov. 18,
CJF President Shoshana S.
Cardin will address the overall
theme of the Assembly, "Dor
L'Dor: From Generation to
Generation Building Com-
munity and Continuity
Through People." On the
following evening, Israeli
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir will speak on the sub-
ject of "Israel and North
America Partners Across
the Generations."
Dozens of workshops,
designed to foster discussion
and interchange of ideas, are
also scheduled. Workshop
topics will include timely
issues such as welfare reform,
AIDS in the Jewish communi-
ty, children of divorce and
catastrophic health care, as
well as the constant Federa-
tion concerns of human
resources and leadership
development, endowments,
campaign, missions, Jewish-
Catholic relations and
synagogue-Federation
relations.
Want to learn how to be
financially sharp and save
money at tax time?
Menorah Manor Foundation
and the Jewish National Fund
(JNF) has the answer for you.
These two groups will co-
sponsor a program entitled
"Don't Leave Your Money To
Chance," through which
speakers will illustrate how to
make a substantial charitable
contribution and save money
at the same time. The program
will start at 5 p.m. on Tuesday,
Dec. 1 at the Sheraton Grand
Hotel (formerly the Lincoln
Hotel), at 4860 W. Kennedy
Blvd., Tampa.
The educational seminar will
be moderated by B. Terry Aid-
man, managing partner in the
accounting firm of Laventhol
& Horwath. Topics of discus-
sion will include bequests, lead
trusts, endowments and plann-
ed giving. Featured guest
speakers are Bruce H. Bokor,
of Johnson, Blakely, Pope,
Bokor, Ruppel and Burns,
talking on "Charitable Giving
- A Horn of Plenty." Stanley
J. Abrams, of Karen
Kayemeth Leisrael, Inc., will
speak on "A Gift You Can Give
and Receive." San ford Sher,
of Laventhol & Horwath will
explain "A Premium Return
For You."
A delicious array of fine hors
d'ouevres and drinks will be
served. There is no charge for
the program. For additional in-
formation, contact Menorah
Manor Development Director
Jolene Shor at 345-2775, or
Larry Wasser at the JNF in
Tampa at 960-5263.
HOLD THE DATE!
TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 1988
An Evening With
ELIE WIESEL
Sponsored By The
Tampa Jewish Federation
HOLD THE DATE!
1911 Weil Wolen Avenue Su.iei 7*9 Tampa, Florida 33614
((13) 935 SlOO
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, November 13, 1987
Buckle Up
By DIANE TINDELL
Seatbelts are required by
law, yet many of us have seen
small children "bouncing off
the seats!" The Health Depart-
ment provided "Junior," their
talking robot along with Frank
Mazzotta, a member of the
Department, to help the
younger grades of Hillel
understand the importance of
wearing a seatbelt.
The program consists of a
15-20 minute script, which is
directed dialogue between
"Junior" and school personnel
(Hillel's Stephanie Josefsberg
starred in this feature!) Junior
is operated by remote control
and a microphone by Mr. Maz-
zotta, (Concealed behind a
curtain).
Aside from the fact that
seatbelts are the law, there is
no reason not to wear one, and
not one valid excuse.
"My daddy says he's too
fat," piped up one small boy.
Junior informed him that
seatbelt extenders are
available and usually Free!
"But what if the seatbelt is
broken", used often as a com-
mon excuse "Get it fixed,"
said Junior.
The children were very en-
thusiastic and entertained as
thev listened intently to the
Officer Lucas and his friend
McGrujf talk about dangers,
strangers and safety to the
children of Hillel School.
very informative presentation.
But the message came across
loud and clear "Buckle-up,
and remind your parents to
also!"
Set up in the Kindergarten
room, the Kindergarten, first
and second graders attended
the presentation, as well as
their teachers.
What did the children think
about this? "The robot was
cute and funny" "you
should have a seatbelt with a
button that you can't take off'
... "so people don't get con-
fused" and finally,
"Seatbelts are for everyone."
"So buckle up!!"
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Buy TreesBy Phone
Honor your name, a friend or remember a loved one.
The gift of Trees is perfect for weddings, births, Bar Mitzvahs.
The permanent gift for any social or business occasion.
men's Plea For Soviet Jewry
Scheduled For Dec. 10
A rbif of S trees is only $25 ... A cbde of 10 trees only $S0
Layr spomonhlpt n>tMitk... Al gifts are Tax Deductible.
A custom certificate will be sent immediately
Mjsu-rt ard Visa jin-pu-il
Call to Order or for Information
' JEWISH Call to Order or for Information
la^KU1-800-542-TREE
Thursday, Dec. 10, the
Women's Division of the Tam-
pa Jewish Federation and
Women's American ORT will
co-sponsor the Women's Plea
for Soviet Jewry at Congrega-
tion Schaarai Zedek, 7:30 p.m.
The program, "Voices of
Soviet Jewish Women" will
feature Soviet Jewish women
who will share their ex-
periences with the community.
An on-the-spot Chanukah card
mailing to Refusenik families
will also be conducted. Co-
chairmen, Betty Shalett and
Lynne Billing also encourage
the community to bring new
toys and old toys in good condi-
tion to the program. The toys
will be donated to Jewish
Family Services to benefit
disadvantaged Jewish children
in Tampa and to simultaneous-
ly highlight the plight of
Refusenik children. Children
from Congregation Rodoph
Sholom will also participate in
the program by singing,
"Leaving Mother Russia."
While the Soviet Union has
proclaimed a new atmosphere
of "glasnost" or openess,
there has been little evidence
that anything substantial has
changed for Soviet Jewry. The
release of a few well-published
cases does not obscure the fact
that only 914 Jews left the
Soviet Union last year.
"We encourage community Jewish agenda." Anyone who
support for this program," is interested in attending this
commented Shalett and Bill- program, please RSVP to
ings, "since human rights has 875-1618 by Dec 7.
always been critical to the
SITTER NEEDED
After school care for seven year old boy,
in South Tampa area.
References and own vehicle necessary.
Please call Tricia at 251-8651
"SENIORS**
Invitation to Apply
Qualifying Independent Seniors (over age 62) may be eligible for residency at beautiful Jewish Towers. Maximum income limits.
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COFFEE TO POLAND
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Parcel Quantity Price
87011 2,20 lbs. packaged
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87012 6,61 lbs. packaged in
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87025 2,20 lbs. in one bag
mix of various brands $ 5.50
87026 6,61 lbs. in one bag
mix of various brands $16.00
BL 110 16 lbs. "Delux Mix" __
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BL 111 11.02 lbs Delux Mix
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BL 112 6.61 lbs. "Delux Mix"
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BC 005 Darboven brand,
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Defense Postscript:
Weinberger Unlikely Missed
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The resignation of Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
has removed from President
Reagan's Cabinet the leading
opponent of the expanding
alliance between the United
States and Israel over the last
seven years.
While maintaining that he is
not anti-Israel, Weinberger
has continually argued that the
United States must not be
seen as neglecting its Arab
friends in the Middle East,
particularly Saudi Arabia and
Jordan, in favor of Israel.
The 70-year-old defense
secretary has been the leading
advocate in the Reagan ad-
ministration for arms sales to
Saudi Arabia and Jordan, and
is believed responsible for
some of the harsh actions the
administration has taken
against Israel during the last
seven years.
After Jonathan Pollard, a
civilian intelligence analyst for
the U.S. Navy, was arrested
for spying for Israel,
Weinberger refused to go
along with a State Department
effort to ensure that the affair
would not harm loner-term
U.S.-Israel relations.
Weinberger also opposed the
administration's efforts for
strategic cooperation with
Israel and sought to prevent
Israel from building the Lavi
jet fighter from its inception.
Some of his most controver-
sial acts came when the U.S.
Marines were sent to Beirut in
1983. Weinberger first refused
any direct liaison between the
Marines and Israeli troops ad-
jacent to them, which resulted
in at least one confrontation
between the two sides.
When the Marine barracks
were blown up on Oct. 23,
1983, the Pentagon rejected
an offer by Israel to have the
wounded flown to an Israeli
hospital. Weinberger main-
tained that this was a decision
by the commander at the
scene, based on established
practices. Later, the United
States and Israel entered into
an agreement to provide such
medical treatment.
Weinberger directly con-
fronted the perception that he
is anti-Israel in a speech to the
American Jewish Committee
in New York on May 13, 1983
UAUC Elects Californian As Chairman
CHICAGO Allan B. Goldman, 60, of Los Angeles, a
lawyer, took office this week as chairman of the board of
trustees of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations,
central body of Reform Judaism in the United States and
Canada. He succeeds Charles J. Rothschild Jr. of Teaneck,
N.J.
Goldman, the youngest chairman in the 115-year history
of the UAHC, was elected to a two-year term at the closing
session of the organization's national biennial convention
here.
in which he stressed that "this
is simply not true."
"I am a strong supporter of
Israel, and an admiring
witness to the democracy they
have built and preserved under
the most trying conditions,"
he said.
But, he added, even if he was
not an "admirer" of Israel, "as
secretary of defense, I would
still be a strong supporter of
Israel," because, in addition to
the emotional ties between the
two countries, "it is clear that
we in the United States have
an important stake in Israel's
security."
Weinberger will be succeed-
ed as secretary of defense by
Frank Carlucci, formally
Reagan's national security ad-
viser. Carlucci is considered
close to Weinberger, having
served under him in the Nixon
administration and then as
deputy secretary of defense
from 1981 to 1983. Carlucci is
believed to have proposed the
sale of AWACS planes to
Saudi Arabia in 1981 and had
pushed for arm sales to the
Saudis when he was deputy
director of the Central In-
telligence Agency in the
Carter administration.
However, it is Carlucci who
is credited with the com-
promise worked out with
Senate leaders to remove
Maverick anti-tank missiles
from a $1 billion arms sale to
Saudi Arabia.
Carlucci is expected to be
replaced by his deputy, Army
Lt. Colin Powell. He would be
the first black to be national
security adviser.
In Whose
Name, Amen
A Religionist, an Attorney,
and a Politician Examine
State/Church Issues
Have you ever attended a
public event in which the
speaker giving the invocation
unexpectantly invokes the
tenets of his religion while
generally ignoring the convic-
tions of everyone else? Such in-
cidents occur in public
ceremonies, sporting events,
etc. and are to many, a source
of agitation, insult and
uncomfortableness.
With such occurrences
becoming more common the
Second Annual Joint Program
of the Young Adult Division
and the Business and Pro-
fessioal Women's Network of
the Tampa Jewish Federation
will explore this important
issue.
The program titled: "In
Whose Name, Amen: A
Religionist, An Attorney, and
A Politician Examine Chur-
ch/State Issues," will feature
the Honorable Linda Saul-
Sena, Tampa City Council
member (at large, District 3);
Alice K. Nelson, Esquire, a
local Tampa attorney; and
Nathan Katz, PhD, associate
professor of Religious Studies
at the University of South
Florida.
The event will be a dessert
reception to be held on Mon-
day, Nov. 23 at 7 p.m. (recep-
tion), 7:45 p.m. (program
begins) at the Howard
Johnson's Plaza Hotel, 700
North Westshore Blvd. in
Tampa.
The cost is $13 per person.
Please call the Tampa Jewish
Federation at 875-1618 to
reserve a seat or for more
information.
,
Toys you can feel good about.'
Phone 254-4727
Pirate's
Toy
1914
Chest
specializing in educational and
developmental toys
... perfect for your Childrens
Chanukah gifts!
South Dale Mabry, Carriage Trade Plaza

Reagan Again
Denounces
Racism-Zionism
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Presi
dent Reagan has vowed to
"continue to denounce" the
UN General Assembly resolu-
tion of 1975 equating Zionism
with racism "until it is
repealed."
The president made the
pledge in an Oct. 28 letter to
Morris Abram, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations. It was in reply
to a letter Abram sent to the
president on Sept. 22 thanking
him for denouncing the anti-
Zionism resolution in the
course of his speech to the UN
General Assembly on Sept. 21.
"You are right that this ad-
ministration nas repeatedly
condemned the 'Zionism is
racism' resolution," the presi-
dent wrote in his letter.
"Moreover, we will continue to
denounce that resolution until
it is repealed. It may not be
soon enough for you or me.
Reagan's letter concluded:
"In the meantime, I know that
I can count on your support, as
you can count on mine, to fight
against any and all attempts to
delegitimize the State of
Israel."
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i
i
L
JEL JBL
MANUMCTtMEft-S COUPON EXPIRES JUNE M, 1 MI
2*
SAVE 25*
on Mott's All Natural Prune Juice
or Country Style with Pulp
COMUMM OfUR G0O0 MU.V U S A ANO ON PROOUCT IMXCAHO VOU PA*
AN* SALES TAX LIMIT OM COUPON PER ITEM PURCHASED MTMU*: COUPON
WILL BE REDEEMED AT IACS VALUE PIUS BC HANOI INCH PROPS R|v REDEEMED
EAIUIRE TO PROVIDE ON REOUEST BV10ENCE OE PURCHASE 0 SUEIIMN! STOCK
10 COVER COUPONS SUBMITTED V0I0S ALL SUCH COUPONS 8CNMM VOID
WHERE PROHIBITED TAXED OR RESTRICTED COUPON MA* NOT BE TRANS
IERRED ASSIW*DOR REPRODUCED CASH VALUE l/JOC
MoltsUSA AOmvxiotCMbwySOweppei mc
MM to P0 So. 1017 Clrnlon low 5273?
IMflOO 1QMA7D
25<
H **
i
Heres2540ff
to Sweeten our Prune Juice
Whether you prefer MoftV All
Natural or our Country Style with
pulp, no other prune juice quite
matches ours.
Maybe its the delicious flavor of
our sun-ripened prunes bursting
through. The smoothness of our
All Natural variety. Or the heart-
iness of our Country Style with
pulp.
Whatever it is, we're sure you'll
love the way we taste. As well as
saving 25c with our coupon.

fi\P CERTIFIED KOSHER


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, November 13, 1987
MAIN BRANCH:
2808 Horatio St.
Tampa, Fla. 33609
872-4451
Jewish Comrr
Jewish Community Center
For All Children Regardless of Race, Color, or Creed.
Claudia's Corner
With the High Holidays behind us, Preschool now focuses on
the varied, colorful events of November. The days turn cooler
and shorter, and the children come to school in sweats and
sweaters. They're so busy discovering these changes through
songs, stories, nature walks and art projects that they gain an
awareness of cooler days, brown and orange leaves, leaves on
the ground (we have to search hard, but we find them!) and
more.
The Hillsborough County Fire Department sent fire trucks to
visit both branches of the Preschool. The children were able to
experience our unit on Fire Prevention first hand, by trying on
hats, seeing the fire fighters get clothed in their equipment, clim-
bing on the truck, and sounding the siren and horn. Main Branch
childen were able to listen to an actual call coming in and to
watch fire-fighters going off to a real fire. What fun!
Field trips are always special for our Preschoolers. The
Seminole Indian Reservation, the "animal" puppet show, and
Alessi Farmer's Market are some of the most recent trips our
children have been enjoying. Ask the Preschoolers about them
and they'll bubble with excitment!
Mitzvah and tzedakah are familiar words in Morah Tammy's
classes. Come by and see our Mitzvah trees. It's fun to watch the
trees grow with the good deeds of our children.
Thanksgiving plans are also underway. All classes will be
celebrating with delicious Thanksgiving feasts. Special child-
made invitations will be going home to tell parents the date, time
and place of their child's celebration. Muffins, vegetable.soup,
custard, pumpkin bread and fruit salad are some of the yummy
dishes the children will be preparing! Be sure to share this
special time with your Preschooler and stop to think about all we
are thankful for.
Session II of enrichment classes is a great success. Children
are enjoying, T-Ball, International Cooking, Bugs and But-
terflies, Musical Potpourri, Super Sand, Bookworms, Fun and
Fitness, Gumby Goo, Balletf and Hinay Matov. Sessions are
seven weeks long and are open to all Preschool-age children.
Come join the fun!
We're all so thankful for your wonderful children. Happy
Thanksgiving to everybody!
Chanukah Celebration

Wednesday, Dec. 16, 1987
7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
$2.00 per person
JCC North
Make your own Ice Cream Sundae party.
Cookies Drink.
Menorah Lighting, Singing, Music, Drawing for the
'Fly Away" Winner.
Advance reservations will be taken.
Fun and Surprises for everyone!
Come celebrate with us!
YOUTH



X/wV****-
ONLY 220 DAYS TIL SUMMER CAMP 1988!!!
^^^^v
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;
A^^-*V^V^Ay\/^VA/wvA/wvA/wv'V*
;
:
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i

Winter Wonderland
Vacation Program
Kindergarten 6th Grade
"Around The World in 8 Days"
Dec. 21-31.
'We will be closed Dec. 15 and Jan. 1.
Fees: Early Bird: $80 a week members, $120 a week non- J
members; Daily rate: $25 a day for members, $37 a day for
non-members.
After Dec. 6:
$100 a week members, $150 a week non-members; $30 a
J day for members, $45 a day for non-members. ,



MM'T IE A TIITCEVfiA
Slill IS AT TIE J.C.CW
FIB A VACATII1
KMUM FOR
KHIRUITU-OTI 6CAIE
FNIAT, MT. 17,1M7
Mil A.M. Stll r.*.
w C- ...llal. n.l IrtKt BSLI fii-iM M. ... tiM-4iM a>,
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laV/har I bbub. 4h> m r <*
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t't44rt________________________________,,,.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR
SENIORS DAY DEC. 3,1987
CHASSIDIC FESTIVAL DEC. 6 1987
CHANUKAH FESTIVAL DEC. 16,1987
PURIM BASKETS MARCH 2,1988
FANTASIA MARCH26,1988
"INTERGENE RATIONAL" JUNE 12 1988
FASHION SHOW
Sunshine, blue skies, pony rides,
wonderful time was had by all who a
Day on October U 1987.
FAMILY
rcnn it
foreuli Chas
Sunday,
r,DC.6,1*7,8p.m.Ru&
MM ON SALE NOWIII Crf***OfK.
CntafPartafra(PATF
Sponsor d and
presented by:
JCC of Phwtla*
County
Kent JCC
_ Tampa JCC
SioaPartarr*
SadionA
Section B
SacJonC
40



- '
lmunity Center
ER
D
rides, a soft ball game and a
I who attended our Family Festival
r
jn- Ruth Ecfcerd Hall
JCCOllic, $72,445,
T (PATRONS) $
temx besulab
-oWta_22 tiuJiem
" $14 $16
I $12 $14
$10 $12
$6 $ 8
Groins of ISor
10%pnc
raducfenolto
cmtrtk**
prior
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
NORTH BRANCH:
3919 Moran Road
Tampa, Fla. 33624
962-2863

Endowment Contributions
BUILDING FUND:
Dr. and Mrs. David Solomon in memory of Louise Eatroff s
mother, Marcella Geltman
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eatroff in memory of Morris Greenberg
SENIOR FUND:
Durbin Paper Company
EARLY CHILDHOOD FUND:
In memory of Louise Eatroff s mother, Marcella Geltman
Mimi and Alan Aaron
Marcia and Jack Cohen
Patty and Bill Kalish
Sylvia and Joel Levy
Renee Miller
Sharon and Roger Mock
Alice and Stanley Rosenthal
Ellen and Mark Stern
Claudia and Bob Valins
Carol and Sam Weinstein
the JCC Board and Staff have donated computer software to
our pre-school in memory of Marcella Geltman.
rxv>
U~
1v" taMMM
}/ t*XXXa> NEW WAi* Of fifcKg.
Come Celebrate The 25th Anniversary Of
The JCC On Our Horatio Street Site
Sunday, December 20, 1987
1:00-3:00 p.m.
Reserve Your Families Square Today!!
PLEASE RETURN THIS FORM BY DEC. 14
1 18 x 18 inch square (Double Chai) $36.00
1 18 x 36 inch square (Patron Chai) $72.00
1 236 x 36inch square (Sponsor Chai) $150.00
NAME:
ADDRESS:.
PHONE NUMBER:.
3rd Annual
AUCTION
Jewish Community Center
Where Wishes
ComeThie.
T&npa Airport Marriott
March 26,1988

J
SENIORS

Seniors Day
Coming up: Adults at Leisure is sponsoring a Seniors
day on Thursday, Dec. 3, 11 a.tn.-4 p.m., at the Main JCC.
Bring a dairy lunch, and be entertained by speaker Mike
Deeson. Table and board games will follow after lunch.

SQUARE NO. (S):---------------------\-----------------------------------
Available on first come first genre basis
Squares can be reserved at the Main or North Branch offices,
or by mail.
AMOUNT ENCLOSED_______-------------------------'-------------
KKSBiBJttSXa^^
Volunteer Of The Month
Louise Eatroff
The JCC's Volunteer of the Month for October is Louise
Eatroff, a longtime Center board member and active
volunteer.
Louise has been a Center member since she and her fami-
ly moved to Tampa nine years ago frm the Philadelphia
area, and she has been doing the editing and layout of the
Floridian'8 "Centerpiece" for over two years. She is cur-
rently on our executive board as a Member-at-Large in
charge of Publicity and Public Relations and she has been
an outspoken advocate of Center programs, special events,
and the importance of the Center's role in Tampa's Jewish
community.
Congratulations, Louise!
^^^^s^fc^^a^^BaBaBaca^^
f!




Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, November 13, 1987
Dear Janice:
A few months ago, my Dad
convinced me that it would be
beneficial for me to come down
to Florida where he thought I
could find a good construction
job. I am an experienced con-
struction worker in my mid-
thirties, and after the good
summer weather is over in
Pennsylvania, it is hard to find
a job. I am really happy to be
here near my Dad and his
family. It's the first time I've
lived near him in many years,
and we really hit it off well.
And I enjoy the job I got and
look forward to making even
better money soon. The pro-
blem is my wife who is still
back in Pennsylvania. She
likes her job there, and when I
came down here, it was sup-
posed to be temporary. Now,
I'd like her to leave her job and
come down here permanently.
When I talked to her this
week, she was angry with me.
She was married once before,
and her first husband moved
her to New York to be near his
family. She felt like an outcast
there, I guess, and from what
she tells me her first husband's
family was active in splitting
them up. She just doesn't
understand that my family is
different and wouldn't do the
same thing. I know we'd be
happy here forever. How do I
convince her to move?
W ant-To-Transplant
Dear Want-To-Transplant:
It sounds as though you have
changed your initial deci-
sion to try out a new plac
to wanting to stay
"forever" as you put it.
Since you are married, this
is a decision that needs to be
shared with your wife. Her
first marriage seems to
have removed her from her
own support group, her
family, and put her into a
storm center of her first
husband's family. She is
probably afraid that she
again will be alienated from
her own folks and perhaps
may be less than welcomed
by your family. You did not
state whether she already
knows your family, or
whether they are still
strangers to her. That may
make a big difference to
her. You may know that
your Dad is different, and
that she will fit in, but your
wife does not know that.
The next time you speak to
her, acknowledge that you
have been going tooo fast,
and that you want her to
share in the decision-
making. Invite her down for
a visit, but back off from
stating that this is to be a
permanent move. Perhaps
she can take a leave-of-
absence from her job. At
least the two of you can
decide how to proceed
together, and not separate-
ly. You also need to assess
the importance of your mar-
riage compared to the im-
portance you place on
moving.
Janice
Dear Janice:
My six-year-old son has been
giving me a problem lately
that may seem to be less than
earth shattering, but it is a
problem to me. Jason loves to
play in water, and he has been
going into the bathroom and
climbing on the counter where
the sink is. I am afraid that,
since the sink is heavy and the
counter rests mainly on the
water pipes, that his weight
will bring the whole thing
crashing down on his head.
What kind of punishment
would work with a situation
like this?
Almost Sunk
Dear Almost Sank:
First, I would explain to Jason
why it isn't a good idea for
him to climb on the
bathroom counter. Then, if
the continued to do it again,
I would give him a conse-
quence that was related to
misbehavior. One possibility
is giving him a can of scour-
ing powder and a sponge,
and letting him clean out
the bathtub and the sink.
This way, he would get his
water play, but he would be
accomplishing something
positive at the same time.
It's also advisable to do this
the same day that he does
the misbehavior, so he
remembers why he is doing
the cleaning. Let me know
what happens!
Janice
Dear Janice:
I moved here recently from
Atlanta but know very few
single people. I have tried to
locate Jewish singles groups,
but all I receive is mail ad-
dressed to "Mrs." after I call-
ed requesting to have local
clubs get in touch with me. I
suspect that my name may
have gotten on the wrong list.
Want-to-Meet-Singles
Dear Want-To-Meet-Singles:
The Tampa Bay Jewish
Singles Council has ac-
tivities to meet many needs
and serves as a way for
single people of all ages to
meet. A telephone informa-
tion line tells of upcoming
events. You may call
960-JASS in Hillsborough
County or 736-JASS in
Pinellas County. Or, call
TBJSC's sponsor, Tampa
Jewish Family Services, at
251-0083 to find out how to
join the group.
IS YOUR DRINKING WATER
SAFE & CLEAN?
IF YOU ARE PAYING MORE
THAN 3C/GAL FOR DRINKING
WATER YOU ARE PAYING
WAY TOO MUCH!
ALL SELF-CONTAINED
3 YEAR WARRANTY
NOT A WATER SOFTENER
OR WATER CONDITIONER
"WE'RE CONCERNED
ABOUT YOUR HEALTH"
NO FILTERS OR CARTRIDGES
TO CHANQE EVER!
ALL EPA APPROVED
ELIMINATES ALL
INCONVENIENCES
CONTACT: WATER WORKS WONDERS, INC.
"SAFE CLEAN DRINKING
WATER FROM YOUR OWN TAP"
JEFFLIEBERMAN STEVE GUTSTEIN
Call It Na'amat Canada
TORONTO At a reportedly merry and slick eighth
triennial convention here, Pioneer Women of Canada voted
to change its name to Na'amat Canada. The sister
organization in the United States recently changed its
name to Na'amat U.S.A.
Teens' Vandalism Trial Postponed
WATERBURY, Conn. The trial of 12 teenagers charg-
ed with vandalizing two Jewish cemeteries here has been
postponed at the request of their attorney. The Connecticut
Jewish Ledger reports.
The 12 including three 15-year-old girls were ar-
rested last month. As Chief Inspector of Detectives John
Griffin described the alleged crime, the teens, after a drink-
ing party, entered the Brass City and Waterbury Hebrew
Sick Benefit cemeteries by rolling back the surrounding
chain-link fence.
They allegedly sprayed paint on and overturned nearly
90 gravestones, causing damage that, Griffin said could run
into many thousands of dollars. Griffin said that it was not
anti-Semitism that motivated the teens, but rather the in-
fluence of alcohol.
iV
T*Z*}
3tt
ICTlON
tVSHMt
DttiON
Jack freeman's
4243 Henderson Blvd. Ph 874-1986
mu
SPECIAL CHANUKAH GIFT
Lox and Salmon from Alaska
All natural wood smoked lox and salmon
with no preservatives, chemicals, or
artificial colorings.
Our own beautiful gift box is vacuum
packed with no refrigeration needed.
It's perfect for gifts, to mail out
or to have on hand for special celebrations.
We are pleased to bring you this quality
seafood product.
Order EARLY as our lox and smoked salmon
is flown in from Alaska.
To order or for more information call:
in Tampa 886-9164
in Pasco 847-3056
FREE DELIVERY TO MOST AREAS
ALASKA GLACIER SEAFOOD COMPANY
960-4474
BANANAS TO POLAND
(30 TRADING CORPORATIONS
Accepts orders for delivery of BANANAS to Poland.
Parcel # Quantity Price
BL148 11,0 lbs.
BL149 17,6 lbs.
BL150 22,0 lbs.
$12.50
$20.00
$24.50
A handling charge of $2.00 is applied
to every one of these parcels.
Information given and orders accepted by
ALL AUTHORIZED PEKAO DEALERS
and
PEKAO TRADING CORPOPRATION
40th YEAR OF SERVICES TO POLONIANS
Park Ave. South (corner of 32nd Street) N.Y., N.Y. 10016
Nuiili Michigan Ave.. Chicago. IL 60601
Tel.: (212) 684-5320)
Tel.: (312) 782-3933


I
Leslye Winkelman
Leaves For San Diego
Leslye Winkelman, the
Florida West Coast director of
the Anti-Defamation League
(ADL) of B'nai B'rith, will be
leaving her post November 20
for her new position as direc-
tor of the Community Rela-
tions Committee of the United
Jewish Federation of San
Diego (California).
"I have really enjoyed being
here and I will miss the many
colleagues and friends that I
have had the opportunity of
working with and knowing,"
said Winkelman.
Leslye Winkelman
Winkelman has been with
ADL for six years and she has
been in the Tampa office ex-
actly four years.
Although she is changing of-
fices her work will be similar in
nature as she continues "work-
ing in the Jewish community
and with the media, communi-
ty leaders, educators, and law
enforcement officers to make
better and more effective rela-
tions between the Jewish and
general communities."
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Jewish Agencies Assist Illegals
HIAS, AJCommittee, AJCongress UAHC, B'nai B'rith,
and NJCRAC were among the sixteen national organiza-
tions which urged members of the United States Senate to
support legislation that would temporarily stay the depor-
tation and detention of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans
residing illegally in the U.S. who face an uncertain future
in their native lands.
Tampa To Participate
In Unique Tly-In'
The Tampa Jewish Federa-
tion has been selected together
with New York City, Los
Angeles, Chicago, and
Houston as one of only five
host cities in the United States
to participate in the UJA Na-
tional Young Leadership
Cabinet "Fly-In" program.
On Dec. 9 and 10, approx-
iately 20 young leaders from
across the United States will
gather in Tampa to join
Tampa's campaign leadership
in meeting with campaign sup-
porters for the 1988 annual
campaign.
Sanford F. (Sandy) Mahr, a
member of the National UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet has
been appointed to head up the
program with the assistance of
the other members of the
cabinet from Tampa who in-
clude Bill Kalish, Lee Tobin,
and Don Weinbren.
ON YOUR TOES
WITH
WOMEN'S WEDNESDAY
JANUARY 6, 1988
HOLD THE DATE!

Sandy Mahr
Typesetting Artworh Aero*' Cole Printing Bindery
5ince 1976 Desktop Publishing free PicKup & Delivery
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Everything made from
scratch using only the
finest and freshest
ingredients
Glen Phillips Chef de Cuisine. Graduate with honors
of the Culinary Institute of America.
Phone 961-8986
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960*565




Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, November 13, 1987
1987: Another Great Year
For Philanthropic Funds
TOP Luckily for the
thousands of Federation
donors who have not yet set up
a philanthropic fund in the
TOP Jewish Foundation, 1987
is another great year to do so.
Philanthropic funds allow a
donor to make a gift to TOP,
and obtain an income tax
deduction for the full value of
the gift. The gift is invested by
TOP and net income credited
to a fund bearing the donor's
name. The donor may then
make recommendations for
distributions from the fund to
the Federation, its agencies
and other non-profit charities.
The special tax savings
bonus this year is a result of a
top income tax bracket in 1987
of 38.5 percent which will drop
to 28 percent in future years.
Coupled with the other advan-
tages of philanthroDic funds.
donors may find them irresisti-
ble this year. The example il-
lustrates how philanthropic
funds multiply the use of one's
charitable dollar.
As the example
demonstrates, philanthropic
funds hold great promise for
the future. This hypothetical
case is provided for purposes
of illustration only. Therefore
the donor's financial advisors
should be consulted before set-
ting up a philanthropic fund.
PHILANTHROPIC FUNDS
"MULTIPLY" YOUR
CHARITABLE DOLLAR
Mr. and Mrs. Altman were
considering whether to set up
a philanthropic fund. Mark
Glickman, TOP's Endowment
Director, showed them how
doing so would more than tri-
ple the value of their charitable
dollar using the tables below.
By establishing a $100,000
philanthropic fund this year,
the Altmans. in their tax
bracket, will realize income tax
savings of $38,500. Let's
assume they reinvest this tax
savings and that it grows at an
average of 8 percent annually
(5.76 percent after taxes).
Their philanthropic fund also
grows at 8 percent annually.
Based on their recommenda-
tions $10,000 is distributed
this year, $11,000 next year in-
creasing by $1,000 each year
up to $19,000 in 1996 for
distributions totalling
$145,000 over 10 years.
During that same period the
Altmans' initial tax savings of
$38,500 will have grown into a
nest egg of over $64,000 for
them to spend as they see fit.
Meanwhile, due to TOP's pru-
dent investment policy, more
than $71,000 will be left in the
"Altman Philanthropic Fund."
To illustrate:
$100,000 PHILANTHROPIC FUND ESTABLISHED IN 1987
197
SI 0.000
98.000
38.500
38.500
1M
SI 1.000
96.000
1969 1996
SI 2.000-SI 9.000
94.000 71.000
10YflB
Total
SI 45.000
71000
43.000 64000
64 000
Distributions
Phil Fund Balance
Income Tax Savings
Accumulated Tax Savings
(Inci reinvestment income) 38.500 41000
By comparison, if the Altmans decide nol lo sei up philanthropic fund bui instead
invest the $100,000 and make gifts in the same increments (see below), they will
deplete these funds by 1996 As in the case above, we've assumed that the Altmans"
$100,000 and lax savings, which they reinvest, will grow at a rate of 8'X annually
(5 76% after taxes).
DIRECT GIFTS TOTALLING $ 145,000 (1987 1996)
10 Year
1987 19M 1989 1996 Total
Gins SI 0.000 SI 1000 S12 000-S 19.000 SI 45 000
S100 000 rund Balance 95000 89000 83.000- 0 0
Income Tux Savings 3800 3080 3 360 5320
Accumulated Tax Savings (Iricl reinvestment income) 3.850 7 200 11.000 44 000 44 000
By 1996, if the Altmans decide to continue lo donate money the old-fashioned v.a>
they will be left with only V44.000 That's $20,000 less than if they set up a philan-
thropic fund and the Jewish community would not receive over $70,000 in additional
funding for programs and services
COMPARISON OF PHILANTHROPIC FUND DISTRIBUTIONS
AND DIRECT GIFTS (1987-1996)
Gilts / Distributions
10 Year-Total
Accumulated Tax Savings
Remainder tor t-ridowment Fund
Olfts Through "Altman
Ftiila&U&iopic Fund
SI 45 000
64.000
71000
DUectOUU
SI 45.000
44 000
0
.
The Tampa Jewish Federation
and the
Jewish Federation of Pinellas County
are pleased to announce
A Combined Major Gifts Event
Monday, December 7, 1987
Hyatt Regency Weatshore 6:45 P.M.
Guest Speaker:
Hon. Simcha Dinitz
Former Ambassador of Israel to the United States
Minimum Commitment: $10,000 to the 1988 Federation/UIA Campaign
A Special Poem
For Thanksgiving
The pilgrims gave a feast,
For the Indians in the east.
The Indians helped them plant
food,
When they were all in a good
mood.
Housing the Indians helped
them make,
They might have lived near a
lake.
At the feast there was peace,
If there were no turkeys there
might be geese.
There were many families at
the party,
Sometimes the children were
tardy.
All the geese were full of
played and
always in
grease,
They sang and
made peace.
Thanksgiving is
November,
It is never never in December.
In Florida it never snows on
Turkey Day,
I love Thanksgiving in Tampa
Bay
We all want to say our thanks
to all who are dear,
And be together another
year.
SECOND GRADE
Hillel School of Tampa
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AND SALES PEOPLE
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and pay you $400 to $500 per sale.
You make appointments only.
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Let us make your Bar Mitzvah
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Bar/Bat Mitzvah
BRADLEY VERKAUF
Bradley Paul Verkauf, son of
|Dr. and Mrs. Byron Verkauf,
Iwill be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah Friday evening,
|Nov. 20 at 8 p.m. and Saturday
[morning, Nov. 21 at 10 a.m. at
[Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and
Cantor William Hauben will
I officiate.
Bradley is in the eighth
I grade at Berkeley Preparatory
School where he is an honor
student. He is a member of
Kadima at Congregation
Rodeph Sholom. He is an avid
tennis player and has been
ranked among the top 20
players for boys 14 and under
in the state of Florida. He has
been invited to participate in
several national tournaments.
In honor of the occasion Mr.
and Mrs. John Osterweil, Mr.
and Mrs. Neal Crystal, and Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Rudolph will
host the Oneg Shabbat on Fri-
day evening. The Kiddush lun-
cheon on Saturday will be
given by Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Verkauf, grandparents of
Bradley and Mrs. Sherry
Friedlander, Bradley's aunt. A
brunch will be held at the
| Verkauf s home on Sunday
morning which will be given by
Mrs. Barney Copeland,
Bradley's grandmother, Mrs.
Nathan Shorstein a great-
aunt, and Mr. and Mrs. Kenny
Seitz, Bradley's aunt and
uncle.
Special out of town guests
include Mr. and Mrs. Kenny
Seitz, Brian and Barry of
Atlanta; Mr. and Mrs. Harold
McCrensky of Delray Beach;
Dr. and Mrs. Marc Taub, Emi-
ly and David of Boca Raton;
Mr. and Mrs. Julian
Straussberger of Mon-
tgomery, Ala.; Mr. and Mrs.
Julian Sandier of Jacksonville;
Mrs. Bert Fein of Cherry Hill,
N.J.; and Mr. Sidney Cooley of
Atlanta.
Bradley Verkauf
ALYSSA ZAMORE
Alyssa Lauren Zamore,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Gary
A. Zamore will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on Fri-
day evening, Nov. 13 and
Saturday morning, Nov. 14 at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and
Cantor William Hauben will
officiate.
Alyssa attends Rodeph
Sholom Religious School and is
a member of Kadima. She is an
honor roll student at Coleman
Junior High School. This sum-
mer Alyssa was a member of
the Tampa Bay All Stars that
won the Little League World
Series in Kalamazoo, Mich.
Dr. and Mrs. Morris Hanan
will host the Oneg Shabbat
following Friday's service.
Saturday morning the Kiddush
luncheon will be hosted by
Alyssa's grandparents and
great-grandparents Mr. and
Mrs. George Pegler, Mrs.
Joanne Mack, and Mr. and
Mrs. Jay Katz. Dr. and Mrs.
Zamore will host a reception
Saturday evening at the Lin-
coln Hotel in Alyssa's honor. A
brunch Sunday morning will
be hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Jim
Klein, Mr. and Mrs. Errol
ulAIBW9 D&EILII WESTTSfflKBIBIE
is pleased to announce that, in
addition to our other services, we will
now be catering ONEQS, KIDDUSHES,
KIDDUSH LUNCHEONS, and other functions,
through the KOL AMI KOSHER KITCHEN.
We offer OLD FASHIONED QUALITY and
SERVICE AT REASONABLE RATES. We
CUSTOM DESIGN menus to suit your taste
and budget.
OUR PLEDGE: We will pay attention to
all important details to make your
Simcha a truly memorable affair.
For Menu, quotes,
consultation etc.,
please contact Marty at
875-9563
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 13
Canada To
Seek Soviet
Help

Alyssa Zamore
Pegler, and Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing Weissman
Special guests will include
family and friends from
Georgia, New York, Florida.
Tennessee and Virginia.
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Canada has begun negotia-
tions with the Soviet Union
and the government of Poland,
Romania, Hungary,
Czechoslovakia, West Ger-
many and Israel to allow Cana-
dian legal teams to search for
evidence in the cases of 20
definite war crimes suspects
and 200 probable suspects
residing in Canada.
Justice Minister Ray
Hnatyshyn announced the
development last week in an
address to an international
human rights conference that
opened at McGill University
Law School here.
Participating in the con-
ference, whose theme is
"Nuremberg 40 Years Later:
The Struggle Against Injustice
in Our Time," are prominent
jurists, government ministers.
FOR YOUR BEST DEAL ON A NEW
HONDA
COME SEE ME
JACK G. SPIRTOS
At Lindall Motor* Inc.
3900 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa
Give Me 4 Call 872-4*41
rV<\V0ttaK
row
Community Representative
THE HILLEL SCHOOL OF TAMPA seeks a part-
time community development representative. Applicant
must possess excellent written and verbal communica-
tion skills and have through knowledge of The Tampa
Jewish Community. 12-20 hours per week, salary negoti-
able. Mail brief resume to "Representative, 5001 Shore
Crest Circle. Tampa. 33609".
THE TOAST
OF THE
TOWN*
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(813)251-0578
LOUIS ZIPK IN
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We are proud to announce
our new Tampa shop offering
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selective accessories for
gift-giving or your own
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You are invited to visit us for
our grand opening Sunday,
November 15th, LOO p.m. to
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BEECHWOOD PLAZA
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Yes, LADY CHI invites
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ftequMt mu*t mctutto S3 loc brochuce


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, November 13, 1987
Congregations/Organizations Events

TAMPA BAY
JEWISH SINGLES
COUNCIL
Coming events:
Wednesday, Nov. 18: Happy
Hour at Brother's, 5941 W.
Kennedy, Tampa, from 5:30
p.m. on. Members, friends,
and newcomers are all
welcome.
Saturday, Nov. 21: Games
Night at Geri's begins at 6
p.m. at 5100 Foxbridge Circle,
No. 118 (Foxbridge Apart-
ments), Clearwater. Snacks
provided. Members $5; non-
members $8. Call Gerri at
535-2554 for directions or in-
formation. Bring your favorite
games along!
Tuesday, Nov. 24: Dinner
and a Planning Meeting at Mai
King Chinese Restaurant,
8503 W. Hillsborough Ave.,
(Buccaneer Square), Tampa.
Wide menu selection with din-
ners from $5-$10. Dinner at 6
p.m.; meeting at 7 p.m. Come
and give us input for coming
events.
ADVANCE NOTICE,
Saturday, Dec. 19: Our Annual
Channukah Dance at the Tam-
pa Bay Performing Arts
Center. Reserve this date
more information to come!!
REMEMBER: JASS LINES
are waiting for your calls!
Hillsborough County:
960-JASS; Pinellas County:
736-JASS.
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
Adult Education
Date Changes
Dr. Nathan Katz, associate
professor of South Asian
religions at USF, and his wife,
Ellen S. Goldberg, writer and
photographer, have just
returned from India where
they spent one year on a
Fulbright fellowship resear-
ching the Jews of this ancient
community. They will present
their findings in two parts on
two consecutive Sundays.
Nov. 15 at 10 a.m. An
overview of the Jews of India
and their great diversity
their synagogues, traditions
and histories
Nov. 22 at 10 a.m. The
last sacred year of the Cochin
Jews and their unique obser-
vances and customs
Color slides and sound recor-
dings will be utilized for both
presentations.
Don't miss these wonderful
educational opportunities! All
are welcome.
Ski Trip To Colorado
Rodeph Sholom is arranging
a ski trip to Colorado over
Gasparrilla weekend Feb. 3
through 8. It is open to all
10th, 11th, and 12th grade
Jewish teenagers from Tampa.
The price will be $550 plus
food and rental equipment (if
needed). Anyone interested
should contact Michael and/or
Karen Linsky at (286-8658-H)
or (223-7509-0), or Debbie
Hafetz at (0-837-1911), no later
than Nov. 30, 1987.
Kadima News
Our Kadimaniks, under the
supervision of advisor, Eileen
Koteles, have begun a "Youth
House Makeover." Several
weeks have been spent clean-
ing, painting and decorating,
and it is really beginning to
look great.
A car wash will be held on
Nov. 22 and a Chanukah candy
sale will be going on into
December.
Several members will attend
a regional Kadima convention
in Atlanta during the weekend
on Dec. 11-13.
USY News
Our USY'ers and their ad-
visors Scott and Heidi Levin-
son just returned from a
subregional convention in
Orlando. The weekend
featured discussions on AIDS,
divorce, and birth control, a
dance, and lots of fun.
Soon we will begin a Lox
Box fund raiser to make our
pledge to Tikun Olam
(Tzedakah).
Upcoming programs include
an airport scavenger hunt and
a "Shul-In" with some
neighboring chapters.
The Joint High School Pro-
gram with Schaarai Zedek will
be hosting a day of perfor-
mance and workshops by well
known Jewish comedian Ally
Shear, on Sunday, Dec. 6 at
Schaarai Zedek.
Religious School
The Religious School
students are participating in
the Soviet Jewry rally being
sponsored by Women's ORT
and the Women's Division of
Tampa Federation. They are
designing Chanukah cards and
posters for Soviet Refuseniks
and are learning about the
plight of Soviet Jews. A family
Hanukkah program is being
planned for Sunday, Dec. 13.
The morning will include the
showing of Lights: A Hanuk-
kah Video About Now And
Then, hands on Hanukkah
workshops, performances by
the students, and a delicious
lunch prepared by the Men's
Club.
The following students were
selected as "Students of the
Month' for November: Elisa
Goldman (K), Debra Leckner
(I), Adam Schoenbaum (2),
Melissa Rosenberg (3), Scott
Present (4/5), Michael
Waksman (6), Leah Silver (7),
and David Schuster (8). These
students are to be commended
for their excellent attendance
and conduct. Keep up the good
work!
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
NCJW has awarded 12
scholarship this year, in the
total amount of $5,900 to
deserving students who are
currently enrolled in colleges
and universities.
Tampa Section presents
scholarships each year to local
Jewish students who meet our
academic requirements and
who demonstrate financial
need.
For information concerning
the NCJW college scholarship
program, please write to the
chairman, Mrs. Howard
Haubenstock, 49 Martinique,
Tampa, FL 33606.
For information on member-
ship and meetings of NCJW,
please call Mrs. Lester Glagov,
962-6485.
JEWISH
WAR VETERANS
Albert Aronovitz Auxiliary
No. 373, Jewish War
Veterans, U.S.A., will on Nov.
22, at the general membership
meeting, present a ceremonial
American Flag to the Jewish
Community Center.
George M. White, Architect
of the Capitol, has certified
that, "this Flag was flown, for
the Jewish Community Center
of Tampa, over the U.S.
Capitol on Aug. 26, 1987, at
the request of the Honorable
Sam M. Gibbons, Member of
Congress."
The Auxiliary will provide
information on the display and
use of the American Flag.
CONGREGATION
BETH AM
Singles Shabbat
On Friday, Dec. 4, members
of the Tampa Bay Jewish
Singles group will conduct ser-
vices at Congregation Beth
Am (formerly the North Tam-
pa Reform Congregation) and
provide the Oneg Shabbat
afterward in observance of the
Sabbath. As usual, the pro-
gram will begin at 8 p.m. at the
Community Masonic Lodge,
402 West Waters Ave.,
Tampa.
Susan Cohen a member of
both Tampa Bay Jewish
Singles and of Congregation
Beth Am is chairman of the
evening. She will conduct ser-
vices along with other single
members of both organiza-
tions. Members of either group
who would like to participate
should phone Ms. Cohen at
254-4464.
The community is most cor-
dially welcome to attend both
the services and the Oneg
Shabbat which follows.
CONGREGATION
KOL AMI
Jewish
War Veterans
Sabbath
On Friday night, Nov. 20,
Congregation Kol Ami will be
hosting the Jewish War
Veterans at Shabbat services.
Services begin at 8 p.m. For
further information, please
call Jerry Posner at 885-3105.
Let Us Do
Your Holiday Shopping
Kol Ami's annual goods and
services auction will be held
Saturday, Dec. 12 at 8 p.m. at
the synagogue. This gala event
is open to the community and
will feature items sure to
please the most discriminating
of tastes.
Patron tickets are $125 per
couple and include a special
dinner hosted by Lewis and II-
eana Berger in their home.
General admission is $18 per
couple and includes an evening
of fine food and spirits.
for further information
regarding specific items in the
auction, please contact Larry
Wasser, chairman, at 961-2272
or 960-5263.
Joint Meeting
Mark your calendar for
Wednesday, Nov. 18 at 7:45
p.m. The Sisterhood and the
Men's Club co-sponsor a forum
on Teenage Suicide. Diane
Smith of the Suicide and Crisis
Center will be leading the
discussion. Plan to bring your
teens to the meeting.
HADASSAH
Tampa Chapter
The November schedule of
events for Tampa Chapter of
Hadassah will include a Yard
Sale on Nov. 15 and 16, and
the Hadassah Supplies Lun-
cheon on Nov. 18.
Hadassah's Yard Sale will be
held at 3823 Vasconia, the cor-
ner of Vasconia and Church
Streets on Sunday and Mon-
day.Nov. 15 and 16, from 9:30
a.m. to 5 p.m. SALE items will
consist of clothing, household
articles and miscellaneous
trivia.
The Supplies Luncheon will
be held on Wednesday, Nov.
18 at 11 a.m. in the Education
Building of Memorial Hospital,
2901 Swann Ave. This lun-
cheon is a once a year project
to raise money for needed
linen supplies used in the two
Hadassah Hospitals in Israel.
Keeping in mind Hadassah's
first and still important func-
tion of health care, the guest
speaker for the afternoon will
be Dr. Seth Okun. Dr. Okun, a
prominent podiatrist in the
Tampa community, will em-
phasize food health and discuss
common foot problems.
Donation for the Luncheon
will be $10 with $5 Donor
Credit. For reservations,
please call: Freda Rosenbaum
879-3244 or Syd Fridkin
879-0439.
Chairpersons for the Sup-
plies Luncheon are Mrs. Nina
Bernstein and Mrs. Judy
Tawil.
BAY HORIZONS
The Bay Horizon Chapter of
the Women's American ORT is
pleased to announce that on
Nov. 17 it will hold a general
meeting and a Chanukkah par-
ty at 10 a.m. at the Red
Lobster Restaurant, 11601 N.
Dale Mabry. At the same time
they will hold a gifts wrap
workshop.
On Nov. 20 there will be a
Sabbath service at Congrega-
tion Shaarai Zedek, 3303
Swann Ave. at 8 p.m. The
Tampa Evening Chapter and
the Career Chapter of ORT
will participate with the Bay
Horizon Chapter. An Oneg
Shabbat will also be held after
the services.
All members as well as their
friends are cordially invited.
For information call Ruthye
963-6961 or Elizabeth
963-2506.
The Organization for
Rehabilitation through Train-
ing (ORT) provides the
teaching of skills and restora-
tion of confidence in their
students.
USF
Hopes High For Hillel
Jewish Student Center
Fundraising is now going on
for the Hillel Jewish Student
Center to be located on the
campus of the University of
South Florida. Although the
center will be housed at USF it
services undergraduate and
graduate students from the
University of Tampa,
Hillsborough Community Col-
leges the four other area cam-
puses of the University of
South Florida and the Jewish
students at Stetson University
College of Law.
Currently housed in a
townhouse across from USF,
the past few years have seen
tremendous growth. Accor-
ding to Hillel's director, Rabbi
Steven Kaplan, fewer than 20
students would come to Hillel
for functions. Recognizing the
weaknesses, the entire pro-
gram was revamped, and
Kaplan's first year found over
75 students consistently com-
ing around. The following
year, the members doubled,
and today. Hillel sees hun-
dreds of different faces during
the academic year.
Services are held Shabbat
and Holidays. Social programs
run the gamut of weekly bagel
brunches to horseback riding,
weekend getaways to bar-b-
ques and jet ski parties.
Three years ago. Hillel
founded the Jewish fraternity
at USF, and last year, founded
the Jewish sorority at USF. A
leader in implementing
porgrams other Hillel units in
the State have followed, a
Career and Counseling Servie
was established three years
ago, where students and facul-
ty avail themselves of these
services in large numbers.
In addition to religious,
social, and counseling needs of
students, educational needs
are met as well. Rabbi Kaplan
teaches courses in Modem
Judaism, and Jewish
? ????????????4
???
fflhofi ncm So*. tx44'pout
ALEPHBETJUDAICA
?
t
?
Hebrew Books
Records
Tapes
Jewish Games
& Coloring Books
for Children
Large selection
of Menorahs
Gifts
for any occasions
Mezuzahs
Yarmulkes
Silver Articles
Candles
Wrapping Paper
Cards
Chocolate Money
1
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i
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Gift wrapping and mailing for
your convenience
13156A North Dale Marby
The Village Center
960 1085
Sunday 12 6:30
Monday through
Thursday 10-5:00
Friday 10:00 3:00
__________


. 'f *i(T'IBJBJBa
ma.
Philosophy for the depart-
ments of Religious Studies,
and Philosophy, respectively,
as well as free non-credit
courses at Hillel. Kaplan's
publishing of articles and
texts, as well as his appoint-
ment as Chaplain at USF's
Florida Mental Health In-
stitute all add to the overall
outreach effort.
What of the future? Hillel's
current facility simply cannot
house the numbers of students
attending Hillel functions.
New quarters are needed to
allow Jewish students from all
backgrounds, traditions, and
walks of life to come together
and share in a variety of ways.
The college youth of today will
soon assume their place in
society. To help insure a
Jewish future for them, call
Rabbi Kaplan at Hillel,
972-4433, and ask how you can
share in the challenge.
JEWISH TOWERS
Candlelight Dinner
The monthly Candlelight
Dinner became a tradition at
Jewish Towers this year. The
Monday evening festivities in-
clude a catered social dinner,
an uplifting entertainment
program followe by delightful
door prizes drawing.
The residents' cost has been
kept modest through the
underwriting of the dinners by
donations made to Jewish
Towers Residents Recreation
Donation Fund. A recent din-
ner was completely underwrit-
ten by Tiba and Mike
Mendelson in honor of their
mother's birthday, Anna
Rosen, resident of the towers.
Recent dinners have been
dedicated in honor of Mary
Alvarez, Jewish Towers resi-
dent, and daughter Judy
Alvarez, for their donation of a
jukebox; Tom Reed for pro-
viding grocery shopping
transportation to the seniors
for 12 years; and Minnie Weiss
Smith for her donation of a
stained glass art work.
"Attendance at Candlelight
dinners has been enthusiastic.
Over one hundred residents at-
tend the Dinners and we invite
those with family members or
friends in towers residence to
attend at a modest donation"
commented Juliet Rodriguez,
Administrator of Jewish
Towers. Please call Towers at
870-1830, at 3001 DeLeon, for
information on upcoming
dinners.
Jewish Towers Invites
Community Viewing Of Art
A magnificent stained glass
art work was recently donated
to Jewish Towers by Minnie
Weiss Smith. Mrs. Weiss
Smith spent over three months
on this creation, one very dear
to her heart.
The artist, whose sister
Rebecca Strause resides at
Jewish Towers, has held a bur-
ning desire for years to grace
the living environment of the
Towers with such a gift.
An upward spread of pink
roses and a beautiful perched
bird, are surrounded by bevell-
ed glass inserts in a field of
aqua sky. The work, over the
transom of the Horatio Street
entrance, catches and reflects
the exterior sunlight as well as
the interior lighting.
Mrs. Weiss Smith was
honored at the October tradi-
tional monthly Candlelight
dinner, family members, Janet
Meltzer, Abe and Minnie
Weiss, and Rebecca Strause
attended the presentation of
an appreciation award.
Jewish Towers Ad-
ministrative and Decorating
Committee members, Jean
Bennett, Lucile Poller,
Florence Lebos, invite the
community to stop by and see
this special art piece. If you
would also like a tour of Jewish
Towers, please call Juliet
Rodriguez, Administrator or
Brigitte Andersen, Resident
Assistant for an open house
visit. The telephone number is
870-1830, at 3001 DeLeon
Ave.
Jukebox Brings Fun And
Music To Seniors
Recently a beautiful cabinet
jukebox was donated to Jewish
Towers by Mary Alvarez, a
resident, and Judy Alvarez,
her daughter. The jukebox has
Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 15
a 80 selection capability and is
an ongoing source of enjoy-
ment to our residents, special-
ly on Saturday nights. When
no formal programs have been
scheduled, the residents come
down to the Recreation Room
for an informal "Saturday
Night Live" get together of
dancing and listening to music
of their choice.
"We had been planning to
rent a jukebox at a cost of $150
for our New Year's party, but
we were fortunate enough to
have Mary Alvarez donate one
to the residents, which we will
be able to use for many years
to come.
"Our Saturday Night Live"
evenings are terrific and
everybody is having a great
time," commented Fernando
Cuebas, president of the
Jewish Towers Resident
Association.
Forums and Workshops Expand GA
Twenty forums, at the
General Assembly, consisting
of formal presentations by ex-
perts and panelists followed by
question-and-answer sessions,
will deal with a wide range of
domestic and overseas con-
cerns. Several forums will
focus on Israel-Diaspora rela-
tions, to commemorate Israel's
40th anniversary.
Domestic issues center on
four basic themes:
Transmission. Involving
the next generation in cam-
paign and leadership and
reaching out to inadequately
Obituaries
JOHNS
Mildred Wolfson Johns, 86, of St.
Petersburg Beach, died Saturday, October
24. A native of Durham, N.C.. she had been
a resident of the Tampa Bay area for 50
years, moving to St. Petersburg Beach 20
years ago. She was a homemaker, a member
of Temple Beth-El and its sisterhood, a
lifelong member of Hadassah, founder and
former president of Tampa Hadassah,
former president of the sisterhood of
Rodeph Sholom of Tampa, and a member of
ORT and of National Council of Jewish
Women. She is survived by a son, Sorrell
Wolfson of St. Petersburg Beach; a sister.
Helen Rest of Miami Beach; seven grand-
children, Aaron and Adrienne Wolfson of
Richmond, Va., Sharon and Andrew
Stempel of Boynton Beach, Mark and Myra
Wolfson of Tampa, and David Wolfson of
Gainesville; and one great-grandchild Alexis
Wolfson of Richmond, Va.
BRODER
Isidore Broder, 90, of Tampa, died Sunday,
October 25. A native of Russia, he had been
a resident of the Tampa Bay area for 12
Crs, coming from Miami. He was a retired
ineas owner and was a member of Con-
gregation Rodeph Sholom. He is survived by
a son, Harold of Rochester, N.Y.;
daughters, Ann Dolgin, and a niece, Milia
Fames, both of Tampa; and five grand-
children, Sanford, Gary and Sarah Dolgin
and Jonathan and Stanford Broder.
SEGALL
Fannie Segall, 86, of Tampa, died Monday,
October 26. A native of New York, she had
been a resident of the Tampa Bay area for
over 50 years, coming from New York. She
was a retired owner of Sam's Clothing Store
in Ybor City and a member of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom. She is survived by a son,
Gerald of New York; a daughter, Marlene of
Community Calendar
Friday, November IS
Candlelighting time 5:19 p.m.
Saturday, November 14
7 p.m. ORTVTampa Chapter Art Auction
Sunday, November 15
9:30 a.m. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter Yard Sale
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5 FM 11 a.m.1
p.m.
9 a.m. Rodeph Sholom Youth Groups Discussion on Cults
10 a.m. Jewish War Veterans Membership meeting
Kol Ami Kadima
7 p.m. Kol Ami USY program
Monday, November 16
9:30 a.m. Hadasaah/Tampa Chapter Yard Sale
10 a.m. Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Board meeting
Noon Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Fall Fashion Show and
Luncheon
1:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board meeting
4 p.m. Jewish Towers Board meeting
8 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Board meeting
Tuesday, November 17
10:30 a.m. ORT/Bay Horizons Membership meeting
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Board of Education meeting
'30 p.m. ORT/Tampa Chapter General meeting
7:30 p.m. JCC/Rodeph Sholom Traditions Class
Wednesday, November 18
Jewish Community Food Bank
9:30 a.m. National Council Jewish Women Board
meeting
11 am. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter Supplies luncheon
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
530 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Happy Hour -
Brother's, Tampa
745 p.m. Kol Ami Sisterhood meeting
Thursday, November It
10 a.m. Brandeis Art Study Group at Morrison's
550 p.m. JCC Executive Board meeting
730 p.m. Kol Ami Fellowship Committee
7:30 p.m. Menorah Manor Budget and Finance meeting
8 p.m. JCC Board meeting
ri UndlelighUag time 5:16 p.m.
8 p.m. Kol Ami Jewish War Veterans and Youth Services
8 p.m. ORT/Bay Horizons Shabbat Service at Schaarai
Zedek
Saturday, November 21
9:45 a.m. Kol Ami Hey Class Service and Luncheon
6 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Games Night
Gerri's, Clearwater
7:30 p.m. Hillel School "Gift of Gold"
Sunday, November 22
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5 FM 11 a.m.-l
p.m.
9 a.m. Rodeph Sholom/Schaarai Zedek Joint High School
at Schaarai Zedek
Kol Ami Youth Group Rehearsal
9:30 a.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary General
meeting
10 a.m. Rodeph Sholom Adult Education
Monday, November 23
7 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation YAD/B and P Joint
Program
7:80 p.m. AIPAC Fundraiser
Tuesday, November 24
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Cake Sale
10 a.m. Brandeis Critical Health Issues meeting
10 a.m. Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Board meeting
Noon Tampa Jewish Federation Executive Committee
meeting
6 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Dinner and Planning
meeting Mai King Restaurant, Tampa
7:30 p.m. Gratz High School Committee meeting
7:50 p.m. Kol Ami Executive Board meeting
8 p.m. Hadassah/Ameet General meeting
Wednesday. November 25
Jewish Community Food Bank
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Men's Club meeting
8 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Executive Board meeting
Thursday, November 26
THANKSGIVING DAY
10 a.m. Schaarai Zedek Thanksgiving Service
Friday, November 27
Candlelighting time 5:14 p.m.
JCC Vacation Day Program
Tampa; a sister, Esther Abrahams of
Miami; and two grandchildren.
DOLGIN
Edith Dolgin, 89, of St. Petersburg passed
away Monday, October 26. She was born in
Austria, and moved to St. Petersburg in
1954 from New York. She was a member of
Congregation B'Nai Israel and its
Sisterhood, National Council of Jewish
Women, life member of Hadassah, Shalom
Chapter for over 40 years. She is survived
by her son, Dr. David Dolgin, Tampa;
daugher, Phyllis Dolgin, New York; brother
Ben Willner of New York; four sisters, Han-
nah Kusheloff, Toby Sheiness, Edna
Rosenweig, and Lillian Konowitz of
Brooklyn, N.Y; and three grandchildren
Sanford, Gary, and Sarah Dolgin.
DOMBROW
Joseph Dombrow, 72, of Valrico, died Mon-
day, October 26. A native of Poland, he had
been a resident of the Tampa Bay area for
over two years, coming from New Jersey.
He was a retired bar owner in New Jersey.
He is survived by his wife,Ethel; a daughter,
Enid Campione of Valrico; a sister, Sylvia
Resnick of Irvington, N.J.; and two
grandchildren.
involved Jews, such as singles,
the elderly and the disabled.
Unity and diversity in the
Jewish community. The ques-
tion of "who is a Jew" and a
unique trialogue with Or-
thodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis to discuss areas
of commonality.
Jewish education.
Strengthening our educational
institutions, supporting adult
Jewish education and
enriching veteran leadership.
Jewish mobility. Retool-
ing federations in order to
cope with the change from a
local to a continental society.
A number of forums will
feature overseas concerns,
including:
Soviet Jewry. A discus-
sion with promient refuseniks
about the current situation,
the role of federations and
future trends.
Jewish communities in
distress. Ethiopia, Syria and
Iran.
The Third World. The
TT)C role in helping developing
tries.
We Believe
In Getting To
When you are forced to
deal with the loss of a loved
one, making funeral
arrangements is never
easy. We understand
Know You Before thoscdii
circumstances.

* N *
***
T T m7 in So we want you to know
YOU Need VS. there is something you
can do to spare your family that kind of
anguish.
We invite you to visit us and discuss
your own funeral needs. By taking the
time now to deal with the situation, you'll
not only be assured of appropriate
arrangements, but you'll know your
family will avoid a very trying
experience.
We have been providing dignified
services for families throughout the area.
If you don't know us, perhaps you should.
We'd like to get to know you under the
best of circumstances.
Planning Ahead Makes Sense.
Be prepared in case of any emergency and spare your
family the stress and financial responsibility of making
funeral arrangements. There is no obligation whatsoever
to purchase anything.
?
?
Name -
Address.
Please send me a free Emergency Information Card
and information about planning my own funeral.
I would also Uke the free Personal Record Guide
and a professional counselor to assist me in completing it.
City/Sutc/Zip _______
Please Call or Write lo:
Phone
Bttfi 2W %tu.'UK S3ani\at 'I),ueL)\i
555 Glen Avenue S. Tampa, FL 33609
874-3330
Tampa's ONLY all Jewish Funeral Chapel

I


Page 16- Friday, November 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Founders Appreciation Dinner A Great Success
Fine food, fast music and
good company combined to
make the Menorah Manor
Founders Association Dinner
of Appreciation a huge
success!
The event, held Sept. 26 at
the St. Petersburg Hilton,
honored individuals and
families from Pinellas,
Hillsborough and Sarasota
counties who have made
substantial commitments to
the future of our elderly.
The evening began with a
cocktail reception, followed by
dinner and dancing. The
highlight of the party was the
presentation of a stainless
steel menorah depicting the
Home's logo to members of the
Founders Association.
Founders Association
members are donors who have
pledged at least $50,000
($25,000 for single persons) to
Menorah Manor's Capital
Building Fund.
"I feel the dinner was a
great success," said Manor
Development Director Jolene
Shor. "We wanted to show our
appreciation to those members
of the community who have
given so much to support our
Home and our elderly."
Many of the recipients were
thrilled with the beauty of the
menorah's design, which had
been kept fairly secret.
"I think it is absolutely
beautiful," said Jule Kroll,
after she received her
menorah. "I certainly didn't
expect anything quite so nice."
The exclusive piece of art
was designed especially for
Menorah Manor by sculptor
and printmaker Gladys
Sauber, whose works have
been exhibited at the
Baltimore Museum of Art, The
Peale Museum and the
Sculpture Center in New York"
City. Her commissioned works
include a 45-foot memorial to
the victims of the Holocaust
for the Baltimore Hebrew
Congregation.
The evening also featured a
video on Menorah Manor, as
well as remarks by Foundation
President Marion Samson-
Joseph, Vice President Thelma
Rothman, Founders Associa-
tion Chairman Walter
Loebenberg, and Next Genera-
tion Chairman Jay Gross. Dot-
tie Goldblatt acted as chairper-
son for the event.
The following is a list of
honorees: Mr. and Mrs. Allen
P. Allweiss, Mr. and Mrs. Her-
man Baum, Dr. and Mrs.
Philip Benjamin, Mrs. Lillian
Berni, Mr. and Mrs. Booky
Buchman, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
J. Buchman, Mrs. Rivy Chap-
man, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew
Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. Gary
Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Cohen, Mr. Ben Diamond,
Mrs. Renee Druban, Mr. and
Mrs. Link Elozory, Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Esrick, Mr. and
Mrs. Jerry Esrick, Mr. and
Mrs. Lowell Fyvolent, Mr. and
Mrs. Maurice Goldblatt, Mr.
and Mrs. Victor Greenberg.
Also, Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Halprin, Mr. and Mrs. Rouben
Halprin, Mr. and Mrs. David
Hyman, Mrs. Murry M.
Jacobs, Mr. and Mrs. Dick
Jacobson, Mr. Martin Jacob-
son, Mr. and Mrs. John
Joseph, Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Kalin. Mr. and Mrs. George
Silverberg, Mrs. Shirley
Solomon, Mr. and Mrs.
Michael R. Sudakow, Mr. and
Mrs. Larry Telles, Mr. and
Mrs. Ted P. Wittner.
For further information on
how you can participate in the
Capital Building Fund cam-
paign, please call Manor
Development Director Jolene
Shor, at 345-2775.
Grapevine
Pictured left to right: Jerry and Jay Gross, Jane and Don
Silverberg.
Continued from Page 2-
ed in memory of Faith's father, Herman Funk. Excited
grandparents are Edith and Mark Aron of Tampa, and
Lois Funk, of Youngstown, Ohio. Great-grandmother
Rose Joffin is also from Youngstown. Ann Funk, Faith's
sister, and Amanda's aunt, just moved to Tampa from
Washington, D.C. Other Tampa relatives include cousins
Eva and Michael Aron. Faith is working with Rabbi Rose
to set a date for Amanda's naming. Lots of hugs, kisses
and congratulations to you!
Karpay, Mr. and Mrs. Walter
H. Kessler, Mrs. Sarah
Kleinfeld, Mrs. Jule Kroll, Mr.
Lewis Kroll and Ms. Mary
Schulz, Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Levine, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce
LeVine, Mrs. Harriett Lieber-
man, Mr. and Mrs. Gene Lin-
sky, Mr. and Mrs. Marshall
Linsky, Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Loebenberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Bruce Marger, Mr. and Mrs.
Irwin Miller, Mr. and Mrs.
Jerry Orns.
Also, Mrs. Lee Pardoll, Dr.
and Mrs. Peter Pardoll, Mr.
and Mrs. David Pearlman, Mr.
Robert Rolde, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank L. Rosenblatt, Mr.
Marion B. Ross, Mr. and Mrs.
Maurice Rothman, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Rutenberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Rutenberg,
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel
Rutenberg, Mr. Jerry
Schneider, Mr. and Mrs. Mel
Sembler, Mr. and Mrs. Don
Silverberc. Mrs. Helen
"Stou 7//l'nf/pn-*>**/* at
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