The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00326

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Full Text
fJewlsti Floridia n
Volume 9 Number 18
OfTaMjMi
Tampa, Florida Friday, September 4, 1987
Price 35 Centa
Israel Cancels
Lavi Jet
END OF AN ERA: Wolf-Ruediger Hess
(right), son of former Nazi leader Rudolf Hess,
stands in front of the gate ofSpandau Prison
(Aug. 18), but he wasn't let inside. He was in
Berlin to see the body of his father, who died
the day before at the age of 98. Left is
AP/Wide World Photo
lawyer Alfred Seidl. Rudolf Hess was the last
of the Nazi leaders confined to Spandau all
alone for the last 21 years of his life. Two other
occupants, Baldur von Shirach and Albert
Speer, were long since released and are now
dead.
Israel's Cabinet voted 12-11,
with one abstention, Sunday to
cancel the Lavi warplane. This
followed a tense national
debate over the jet which was
considered by many to be the
best of its kind but whose ac-
celerating costs many feared
would strain Israel's fragile
economy.
The Reagan administration
had urged the scrapping of the
U.S.-financed project. The
vote will likely influence the
high-technology industry in
Israel and the nature of
U.S.-Israeli strategic coopera-
tion in the future.
The Cabinet accepted the
proposal of Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres to scuttle the
Lavi project after he used his
political leverage within his
Labor Party. Although Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
his Likud bloc ministers sup-
ported the project, he did not
invoke party discipline to in-
fluence the vote.
Peres saw the Lavi as a
doomed venture and submitted
a plan for Israel to cut its
losses.
Peres' plan calls for the
Israel Aircraft Industies (IAI),
and the myriad smaller con-
tractors involved in the Lavi
project, to become involved in-
stead in the development and
production of a new genera-
tion F-16.
The U.S. Defense Depart-
ment proposed such Israeli in-
volvement in 1986, in the
course of its ongoing efforts to
persuade Israeli policymakers
to forgo the Lavi. Washington
feels the Lavi is too costly for
Israel to undertake without
seriously prejudicing other
vital defense needs. Pentagon
officials, and Israeli Air Force
experts, believe the present
generation F-16 can fulfill the
needs designed to be covered
by the Lavi.
Peres' plans would assume
U.S. consent to convert to
Shekels and use in Israel a fur-
ther $100 million of the U.S.
military aid package ($1.8
billion annually) for the
Lavi-2000 Project.
Washington has indicated in
the past that it would agree to
this.
In effect, the Lavi 2000 idea
would mean Israeli participa-
tion in American plans for an
ATF or Advanced Tactical
Fighter, viewed by U.S. plan-
ners as the leap forward soon
imminent in warplane design
and technology.
By referring to Lavi 2000,
Peres apparently hoped to woo
some of the Ministers who had
backed continuation of the pre-
sent Lavi project. Peres
himself had become convinced,
Continued on Page 5-
Hess Buried
Son Has Stroke, Neo-Nazis Are Arrested
MUNICH (JTA) Rudolf
Hess, Hitler's deputy, was
buried in secret at an unknown
location. German Radio said
the federal government
ordered his immediate burial
to prevent further Neo-Nazi
demonstrations and efforts to
try to turn the former Span-
dau prisoner into "some sort
of martyr."
The Mayor of Wunsiedel,
Hess' home town where the
burial was scheduled to take
place Wednesday afternoon,
said that Hess has not been
buried anywhere in or near the
city.
IT IS NOT known whether
Hess' widow, Lisa, 87, attend-
ed the ceremony. His son,
Wolf-Ruediger, 50, is still in
the intensive care unit of a
Munich hospital after suffer-
ing a stroke Saturday evening
at his Munich home.
Hess died last Monday (Aug.
17) in Berlin's four-power
Spandau Prison for war
criminals where he had been
serving a life term. A British
military coroner had said the
93-year-old Hess died of
asphyxiation after choking
himself with an electric wire in
a suicide attempt.
The four-power Allied con-
trol over Spandau Prison is
scheduled to end Monday
when the U.S. guard will
march out. The red brick fort
will be razed to prevent it from
becoming a neo-Nazi shrine.
The federal government
ordered Hess buried secretly
and without delay as neo-Nazi
demonstrations took place
throughout West Germany
over the weekend.
IN WUNSIEDEL alone, 75
neo-Nazis were arrested after
a crowd of several hundred
massed outside the cemetery
gates. Police said sym-
pathizers had come from as far
away as north Germany,
Bavaria and nearby
Nuremberg to attend a banned
demonstration. Police found
Nazi flags, armbands and Nazi
posters in some of the search-
ed cars.
After the news of Hess'
burial broke, local state and ci-
ty police increased patrols
near the city and cordoned it
off from the main highways.
Entrance into the cemetery
itself was banned and local of-
ficials confiscated flowers and
wreaths placed outside the
cemetery wall.
Many West German papers
Monday continued printing
lengthy reports, often in a
sympathetic tone, on Hess' life
and the 40 years he spent in
prison.
HESS' FORMER
Continued on Pajte 4

Gratz Community High School Coming To Tampa
See Pages 2-3-4 1
1


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 4, 1987
Welcome Back ... to Jolene Shor, Laura Kreitzer,
Lee Tobin and Don Weinbren who returned from their
respective UJA Young Leadership Cabinet retreats.
Jolene and Laura spent time in Chicago at the Women's
retreat, while Lee and Don were attending the Men's
retreat at Colorado Springs. Unable to attend, but serving
on the National cabinet were Bill Kalish and Sandy Mahr.
We are lucky to have such dedicated people representing
us!
Where you ORT to be Tuesday night, Sept. 15 at 7
p.m. Women's American ORT, the Organization for
Rehabilitation through Training, is having its annual
reenrollment function. It is at the home of Dr. and Mrs.
Robert Farber in Cheval. Marilyn Farber is a past vice-
president of the evening chapter. This year's theme for the
reenrollment is the different countries where ORT has
schools: Mexico, Italy, France, and the United States. In-
ternational foods will be served for dinner, and helping
coordinate the event are Nancy Shaw, Edee Hammer,
Toby Flicker, and Gail Titen. It is open for members and
prospective members.
The Academy acknowledges The United States
Achievement Academy has announced that Suzanne E.
Gilbert has been named a United States National Award
winner in Foreign Language. The Academy recognizes less
than 10 percent of all high school students. Suzanne, who
attends Berkeley Prep, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
.Leonard Gilbert and granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Gilbert, Lakeland, and Mr. and Mrs. Louise
Buchman, of Tampa. Truly outstanding, Suzanne.
Take out to the ballgame The Little League World
Series was won by the Tampa Little League AH Stars! The
following 11 and 12 year-old girls represented the Jewish
community: Amy Buchman, daughter of Cookie and
Bookie Buchman; Caroline Kass, daughter of Janet and
Michael Kass; Amy Spector, daughter of Jane and Neil
Spector; and Alyssa Zamore, daughter of Roberta and
Gary Zamore. The finals were played in Kalamazoo,
Michigan where our girls won 7-0! Mayor Sandy Freedman
has invited the team to her office next week to be honored
further. WAY TO GO, TEAM!
Open Wide Dr. Randy Feldman has received the
Academy of General Dentistry's prestigious Mastership
Award. The Academy is composed of 30,000 dentists in the
U.S. and Canada, dedicated to continued education in
general practice. To earn mastership, members must have
obtained Academy of General Dentistry Fellowship status
(500 hours of continuing education within 10 years), and
then have completed 600 more hours, 400 of which must be
earned in hands-on participation courses. A great honor for
your hard work, Randy.
Babyline Mazel Tov to Sally and Stuart Pliskow on
the birth of their first child, Jared Daniel, who was born
Aug. 12. He weighed 6 lbs. and was 18 % inches long. Ex-
cited first time grandparents are Jack and Sylvia Zichlin
of Tampa, and four-time grandparents Sanford and Helen
Pliskow of Oak Park, Michigan. Jared is lucky to have two
great grandmothers: Sadie Zichlin of Tampa and Ida
Pliskow of Oak Park.
There are many happy aunts and uncles in Tampa and
Michigan and three special cousins in Michigan. Sally was
very moved with the bris ceremony and thanks Canter
Hauben and Dr. Robert Brauner for making the event so
special. The bris was held at Sally and Stuart's home
Aug. 19. Happiness to all of you!
Welcome to the world Ally! Allison Rose Tawil was
born to Dr. Robert and Joyce Tawil Aug. 18. She weighed
7 lbs. 7 ozs. and was 19Vz inches of cuteness! Ally has a big
brother, Jordan Lee, 3V2 years old. She is named with the
melding of two traditions: Sephardic and Ashkenazi, honor-
ing the living and the deceased. "Allison" is named in
remembrance of Joyce's grandfather, Abraham Whitman,
and "Rose" is a tribute to Bobby's mother, Rose Tawil, of
Tampa. Ally's other grandparents are Hy and Lottie
Whitman, of Ft. Lauderdale, and Leo Tawil, grandmother
Rose's late husband. There are lots of happy aunts, uncles,
and cousins in Tampa and Miami who will be celebrating
Ally's arrival and her naming, which will be at Rodeph
Sholom in October. Much love and happiness and all good
things to wonderful friends!
New in Tampa. Welcom to Dr. and Mrs. Seth Gasser
who are newcomers to Tampa from Baltimore. Seth is a
resident at Tampa General Hospital in orthopedic surgery
and Nina has been taking time to get adjusted to the area,
and taking advantage of the sun and pool in their Car-
rollwood condominium. Seth enjoys weight lifting, tennis,
and golf in his free time. Welcome!
Gratz Who?
By DIANE TINDELL
"The teen years are for-
mative. People have viewed
the adolescent as a novice try-
ing to master the tasks of
beginning adulthood. From
the time of dependence until
the time of independence, this
semi-adult practices what his
role models have taught. Our
present high school student
has a greater physical and in-
tellectual maturity than the
youth of the past. Although
the youth of long-ago had a
more concrete perception of
their function in society, to-
day's young person often lacks
the necessary experiential or
educational criteria demanded
by modern-day world."
"The term "identity" as
defined by Erik Erikson refers
to the older adolescent's com-
ing to feel that he understands
himself and that his image of
himself is congruent with the
way he is viewed by others.
His ideas become separate
from the viewpoints of others.
As all this occurs, the youth
leaves behind his earlier preoc-
cupation with himself and
turns his energies toward
discovering what ethics and
values the outside world offers
him. With these standards, he
creates a picture of himself."
"Presently afternoon
Hebrew schools lead to Bar or
Bat Mitzvah. Students not on-
ly require more, but that is
precisely the age that they
begin searching and for-
mulating who they are. We
have not provided them with
enough to help them later in
life...," so begins Mr.
Joachim Scharf, presently the
Headmaster of Hillel Day
School, as he speaks about
Gratz College. Sitting back
comfortably in his chair, he
describes with unreserved ex-
citement what the school is.
He is one of the principles in-
volved in the effort to bring
Gratz College High School
Department to Tampa. Mr.
Scharf will act as liason bet-
ween Gratz College and of-
ficially serve as Represen-
tative of the Department of
Secondary Education to Gratz
College in Tampa.
To provide you with some
background on Gratz College,
the Academic year of 1985-86,
marked Gratz College's 90th
Anniversary. For those un-
familiar with the school, it is
the "oldest general non-
denominationally affiliated col-
lege of Jewish Studies in the
Western Hemisphere. In 1895,
it was founded as the first
Jewish teachers training col-
lege in the U.S., established to
meet the immigrant com-
munity's need for well-trained
educators. Hyman Gratz,
whose name the school bears,
endowed a trust for the
"establishment and support of
a college for the education of
Jews residing in the city and
county of Philadelphia."
Today Gratz College is a
comprehensive institution of
higher Jewish, Hebraic, and
Middle East Studies offering
secondary, undergraduate,
continuing education, teacher
training and special cer-
tificate programs, as well as
serving as the central agency
for Jewish Education in
Scharf
Cohn
Birnholz
Berger
greater Philadelphia through
its Division of Community
Services.
The Division of Secondary
Education (High School) offers
a five-year program of Jewish
Studies on the secondary level.
The courses in the high school
are transferrable to all public
and private schools in
Philadelphia. Special courses
on the senior level are ac-
cepted for credit by Gratz Col-
lege as well as many other col-
leges and universities across
the country. Upon completion
of the course of study, the stu-
dent may qualify for certifica-
tion as a teacher in a Sunday
School program. The hours of
classes are available anywhere
from two to nine hours a week.
According to Mr. Scharf,
Federation in Pennsylvania
subsidizes the school with over
1.5 million dollars annually. On
the national level, Federation
regards Gratz TOP
PRIORITY!
Tampa Rabbinical Associa-
tion and Jewish Federation
have long recognized the need
for a central high school.
There is limited opportunity
for such activity beyond the
Bar/Bat Mitzvah year.
Through contacts made by
Mr. Scharf, discussion ensued
with visits by Dr. Uziel Adini,
Director of Secondary Educa-
tion, and Dr. Gary S. Schiff,
President of Gratz College.
Both men met extensively
with community leaders of
Tampa and concluded that a
Tampa Branch Department of
secondary education would be
mutually beneficial.
Federation President Doug
Cohn, immediately appointed a
committee chaired by Dr.
Robert Goldstein to expedite
implementation and negotia-
tion with Gratz College. For-
mal application was then made
to the Gratz College Board of
Overseers, and evaluated by
the High School Committee
that tentatively approved it.
The Board of Overseers will
meet to discuss the recommen-
dations of the high school com-
mittee in order to actualize the
end of September as the begin-
ning of the school term.
The committee coordinating
the program includes Gary
Alter, two representatives
from each synagogue, rabbis,
representatives of Jewish
Federation, as well as Doug
Cohn, Robert Goldstein and
Joachim Scharf.
The projection for this pro-
ject is as follows: Classes will
begin in the fall after the
Jewish Holidays. The Board of
Hillel has already approved the
free use of its facility for
classes one evening a week, for
one year. The North Branch of
the JCC will provide another
evening to Gratz, so that dif-
ferent classes may be offered
on the other side of t< n as
well. The rabbis have
generously volunteered to
teach free of charge for the
first year, ensuring the success
of the school. Rabbi Birnholz of
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
said, "This is a wonderful pro-
ject for Federation and a great
service rendered to the Tampa
Jewish community," when
asked about the school.
"It is important to note that
because this is an established
institution, a lot of research
has been done by professionals
to prepare a viable and mean-
ingful program and curriculum
that would offer stability and
quality to the central effort of
a community High School,"
states Mr. Scharf. The courses
are a "fixed curriculum from
Gratz. Concerned about the
prestige of lending the quality
of their name, Gratz rigidly in-
sists that their curriculum be
adhered to, and regularly
monitor it as well," continues
Dr. Goldstein.
"There is a need for a good
comprehensive program here
in Tampa," explains Scharf.
"As an offshoot of Federation,
Gratz will function within the
community interdenomina-
tionally combining all the
movements of Judaism and
supported by the community.
The program has the potential
to expand to a college pro-
gram, and may (as in
Philadelphia) offer incentives
for students interested in
Judaic studies or Jewish
education on the college level.
The affiliation with a national-
ly recognized institution will
have obvious advantages."
Excitement abounds as
Tampa is about to receive only
the second branch made for
the transferance of credits to
public and private schools in
the area .
It is a significant challenge
to our leaders which will help
bridge the gap between
synagogues as well as North
and South. Certainly a
wonderful opportunity for our
youth.
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Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Gary Alter On Gratz
Talking With Rabbi Rose .
By DIANE TINDELL
He sits behind a large desk
surrounded by books,
photographs of his family, and
the papers of Federation at his
fingertips. As he leans back in-
to his chair, the phone rings
and he glances over to it in-
stinctively. Once a student oi
the Reform Rabbinate, he
went on to Jewish Communal
work. A Tampa resident, he
previously spent four years in
Atlanta as campaign director.
Today Gary Alter is the Ex-
ecutive Vice President of the
Tampa Jewish Federation.
"Nine years ago I became
aware that when our students
became bar or bat mitzvah, or
went through confirmation,
there was no opportunity to
continue or further their
education beyond the 8th
grade. This has been a dream
of mine for over nine years, to
provide the Tampa community
and high school teenagers with
an opportunity to go beyond
"Pediatric Judaism."
He too, like Dr. Goldstein
has expressed, the thought of
being able to discuss History,
Philosophy and Ethics with
students who have the age and
maturity to truly comprehend
these fundamentals of
Judaism.
"We send ou children to col-
lege with a juvenile sense of
our Judaism. They know about
Chanukah, Passover and some
bible stories but do not real-
ly have the background that
sustains them in their adult
years. To me, this kind of pro-
gram fills a tremendous void in
the Tampa Jewish
Community."
Current statistics show that
50 percent of a known Jewish
population belongs to a Jewish
congregation. Therefore 50
percent of the teenagers have
no synagogue affiliation. To
give a more specific idea of
numbers, there are 4,100
estimated household units in
Tampa which is the equivalent
of 12,000 people. The program
is attractive to all teenagers. It
provides them with the oppor-
tunity to get to know one
another and broaden the
horizon of the entire teen
population.
Tampa is considered a small
intermediate community. Most
intermediate communities
have a program such as Gratz
either under the auspices of
the Federation or in many
cases, a bureau of Jewish
education, (which Tampa does
Gary Alter
not have at this point).
The benefits of Gratz High
School are very obvious. It
utilizes a prepared curriculum,
sets requirements for the pro-
gram, can offer transferable
high school credits, and
employs local resources for
teachers. Senior level courses
are eligible for college through
Gratz college as well as many
others. This is attractive to
parents in terms to tuition
dollars that are spent in high
school becomes applicable
toward graduation credits in a
University.
The second part of Gary
Alter's dream is to provide
"The carrot at the end of a
stick." Built into the tuition
schedule would be money put
into an escrow account. This
would provide funds for the
graudating class (at the end of
12th grade) to spend four-six
weeks in Israel. It is very am-
bitious to begin class in
September with one or two
courses. Each year additional
courses will be added until
there is a full program.
Although a major portion of
the school will be funded by
the Jewish Federation, it will
require a lot of support from
the community. Hopefully
through endowments, scholar-
ships will become available and
provide for the course of pro-
gram as well.
"We hope this will bring
together congregations in a
community effort, create a
positive working relationship
with the rabbis and lay leaders
and help cement relations by
providing a service for the
Synagogues."
An Open Letter
To The Hillel School
Thank you for providing my
child the opportunity to grow
and learn in an atmosphere
dedicated to the uniqueness of
each child. Each morning
when she runs off to school so
eagerly I think of how
wonderful her day will be, and
smile.
We want her to love learning
and love school, develop in-
dividuality and a sense of self-
esteem. You have taught her
to strive and aim for goals
higher than she may have
thought possible. She is
developing values, the ability
to question, and discovering
her heritage so naturally
just by integrating them in dai-
ly activities.
We can not thank you all
enough for the gloriously hap-
py and enthusiastic child that
greets me at the end of each
day. She has gained so much
and grown in such a beautiful
way, we are certain the caring
environment has allowed our
youngster to flourish.
Sincerely,
A First Grade Parent
By Diane Tindell
The vitality of his thoughts is
probably the most obvious
trait of this "new order" rabbi.
He thrives on congregation
participation like a bear for
honey! His enthusiasm for
Gratz is highly contagious to
anyone who approaches him.
Rabbi David Rose is a welcome
addition to our community!
"I think it's fantastic! We
really need to have a communi-
ty high school program. I think
a crisis of Jewish life today is
that most adults have Jewish
minds of 12 and 13 year olds.
Judaism is therefore not mean-
ingful because they don't
relate to it as an adult.
Anything we can do to in-
crease Jewish education and
move it up to an older age is
very positive."
The center of Judaism has
always been study according to
the Rabbis, the study of Torah
is equal to, if not greater than
all the other commandments.
Without study, we really can-
not understand what the com-
mandments are. The rabbi con-
tinued by saying that the Jews
have continued to "star in
scholastic areas and be at the
forefront of education, but
Jewishly we have fallen."
"It is not enough that our
children come to services,
(Although I want them to
come), but they have unders-
tand why they are there. They
need to understand how
Judaism can work in their
lives, answer their questions,
and help face the challenge of
adolescence.
Presently each synagogue
does have some sort of limited
program for this age group of
children. The numbers at pre-
sent are not significant enough
to be able to offer many dif-
ferent course choices and a
social outlet for the children.
With the high school, the
larger group will enable them
to have these options.
More options and greater in-
teraction will attract the
Rabbi David Rose
students. The courses range
from "Jewish Theology after
Auschwitz, Jewish music to-
day, to the marriage revolu-
tion, Jewish women, and Yid-
dish." Teens can relate to
many of the topics as they go
through crises in their lives,
and face new challenges. Rabbi
Rose sees them trying to
understand themselves as
human beings. It is important
that the Jewish community
add the Jewish component into
that searching that is part of
the teenage years.
"I think it is important that
the high school deal with
issues that the kids are con-
fronting such as drug abuse,
nuclear war, sexuality, and
Jewish perspectives on things
that confront them."
The rabbis have consented to
do some teaching in the Gratz
school. For Rabbi Rose, this
means an expansion of a pro-
gram already in existance and
the ability to make it better
without the worries. He feels
that the children are already
there, but the curriculum need-
ed to be stronger.
The enticement to the
students will be the larger
group, number-wise, getting
together with friends.
Rewards need to be built into
the program; if they learn
about the service, they need to
be able to participate in the
service. "They need hands-on
skills at living Jewishly,"
smiles the Rabbi. "Hopefully
what the students will gain
from this high school will be
Jewish awareness, the actual
joy and thrill of being Jewish.
Also the ability to enjoy learn-
ing. With the more that they
know, comes the realization
that there's even more that
they don't know."
He has seen the excitement
of the 13 year olds as they have
completed a tremendous ac-
complishment, their Bar/Bat
Mitzvah. To most children,
nothing happens after that.
This is an ideal time to take
their enthusiasm and continue
to build upon it.
"Jewish community educa-
tion is vital. We must educate
our children. Community
leaders are working on this
fantastic idea for this com-
munity that is desperately
needed. It will benefit this
community in ways that are
just not calculable. The im-
mediate gains are teens who
know more and are excited
about being Jewish... and the
long term is future community
leaders who have commitment
based on knowledge. We are
laying the foundation for the
future of our community."
Gratz
Alumni
By DIANE TINDELL
He sorted out events of the
day as he descended into the
Philadelphia subway every
Tuesday, Thursday and Sun-
day. Somewhere between 9th
and 10th Grade the subway
journey decreased to a short
walk because Gratz College
moved to a brand new struc-
ture on 10th and Tabor Road
near his high school. He
faithfully continued attending
Gratz College High School
Department until graduation.
Continued on Page 4
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Personalized Attention
Expert Staff
Breathtaking Presentations
Deliciously Prepared Foods
Party Coordination
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Total Event Planning
Constantly Creative
Everything made from scratch
using only the finest and
freshest ingredients
... Thsrs Is No Substitution For Real Jewish Cooking
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>MKac
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 4, 1987
Gratz Alumni
Continued from Page 3
coinciding with his graduation
from Central High School as
valedictorian. He went on to
Princeton University and Har-
vard Medical School,
graduating from both with
Honors. Residencies were
completed at Beth Israel and
Massachusetts General
Hospital in Boston. One can-
not help being impressed by
this list of accomplishments,
but what is more astounding is
that Dr. Robert Goldstein
credits Gratz College for pro-
viding a quality background
and influence on his life.
"When I think back to all the
different teachers that I had,
the best teacher was one at
Gratz College. I remember
vividly the two classes that I
took with Dr. Samuel T.
Lachs, Exodus or (Shmot), and
The Ethics of the Fathers,
(Pirke Avoth).
Congruent with the thoughts
of community leaders, he voic-
ed similar concern that in
Jewish Education we teach
them about Jewish things until
age 13, then stop. "At age 13,
is when the brain just starts to
mature to the point where they
can really begin to grasp
thoughts, concepts, and
values. You can't teach a 10
year old about philosophical
thoughts such as the Laws of
Keeping Shabbat. You can't
explain to a 9 or 10 year old
why it is so valuable ... This
Jewish tradition until the
teen years."
Dr. Goldstein's involvement
with Gratz rose out of concern
about the kind of experiences
he could structure for his
children once they reached
their teenage years.
He is confident that "Gratz
College High School Depart-
ment in Tampa" will offer a
quality challenging group of
courses that will help young
people understand the values
of the tradition they have been
born into.
Overall the general feeling is
that this is something the com-
munity needs for our children,
specifically our teenagers. "If
you tell them they're Jewish,
but not what is means to be a
Jewish, you haven't told them
anything."
However eloquently he
makes his point, Dr. Goldstein
backs the works with action.
He has agreed to accept the
position of Ad hoc chairman of
Gratz Committee, a position
responsible for putting it all
together.
"Mr. Scharf was the Direc-
tor of the Delaware Valley ex-
tension of Gratz College, and
IMt
through his contacts with the
College, coordinated the
necessary meetings. Dr. Adini
explained that Gratz over the
last 10 years is in an expansion
phase going from one facility
to a number of satellite schools
throughout the Philadelphia
area. Delaware Valley was
their first long range and we
would be the second and most
far-flung. We are all very en-
thusiastic about it!"
It has been proposed that in
the fall two classes be offered
at the North end and two
classes at the South end of
Tampa. The Adult Education
Division is targeted for the
spring.
Once again it is extremely
important to note the social
aspects of such a program. "In
Tampa there is a lot of
segregation of Jewish youths
groups along synagogue lines.
Gratz College brings together
children of all synagogues
thereby increasing social in-
teraction among Jewish
teens."
More specifically, additional
time between classes is
deliberately scheduled to en-
courage social interaction.
Parents are encouraged to
become involved. Without
their support and strong urg-
ing, this program will take a
lot of time to succeed.
Dr. Goldstein offers the
following aside, "This ex-
perience is one in which the
colleges look upon favorably
on college applications. It is an
unusual extra-curricular ac-
tivity at a name school whose
academic excellence is
recognized. This summer we
will endeavor to discuss with
public High Schools and
private, obtaining transfer
credits for these courses."
. and if anyone can do it
... Robert Goldstein certainly
can!
Excitement Builds
For Rochelle Lewis
By DIANE TINDELL
"I feel great! I've got a lot of energy and
with a lot of community support it'll catch
on!" So says Mrs. Rochelle Lewis, the ap-
pointed administrator of the Gratz High
School.
Mrs. Lewis has two children, one who is 16
and ready to attend, and a 10 year old who
will follow in her sister's footsteps. Speaking
as a mother, she said "This town has needed
it for a long time. It is college sponsored from
an accredited source that has already proven
itself."
Rochelle Lewis
What is going to attract our young people
to this type of extracurricular program?
"Initially it must come from parental commit-
ment, and soon the child will become intrin-
sically motivated. Then, there is the social ele-
ment involved. Each synagogue has their own
youth group but it is evident to all parents
and students that they need to have some
variety."
Mrs. Lewis displays a tremendous level of
excitement as she discusses Gratz. Although
there are still a lot of decisions to be made,
discussions to be held, Rochelle Lewis
ready to accept the challenge.
is
TOP Offers Pooled Income Fund
As of July 1, the Council of
Jewish Federations has made
a new service available to the
TOP Jewish Foundation for
local Federation participation.
The CJF Jewish Federation
Pooled Income Fund (JFPIF)
enables a donor to make an ir-
revocable gift to his/her
Federation while providing life
income for the donor and/or
named beneficiaries. A donor
receives other important
benefits:
1. INCOME TAX DEDUC-
TION in the year the gift was
made for the remainder in-
terest. This is calculated with
IRS tables based on the age of
the beneficiairies and the
percentage payout of the
Fund.
2. INCREASED INCOME
for the beneficiaries if the pro-
perty contributed was paying a
low income dividend.
3.AVOIDS CAPITAL
GAINS TAX on the ap-
preciated portion of gifts of
The Best For Your Child:
The Hebrew Academy Preschool
With great pride, the
Hebrew Academy enters its
second year this September.
The program is geared for
children ages three and four.
Through a variety of learning
experiences the Academy
serves your child's social and
intellectual needs. Our ex-
perience has taught us that
through individualized instruc-
tion, the children attain a
higher standard of education
both in the Judaic nd secular
program.
Jewish holidays, customs
and traditions are explored
through role play, songs,
Oewish Floridian
Of Tampa
Business Office: 2808 Hormtio Street. Tampa. Fla. 13609
Telephone 872-4470
Publication Office: 120 NE 6 St.. Miami. Fla S3132
FREDK SHOCHET SLZANNESHOCHET AUDREY HAUBEN8TOCK
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Editor
Miuu
Tht Jewu* FUrMltaa Dee* Nat Guarantee The Kaskratk
<* The Merchandise Awvertiaaa la Iu Class.
Published B. Weekly Plus 1 Additional Edition on January 1. 1986 by The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Second Clan Portage Paid at Miami. Fla USPS 471-910 ISSN 8750-5053
POSTMASTER: Send Address change- to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 33101
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) 2 Year Minimum Subscription 17.00 Annual 13 50)
Out of Town Upon Request.
The Jewish Floridian maintain, no "free list." People receiving the paper who have not subscribed directly
are subscribers through arrangement with the Jewish Federation of Tampa whereby 12.20 per year is
deducted from their contributions for a subscription to the paper. Anyone wishing to cancel such s
subscription should notify The Jewish Floridian or The Federation.
crafts, and living experiences.
Each Friday the children par-
ticipate in a wonderful shabbos
experience, in addition to en-
joying the baking of the shab-
bos challah. Hebrew
vocabulary and letter recogni-
tion is an integral part of the
Judaic program. Even the
youngest child is exposed to
the Hebrew alphabet through
hands on activities, crafts, and
games.
The secular program in-
cludes reading and math
readiness, science and social
studies through hands on ac-
tivities and individualized
instruction.
Contact Sulha Dubrowski
for further information at
962-2375. Wishing you a happy
and healthy New Year.
long term appreciated
securities (if donor is not sub-
ject to the Alternative
Minimum Tax).
4.REDUCES ESTATE
TAXES if the donor is the sole
income beneficiary. The estate
will receive a charitable deduc-
tion for the full value of the
gift. If there is a surviving in-
come beneficiary, the estate
will receive a partial charitable
deduction.
For example (see right): Mr.
Harry Cohen, age 65, owns
stock which he bought ten
years ago for $5,000. The
stock is now worth $25,000,
but pays only $500 (2 percent)
in annual dividends. His top
federal income tax bracket in
1987 is 38.5 percent. In lieu of
selling the stock aned
reinvesting the proceeds, he
donated the stock to the
JFPIF to benefit his Federa-
tion while retaining a life in-
come for himself and his wife,
also age 65. He has now
bypassed any capital gains tax
(if he is not subject to the
Alternative Minimum Tax).
The gift of stock worth
$25,000 entitles Mr. Cohen to
a charitable contribution
deduction of $4,864. This saves
him $1,873 in federal income
tax.
If the JFPIF is earning 7
percent net, the annual income
Mr. Cohen receives increases
from $500 to $1,750. When the
Cohens are deceased, their
estate will have been reduced
by their gift to the Fund and
the Federation will receive the
market value of their units. In
the JFPIF, there is also prin-
cipal growth so that this
amount has often been greater
than the original gift.
Simplicity is a key ingre-
dient of the JFPIF. A simple
one-page document, signed by
the donor, will transfer assets
to the Fund. In addition to this
asset transfer document, CJF
will provide you with a pro-
spectus and other materials,
including, upon request,
calculations of the donor's
charitable deduction for a
specific gift to the Pooled In-
come Fund. The JFPIF
trustee, with the supervision
of the Administrative Commit-
tee and CJF, administers the
Pooled Income Fund including
the issuing of quarterly checks
to income beneficiaries,
quarterly and annual reports,
Federation tax forms, invest-
ment of the funds and all
necessary calculations.
The JFPIF has current
assets in excess of $2.3 million.
Twenty Federations from New
York to San Francisco are par-
ticipating in the Pooled In-
come Fund. The Fund's invest-
ment performance (principal
and income) after expenses for
the past year has been 10.64
percent (approximately 6.3
percent Income, 4.3 percent
principal growth).
The newly appointed trustee
for the JFPIF is Mercantile
Safe-Deposit and Trust Com-
pany of Baltimore which has
extensive experience in ad-
ministering pooled income
funds and other charitable
trusts. In addition to the CJF
Fund, they administer funds
for the Associated Jewish
Charities and Welfare Fund of
Baltimore, UJA-Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies of New
York and the CJF Endowment
and Legacy Fund.
Hess Buried
Continued from Page 1
Nuremberg trial lawyer,
Alfred Seidel, Monday accused
the four Western Allies of hav-
ing kept Hess in prison in spite
of his age and poor health.
Seidel, who gave a press con-
ference in Munich, said that
the Allied claim that it was the
Soviet Union which had vetoed
Hess' liberation "was only an
excuse taking refuge behind
the skirts of the Soviet Com-
munist Party.
Business Beat: Harbour Island Hotel Offers Kosher Catering
Friday, September 4,1987
Volume 9
10ELUL5747
Number 18
The Harbour Island Hotel
will begin offering full Kosher
catering under the supervision
of Rabbi T. Brod on Oct. 1. A
variety of delicious foods will
be included on each custom
designed menu. All the tradi-
tional dishes will be offered.
In addition, specialty entrees
including smoked sturgeon
with a carver to serve and
pasta dishes prepared by a
chef are available.
The Harbour Island Hotel is
a luxury resort property in the
heart of downtown Tampa.
The Hotel offers a grand
The catering staff can help ballroom and seven additional
custom design a menu, assist elegantly appointed smaller
with a theme and decorations meeting rooms for any size
such as floral or ice carvings, event. The Grand Ballroom
Entertainment can also be seats 450 for dinner and over
arranged. 700 for receptions.



Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
Congregation Kol Ami Open House and Hillel
Dedication Of 1st Phase of Renovations Guidance Department
Kol Ami invites the entire
Jewish community to an Open
House and the Dedication of
the first phase of the renova-
tions to their synagogue on
Monday evening, Sept. 7 at
8:15-9:30 p.m. A Preview
Reception will be held for the
sponsors of this project at 7:30
p.m.
Chaired by Bill Kalish and
Marc Perkins, Kol Ami's Spon-
sors Campaign began just a
year ago. Through the support
and generosity of the con-
gregation $300,000 has
already been pledged. Pay-
ment of a significant portion of
these pledges was received
early enabling the expansion
and first phase of the renova-
tions to be completed prior to
the High Holy Days. In addi-
tion to improvements to the
building an important aspect
of this campaign is to raise
funds to reduce Kol Ami's
mortgage.
Thanks to the diligent super-
vision of Kol Ami's Synagogue
Coordinator, Howard Kanter,
it has taken just five weeks to
complete the expansion of the
administrative offices and
Sanctuary redecorating. Ar-
thur Simon, Linda Zalkin and
their committees worked with
various designers and ar-
chitects to finalize the plans
for these renovations. This
transformation will make a
tremendous impact on Kol
Ami's ability to handle its
growing responsibilities in
religious, administrative,
educational and social areas.
Please come on the evening
of Sept. 7 and admire the
beautiful new oak paneled
Bimah highlighted with brass
which features a magnificent
hand worked brass Eternal
Light and custom made Bimah
furniture. You are also invited
to view the three new offices,
including the Rabbi's new
study as well as the 'old' office
space which has been com-
pletely redesigned.
A special debt of gratitude is
owed to all who have made this
dream a reality Rich
Kanter and his Board of
Trustees who had the vision
and enthusiasm to initiate this
project ... the congregants
who worked on the various
committees needed for a pro-
ject of this scope the
generous Sponsors whose con-
tributions enabled the plans to
proceed and the fine craft-
smen who put it all together so
beautifully!
Rabbi Mockin Joins USF Faculty To Teach Hebrew
Rabbi Dovid Mockin, direc-
tor of Chabad House Jewish
Student Center and chaplain
of area hospitals and prisons,
joined the staff of educators at
the University of South
Florida. He will be giving a
four credit hour course in
reading modern Hebrew.
In announcing the program,
Rabbi Mockin explained that
this will give the Chabad
House further opportunity to
reach out to the Jewish
students of USF and reac-
quaint them with their
beautiful heritage.
Chabad House is a Jewish
Student Center dedicated to
the need of all Jewish
students. Using a strictly no
pressure approach, Chabad
helps interested students,
regardless of their affiliation
Rabbi Dovid Mockin
and level of observance, ex-
plore Judaism and its
relevance to their lives. Every
Wednesday the Rabbi is
available at the Flea Market,
at which time students can
stop and have a "shmooz"
about everything and
anything. Let us not forget
Chabad's special Friday night
(shabbat) service and dinner.
These dinners are a wonderful
combination of song, stories,
discussions and of course
scrumptious food.
Private classes on various
topics, from Alef Bais to
Talmud are offered to meet
the students need. Chabad
house is a great way to meet
new friends, have fun, and en-
joy being Jewish.
For information call Dovid
or Chany at 980-0942 or come
to 5202 Seneca Ave.
Community Calendar
Friday, September 4
Candlelighting time 7:28 p.m.
6:30 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Early Service
Monday, September 7
Labor Day
JCC closed
Tuesday, September 8
10:30 a.m. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter board meeting
Tampa Jewish Federation/B and P Board
10:30 a.i
6:15 p.m.
meeting
7:30 p.m. Hillel School Board meeting
Wednesday, September 9
Jewish Community Food Bank
10 a.m. Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Florida Branch
Menorah Fund Kick-off
11 a.m. National Council Jewish Women Open General
meeting
Noon Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood NE meeting
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
4:45 p.m. Tampa Jewish Family Services Executive
Board meeting
5:30 p.m. ADL Executive Committee meeting
6:30 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Men's Club meeting
7 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Board Meeting-
Clearwater
7:30 p.m. ADL Regular Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Mosaic Historical Committee meeting
7:45 p.m. Kol Ami Sisterhood meeting
Thursday, September 10
10 a.m. Brandeis Study Group Showcase
4:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation Board meeting
7:50 p.m. Kol Ami Board meeting
Friday, September 11
Candlelighting time 7:20 p.m.
Saturday, September 12
Schaarai Zedek Retreat for 7th and 8th Graders
7:30 p.m. North Tampa Reform Jewish Congregation 1st
Annual meeting
7:30 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Games Night at.
Petersburg
Sunday, September 13 ,
Schaarai Zedek Retreat for 7th and 8th Graders
9 a.m. Kol Ami Religious School Brunch
11 a.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles 40 Isn't Fatal
Brunch Holiday Inn, Ulmerton
Noon Kol Ami Youth Groups meeting
Monday. September 14
12:15 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Executive Board meeting
1:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board meeting
7:30 p.m. JCC/Kol Ami Traditions Class
7:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/Washington Recruit-
ment meeting
Tuesday. September 15
10:30 a.m. ORT/Bay Horizons Membership Lunch and
Fashion show
4 p.m. Jewish Towers Board meeting
5:30 p.m. TOP Quarterly Board meeting
6 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Dinner/Planning
meeting China One
7 p.m. ORT/Tampa Chapter Reenrollment meeting
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Board of Education
7:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/Young Leadership
Development meeting
7:50 p.m. Kol Ami Executive Board meeting
Wednesday. September 16
Jewish Community Food Bank
10:30 a.m. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter Open meeting
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
6 p.m. Jewish National Fund Award Dinner
7 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation, YAD meeting
Thursday, September 17
11 a.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/Women's Division
Board meeting
5:30 p.m. JCC Executive Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Menorah Manor Admission and Resident Care
Committee
7:30 p.m. YAD Tampa Jewish Federation/YAD Cam-
paign Cabinet meeting
8 p.m. JCC Board meeting
8 p.m. Kol Ami New Member Coffee
Friday, September 18
Candlelighting time 7:12 p.m.
8 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Single Services at B'nai
Israel Clearwater
8 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Family Services
By DIANE TINDELL
Big things are happening at
Hillel and the bees are buzzing
in the air! All this and more ac-
cording to Meryl Bornstein,
caseworker supervisor at Tam-
pa Jewish Family Services.
Joint affiliation with TJFS
enables Hillel to offer a
Guidance Department with a
full range of services.
They are now going full-
steam ahead and expanding
that role by becoming more
visible within the school on a
regular basis.
The first visible change will
be the addition of parent
education groups, providing
adult education for parents.
Outside speakers have been of-
fered through combined ef-
forts of the Parents Associa-
tion and TJFS. Along with this
will be the contributory efforts
of professionals within our
own community availing
themselves of their services.
"There are lots of normal ad-
justments in growing up.
Science teaches the facts,
social work deals with the
thoughts and feelings. We
want to help them build their
self-esteem and develop con-
fidence!" said Mrs. Bornstein.
This fall, a Family Life
Education curriculum will be
added to the school. The class
is composed of thoughts and
feelings about growing up,
building a value system, and
how to make decisions.
"A good guidance depart-
ment helps develop self-
esteem in the child so he feels
that he can cope with
whatever each day brings. By
helping children maximize
their potential, they can fulfill
their goals and be the kind of
person that they want to be,"
explained Bornstein.
More specifically, Robin
King, a staff social worker will
be meeting with the children in
groups. There will be discus-
sions on learning how to get
along together, feelings about
growing up, and for the older
children, going out to Jr. High.
"The objective of this pro-
gram is to provide a group ex-
perience geared to healthy
Meryl Bornstein
growth and development,"
continued Mrs. Bornstein.
Originally from New
England, Meryl Bornstein
holds a BA in Sociology from
Brown University. She began
graduate work at the Universi-
ty of Chicago, and completed it
at Simmons College School of
Social Work where she receiv-
ed a Masters of Social Work.
She is a licensed Clinical Social
Worker with one year training
and just became a Diplomat in
the College of Social Work!
When asked to provide a
suggestion on how to make
school time positive, Bornstein
replied, "Hillel does a terrific
job! The kids are in a warm
caring environment, teachers
are providing for the childrens
needs parents need to
RELAX!
Lavi Jet
Continued from Page 1
during weeks of intense con-
sultations with Defense and
Finance Ministry officials, that
the present project is not
viable without a massive in-
crease of the tax burden on the
Israeli public.
At presstime it was reported
that Minister without portfolio
Moshe Arens indicated that he
intended to resign in protest
because he did not want to "ac-
cept responsibility" for the
Cabinet decision.
3r
p*** ***.
Breathtaking...
That's what the view of
the bay from our floor to
ceiling windows is...
And that's what our
Banquet Coordinators
want your Bar Mitzvah or
Wedding Reception
to be... Breathtaking!!!
2425 Rocky Point Dr.
887-1943


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 4, 1987
MAIN BRANCH:
2808 Horatio St.
Tampa, Fla. 33609
872-4451
Jewish Commu
Jewish Community Center
For All Children Regardless of Race, Color, or Creed.
Enrichments
An exciting, creative
afternoon program
featuring specialties
such as ballet, literature,
music, science, and more.
Please Call 872 4451
for further information on
this program and all our
other programs for PlayTots
through PreKindergarten.
Main Branch. '.'SOS Hor.uin. Tampa. Florida MtifW. KI5/872 4451
North Branch. MW Mnnn Road. Tampa. Florida *<(i I Jv 815 962 2865
and small motor skill develop-
ment, while awakening the
child's musical imagination.
The children enrolled in
Kindermusik classes meet in a
class of 10-12 students for a
one-hour lesson each week.
The class activities are varied
and well-paced to hold the
children's attention.
The curriculum is spread
over a two-year period con-
taining four semesters. The in-
tention is that the child who
graduates from the Kinder-
musik program has been
prepared for the study of an
instrument.
The director of the Kinder-
musik program is Judith
Cataldo, who is the
founder/director of the Florida
Keyboard Arts Center. Ms
Cataldo has degrees from New
England Music and the
University of South Florida.
I She has taught music at the
_J Manhattan School of Music as
^jiliiMBlK^^ilBllg^ well as at Brooklyn's Conser-
vatory of Music.
Children in the program
receive a music primer, a
notebook, a German-made
Glochenspiel, a bag to carry
materials in, and colorful
stickers.
Pre-Schooi
Introducing the
New and Exciting
KIPDERmUSIK
Kindermusik specialized
program of mu- irning and
enjoyment thai has been
designed for Preschool
children and which was
developed about 20 years ago
by a team of musicians, child
development specialists and
child psychologists.
The goal of the Kindermusik
program is to assist in the total
development of the child. With
this in mind, the in-class ac-
tivities are designed to pro-
mote language development,
symbolic thinking, and large
Session 1 and 2: Sept. 8-Dec.
16 Tuesday, 2:15, North
Branch; Tuesday, 3:30, North
Branch; Wednesday, 2:15,
South Branch.
Fee: $90/semester, JCC
member, $50 supply fee;
$135/semester, non-member,
$50 supply fee.
Fall and Winter
Programs
DRAMATIC ANTICS
Creative experiences with
costumes, make-up, pan-
tomime, musical instruments,
and improvising. Imagination,
creativity and problem solving
skills are discovered and
enhanced through improvisa-
tional play.
NORTH BRANCH:
Mondays 12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Six weeks: Members
$21; Non-Members $32.
MUSICAL CHAIRS
This class includes musical ex-
periences through music,
movement activities and
musical instruments.
NORTH BRANCH:
Mondays 12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Six weeks: Members
$21; Non-Members $32.
CREEPY CRAWLERS
A fun way to strengthen at-
tachment between mother and
infant. Parents and children
interact in a variety of gym
activities.
NORTH BRANCH:
Tuesdays 10:15-11 a.m.
Age: 6-18 months.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Six weeks; Members
$21; Non-Members $32.
2nd Session: Oct. 26-Dec. 11.
Seven weeks: Members $25;
Non-Members $37.
BABY BICEPS
Child and parent will be in-
volved in perceptual motor and
gross motor stimulation ex-
ploratory activities, and exer:
cise for both parent and child.
NORTH BRANCH:
Tuesdays ll:15-noon.
Age: 18-24 months.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Six weeks: Members
$21; Non-Members $32.
2nd Session: Oct. 26-Dec. 11.
Seven weeks: Members $25;
Non-Members $37.
FUN AND FITNESS
Children will learn the fun-
damentals of track and field
and fitness such as pullups,
situps, races, relays, broad-
jumps, etc. Children's in-
dividual fitness ac-
complishments will be charted.
NORTH BRANCH:
Tuesdays 12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Six weeks: Members
$21; Non-Members $32.
2nd Session: Oct. 26-Dec. 11.
Seven weeks: Members $25;
Non-Members $37.
NUTRI-NOSH
Nutritious snacking we
make ourselves. Fruits, grains
and nuts a healthy combina-
tion of foods which will lead to
delicious snacking.
NORTH BRANCH:
Tuesdays 12:15-1 p.m.
MAIN BRANCH:
Friday 12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Three weeks:
Members $10.50; Non-
Members $15.75.
BUGS AND BUTTERFLIES
Bugs that fly, crawl and
creep, butterflies, snakes,
snails and lizards with tails. All
the things you wouldn't want
in your house we will learn
about in school. Some crawlers
and flyers are good, but some
are not. A nature walk will
help us discover the difference.
MAIN BRANCH:
1st Session Wednesdays
- 12:15-1 p.m.
NORTH BRANCH:
2nd Session: Monday
12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Wednesdays. Six
weeks: Members $21; Non-
Members $32.
2nd Session: Oct. 26-Dec. 11.
Mondays. Seven weeks:
Members $25; Non-Members
$37.
TERRIFIC T-BALL
Children will learn the fun-
damentals of the game of t-
ball. Throwing, catching, bat-
ting off at and running around
the bases will be practiced.
MAIN BRANCH:
2nd Session: Four year olds:
Monday 2:15-3 p.m. Three
years olds: Wednesday
12:15-1 pm.
NORTH BRANCH:
2nd Session three and four
year olds. Thursday 12:15-1
p.m.
Fee: 2nd Session: Oct.
26-Dec. 11. Seven weeks:
Members $25; Non-Members
$37.
GUMBY GOOD
Imagination, creativity, fine
motor skill and eye-hand coor-
dination will be enhanced
through manipulating and ex-
perimenting with clay. Coil
pots and jewelry will be
created, fired, and glazed.
NORTH BRANCH:
2nd Session: Tuesday
12:15-1 p.m.
Fee: 2nd Session: Oct.
26-Dec. 11. Seven weeks:
Members $25; Non-Members
$37.
INTERNATIONAL
COOKING
Funtastic and easy recipes
from many foreign countries
will be tried out in this class.
Basic math and science con-
cepts are part of preparing
these recipes.
NORTH BRANCH:
2nd Session: Wednesday
12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 2nd Session: Oct.
26-Dec. 11. Seven weeks:
Members $25; Non-Members
$37.
Volunteers Needed
The March of Dimes needs
volunteers to make phone calls
to get people to help with the
Mother's March. Please con-
tact the JCC, 872-4451.
Adult Aerobics
Adult Aerobics will be of-
fered at the JCC, South
Branch beginning Sept. 1. It
will meet every Tuesday and
Thursday from 6 until 7:30
p.m., and Dee Dingley will be
the instructor.
The fee for Adult Aerobics
will be as follows:
Members: $3.50 per class or
$24 per month.
Non-Members: $4.50 per
class or $36 per month.
For registration, stop in the
office at the South Branch, or
call 872-4451.
Tennis, Anyone?
Michelle Oliva has joined
our staff as a tennis instructor.
Michelle's Tennis Program
will consist of teaching Novice,
Intermediate, and Advanced
classes to children, juniors,
and adults. Private, semi-
private and group lessons will
be offered.
The JCC is beginning a Ten-
nis league team for women,
men and juniors, to compete in
the Tampa Tennis Association
League. The cost of participa-
tion will be $35, which includes
a t-shirt.
We will also be offering a
Tennis Ladder at our JCC
courts. For more information
contact the JCC office at
872-4451 or Michelle Oliva at
254-4041.
Adults at
Leisure
Art Classes for
Adults-At-Leisure
Mondays
9-11 a.m. Ceramics/Pottery
Includes all aspects of mak-
ing, glazing and firing
ceramics.
11 a.m.-l p.m. Fiber Art
Includes macrame, weaving,
batik, hooking, embroidery,
needlework, etc.
1-3 p.m. 2-D Design In-
cludes all aspects of good
design in 2 dimensions.
Classes held at the Jewish
Community Center, 2808
Horatio St. Teacher: Carol
Skelton.


lunity Center
D
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
NORTH BRANCH:
3919 Moran Road
Tampa, Fla. 33624
962-2863
Youth
The Model's Workshop
Children's Program Ages 4 to 10
4 Weeks Fridays 3:30 p.m. to 4:15
p.m.
Main Branch of the Jewish Community
Center, 2808 Horatio Street
Session 1. Introduction To Modeling,
Developing Good Posture Habits, Model's
Walk and Stances
Session 2. Basic Runway Modeling Techni-
ques, Hand Positions and Showing Methods,
Fashion Show Turns
Session 3. Model Manners/Projecting Pro-
fessional Poise, Self-Confidence Develop-
ment, Personal Grooming
Session 4. Photoposing Workshop, Product
Ads, On Stage Showmanship
Fee: $20/Members; $30 Non-Members.
Please contact JCC 872-4451 or Lucy
Wager 989-0970 for further information.
Adults
Total Look Consultants
Professional Image Workshop
4 Weeks Mondays 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m.
Session 1. Guide to Radiant Skin, Color
Analysis
Session 2. Make-Up Artistry, Classic Hair
Styling
Session 3. Creative Wardrobe Planning,
Developing Fashion Flair
Session 4. Professional Voice Projection
Achieving Model Poise and Posture
Fee: $80 Members, $100 Non-Members.
Lucy Wager is the Director
of the Model's Workshop,
located in Temple Terrace.
She is a former model, make-
up artist and fashion coor-
dinator who began her career
at the age of 16 modeling in
New York City for several
fashion designers. She has
designed her programs to
develop the Student's
knowledge of training with
professional standards in all
areas of self-improvement and
modeling. She has judged
numerous pageants in the
Tampa Bay area on both the
local and state levels and her
affiliations include the Inter-
national Modeling and Talent
Association and the Fashion
Group.
Lucy has been slowly
building an exclusive modeling
agency in the Bay Area, and
she privately manages a select
group of models.
PLEASE ACCEPT OUR
APOLOGIES!!!
Mr. Sam Greenberg's name
was inadvertently left out of
our Fall/Brochure under the
Friends of the Center. We
want Mr. Greenberg to know
that we do indeed
acknowledge him as a beloved
Friend of our Center, and we
are very sorry that his name
was omitted.
Announcing:
The 2nd Annual
Tampa Jewish
Community Center
Golf Tburnament
MacDill Air Force Base
Bay Palms Golf Complex
Sunday, September 20, 1987
:W::::*^^
Did You Know
About The JCC
Endowment Funds?
If you have a birthday, a
memorial, or wish to honor any
occasion^ you can make your
donation to the following
endowments:
Senior Endowment Fund,
Early Childhood, Camp
Scholarship, Jewish Culture,
Jerilyn and Stuart Goldsmith
Camp Scholarship Fund,
Building Endowment, Sports
Endowment.
These donations will be
acknowledged by a personal
note in your name to the reci-
pient. What a meaningful way
to support your Center!
JUNIOR GYMNASTS
Young boys and girls will
develop balance, body strength
and flexibility through a varie-
ty of basic tumbling activities.
NORTH BRANCH:
1st Session: Tuesdays
1:1:45 p.m.
2nd Session: Thursday
11:45 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Tuesday. Six weeks:
Members $21; Non-Members
$32.
Second Session: Oct. 26-Dec.
11. Thursday. Seven weeks.
Members $25; Non-Members
$37.
MINIATURE
HOUSERCISE
Boys and girls will par-
ticipate in an exercise to music
program warm up exercises,
dramatization, and cool down
to storytelling. Stretch like a
rubber band, be a pretzel.
NORTH BRANCH:
1st Session: Thursdays,
1-1:45 p.m.
2nd Session: Tuesdays -
1-1:45 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Three weeks:
Members $10.50; Non-
Members $15.75.
2nd Session: Oct. 26-Dec. 11.
Seven weeks: Members $25;
Non-Members $37.
MATH MAGIC
Enter the magical world of
numbers to learn about
measurements, sets, balance
and graphing. Find shapes in
the environment; measure and
graph the heights of different
children, find the heaviest ob-
ject and the lightest object.
NORTH BRANCH:
2nd Session: Thursday
12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 2nd Session: Oct.
26-Dec. 11. Seven weeks:
Members $25; Non-Members
$37.
SCIENTIFIC SCIENTIST
Exciting hands-on projects
explore animals, vegetables
and minerals. Includes oppor-
tunity to use science and im-
agination for play, ex-
periments, discussions, and
projects.
NORTH BRANCH:
Wednesdays 12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Six weeks: Members
$21; Non-Members $37.
HINAY MA TOV
A fun filled program of
creative Judaic activities
games and crafts, cooking,
songs and special holiday pro-
jects. Learning colors,
numbers and body parts in
Hebrew and simple Hebrew
conversation is an added at-
traction to this class.
NORTH BRANCH:
Fridays 12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 26. Three weeks:
Members $10.50; Non-
Members $15.75. Seven
weeks: Members
Members $37.50.
$25; Non-
SUPER SAND
Oh, the joys of sand box
play! Children will scoop, pour,
shake, dig and build. They will
use sand to explore such basic
educational concepts as shapes
and sizes, weights and
measure, texture and color.
Swirly sand paintings, sand
soup, sand mold and ter-
rariams are samplings of the
session.
NORTH BRANCH:
1st Session: Wednesday
12:15-1 p.m.
2nd Session: Wednesday -
12:15-1 p.m.
BOOK WORMS
Delight in your favorite
classics in children's
literature. The children will
use art, drama, music and
cooking to make these stories
come to life.
NORTH BRANCH:
1st Session: Thursday
12:15-1 p.m.
2nd Session: Monday
12:15-1 p.m.
MAIN BRANCH:
2nd Session: Monday
12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
10-17-Oct. 1. Thursday. Three
weeks: Members $14; Non-
Members $21.
NOTE: The last class, Oct. 1,
is a double session (12:15-1:45).
2nd Session: Oct. 26-Dec. 11.
Monday. Seven weeks:
Members $25; Non-Members
$37.
SOCCERMANIA
Children will learn and prac-
tice the basic skills of soccer. A
class full of fun with soccer.
NORTH BRANCH:
Thursdays 12:15-1 p.m.
Age: Three and four year
olds.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Three weeks.
Members $10.50, Non-
Members $15.75.
TUMBLEBUGS
Movements exploration and
experiences with gymnastic
apparatus. Children will learn
balancing, climbing, swinging
and rolling skills while using
ropes, balance beam and floor
mats. Progression on an in-
dividual basis allows repeaters
to be constantly challenged.
MAIN BRANCH:
Three years Monday -
12:15-1 p.m.
Four years Wednesday
2:15-3 p.m.
Fee: 1st Session: Sept.
8-Oct. 16. Six weeks: Members
$21; Non-Members $32.
2nd Session: Oct. 26-Dec. 11.
Seven weeks: Members $25;
Non-Members $37.
*.
i
Volunteer Of
The Month
David Boggs
$M&>m$^^



Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 4, 1987
Wedding Announcement
H AME ROFFTURNE R
Bonnie Lynn Hameroff and
James Hill Turner exchanged
wedding vows beneath a
gazebo in the ballroom of the
historic University of Tampa
on Saturday evening, Aug. 22.
Bonnie is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Hameroff
and the granddaughter of Mrs.
Dora Hurwitz. Hill's mother is
Mrs. Kathryn Hill Turner.
David Anton officiated, us-
ing a very personal ceremony
which the couple themselves
helped to compose. Included
was a poem, "Wedding
Toast," written many years
ago by the groom's late grand-
father Lewis Hill, Jr.
As guests were seated, the
music of The Lyric Chamber
Trio filled the ballroom. The
bride was attired in white lace
and wore a garter designed by
her sister Marcia Jampole of
Atlanta, who served as her
tS
w
wt
Mrs. James Hill Turner
maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Linda
Haughom of Tampa, Karyn
Advanced Ticket Sales
For Chassidic Festival
Tickets for 19th annual
Israeli Chassidic Festival go
on sale now.
In a departure from tradi-
tion, this year's a festival will
be held on Sunday, Dec. 6, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall in
Clearwater.
This year's Chassidic
Festival is being sponsored in
the Tampa Bay area by all
three of the Jewish Communi-
ty Centers the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Tampa, the
Jewish Community Center of
Pinellas, and the Kent Jewish
Community Center of St. Pete
working together to make
this year's event the best ever.
The Israeli Chassidic
Festival has toured North
America for the past 18 years,
but the 1987 production is
especially dedicated to Israel's
40th birthday.
Ticket prices are: Patrons
seated in the Center Parterre
- $25; Side Parterre $14
advance, $16 regular; Section
A $12 advance, $14 regular;
Section B $10 advance, $12
regular; Section C $6 ad-
vance, $8 regular.
Advance tickets are on sale
from Aug. 31-Nov. 22. For
tickets and additional informa-
tion, call the JCC office
872-4451.
Hameroff of Pensacola, Deb-
bie Hameroff of Atlanta, and
Kaye Alsbrooks of Mundford,
England. Marci Bilofsky at-
tended the bride's book.
Hill's best man was Steven
Pyle of Greensboro and
groomsmen were Jeffrey
Hameroff of Atlanta, John
Alsbrooks of Mundford,
England, and David Ferraro
and Robert L. Hill, both of
Tampa. Graham and Trevor
Alsbrooks of England rolled
the aisle cloth.
Following the ceremony,
well-wishers followed the
music of flautist Melissa
Johnson as she led them down
the hallway to Fletcher
Lounge. There, a dinner recep-
tion was hosted by the bride's
parents, Terrill and Al
Hameroff. The festivities
began with the Hamotze over
the challah chanted by Grand-
mother Dora Hurwitz and a
special blessing by Uncle
Robert Hill.
During the months leading
up to the wedding, there were
many parties honoring the
bride and groom. Bridal
showers were hosted by
Rosalie Glagov and Grandma
Dora, and by Gloria Barr.
Sheila Feldman entertained
with a luncheon, and Lewis H.
and Sally Hill III with a barbe-
que pool party. A dinner party
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Cannon, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin
K. Nelson III, and Mrs. B.
Nelson Stephens. Mr. and Mrs.
George Bentley, Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Gould, and Mr. and
Mrs. Wellborn Hill hosted a
brunch, and the bridesmaids
luncheon was given by Bunny
Hameroff.
Bonnie is a partner of Barr-
Hameroff Insurance Agency.
Hill is a Methods Analysis Of-
ficer of the First Florida Bank.
After a honeymoon trip, the
couple will be at home in
Tampa.
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Experience the Beauty of
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Yom Kippur October 2,3
Deluxe accommodations for 5 nights in the
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Eight Kosher meals including a sumptuous
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'
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
Mitzvahs
-
t ,


JOANNE COHEN
And MARC COHEN
Joanne Dale Cohen and
larc Jay Cohen, daughter and
Lon of Mr. and Mrs. Michael S.
^ohen, will be called to the
Torah as B'nai Mitzvah Satur-
day morning, Sept. 5, at 11
a.m. at Congregation Schaarai
fcedek. Rabbi Richard J. Bir-
hholz will officiate.
Joanne is a student at
Schaarai Zedek Religious
bchool and is a member of
pchzfty. She attends
Chamberlain High School
Iwhere she is in the tenth
|grade.
Marc is a student at Schaarai
IZedek Religious School and is
la member of the Junior Youth
[Group. He attends Ben Hill
I Junior High School where he is
[in the eighth grade.
Following the service, Mr.
land Mrs. Irwin I. Feldman, the
[children's maternal grand-
Iparents, Mr. and Mrs. David
IHerckis, Mr. and Mrs. Howard
JKelman, Mr. and Mrs. Todd
|Platt, and Claire Seltzer will
host a luncheon for the out-of-
town guests at The Centre
Club. Saturday evening, Mr.
and Mrs. Cohen will host the
reception at the Tampa Mar-
riott Westshore Hotel.
Brunch, Sunday morning,
.ill be hosted by Mr. and Mrs.
'orman J. Cohen, Marc and
[loanne's paternal grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. David
t. Cohen and Mr. and Mrs.
IcKinley G. Freeman.
Other special guests will In-
clude cousins Sarah and Scott
tohen of Birmingham, Ala.;
{Scott Herckis, Dana and
lelanie Kelman of Atlanta,
a.; and Jeffrey Platt of
)allas, Tex.
evening, Sept. 11 at 8 p.m. and
Saturday, Sept. 12 at 10 a.m.
at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom. Rabbi Kenneth
Berger and Cantor William
Hauben will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Rodeph Sholom Religious
School and a member of
Kadima. He is a 9th grade stu-
dent at Berkeley Preparatory
School where he is on the
Headmaster's List. David
plays soccer for the Black
Watch Soccer Club. His team,
the Royals, have been state
champions for the past two
years.
In honor of the occasion Dr.
and Mrs. Germain will host the
Oneg Shabbat on Friday even-
ing and the Kiddush luncheon
following the services on
Saturday morning. There will
be a reception and dinner
Saturday evening at the Lin-
coln Hotel and a Sunday
brunch at the Germain home
for family and out of town
guests. Welcoming baskets are
being provided by Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Rudolph and Dr.
and Mrs. Allan Goldman.
Out of town guests include
Mr. and Mrs. Ken Macksoud
and Kara, Providence. RI; Mr.
and Mrs. Gad Jacobson,
Hallandale, Fla.; Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Spielberger, Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Ney, Miss Mimi
Ney, Miss Sophia Germain,
Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Bogoslawsky, Lacy and Scott,
Dr. and Mrs. Solomon Cohen,
and Frank Ney and Mary

Wilkes with their son, Adam,
Atlanta, Ga.; Mr. and Mrs.
Ron Novak, Leila and Myra,
Brooklyn, NY; Dr. and Mrs.
Jack Waxman, New Orleans,
La.; Mr. and Mrs. Beryl Jacob-
son, Darien, 111.; and Mr. and
Mrs. Dennis Kochan, Jennifer
and Kim of Lakeland, Fla.
Junior High School.
Dr. and Mrs. Michael
Stevens will host an Oneg
Shabbat on Friday evening
and a Kiddush on Saturday
following the services. A din-
ner reception will be held
Saturday evening at the Tam-
pa Airport Marriott Hotel in
Adrienne's honor. Sunday
morning a brunch will be held
in the Stevens' home for out-
of-town guests.
Specil guests will include
grandparents, Bob and Mary
Stevens, New York City, and
Irene and Eddie Strauss,
Clearwater; Aunt Gail Stevens
and Ken Kaufman, and Great
Aunt and Uncle Ella and Mar-
ty Mandell, all from New York
City; Uncle Howard Weinberg,
Houston, Tex.; cousins Carol
Goldner, Freida Hess, and
Blanch Markus.and Robert,
Bobbie, Ilise, and Bret
Rosenfeld, all from Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.
Tell Our Advertisers,"/ Saw It
In The Jewish Floridian.9
ADRIENNE STEVENS
Adrienne Lynn Stevens,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
Michael Stevens, will be called
to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah
on Friday, Sept. 11 at 8 p.m.
and Saturday, Sept. 12 at 9:45
a.m. at Congregation Kol-mi.
Rabbi H. David Rose and Can-
tor Sam Isaak will officiate.
Adrienne is a graduate of
Congregation Kol Ami's
Religious School and an active
member of Kadima. She enjoys
cheerleading, gymnastics, run-
ning, and swimming. She is an
8th Grade honor roll student in
the gifted program at Ben Hill
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 4, 1987
Congregations/Organizations Events
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
Attention: .
Do you have too many old
books? We need fiction,
children's, reference, paper
backs, cookbooks, sheetmusic,
etc., etc. Call Barbara Nathan,
961-8383.
Study Group Showcase!
Date: Thursday, Sept. 10.
Time: 10 a.m. Place: Car-
rollwood Recreation Center,
(corner of Orange Grove and
McFarlane Road).
At this meeting information
will be given for ethnic stories,
contemporary living, fine arts,
critical health issues, films and
Jewish short stories.
Any questions, please call
Janice Silver at 961-7835.
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
Religious School
Opening Day
Mark your calendars for
Sunday morning, Sept. 13,
from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. All
Religious School parents are
invited to attend a breakfast
orientation. Our Educa-
tion/Youth director, Debbie
Hafetz, and our Education
Committee chairman, Steve
Sonnenfeld, will be hosting the
orientation to answer any
questions you many have
regarding our religious school
and to discuss plans for the up-
coming year. (ie. finalization of
satellite school locations).
Don't miss this most impor-
tant kickoff to a new and ex-
citing program!
Please note that Sept. 13 is
the first day of Religious
School for K-8th grades.
Students will be attending
classes during the orientation
meeting and will be dismissed
at 11:00 for your convenience.
September
Family Service
All parents and students are
invited and encouraged to at-
tend this year's first family
service which will take place
on Friday, Sept. 18, at 8 p.m.
Please join us as we get off to a
fresh start for the new school
year.
Wine and Cheese
Reception
All new and prospective
members of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom are cordially
invited to a wine and cheese
reception in their home on
Saturday, Sept. 19 at 7:30 p.m.
at the synagogue, 2713
Bayshore Blvd. They are then
invited to join the rest of the
congregation for Havdalan
services and the annual
Selichot reception.
Before the Selichot service
the film "Cast a Giant
Shadow," starring Kirk
Douglas, relating Colonel
Mickey Marcus' involvement
with Israel's War of In-
dependence will be shown.
For further information,
please call the synagogue of-
fice at 837-1911.
JEWISH CONGREGATION
OF SUN CITY CENTER
'Shana Tovah"
The Jewish Congregation of
Sun City Center is happy to
announce that sometime in the
very near future the ground
will be leveled and the con-
struction of their House of
Worship will begin. However
the High Holy Day Services
will, this year again take place
in the Gold Room of the United
Community Church as time
does not allow their own
building to be completed as
had been the congregants'
hope.
Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur Services, (evening
Wednesday, Sept. 23, Thurs-
day, Sept. 24, evening Friday,
Oct. 2, Saturday, Oct. 3) will be
conducted by the congregants
and a "break-fast" will be held
following the conclusion of
Yom Kippur. The Holiday
Committee is busy making
plans to ensure meaningful
and beautiful services as in the
past.
B'NAI B'RITH YOUTH
ORGANIZATION
AZA and BBG had their first
membership party at the
Jewish Community Center
Saturday evening, Aug. 15.
Those who attended this event
enjoyed games, swimming,
Havadallah services, and lots
of food and fun. If you are in
the 9th through 12th grade
and are interested in joining
an exciting youth group,
please call Ellen Silverman,
Assistant Regional Director,
at 872-4451.
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Student Center
Of USF
The Chabad House
welcomes back all the students
for the fall semester. And
wishes them a happy and good
year. We are looking forward
to a year of exciting events.
What Is Chabad House All
About Anyway You Ask?
Let us tell you. CHABAD
HOUSE is a Jewish Student
Center dedicated to serving
the needs of the Jewish
students at USF. CHABAD
does not seek to differentiate
between Jews by their level of
observance of their commit-
ment to religion, instead it
seeks to unite all Jews. Using a
strictly no pressure approach,
CHABAD helps interested
students explore Judaism and
its relevance to their lives. We
also concentrate on organizing
exciting social activities to
help the Jewish students iden-
tify with each other. The
Chabd table at the USF Flea
Market on Wednesday, is the
place to "Ask the Rabbi" that
question that has been on your
mind, or just stop by and
"shmooz." You can also get
your preview on what will be
happening at Chabad and what
is coming up for the Holidays.
The CHABABD HOUSE, con-
veniently located near campus,
is a center of Jewish activity
and excitement seven days a
week. Friday nights, Satur-
days and Holidays, CHABAD
opens its doors to any student
interested in services followed
by dinner. These dinners are a
wonderful combination of
song, stories, thought provok-
ing discussions and of course,
scrumptious food. Then there
are bowling tournaments, par-
ties, barbecues, and private
classes in anything from Alef-
Bet to Talmud. CHABAD
HOUSE is a great way to met
new friends, have fun, and en-
joy being Jewish while you'are
at USF. For more information
just call David or Chany at
971-6234.
NORTH TAMPA
REFORM JEWISH
CONGREGATION
Officers Elected
The North Tampa Reform
Jewish Congregation has ac-
cepted the slate of officers pro-
posed by its nominating com-
mittee, according to chairman
Golda Brunhild, and is proud
to announce that the following
individuals will lead the con-
gregation in the coming year:
President, Maurice Shaw,
MD; Vice Presidents: Ad-
ministration, Marsha Sher-
man; Ritual and Education,
Hans Juergensen, PhD;
Growth and Development,
Betsy Singer, Esq.; Treasurer,
John Riesenburger;
Secretaries: Financial, Ellen
Lorenzen, Esq.; Recording,
Jerome Gourse, PhD;
Members at Large: Mort
Klein, Stuart Weston, Esq.
B'NAI B'RITH
OF BRANDON
The B'nai B'rith Unit of Bran-
don will hold their monthly
general meeting on Sunday,
Sept. 13 at 10 a.m. (SHARP)
at CDB's Restaurant in Oak
Park Plaza. Breakfast is $5 per
person.
Our guest speakers will be
Mr. Cliff Curry, Chairman of
the Brandon Incorporation
Committee and Mr. Fred
Uphoff, President of the
Bloomingdale Special Taxing
District, who will discuss the
proposed incorporation of the
Brandon Community.
For further information call
Lois Karb, 685-8586 or Ellyn
Kessler, 685-5099.
JEWISH
WAR VETERANS
Albert Aronovitz
Auxiliary No. 373
Albert Aronovitz Auxiliary
No. 373, Jewish War
Veterans, USA will provide a
keepsake Identification Card
for each new citizen at the
Naturalization Ceremony to
take place at the Federal Cir-
cuit Court on Sept. 16.
Although this is a regular ser-
vice at the Auxiliary, this
ceremony will be a special oc-
casion, honoring the signing of
the Constitution (1787). Sadie
Wahnon is chairwoman.
The first general meeting of
the Auxiliary, Sept. 20, star-
ting at 10 a.m. at the Jewish
Community Center will com-
bine business and a guest
speaker. At 11 a.m., Mary
Iacovelli, Human Services
Consultant, State of Florida,
Department of Health and
Rehabilitation Services, will
present information concern-
ing "The Cares Program."
The public is invited, chair-
women are Marcia Simon and
Janet Lynn.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
The Bay Horizon chapter of
the Women's ORT is pleased
to announce that they will hold
their re-enrollment luncheon
and fashion show on Tuesday,
Sept. 15, at 10:30 a.m., at the
Wild wood Restaurant, 1241 E.
Fowler Ave., between
Nebraska and 30th St.
There will be door prizes and
gifts. There will also be a
preliminary drawing for a free
trip to visit an ORT school in
New York or Los Angeles.
This will include air fare, ac-
commodations for three nights
at a Deluxe hotel, and escorted
tour of the Bramson school in
New York or the Los Angeles
ORT Technological Institute.
The annual dues will be your
admission and includes lunch.
For information you may call
Ruth Feivelson, at 973-1106.
We are looking for women
who would be willing to do
some charitable work and also
meet new Jewish women.
The Bay Horizon chapter
will be 10 years old, and ORT
is celebrating its 60th
anniversary.
The Organization for
Rehabilitation through Train-
ing (ORT) is dedicated to train-
ing youth for gainful employ-
ment, thus helping them help
themselves.
CONGREGATION
KOLAMI
Sisterhood
Kickoff the New Year at
Sisterhood's first general
meeting to be held Wednes-
day, Sept. 9 at 7:45 p.m. at Kol
Ami. Our speaker will be Dr.
Michael Lillibridge, a dynamic
psychologist from USF who
will discuss "Personal
Wellness" with emphasis on
relationships, fitness, and
balancing home, family and
career. Looking forward to
seeing all old and new
members in attendance.
Theatre Party
Save the date! Saturday,
Oct. 10, 8 p.m., will be
Sisterhood's Theater Party at
Tampa's new Performing Arts
Center. We'll see nationally-
acclaimed musical Tango
Argentine and enjoy delicious
desserts afterwards. Tickets
are $30 per person, made
payable to Kol Ami
Sisterhood. A limited number
of orchestra seats have been
reserved. Send your check to
the synagogue by Sept. 15 and
join us for a delightful evening.
Youth News
Kol Ami's youth groups look
forward to another banner
year. Warmest welcome to our
new advisors: Sari Starr
Boneem, Caryn Levy
Kadima, and Brian Shall
USY. If your child is in-
terested in joining one of our
youth groups, please call Marci
Harris at the synagogue office,
962-6338.
Membership Committee
Sponsors Information Get-
Together
The membership committee
of Congregation Kol Ami will
be holding an evening coffee to
introduce interested families
and individuals to the con-
gregation, its leadership, and
many of its members.
Kol Ami, a conservative con-
gregation located in North
Tampa, offers a full range of
religious, educational and
social activities. Its profes-
sional staff, including Rabbi H.
David Rose, Cantor Samuel
Isaak, School Administrator
Beverly Fink, and others,
stand ready to assist members
in a myriad of ways.
The coffee will be held at 8
p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 17 at
the home of Dr. Kalman and
Judith Pila, 4011 Shady Shores
Dr. Anyone interested in at-
tending this coffee, desiring
additional information, or
planning to attend a future
coffee, should call 963-6540.
CONGREGATION
SCHAARAIZEDEK
Brotherhood
Brotherhood of Congrega-
tion Schaarai Zedek would like
to announce its annual brunch
to be held on Sunday, Sept. 20,
at the Temple, 3303 Swann
Ave. The time will be 9:45 a.m.
Guest speaker will be Tom Ox-
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:30 a.m., 5:45 p.m.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Conservative
3919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H. David Rose. Cantor Sam Isaak Services:
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Conservative
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, hazzan William
Hauben Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Richard J. Birnholz.
p.m.
Services: Friday, 8
CONGREGATION BAIS TEFFILAH Orthodox
3418 Handy Road No. 108 Rabbi Yosai Dubrowski 962-2375 Services Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF TAMPA Orthodox
President Alfred Waaserberger, 254-2907, 839-5980 Services Friday 7:30 p.m.;
Saturday 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday night classes 8 p.m.; High Holiday Services Call
2541907 or 839-5980 for location of services.
NORTH TAMPA REFORM JEWISH CONGREGATION
C/o Joseph Kerstein, 1448 W. Busch Boulevard, Tampa, Fla. 33612, 949-0115. Con-
gregants officiating, Vikki Silverman, Cantor. Services at 8 p.m., first and third Fri-
day of each month, Masonic Community Lodge, 402 W. Waters Ave. (at Ola).
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
P.O. Box 271157. Rabbi Yossie Dubrowski, Executive Director. 963-2317.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
13801 N. 37h St. No. 1114. Rabbi Dovid Mockin, Program Coordinator. 971-6234.
Friday night Services one half hour after sunset. Tuesday night classes at 8 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION at U.S.F./U.T./H.C.C.
U.S.F.-CTR 2382 Tampa 33620 972-4433. Services and Oneg Shabbat Friday
evening 7 p.m. Sunday Bagel Brunches, 11:30 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
634-9162. United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Street, Sun City Center, Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECONSTRUCTIONS COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
RecoMtructionist Cambridge Woods 972 4433 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly
study discussion sessions. "Shal>bat Experience," monthly services and dinner


ly, the former head trainer
or the Tampa Bay Bucs. Open
o all temple men and prospec-
ive members, drop the
hildren off at religious school
md take a few minutes to get
o know some of the other tem-
,le members.
HADASSAH
Tampa Chapter
A general meeting of the
fiadassah/Tampa Chapter will
>e held Wednesday, Sept. 16
it 10:30 a.m. at the Jewish
>munity Center.
TAMPA BAY
JEWISH SINGLES
Ivednesday, Sept. 9: TBJSC
3oard Meeting! Join us for
mr monthly Board meeting
ind find out how this great
>rganization works! This
Tionth we'll be adressing open-
ng our nominations and an-
lual elections of officers. The
neeting begins at 7 p.m. and
rill be at the Golda Meir
lenter, 301 S. Jupiter Ave.
Saturday, Sept. 12: Games
^ight! Deborah has invited us
o her home for another even-
rig of fun and games! We'll be
neeting from 7:30 p.m. on at
0212A 3rd St. North, St.
'etersburg (Sandpiper Apart-
ments). Sodas and munchies
/ill be provided. Cost:
lembers $3 and $5 for Non-
lembers, and don't forget to
ring your favorite game! Call
)eborah at 577-4202 for more
iformation.
Sunday, Sept. 13: Brunch
/ith the bunch! The 40 Isn't
'atal! Group will be hosting
his Sunday morning get-
ogether beginning at 11 a.m.
t Cascades, Holiday Inn.
!lw/SP Airport (on Ulmerton
load). Please call Linda,
97-4957, or Nancy, 360-0000,
you plan to attend so they
Ian make reservations. Cost:
4.25 for buffet, menu also
vailable.
Tuesday, Sept. 15: Din-
er/Planning meeting! Please
>me and get involved, a little
a lot! We'll start off with
nner at 6 p.m. at China One,
{40 W Kennedy, Tampa,
ley have a fabulous Chinese
od buffet. The planning
eetingfor
ovember/December will
'gin at about 7 p.m. Dinner
st about $6. Call Sandy at
97-3536 for more
information.
Friday, Sept. 18: Singles
Service! Rabbi Baseman has
invited all Bay area Singles to
Friday Night Services at Tem-
ple B'nai Israel, 1685 S.
Belcher Road, Clearwater.
Services begin at 8 p.m. and
look for our hosts Lynn
(441-8249) and Bill (786-5444)
to introduce you around.
All functions subject to
change! Please call for more
information!
JASS Lines! Hillsborough
960-JASS (5277); Pinellas
736-JASS (5277).
Tampa Bay Jewish Singles!
Hillsborough, Rich
988-9273; Pinellas, Sandy
797-3536, 40 Isn't Fatal!, Lin-
da 397-4957.
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
Hebrew School
You owe it to yourself, you
owe it to your people, but most
of all you owe it to your
CHILDREN. Enroll them in
the Chabad Hebrew School.
Send your children to a Jewish
school to give them the
spiritual security they need for
a wholesome life. To give them
a sense of belonging to their
family and community. To
secure their identity as a bona
fide member of the Jewish
nation.
The goal of our school is to
instill within your child a sense
of pride in being a Jew. To not
only learn Judaism, but to love
it and cherish it as their own
treasure. Our teachers are
young, sincere and dedicated
and they speak the language of
the youth today. Our program
offers Hebrew reading,
writing, vocabulary and basic
conversational Herbew.
Children are trained for
becoming Bar-Bat Mitzvah. In
addition we offer study of
Jewish History, Bible, culture,
Holidays, customs and an arts
and crafts program. At
Chabad Lubavitch Hebrew
School learning is serious but
fun!
Classes are held every Sun-
day at Congregation Bais Tef-
filah, 3418 Handy Road (Car-
rollwood), 10' a.m.-noon for
ages 5-13, for boys and girls
with limited or no Hebrew
education. Tuition is $40 per
month. To register call our of-
fice at 963-2317 or 980-0942.
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Young Israel of Tampa Founded .
)n July 19, the Young Israel
Tampa's inaugural meeting
k place with about 25 peo-
at the Diplomat on
shore Blvd. Hillsborough
nty's new orthodox con-
gation heard Rabbi Ber-
nd Lamm, the Orthodox
ion's Outreach Director,
ak about the growth of the
hodox Jewish Renaissance
ading across America,
rthodox Jews now com-
fully one million of the
roximately five million
s of America. The Rabbi
e of the great potential for
growth of Young Israel of
pa, pledging his organiza-
s support.
fred Wasserberger, long
resident of Tampa and
ident of Young Israel of
pa, chaired the meeting,
ob David, vice-president,
spoke of the need for the
success of the Young Israel.
Mr. Dick Gordimer, Treasurer,
gave the financial report. He
and Mr. Wasserberger head
the schul search committee,
pledging that there will be a
schul facility available in time
for the High Holidays.
Charity coin boxes for the
Young Israel were distributed
to all. Prominent in attendance
were Mr. Ben Greenbaum and
Mr. Eli Blumenfeld, well-
known local philanthropists.
A weekly class in Torah-
Judaism takes place every
Wednesday night at 8 p.m.
For more information and
reservations for the High
Holidays and classes, or to be
involved in any other way, call
254-2907 or 839-5980. Come
and join us in the coming year
to-learn, to celebrate, to share
and to understand.
Chessed Shel Ernes
By RABBI THEODORE BROD
The name Chevra Kaddisha,
(holy scared brotherhood) or
among Sephardim known as
Chevra Chesed Ve-met, (kind-
ness and truth brotherhood),
was applied to a membership
association which dealt
primarily wiht the ritual and
reverent burial of the dead, ac-
cording to Jewish law and
tradition.
There were other associa-
tions of this sort that included
a Bikkur Cholim group, for
visiting the sick and in general
care of the sick. Gemilut-
Chasadim, providing free
loans (no interest) to the
needy; Pidyon Shevuyim for
ransoming captive or bonding
out Jewish prisoners;
Hachnasat Orechim, feeding
poor transients and Hachnasat
Kallah, providing dowries for
poor brides.
The most important function
of the Chevra (Brotherhood)
was the Tihara, the prepara-
tion of the body for burial in
accordance to the traditional
laws of Israel. Those engaged
in this sacred task were called
Mitassekim (workers). Among
Sephardim (Spanish) they
were called Lavadores
(washers) because of their
ritual washing of the bodies.
The institution of the Chevra
Kaddisha existed during the
Talmud Era, formed because
of the law that no material
benefit may accrue from the
dead. As a result, no one could
engage in the disposal of the
dead for profit or gain. Thus it
became a duty and function of
the community.
The membership of the
Chevra was limited to males
who were Bar Mitzvah.
Women formed an auxiliary
organization to attend the dy-
ing and wash the female dead.
They were called "Nashim
Zidkaniyot" (Righteous
Women). After their own
demise, they were buried in a
special part of the cemetery
and given a free funeral. In
some cities the board of the
Chevra was comprised of 18
members because of the
numerical value of Chai (Life).
Every year the Chevra
observed a Fast Day, on which
after the morning prayers,
members visited the cemetery
to repair the tombstones and
rake up the grounds; in the
evening they held a banquet
(Se-uddah) for all members.
The most popular date for this
was Adar 7, the traditional
date of Moses' death.
In the Talmud: R. Hiyya B.
Abba said in R. Johanan name,
"When one of brothers dies, all
Obituaries
ROTHMAN
Florence E. 74, of Tampa, died Thursday,
Aug. 6. 1987. A native of Brooklyn, New
York, she was a resident of the Tampa Bay
area since 1983, moving from Miramar,
Florida. She was a past president of the
Jewish War Veteran's Auxiliary. She is sur-
vived by a daughter, Anita Roth man Rahal
of Tampa.
SPITZ
Marguerite H.. 93, of Tampa, died Monday,
Aug. 24, 1987. A native of Pittsburgh, she
was a resident of the Tampa Bay area for 35
years. She was a member of Congregation
Schaarai Zedek. the Schaarai Zedek
Sisterhood, Hadassah, the Jewish War
Veterans Auxiliary and National Council of
Jewish Women. Survivors include a
daughter. Charlotte Berger, three grand-
children, Andrew .1. Berger and Robert K.
Berber. Tampa, Cynthia D, MTfir, I >..
It, and two great-grandchildren, Alex
ander R. Berger and Benjamin A. Berger.
the other brothers should look
to their deeds and fear. When
one of a Chevra dies, the whole
Chevra should seek to mend
their ways (Shabbath 106a)."
Rab Judah citing Rab said:
"When a person dies in town,
all the townspeople are forbid-
den from doing work. R. Ham-
muna once came to a town and
heard the sound of the
Funerary-Bugle, yet people
continued to work, he then
said: Let these people be put
under the Ban (Chyrim). Is
there not a person dead in
town? They then told him that
there was an association in
town that attended to burials.
If so, said he to them, it is
allowed for you to work.
(Mo'ed Katan 27b)
Resh Lakish said to Judah,
the son of Nahmani, when they
were in a house of mourning:
"Rise and say something with
regard to the friends who
came to comfort the mourners.
He spoke and said: "Our
brethren, bestowers of loving
kindness and sons of
Bestowers of Loving Kind-
ness, (Gomlay Chasudim), who
hold fast to the Covenant of
Abraham who himself bestow-
ed Chesed (Loving Kindness),
may the Lord of recompense
pay you your reward for your
Holy Work. Blessed art Thou
who payest the recompense."
"Master of the World,
redeem and save, deliver and
help Thy people Israel from
pestilence, from the sword,
plundering, mildew, and from
all kinds of calamities that may
break forth and come into the
world. Before we call, mayest
Thou answer our prayers.
Blessed art Thou who stayest
the plague (Ketuboth 8b).
From the above Babylonian
Talmud we derive that there
was a Chevra (Society) called
Gomlay Chasudim, (Bestowers
of Loving Kindness) whose
function was to pay a visit of
condolence to the house of
mourners. During all the seven
days of mourning (Shiva), if
new friends came to the house
and if there was a quorum (Mi-
nyan of 10 people) the Chevra
Chesed Ve-emet or Gomlay
Chasudim would recite special
Blessings called Birchat
Richuvah (Blessings of Con-
solation. In our times this
Tradition of Blessings has
vanished.
There is another explanation
found for the Blessings of
Richuvah. The term Richuvan
refers to the "Open Space"
behind the house of the
Mourners.
It refers to the blessings the
Mourners said in the Wide and
Open Space behind the house.
When many friends gathered
to carry out the Mitzvah of
Comforting the Mourners,
there was not sufficient room
in the house. Therefore the
Benedictions were recited
before the overflow of people
in the yard.
"Thou makest me know the
path of life; in thy presence is
fullness of joy, in thy right
hand bliss for evermore.
(Psalma 16)
To be continued.
Arichat Yumim!
Shabbat Sholom!
B KELLY
ASSISTED LIVING*
A subsidiary of Kelly Services, Inc.
Companionship
and care in
the comfort
of your own
home.
1987
Select the services that best fitvour
personal needs, ranging from help with
cooking and laundry, to personal care
24 hours a day.
Caregivers are thoroughly screened,
for safe and secure homecare.
Call for service, or more information.
879-6144 (Tampa)
? m o <
CHESSED SHEL EMES
BURIAL ASSOCIATION OF TAMPA
It Is the sacred task of the members of thl association to perform
? tho purification of tho body upon death. Thoy taks charge from tha
' moment ot death until burial.
X Tho men's division of the Chessed Shel Ernes Is In dire need of
. help In this sacred work. If you wish to volunteer, we will train you.
Call 261-2552
Rabbi T.Brod
Louis Gordon, Pros.
Herman Stem. Trees.

&lfi "ham,
ymmtnam ^Planning
because even voeU meaning indhnduals
can shift (he harden to someone fhey love by
doing nothing.
Charles D. Segal Jonathan A. Fuss
Funeral Director 874-3330 Funeral Director
555 Glen Avenue South
Tampa's Only All Jewish Funeral Chapel




Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 4, 1987
Schaarai Zedek, Rodeph Sholom
Form Joint High School Program
The new Bucs aren't the on-
ly exciting happening on Sun-
days this year in Tampa. Con-
gregations Schaarai Zedek and
Rodeph Sholom are excited
about the formation of a joint
High School program which
will begin Sunday, Sept. 20 at
9 a.m. at Congregation
Rodeph Sholom for the 10th
Grade.
This is the first time in Tam-
pa a Conservative and a
Reform congregation have
joined forces for an ongoing
educational/youth program.
There is hope that this joint
venture will pave the way for
Rabbi Bernat To Lead High Holy
Day Services At North Tampa
Reform Jewish Congregation
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat, na-
tionally recognized religious
leader and author, most
recently senior rabbi at Tem-
ple Israel of Greater Miami,
will this year preside at High
Holy Day services for the
North Tampa Reform Jewish
Congregation. The congrega-
tion is honored and delighted,
and is certain that Rabbi Ber-
nat's presence will enhance
and enrich the worship ex-
perience for all who attend
services.
Although Rabbi Bernat's
curriculum vita includes far
more than can be conveyed
here, following are a few of the
highlights:
Extensive service in the
fields of mass communications,
mental health, corrections and
brotherhood, amongst others.
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations Regional direc-
tor for the Chicago-Great
Lakes area, senior Rabbi at
Temple Israel, Hollywood,
California for seven years (750
families) and his tenure for six
years at the 1,100 family of
Miami's Temple Israel. His
communal involvement has
been on local, regional and na-
tional levels from coast to
coast.
Rabbi Bernat's publications
are numerous. They include
nar-
Rabbi Haskell Bernat
creating, writing and
rating two holiday specials for
West Coast ABC-TV, one of
which. The Amazing Menorah,
was nominated for the 1977
Emmy award in the category
of Information Short Stories.
His strong interest in enhanc-
ing synagogue activities and
ritual with the arts also led
Rabbi Bernat to found the
Isaiah Art Institute, a
laboratory for the utilization of
fine and performing arts.
North Tampa Reform
Jewish Association considers
itself fortunate to be able to
welcome to its midst Rabbi
Haskell M. Bernat to officiate
at ushering in the year 5748.
Join In 'Mosaic: Jewish
Life In Florida' Sept. 9
On Wednesday, Sept. 9 at
7:30 p.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center everyone in-
terested in participating in
"Mosaic: Jewish Life in
Florida" will meet to organize
the Tampa task force. This
task force will put together
this community's file in the
mosaic for the statewide
travelling exhibition of the
Jewish experience in the state
of Florida from 1763 to the
present.
At this meeting, the Tampa
task force will be organized in-
to eight subcommittees: oral
histories, archival material,
publicity, educational pro-
gramming in the community,
fund raising. Special
programming-interfaith and
interethnic, the exhibition, and
publication of Tampa's Jewish
history.
If you have a deed from a
property of an early business
in downtown Tampa of Ybor
City, religious ceremonial ob-
jects, early news articles about
Jews or Jewish events, family
trees of early residents, or
simply an interest in being
oart of this project, you are
needed at this meeting.
If you are interested in being
a part of this exciting task
force, but are unable to attend,
please let Goldie Shear know
by calling her at 251-3602 or
the Tampa Jewish Federation
office.
future attempts at breaking
down the traditional barriers
between the different bran-
ches of Judaism. By combining
the talents and resources of
both movements, everyone
will benefit!
This program will provide
the ninth through twelfth
graders of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom and Congrega-
tion Schaarai Zedek shared
social and educational
experiences.
The ninth graders will meet
each Sunday for one half of the
year at Rodeph Sholom and
the other half at Congregation
Schaarai Zedek. Their morn-
ings will be divided into three
parts: a short service,
breakfast, and a mini-course
taught by Dr. Barbara
Goldstein.
Dr. Goldstein is an instruc-
tor of English at USF and
HCC. She has many years of
experience as a teacher at the
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
Religious School. She will offer
classes on Jewish expression in
the arts and media. Students
will be exposed to modern
Jewish authors, playwrights,
directors, musicians, and ar-
tists and will be encouraged to
use their own creative talents
as well.
Tenth graders will par-
ticipate in their respective con-
firmation classes led by Rabbi
Berger of Rodeph Sholom and
Rabbi Birnholz of Congrega-
tion Schaarai Zedek. These
classes will not be combined on
a weekly basis, but will enjoy
social events together.
Eleventh and twelfth
graders will meet one Sunday
per month for half the year at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
and half the year at Rodeph
Sholom. These students will
participate in a short service,
followed by breakfast and then
a featured speaker on a vairety
of topics suggested by the
students. Prominent members
of the Tampa Jewish communi-
ty will be invited to address
the class. Through this pro-
gram we hope to broaden our
teenagers' perspectives of our
Jewish community as well as
encourage friendships among
our Jewish teen population.
The educational directors of
Rodeph Sholom and Congrega-
tion Schaarai Zedek, Debbie
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Hafetz and Marcia Levine, are
now working together on this
innovative project. Rabbis
Berger and Birnholz are con-
sulting with the educators as
they finalize the program's
curriculum. All are looking for-
ward to an exciting and pro-
ductive year.
WANTED:
Jewish singles who have
graduated from college bet-
ween 1982 and 1987 to repre-
sent and provide information
for a "College Bound Brunch"
on Sunday, Oct. 25, at
Schaarai Zedek. This progrom
is a part of the new Joint High
School Program. Anyone in-
terested should contact Debbie
Hafetz at 837-1911 or Marcia
Levine at 876-2377 as soon as
possible.
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FILES



Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
I
r/Bat Mitzvahs
JOANNE COHEN
And MARC COHEN
Joanne Dale Cohen and
klarc Jay Cohen, daughter and
;on of Mr. and Mrs. Michael S.
>hen, will be called to the
Torah as B'nai Mitzvah Satur-
lay morning, Sept. 5, at 11
i.m. at Congregation Schaarai
tedek. Rabbi Richard J. Bir-
holz will officiate.
Joanne is a student at
Schaarai Zedek Religious
School and is a member of
Schzfty. She attends
Chamberlain High School
where she is in the tenth
grade.
Marc is a student at Schaarai
Zedek Religious School and is
member of the Junior Youth
Group. He attends Ben Hill
Junior High School where he is
n the eighth grade.
Following the service, Mr.
and Mrs. Irwin I. Feldman, the
children's maternal grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. David
Herckis, Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Kelman, Mr. and Mrs. Todd
Platt, and Claire Seltzer will
[host a luncheon for the out-of-
own guests at The Centre
lub. Saturday evening, Mr.
ind Mrs. Cohen will host the
Reception at the Tampa Mar-
iott Westshore Hotel.
Brunch, Sunday morning,
A'ill be hosted by Mr. and Mrs.
iNorman J. Cohen, Marc and
lloanne's paternal grand-
aarents, Mr. and Mrs. David
pi. Cohen and Mr. and Mrs.
IcKinley G. Freeman.
Other special guests will in-
clude cousins Sarah and Scott
^ohen of Birmingham, Ala.;
Scott Herckis, Dana and
lelanie Kelman of Atlanta,
ia.; and Jeffrey Platt of
)allas, Tex.
evening, Sept. 11 at 8 p.m. and
Saturday, Sept. 12 at 10 a.m.
at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom. Rabbi Kenneth
Berger and Cantor William
Hauben will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Rodeph Sholom Religious
School and a member of
Kadima. He is a 9th grade stu-
dent at Berkeley Preparatory
School where he is on the
Headmaster's List. David
plays soccer for the Black
Watch Soccer Club. His team,
the Royals, have been state
champions for the past two
years.
In honor of the occasion Dr.
and Mrs. Germain will host the
Oneg Shabbat on Friday even-
ing and the Kiddush luncheon
following the services on
Saturday morning. There will
be a reception and dinner
Saturday evening at the Lin-
coln Hotel and a Sunday
brunch at the Germain home
for family and out of town
guests. Welcoming baskets are
being provided by Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Rudolph and Dr.
and Mrs. Allan Goldman.
Out of town guests include
Mr. and Mrs. Ken Macksoud
and Kara, Providence. RI; Mr.
and Mrs. Gad Jacobson,
Hallandale, Fla.; Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Spielberger, Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Ney, Miss Mimi
Ney, Miss Sophia Germain,
Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Bogoslawsky, Lacy and Scott,
Dr. and Mrs. Solomon Cohen,
and Frank Ney and Mary
DAVID GERMAIN
I David Jacob Germain, son of
and Mrs. Bernard Ger-
m, will be called to the
>rah as a Bar Mitzvah Friday
Wilkes with their son, Adam,
Atlanta, Ga.; Mr. and Mrs.
Ron Novak, Leila and Myra,
Brooklyn, NY; Dr. and Mrs.
Jack Waxman, New Orleans,
La.; Mr. and Mrs. Beryl Jacob-
son, Darien, 111.; and Mr. and
Mrs. Dennis Kochan, Jennifer
and Kim of Lakeland, Fla.
ADRIENNE STEVENS
Adrienne Lynn Stevens,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
Michael Stevens, will be called
to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah
on Friday, Sept. 11 at 8 p.m.
and Saturday, Sept. 12 at 9:45
a.m. at Congregation Kol-mi.
Rabbi H. David Rose and Can-
tor Sam Isaak will officiate.
Adrienne is a graduate of
Congregation Kol Ami's
Religious School and an active
member of Kadima. She enjoys
cheerleading, gymnastics, run-
ning, and swimming. She is an
8th Grade honor roll student in
the gifted program at Ben Hill
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Junior High School.
Dr. and Mrs. Michael
Stevens will host an Oneg
Shabbat on Friday evening
and a Kiddush on Saturday
following the services. A din-
ner reception will be held
Saturday evening at the Tam-
pa Airport Marriott Hotel in
Adrienne's honor. Sunday
morning a brunch will be held
in the Stevens' home for out-
of-town guests.
Specil guests will include
grandparents, Bob and Mary
Stevens, New York City, and
Irene and Eddie Strauss,
Clearwater; Aunt Gail Stevens
and Ken Kaufman, and Great
Aunt and Uncle Ella and Mar-
ty Mandell, all from New York
City; Uncle Howard Weinberg,
Houston, Tex.; cousins Carol
Goldner, Freida Hess, and
Blanch Markus,-and Robert,
Bobbie, Uise, and Bret
Rosenfeld, all from Fort
Lauderdale, Fla.
Tell Our Advertisers,"I Saw It
In The Jewish Floridian"
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*



Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 4, 1987
*v
Wedding Announcement
HAME ROFF-TURNER
Bonnie Lynn Hameroff and
James Hill Turner exchanged
wedding vows beneath a
gazebo in the ballroom of the
historic University of Tampa
on Saturday evening, Aug. 22.
Bonnie is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Hameroff
and the granddaughter of Mrs.
Dora Hurwitz. Hill's mother is
Mrs. Kathryn Hill Turner.
David Anton officiated, us-
ing a very personal ceremony
which the couple themselves
helped to compose. Included
was a poem, "Wedding
Toast," written many years
ago by the groom's late grand-
father Lewis Hill, Jr.
As guests were seated, the
music of The Lyric Chamber
Trio filled the ballroom. The
bride was attired in white lace
and wore a garter designed by
her sister Marcia Jampole of
Atlanta, who served as her
Mrs. James Hill Turner
maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Linda
Haughom of Tampa, Karyn
Advanced Ticket Sales
For Chassidic Festival
Tickets for 19th annual
Israeli Chassidic Festival go
on sale now.
In a departure from tradi-
tion, this year's a festival will
be held on Sunday, Dec. 6, at
Ruth Eckerd Hall in
Clearwater.
This year's Chassidic
Festival is being sponsored in
the Tampa Bay area by all
three of the Jewish Communi-
ty Centers the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Tampa, the
Jewish Community Center of
Pinellas, and the Kent Jewish
Community Center of St. Pete
working together to make
this year's event the best ever.
The Israeli Chassidic
Festival has toured North
America for the past 18 years,
but the 1987 production is
especially dedicated to Israel's
40th birthday.
Ticket prices are: Patrons
seated in the Center Parterre
- $25; Side Parterre $14
advance, $16 regular; Section
A $12 advance, $14 regular;
Section B $10 advance, $12
regular; Section C $6 ad-
vance, $8 regular.
Advance tickets are on sale
from Aug. 31-Nov. 22. For
tickets and additional informa-
tion, call the JCC office
872-4451.
Hameroff of Pensacola, Deb-
bie Hameroff of Atlanta, and
Kaye Alsbrooks of Mundford,
England. Marci Bilofsky at-
tended the bride's book.
Hill's best man was Steven
Pyle of Greensboro and
groomsmen were Jeffrey
Hameroff of Atlanta, John
Alsbrooks of Mundford,
England, and David Ferraro
and Robert L. Hill, both of
Tampa. Graham and Trevor
Alsbrooks of England rolled
the aisle cloth.
Following the ceremony,
well-wishers followed the
music of flautist Melissa
Johnson as she led them down
the hallway to Fletcher
Lounge. There, a dinner recep-
tion was hosted by the bride's
parents, Terrill and Al
Hameroff. The festivities
began with the Hamotze over
the challah chanted by Grand-
mother Dora Hurwitz and a
special blessing by Uncle
Robert Hill.
During the months leading
up to the wedding, there were
many parties honoring the
bride and groom. Bridal
showers were hosted by
Rosalie Glagov and Grandma
Dora, and by Gloria Barr.
Sheila Feldman entertained
with a luncheon, and Lewis H.
and Sally Hill III with a barbe-
que pool party. A dinner party
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K. Nelson III, and Mrs. B.
Nelson Stephens. Mr. and Mrs.
George Bentley, Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Gould, and Mr. and
Mrs. Wellborn Hill hosted a
brunch, and the bridesmaids
luncheon was given by Bunny
Hameroff.
Bonnie is a partner of Barr-
Hameroff Insurance Agency.
Hill is a Methods Analysis Of-
ficer of the First Florida Bank.
After a honeymoon trip, the
couple will be at home in
Tampa.
Experience the Beauty of
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