The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00309

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text


*Uewlsti Meridian
Of Tampa
Volume 9 Number 2
Tampa, Florida Friday, January 9, 1987
AM
Price 35 Cents
Jan. 18
Young Adult Division Holds
Main Campaign Event
Betty Shalett
Betty Germain
Diamond Division Chairmen
Germain And Shalett
Ellen Stern and Aida
Weissman, 1987 Women's Divi-
sion co-chairmen, announced the
appointment of Betty Germain
and Betty Shalett as co-chairmen
of the Diamond Division
($1,000-2,499).
"We are fortunate to have them
heading one of our Upper Cam-
paign Divisions. Their expertise
and organizational talents will
greatly benefit our Community,"
stated Stern and Weissman.
Both Germain and Shalett have
been active in the community and
both serve on the 1987 Women's
Division Board of Directors and
Women's Division 1987 Campaign
Cabinet.
Betty Germain is married to Dr.
Bernard Germain and they have
four sons Aaron, 14; David, 12;
Michael, 10; and Mark, 7. They
are members of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom where Betty serv-
ed as a vice president of
Sisterhood. She also served as a
past co-chairman of the Sapphire
Division of the Women's Division
of the Tampa Jewish Federation.
Betty Shalett is married to
Sheldon Shalett, and has two
daughters, Rachel and Rebecca.
They are members of Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom, where she
served as president of Sisterhood.
She is also a past Women's Divi-
sion vice president and Executive
Board member.
Shalett is presently a member of
the Hillel School Executive Board,
Rodeph Sholom Board of Direc-
tors and the Tampa Jewish
Federation Board of Directors.
The Young Adult Division of the
Tampa Jewish Federation will
hold its annual campaign event on
Sunday, Jan. 18 at the Airport
Marriott, benefitting the 1987
UJA/TJF Campaign Effort. The
event will begin at 6 p.m., with a
buffet dinner, and the program
will begin promptly at 7 p.m. The
Honorable Congressman Larry
Smith of Hollywood, Florida, will
give the keynote address and will
share his experiences of being a
Jew involved in the political pro-
cess. His topic for the evening is,
"Politics in the Middle East And
How It Affects The American
Jew."
"The Young Adult Division's
Campaign efforts to date have
already surpassed last year's
W. Keith Schilit
$125,000 Super Sunday Goal
As the Jewish Federation of
Tampa prepares for Super Sun-
day '87 on Feb. I, it will be aiming
for a new record in the one-day,
all-out fund-raising effort for the
Federation/UJA CampfiflJnVwTfich
must raise $125,000 on that one
day.
Where does the money go?
At home in Tampa The Tam-
pa Jewish Family Service. An
agency that provides professional
counseling and community ser-
vices to assist in responding to the
problems of daily living. Other
services offered by the Tampa
Jewish Family Services include
family life education, resettlement
of immigrant Jewish families, in-
formation and referral, and
special services to Senior Citizens.
The Tampa Jewish Community
Center exists in order to serve the
recreational, cultural, and. educa-
tional needs of the Tampa Jewish
community. Aside from ongoing
classes, lectures, speakers, film
series, Israeli folkdancing and
book reviews, the Jewish Com-
munity Center runs two excellent
pre-schools one on the main
JCC Campus and the other in its
new facility at the northend, sum-
mer Camp and Senior Citizens
Programs. The Center athletic
.*?#!**
m 0 la
..........;p...........
academic atmosphere. Its objec-
tives are to provide a means for
Jewish identity geared to the in-
..T Jewish university community, and
to provide a formal outlet for con-
temporary Jewish expression.
programs are among the best in
the city with major emphasis on
gymnastics, basketball, soccer, T-
ball, swimming and tennis.
The Hillel Day School offers
education of a superior quality in
both general and Jewish studies.
Small classes, innovative
teaching, and a flexible program
help to establish an ideal environ-
ment for learning.
The University of South Florida
and University of Tampa Hillel
are centers for Jewish educa-
tional, cultural, religious, political
and social expression in an
In Israel our fund-raising ef-
forts go to resettle Soviet as well
as Ethiopian Jews. Our contribu-
tions support rural settlements,
youth care centers, and academic
and vocational training services.
The dollars we raise subsidize
secondary education as well as
seven universities. It provides
rehabilitation and rent subsidy for
the elderly.
Where do the dollars go? They
go to build a better Jewish com-
munity for all of us in Tampa,
Israel and around the world.
On Feb. 1 answer the call. Join
together to make the community
and the world a better place in
which to live.
goal," according to campaign
vice-president, W. Keith Schilit.
"YAD has raised over $14,000
from 40 individuals, which is over
a 100-percent increase from
1986," Schilit added. While the
main campaign event affords in-
dividuals the opportunity to hear
nationally acclaimed speakers, it
also seeks to reinforce one's com-
mitment to Jewish culture and
roots. Dede Jacobs, president of
the Young Adult Division, en-
courages the entire YAD consti-
tuency to attend this very impor-
tant event and to show communi-
ty support. "It is through our fun-
draising efforts, that the Tampa
Jewish community will proposer
as a vibrant core for Jewish life,"
stated Jacobs.
A dessert buffet will follow the
formal presentation by Con-
gressman Smith. "On behalf of
the Young Adult Division, I en-
courage all members to take ad-
vantage of the chance to hear
from one of Congress's most
respected leaders. Congressman
Smith continues to work on behalf
of all Jews and he can truly be an
inspiration to all of us," com-
mented Schilit. Through his in-
volvement on the Foreign Affairs
Committee of the United States
House of Representatives, Con-
gressman Smith has established a
reputation of being an authority
on Middle East affairs. His ex-
perience, both as a volunteer in
his local Jewish community, and
as a professional politician will
certainly be enlightening to
Tampa's emerging leadership.
The cost for the event is $18 per
person. Individuals will also have
an opportunity to make their com-
mitment to the 1987 campaign.
Anyone interested in attending
this event should contact the Tam-
pa Jewish Federation, 875-1618,
no later than Jan. 10.
Neal Crystal Named
New Gifts Chairman
Walter Kessler, 1987 Tampa
Jewish Federation/United Jewish
Appeal Campaign Chairman, has
announced the appointment of
Neal Crystal as Chairman of the
New Gifts Division.
In discussing the expanded New
Gifts Program, Crystal explained
that the Federation has identified
approximately 2,000 Jewish
families in Tampa that are either
new or have not been previously
contacted to participate in the an-
nual Campaign.
On Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday, Jan. 12, 13, 14, these
names will be available in the
Jewish Community Center
Auditorium from 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
"As a large number of
Neal Crystal
volunteers are needed for
Continued on Pare 10
the
Interfaith Service Honoring Memory
Of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Jan. 19
Nineteen years after his death, residents of Tampa and Hillsborough County will join
together for an annual commemoration of Martin Luther King, Jr. An interfaith service
at St. Paul's Ame Church, 506 Harrison St., Tampa, will take place at 6 p.m. on Monday,
Jan. 19. A reception will follow the service.
According to Leslye Winkelman, Commemoration Co-Chairperson and Regional
Director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, "The golden values of Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. transcend racial and religious lines. He was a man of peace and a man of
vision. It is important that the entire community assemble to honor his memory."
Because of King's hard work and dedication, 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting
Rights Act became laws. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 and was a recipient of
many of America's highest honors. He was assassinated in April 1968.
The life of Dr. King is being commemorated every year with a national holiday in his
honor. This year, the date of Jan. 19 has been selected and the theme is "Living the
Dream: Let Freedom Ring."
Many government agencies and community organizations are sponsoring the celebra-
tion locally, including the ADL; the Community Relations Committee of the Tampa
Jewish Federation; the cities of Plant City, Tampa and Temple Terrace; Hillsborough
County; the Equal Employment Opportunity Office-City of Tampa and the Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Office-Hillsborough County; the Tampa/Hillsborough County Public
Library System; the Greater Tampa Urban League; the National Organization for
Women; the National Con 'nee of Christians and Jews; and the University of South
Florida. The community-w..Is celebration is entitled "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Com-
memoration and Black History Month Celebration." For more information, call the ADL
at 875-0750.



M
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, January 9, 1987
H
I
By Amy Scherzer
Get to know the can-
didate. Many of you already
know Michael Steinberg, at-
torney and candidate for the
Tampa City Council District 7
seat. Everyone is invited to
come to meet him, hear his
views and enjoy music and
refreshments on Jan. 18 at
Fried's Lounge, Hillsborough
at 19th Ave.
Michael, 27, graduate of the
University of Florida,
undergraduate and the Col-
lege of Law, is a native of
Tampa. He is active in the
Hillsborough County Bar
Association and has served on
the Board of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom. He is the son
of Judge Ralph and Marlene
Steinberg, and the grandson
of Sam Greenberg, Tampa,
and Sarah Steinberg, St.
Petersburg. His wife,
Miriam, is a chemical
engineer at Sperry Corpora-
tion; they have a 1-year-old
daughter, Jacklyn.
Michael Steinberg
Major concerns of the candidate include growth management,
downtown Tampa development and crime prevention. He'd also
like to see major league baseball and better city beaches in
Tampa.
We wish you well in March, Michael!!
NCCJ. At the Nov. 13 meeting of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, the following people were among those in-
troduced as new board members: Judge Barbara Fleischer, Rab-
bi Richard Birnholz, Leslie Scharf, and Leslie Reicin Stein.
They have been elected to three year terms; call 223-2721 for
more information on this group.
Bravo Louise! More than 90 Bay area arts and .civic leaders
gathered at a luncheon of the Greater Tampa Chamber of Com-
merce Cultural Affairs Council to honor Louise L. Kotler as
"Cultural Contributor of the Year." Mayor Sandy Freedman and
many others praised her 40 years' work with arts organizations
including the Florida Orchestra, Playmakers, Tampa Museum of
Art, Ybor City Arts Center, USF Theater Dept., and many
others.
She is credited with assisting Florida in achieving a current
rank of fourth in the nation for total financial support of the arts.
Scholar. A very proud grandmother, Rose Edison, just called
to tell us about her granddaughter, Wendi Michelle Leiter,
daughter of Elaine and Gerald Leiter. Wendi, a junior, has been
named to the National honor society at Leto High School. Besides
being a great student, she is lettered in both cross-country and
track, and vice-president of the debating society. Mazol tov to
Wendi and the whole family!
Adventuresome Author. Last summer Maas Brothers and
Bantam Books sponsored a contest called "Choose Your Own
Adventure" in which students between the ages of 7 and 12 were
to write their own endings to a brief adventure story. Well, con-
gratulations to winner Jeffrey Balis, son of Dr. Gene and Leslie
Balis, who will receive a Week-end Adventure in New York, in-
cluding airfare and hotel accommodations for 4, and $250 spen-
ding money. Terrific!! Jeffrey, who just loves to enter contests,
is 11 years old and in the 6th grade at Berkeley Prep. He wrote
3 different endings to the brief story, 12 pages in all. Good
work!
Welcome to Dr. Arnold and Fran Wax, and their family. They
left sunny California behind four months ago to join a private
practice with Drs. Frank Lane and Lewis Auerbach as an on-
cologist. Fran is a full-time Mom keeping up with Erin, 14^i who
goes to Ben Hill Junior High School; Rachel, 4Vt and Adam, 3 are
attending the JCC North End. Son Benjamin, 11, lives in New
York. The Wax family is presently living in Carrollwood and has
joined Congregation Kol Ami. The former New Yorkers are
delighted to be here, and we're delighted to have them.
When You Think of IRS This Year
THINK OF
Individual taxes
Reasonable rates
Senior discounts
and
PHYLLIS SCHAINHOLTZ
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
884-0239
FILE EARLY- CALL TODA Y
Over 100 people participated in the Soviet
Jewry program. In addition to Mr. Brown's
comments, students from the Hillel Day School
were asked to write letters to their peers in the
Soviet Union. Caron Jacobson, a seventh
grader and Sara Ewen, a fourth grader wrote
the winning letters, which were read the day of
the program. Avi Berger, liana Berger, Ian
Davidson, David Cyment, Rachel Shalett,
Jocelyn Lewis, Sara Davis Zolinsky, Shira
Doron, Idan Doron, Jonathan Forman
an>
Danielle Blum, who are also Hillel students,
sung freedom songs. Toby Mendelson, a
member of the YAD Social Action Committee,
read a proclamation from the Mayors Office,
proclaiming Dec. 28, as Human Rights Day in
Tampa. Upon the conclusion of the program,
everyone participated in the community
lighting of the menorah. Shown in photo (left to
right), Rabbi Kenneth Berger, Rabbi David
Rose, Rabbi Richard Birnholz and Lee Tobin,
president of the Jewish Community Center.
The Florida
Orchestra Guild
Books. Books. Books! The
Florida Orchestra Guild is in need
of and collecting books to be sold
at their Bookfair. The fair will be
held at the Tampa Bay Center
Mall March 14 and 15. The pro-
ceeds will benefit the Florida
Orchestra.
Book donations can be dropped
off at any Kash N' Karry in the
months of January and February.
For large tax-deductible pick-ups
or for further information please
call (813) 885-5590.
Sunday, Dec. 28, the Young Adult Division of the Tampa Jewish
Federation sponsored a Soviet Jewry program at the Jewish
Community Center. Bobby Brown, Deputy Director of the Israel
Aliyah Center of North America was the guest speaker who
discussed his expulsion from the Soviet Union in 1986. He was
forced to leave because he visited with Jewish activists and
refuseniJcs in the Ukraine. Shown with Brown (center) are Dough
Cohn, president of Tampa Jewish Federation and Andy Hirsch
representing YAD.
Jl
XL
I fCCRxNNtcilCNl
JLVrucJW-JDori
11921-12 North Dale Mabry Highway
in the Regency Plaza
The Food Connection Families Wish Everyone
A Happy and Healthy New Year.
Welcome To The Food Connection-
A Gourmet's Delight In Deli And
Smoked Fish Varieties!
Friendly And Courteous
Atmosphere With A Delectable
Menu Served 7 Days A Week
Mouth-Watering Breakfasts-
Saturday And Sunday Only -
Tantalizing Lunches and
Scintillating Dinners.
Kosher Dinners Will Be Served
With Kosher Utensils Upon
Request And For That Important
Party Our Ideas Are Never Ending!
OUR KITCHEN IS CERTIFIED KOSHER. RABBI H. DA VID ROSE
CALL: THE FOOD CONNECTION 968-2771 Ask for BILL or JOE
FrW.dwyThUr,day 10,m- 9PJ".
Sunday m.lOp.m.
8t.m.- 9 p.m.



Everyone Invited To Join
The Super Sunday Effort
Friday, Janaary 9,1987/The Jewish FlOridiah of Tampa Page 3
The 1987 Campaign Chairman,
Walter Kesaler, and Super Sun-
day Co-Chairmen Cathy Gardner
and Don Weinbren, invite you,
your family and friends to join the
Tampa Jewish Federation on
Super Sunday, Feb. 1 at the
Jewish Community Center, 2808
Horatio St. On this day,
volunteers in over 200 com-
munities across the country will
contact more people and raise
more money for local Federations
and the United Jewish Appeal,
than ever before. Here in your
own community, you have the op-
portunity to help make fundrais-
ing history.
From 10 a.m.-9 p.m. phones
throughout Tampa will ring for
Jewish needs at home and
overseas.
Super Sunday is the massive an-
nual phone effort to reach Jews in
the Tampa area on behalf of the
Tampa Jewish Federation/United
Jewish Appeal Campaign. Last
year over 250 volunteers par-
ticipated in this event. Through
their combined efforts, a total of
$115,000 in pledges was realized.
We hope to surpass that amount
thisyear.
However, only you and all the
other super volunteers can make
it happen. It is not too late to sign
up to be on the phones or to assist
in any of the many other impor-
tant jobs to be done. Babysitting
will be available for volunteers
with children.
So mark your calendar for
Super Sunday, Feb. 1 and if you
want to participate further,
there's Super Week, Monday,
Feb. 2; Tuesday, Feb. 3; Wednes-
day, Feb. 4, and Thursday, Feb. 5
irom 6-9 p.m. food and
refreshments will be provided for
all volunteers on all shifts for
Super Sunday and Super Week.
"Be a Super Person and join
your friends and neighbors by
volunteering. A registration form
takes just moments to complete.
For three hours of your time, you
can make a world of difference,"
urge Gardner, Weinbren and the
entire Super Sunday Campaign
Cabinet.
The Committee Members
Assisting Frail Elderly To
Avoid Institutionalization
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK Frail
elderly who have difficulty
taking care of themselves
need not be candidates for
hospitals and nursing
homes. A program of a
Jewish social welfare agen-
cy here, which has begun its
second year with 22 clients,
provides an intermediary
service.
The Management Assistance
Program of the Jewish Associa-
tion for Services for the Aged, one
of three such program under
Jewish auspices in the United
States, has been described as pro-
tective service for mentally im-
paired older adults who no longer
can manage their own affairs.
Clients, most of whom are Jewish,
range in age from their 70s up to
97, and most are in their 80s.
Twelve of them are conser-
vatees. Under New York State's
Mental Hygiene Law, a conser-
vator is a court-appointed guar-
dian of property for persons who
have suffered a "substantial im-
pairment of their ability to care
for their property."
THE LAW specifies that a fin-
ding of "substantial impairment"
is not to be equated with a finding
of "incompetence," the latter
which results in a major loss of
rights.
MAP director Edith Goldensohn
said that it was difficult to find
prospective beneficiaries, as they
seldom have contact with the
agencies that may be able to help
them.
Once a potential recipient is
identified, the MAP aid process
begins with careful and lengthy
deliberations by the director and a
caseworker as to just what the
prospective client will need. Solu-
'From Desk
To Dinner'
Monday, Jan. 26, the Business
and Professional Network of the
Tampa Jewish Federation will
host a fashion show titled, "From
Desk to Dinner," at the
Westshore Mass Brothers, in the
Greenhouse Restaurant Accor-
ding to Program Chairman Alicia
Tellis, "the opening should prove
to be exciting in that individuals
will have an opportunity to
preview the new Spring fashions
by both models from Mass
Brothers and by our own B and P
Board members." Tellis also com-
mented that women will learn how
to coordinate their existing war-
drobes with accessories to make
what they wear more versatile.
Networking will begin at 5:30
p.m. and dinner will be served at
6:15 p.m. The formal program will
begin at 7 p.m. The cost for the
event is $13.50 per person, which
includes dinner and wine. In-
dividuals interested in attending
should contact the Tampa Jewish
Federation, 879-1618, no later
than Jan. 23.
dons can include a variety of ar-
rangements, such as home care,
delivered meals and arranging for
involvement of the family.
The deliberations stem in part
from the need to prevent MAP
from entering into a conservator-
ship too soon "because that status
is a very serious matter," Golden-
sohn said. "It takes away a per-
son's right to conduct his or her
own affairs and manage his or her
own finances."
UNLIKE LAWYERS, who are
court-appointed as individuals, the
conservatorship for MAP clients
is appointed to a JASA as a whole.
This assures both continuity and
an integrated range of services,
Goldensohn said.
Referrals to the MAP program
are made by friends and relatives
and by other agencies of UJA-
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater New York.
MAP serves only JASA clients.
It works in close cooperation with
JASA social services throughout
New York City and on Long
Island. Goldensohn added that
MAP "takes cases only from
JASA social workers. We are
simply not equipped to provide
financial management services to
other agencies, but we do offer
consultation to other agencies on
how a case should best be
handled."
A determined effort is made to
involve families in the process. In
fact, rather than to apply to be a
conservator, JASA has helped
some half dozen families
themselves to become
conservators.
Goldensohn said that MAP con-
tinues "to work jointly with fami-
ly members to assure the ongoing
well being" of the new
beneficiary.
SHE CITED the case of Mrs.
W., a childless widow who has
enough money to support herself,
but who often forgets to pay her
bills. She trusts only her accoun-
tant, but he cannot serve as her
conservator, and referred her to
JASA.
When a JASA social worker
met with Mrs. W., she refused to
take a medical examination,
despite some obvious health pro-
blems. She was disheveled, had
not bathed recently and could not
remember whether she had eaten
that day.
Adrienne Roydan, the JASA
caseworker, gradually won the
trust of Mrs. W., who had initially
been very disturbed at the
thought of strangers "interfering
in her life."
Now, an attendant hired by
JASA straightens up her apart-
ment and makes sure she eats pro-
perly and baths regularly. Golden-
sohn said it took three months to
achieve that much "and we were
lucky because the accountant
could tell us about her finances,
saving us a great deal of time and
trouble." The process of getting a
conservatorship can take six
months.
Once the conservatorship is
granted, the MAP and the JASA
caseworker plan a budget, im-
plementing JASA investment pro-
cedures, when that is appropriate;
set up separate bank accounts for
each conservatee; and prepare ac-
counting reports.
GOLDENSOHN SAID that
while other Jewish social agencies
have similar programs, MAP is
probably the largest of its kind and
the most formally organized. The
Boston Jewish Family and
Children's Service and Jewish
Social Services of Madison, Wis.,
have similar programs.
MAP services, as described by a
JASA spokesperson, include
assessment to decide what the in-
dividual needs and protect the
person's safety; arrangement for
home care, constant if needed:
Super Sunday Co-Chairmen
Cathy Gardner and Don Weinbren
report that preparations for the
day of intensive activity are pro-
gressing right on schedule.
"We are once again fortunate in
having a combination of ex-
perienced committee members,
together with new faces with
fresh ideas and enthusiasm," they
stated.
The following men and women
are chairmen or co-chairmen of
their respective Super Sunday
committees: Cynthia Linsky,
Child Care; Mitchell Linsky, Food;
Adrienne Ness, Decorations; Neal
Crystal, New Gifts; Dan Albert,
Phone Sponsors; Elaine Linsky,
Publicity; Lee Tobin, Training;
Karen Alter and Carl Steinman,
Super Week; Susan Swift,
BandP Coordination; Susan
Okun and Nadine Feldman,
Women's Division Coordinators.
Next Best Thing
To Being There
Dan
Super
Albert, Chairman of the
Sunday Phone Sponsors
Committee, is actively seeking
phone sponsors to help defray the
expense of telephone rentals.
"For a tax deductible donation
of $75 per phone, your company
name will be prominently
mounted on a Super Sun-
day/Super Week telephone. In ad-
dition to this, all sponsors' names
will be published in The Fieri-
dian," stated Albert.
To participate in this most im-
portant event, write a check for
$75 for each phone sponsored, and
mail to the Tampa Jewish Federa-
tion, 2808 Horatio St, Tampa, FL
33609.
... When Your Phone Line
Becomes o Lifeline
ON SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1st,
you will receive a call
irom one of your neighbors
asking you to help
Jews in need at home, in Israel and
throughout the world.
DON'T PUT THIS CALL ON HOLD.
TOO MANY PEOPLE
ARE WAITING ALREADY.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, January 9,1987
Soviet Jews:
Still Waiting For A Signal
By MARVIN 8. RAPPAPORT
After our flight lifted off the
runaway leaving Leningrad
behind us on a cold September
afternoon, we each breathed a
sigh of relief. Our Anti-
Defamation League group had
just spent a week in the Soviet
Union visiting several refusenik
families. When we showed our
American passports at the air-
port, passing easily through
customs, we thought of the people
we had met, who could not do
what we were about to do leave
the Soviet Union.
All of the briefings, reading and
studying had not quite prepared
us for what we experienced dur-
ing that week. Certainly it didn't
ease our minds to hear that the
Nicholas Daniloff incident was
coming to a head as we arrived.
In just one week's time, we
learned a great deal about how the
Soviets deal with Jews who ask to
leave the country. Some describe
Marvin S. Rappaport is assis-
tant to the Anti-Defamation
League's national director and
*>d of the agency's Leadership
Division. This article reports on a
visit to the Soviet Union by
members of ADL's national
Leadership Committee.
the system as arbitrary; others
term it calculated and methodical.
No formal refusal is given to those
who express a desire to accept in-
vitations to join families in Israel
or who ask to leave because they
cannot live as Jews in a country
where atheism is the order of the
day. Instead, they simply learn
that the gates are closed.
Subsequently, many lose their
jobs. Others are harassed and in-
timidated. Some even end up
behind bare. Never is their ap-
plication to leave given as the
reason. Rather, they are found
guilty of "defaming the state" or,
after los of their jobs, guilty of
Readers Write
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The eighth day of the Jewish
month of Kislev is my father's
Yahrxeit (memorial day). He was a
remarkable man with many at-
tributes: Physician, scholar, poet,
humanist and Holocaust survivor.
If I had to remember one quality
about my father, it would be his
deep commitment to Yiddishkeit
(Jewish Tradition). He once
described how in war-torn
Eastern Europe, Jewish refugees
fleeing Hitler had banded
together. The first priority for a
makeshift Jewish Community was
to establish a Chevra Kadiaha
(buried society). The second
priority was to form a minyan to
say proper Kaddish for the dead.
After the end of World War II,
my family like many who surviv-
ed, came to this country. Despite
financial hardship, my parents
made certain that their children
received the best in Yeshiva
education so as to keep alive the
knowledge of our people. As both
a Zionist and traditional Jew, my
father did all that he could to
perpetuate the spark of
Jewishness in the ashes of the
Holcoaust.
To honor my father's memory,
it was my wish to commemorate
his Yahreeit in Tampa by saying
the Kaddish in a traditional
minyan.
This goal required the gathering
together of 10 Jewish men for
three separate prayer sessions
during a week day. The task, I
must confess was not an easy one.
It required the calling of friends
and fellow congregants but even-
tually the required number of men
had agreed to participate.
The Maariv (evening) service
was the easiest to fulfill and 15
persons attended. The Shacharit
(morning) service posed some pro-
blems since it was not easy for
people to commit themselves for
early morning prayers during a
work day. Nonetheless 11 persons
Fathered at Congregation Bais
effilah by 7 am.
The final challenge was putting
together the Mincha (afternoon)
service which was called for 5 p.m.
It became apparent during the
day that getting the necessary 10
Jews together would be a
challenge.
5 p.m.: Seven Jews have
gathered for my father's
Yahreeit.
5:15 p.m.: Nine Jewish men are
gathered. The 10th person calls to
let us know that he is stuck on In-
terstate 4.
5:35 p.m.: Nine Jews are still
waiting. I wonder whether I will
be able to recite the last Kaddish
of the day for my father.
Finally a 10th Jew arrives, and
then an 11th! Kaddish is said. As
the day ends, I am grateful for the
opportunity to have fulfilled the
Mitzvah of honoring my father's
memory.
In sharing this personal story
with the Tampa Jewish Communi-
ty, I wish to thank, Rabbi Yossie
Dubrowaki of Congregation Bais
Teffilah and all the many persons
who attended the minyanim. The
new spiritual congregation of Bais
Teffilah is committed to the same
ideals shared by my father and the
many generations of our
forefathers: Yiddishkeit and its
survival.
It is my fervant hope that one
day, with the Almighty's help,
there will be a daily traditional mi-
nyan three times a day in the city
of Tampa. On that day every one
of us can join together in daily
prayer and in brotherhood.
LEONARD J. HOENIG, MD
^Jewish
Of Tampa
FKEOK SHOCHKT
Kditora
HawiWM Ortirr 2HOH Horalio St ran. Tampa. Kla 3.I6W
Ttlaphom 872 4470
Publication IHficr IIWNKK Si. Miami. KU 33132
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Krrulivr Kdltor Kdltnr
PaatfMMaaaM
TW Jaariak FterMtea Daw Nat Gaaaaataa TW KaaWatfc
na-ra-aa......... MaaaaaaaSal *---------nil I
Pubbahad Bi-WaaUy'Pb 1 Additional Edition an JajMary 1. IM. by Tt Jaanah Flondun of Tampa
Sacond CUaa Poataaja Paid at Miami. FU. U8P9 471*10. ISSN 8760-60*3
Postmaster: Send address changes toTh Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
SUBSCRIPTION HATKS 11 .oral Araal 2 Yaer Minimum Suharnpuaa $7 tin 1 Annual $.1 .Mil
Out of Town Upon Kaqurat
Tha Jfwuh Kloridiaii maintain* no fraa lint Proper m-rivinar llir pipir who have noi auhacrira-rl
directly are mibocrihrn through arranjratnrnl with thr Jrwiah r'rdrralmn of Tampa whrrrbv 2 20
par vaar la daductatj Iron lhair nntnhuliona for a aaihacriptmn to Ihr paprr \ninnr wiahinic la
am al auch a -ubv riptaan abnuld ar. amilv Thr Jrwiah Klondian iir Thr Krdrral inn
Friday, January 9,1987 8 TEVETH 5747
Volume 9 .. N Number 2.
"parasitism" or failure to be pro-
ductive comrades. Some are jailed
on trumped-up charges.
After only a few days, we realiz-
ed that the system was as bad as
we had heard.
Our group of four, purposely
small to attract as little attention
as possible, was led by Michael
Nachman of Rye Brook, NY,
chairman of the national Leader-
ship Committee, and consisted of
Norman Gray of Denver, CO,
Barry March of Fort Lee, NJ, and
myself. When we first arrived in
Moscow, we arranged to visit with
a noted oncologist, Dr. Josef Irlin.
Dr. Irlin, after he began hemor-
rhaging internally, had just ended
a 24-day hunger strike. When we
met, he was noticeably weak and
depressed.
He told us both he and his wife
lost their jobs after they applied in
1979 to leave. He had hoped that
his hunger strike would become
an issue for discussion at an East-
West conference of medical doc-
tors in Budapest. Perhaps, he
thought, the Soviets would allow
him and others to leave, in ex-
change for the scientific informa-
tion sorely needed from the West.
While his case was raised in
Budapest, the conference was
concluded without any conces-
sions on his behalf nor for anyone
else.
Dr. Irlin is convinced that only
outside pressure will help. He said
the Soviets "do not care if I live or
die."
We met with Professor Naum
Maiman, a Nobel prize nominee in
physics, and his wife Inna, who
suffers from a cancerous tumor in
her neck. We talked in his dimly-
lit study as the professor sat
beneath a picture of /Albert Eins-
tein. I couldn't help wondering
whether we were in the presence
of another Einstein one whose
contributions might never fully be
realized. The professor has a
serious heart condition. He told us
he and his wife were "short on
time" and didn't expect to see
freedom.
Inna Maiman, a professional
translator, speaks English
beautifully. She said she has had
four separate operations because
the latest medical technology is
not available to her in the USSR.
She, too, questioned whether
they would ever be allowed to
emigrate. She said, "I would like
to see and experience freedom
just once ..."
We also met with others less
well known. A 40-year-old father
of two bright, energetic
teenagers, Valery Gelfer is an
engineer who also applied to go to
Israel in 1979. He was then
demoted to the position of a super-
visor in charge of construction
material. When he reapplied to
leave some time later, he was told
that material was missing from
his job site and he would be dock-
ed 15 percent of his salary for two
years as "punishment." The real
punishment is that he cannot use
his well-trained mind and skills in
his current work but then at
least he has a job.
We listened to Gregory
Genosuv, a member of the Len-
ingrad refusenik community. He
explained the basic needs of most
refuseniks: to keep their family in-
tact throughout the difficulties; to
keep their religion, their culture
and the movement alive despite
the efforts to squelch them by the
authorities; and to obtain help to
fight depression and the intellec-
tual isolation and deprivation so
many are now facing.
The needs of Natasha Ratner
and her infant son are even more
pressing. Natasha's husband,
Alecksey Magarik, was arrested
in March, 1986. A 28-year-old
cellist, he was visiting friends in
v..
Tbilisi. When he boarded his
return flight, authorities told him
to check his hand luggage though
it is not customary to do so. Then,
they took him off the plane and
showed him a few grams of
hashish which they said they
found in his bag. Treated as a
"first offender, he was given
"only" three years in a Siberian
prison camp. We have just learned
that he has been brutally beaten at
the camp because he refused to
join the internal police.
Natasha told us her husband's
arrest came as a surprise. He was
not an outspoken activist but had
applied to join his father and
sister in Israel. Natasha was cer-
tain the authorities had arrested
her husband to warn others that
anyone who defies the system is
liable to become a victim of it.
All of the refuseniks we met
with, regardless of their in-
dividual circumstances, told us
one thing: there is no question
that "linkage,'* tying increased
emigration to providing
technology, science and cultural
exchanges, is essential in dealing
with the Soviets. No assistance f
these areas should be given by the
United States, they stressed
unless there are emigration
concessions.
Each refusenik is determined to
put up with abuse and harass-
ment, so strong is the desire to
live as a Jew in freedom.
The members of our ADL group
are back with our families, our
homes and our work, but none of
us has stopped thinking about
those we met and now count at
friends in the Soviet Union. We
think about not only the ruindful
we met in one week but the
thousands of individuals like them
- who wait and watch for a signal
that things will change, that they,
too, will be able to show their
passports to Soviet customs and
board a plane for freedom.
At press time, ADL learned that
Dr. Irlin and his wife have receiv-
ed permission to emigrate.
Controversy Flares
Over Archbishop's
Mideast Visit
New York Archbishop John
Cardinal O'Connor spent the
first two days of his visit to
Israel trying to untangle
himself from the embarrass-
ment of having to cancel
meetings with Israel's Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog, Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and Jerusalem Mayor
Teddy Kollek under pressure
from the Vatican.
However, in what the
Vatican characterized as a
courtesy call rather than a
political meeting, O'Connor
met with Israeli President
Chaim Herzog last Sunday at
his official residence which
also serves as his office. His
talks with Herzog were a
prelude to a meeting with
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres last Monday.
Officially, O'Connor claimed
he had to cut short his visit
because he was scheduled to be
in Rome Jan. 6 to attend the
appointment of a new Aux-
iliary Bishop for New York,
William McCormack.
THE SCHEDULED
changes have disrupted the
delicate relations between
Jerusalem and the Archbishop,
who first prompted an official
invitation to visit Israel after
making statements last sum-
mer m the press sympathetic
to Palestinian nationalism.
"Somehow, a homeland has
to be provided for the Palesti-
nian peoples," O'Connor told a
New York Times reporter
upon his arrival in Rome in
June. "But from a moral
perspective, those people have
to be given a homeland. Other-
wise everything spills over into
every area and that has to
result in a very volatile situa-
*10n- So I think that's
imperative." at 8
In efforts to show O'Connor
the problem from an Israeli
perspective, Peres, who1Z
then Prune Minister, exS JS
a personal invitation toToff
^might have been betr^
cancel the visa rather than
face a diplomatic controversy
over O'Connor avoiding of-
ficial contacts.
Meanwhile, officials here
and in Israel have been careful
not to criticize O'Connor, say-
ing the changes were directed
by the Vatican in Rome.
Rabbi Ronald Sobel of Tem-
ple Emanu-El, a friend of
O'Connor, said that although
O'Connor did not go to Israel
as an official envoy of the
Vatican, there was much hope
of improving relations bet-
ween Israel and the Holy See.
"THESE LATEST events
lead one to sadly conclude that
perhaps it would have been
better had the trip not been
planned at all at this time,"
Sobel said.
Nathan Perlmutter, Na-
tional Director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, agreed that O'Connor
would have been better off to
not have scheduled his visit
under these circumstances.
"The Vatican has embar-
rassed John Cardinal O'Con-
nor and itself more than it em-
barrasses Israel. The Vatican's
long-expressed and genuine
concern with theological anti-
Semitism is welcome. But its
concern is compromised by
this kind of cynical, political
gamesmanship," Perlmutter
said.
$1 Million Chair
The Annenberg Research In-
stitute for Judaic and Near
Eastern Studies announces a
pledge of one million dollars from
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Rothfeld
of Philadelphia to establish the
Charles W. and Sally Rothfeld
Chair in Jewish History. Walter
Annenberg, Chairman of the
Board of the Institute, made the
nnouncement to the Trustees.
Wolfe Re-Elected
CLEVELAND (JTA) -
Milton Wolf recently was
elected to a second term as
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation of
Cleveland.


Wedding Announcement
ADELM ANH AME ROFF
Deborah Lynn Adelman and Dr.
Jeffrey Hameroff were married in
a setting reminiscent of an
English country garden at Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek on Dec.
27.
Deborah is the daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Martin Adelman and the
granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Boardman, Longboat Key
and Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Adelman of Sun City. Jeffrey's
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Alvin
Hameroff and his grandmother is
Mrs. Dora Hurwitz of Tampa.
Rabbi Richard Bimholz and
Rabbi Kenneth Berger co-
officiated at the candlelight
ceremony.
Deborah wore the gown in
which her mother, Priscilla, was
married, and the bridesmaids
were attired in royal blue satin.
The bride's aunt Barbara Johnson
of Phoenix served as Matron-of-
Honor with bridesmaids Sue
Kaplan and Marcia Jampole both
of Atlanta, Bonnie Hameroff,
Denise Vaughan and Valerie
Jacobs all of Tampa, and Mary Jo
Greaser of Dallas.
Jeffrey's father Alvin Hameroff
served as his son's Best Man with
groomsmen Dr. William Zinney of
Atlanta, Dr. Marc Frankel of
Brooklyn, Mark Gasbarro of
Washington, D.C., Daniel
Hameroff of St. Petersburg, and
Howard Adelman and J. Hill
Turner, both of Tampa.
Flower girls were Erika
Johnson of Phoenix and Denise
Adelman of Atlanta. Josh Johnson
of Phoenix was the ring bearer.
Nancy Turkel attended the bride's
book.
Many friends and relatives
entertained for the couple, begin-
ning with a gala engagement par-
ty at the Embassy Suites Hotel
hosted by the groom's parents,
Alvin and Terrell Hameroff. A
shower in Atlanta was given by
Deborah's aunt Sheila Adelman.
Showers in Tampa included one
hosted by Yvette Eichberg, Leslie
A id man, Lucille Falk, and Leslie
Osterweil at the Eichberg home,
and another at the Lincoln Hotel
hosted by Gail Levine, Amiee
Mezrah, Sandy Freedman, Helen
Hameroff, and Lynn Hirsch.
The week of the wedding was
filled with parties: a family brunch
given by Betty and Lawrence
Cohen and Sheila and Alan
Feldman at the Cohen home; a
casual dinner at the Jacobs home
hosted by Kay, Maril and Valerie
Jacobs with Ileana and Lew
Berger, Maureen and Doug Cohn,
Alice and Sam Gross, Ann and
Ronald Rudolph, and Franci and
Richard Rudolph; a bridal shower
by Denise and Jean Vaughan at
their home; the rehearsal dinner
at the Hyatt Regency Hotel
hosted by Jeffrey's parents, and a
wedding morning brunch given at
Avila Golf and Country Club for
the bridal party and out of town
guests by Ruth Adrian, Jean
Atlas, Blossom Leibowitz, Sharon
Stein, Rosalie Glasgov, Lois
[:]ROWARD
IJAPER &
[Packaging
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 MO 432 37M
[:]ROWARD
IJAPER a
iJACKAGING
Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish FJoridian of Tampa Page 5
JNF Executive Discusses Missions
To Egypt With Egyptian, Israeli
And American Officials In Cairo
Mrs. Jeffrey Hameroff
Stern, Susan Greenberger, Elinor
Turkel, and Sandra Turkel.
Deborah's parents hosted the
wedding reception dinner at the
Harbor Island Hotel, and her
grandparents Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Boardman entertained the
out-of-town guests at a post-
wedding brunch at Avila Golf and
Country Club.
Following a honeymoon in
Jamaica, the newlyweds will be at
home in Atlanta.
Stuart Paskow, director oi
Public Relations for the Jewish
National Fund, recently made an
unscheduled trip to Cairo, Egypt,
where he met with Dr. Fouad
Sultan, Egyptian Minister of
Tourism; Moshe Sasson, Israeli
Ambassador to Egypt, and Frank
Wisner, American Ambassador to
Egypt, to discuss adding Egypt to
the list of tourist stops for JNF
missions to Israel.
The meetings took place,
respectively, at the Egyptian
Aviation Ministry, the Israeli Em-
bassy and the American Embassy,
all located in the Egyptian capital.
Ambassador Wisner stated that
"JNF is the first major Jewish
organization which has come to
my door to discuss tourism to
Egypt. Major Jewish organiza-
tions such as JNF can make a
decisive difference in the effort to
foster positive relations between
Israel and Egypt." He also ex-
pressed his appreciation for the
positive stand that JNF has been
taking on the matters of tourism
and terrorism, referring
specifically to statements released
by Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein, JNF
president, that Americans should
not allow Khadafy to intimidate
them into becoming their travel
agent.
The American Ambassador ex-
tended an invitation to Dr. Sterns-
tein, who also serves as chairman
of the Task Force on Tourism for
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organiza-
tions, to host a delegation of
representatives of Jewish
organizations to visit Egypt after
JNF's Third National Assembly in
Israel, Feb. 8-18, 1987. Israeli
Ambassador Sasson and Egyptian
Minister Sultan both expressed
their interest in the possibility of
personally meeting this
delegation.
Reflecting upon the various
discussions which took place in
Cairo, Mr. Paskow stated, "I was
gratified by the interest and
amount of time afforded me by
each of these distinguished
representatives. I am encouraged
by the possibility of an 'Egyptian
option' as part of JNF's missions
program." He added, "JNF con-
tinues to play an historic role in
developing the land of Israel, and
we would be more than gratified
in serving as a bridge to the conti-
nuing dialogue between the
descendants of Jacob and Esau."
The newly planned mission will
raise the number of JNF-
sponsored missions to Israel for
the year 1986-87 to 19. JNF tours
highlight the agency's vital af-
forestation and land reclamation
activities in Israel, as well as the
Jewish homeland's many cultural
treasures. During JNF's Third
National Assembly from Feb.
8-18, which celebrates the centen-
nial of the birth of David Ben-
Gurion, participants will visit JNF
projects in the Galilee, Jerusalem
and the Negev, as well as attend
receptions featuring top Israeli
and American officials. Because
of its promotion of tourism to
Israel through its missions pro-
gram, JNF recently won the first
Shalom Award from the Israel
Government Tourism Office in
New York City.
For more information about
JNF missions to Israel, contact
the local JNF office at 8405 N.
Himes Avenue, Suite 209, Tampa,
Florida 33614, (813) 833-8733 or
the Jewish National Fund, 42
East 69th Street, New York, N.Y.
10021, (212) 570-1673, 1674 or
1675.
Eat in Good Health
With Fleischmann's. Margarine
|62VV
s&
(pfMtf
o&f"^
Sweet UNSALTED
Fleischmanns
/IOO% corn oil
MADE
FROM I

corn oil
Se
Margarine
Margarine
riflflfl
u
*"<*
A'
Now its easy to make delicious, low cholesterol Challah
French Toast. Start with your own low cholesterol Challah
(see recipe below) and make sure Fleischmanns Margarine
and Fleischmanns Egg Beaters are part ot the recipe.
Fleischmanns Margarine is made from 100 .. corn oil. has 0 o
cholesterol and is low in saturated tat
So. il you want to en|oy good eating and good health one
thing's lor certain: There's never been a better time tor the
great taste ot Fleischmann s
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH m*2m.
6 cups all-purpose flour tt cup FLEISCHMANNS Sweet
2 tablespoons sugar Unsalted Margarine softened
2 teaspoons salt 1 cup FLEISCHMANN S EGG
Dash powdered saffron, optional
1 package FLEISCHMANNS-
RapidRise" Yeast
1 cup hot water (125" to 130*F)
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH FRENCH TOAST
M*es4se V, cup EGG BEATERS
Cholesterol Free 99% Real
Egg Product
V? teaspoon varaHa extract
V> teaspoon ground cinnamon
4 (fc-mch thick) skces Low
Cholesterol Challah (recipe follows)
1 tablespoon FLEISCHMANN S
Sweet Unsafted Margarine
Syrup iam or confectioners sugar
BEATERS Cholesterol Free 99%
Real Egg Product, at room
temperature
Sesame or poppy seed
Set aside 1 cup flour In large bowl, mix remaining flour sugar. saN.
saffron and FLEISCHMANN S RapidRise Yeast stir in hot water and
FLEISCHMANNS Sweet Unsalted Margarine Mix in V. cup
FLEISCHMANN S Egg Beaters and enough reserved flour to make soft
dough Knead until smooth and elastic. 8 to 10 minutes Cover, let rest
10 minutes
Divide dough in haft Divide one haft into 2 pieces one about'A of dough
and the other about ft of dough Divide larger piece into 3 equal pieces,
roll each into 12-inch rope Braid the ropes, seal ends Divide smaller
piece into 3 equal pieces, roll each into 10-mch rope Braid ropes, place
on top ot large braid Seal together at ends. Place on greased baking
sheet Repeat with remaining dough Cover; let nse in warm draft-free
place until doubled in sue. about 1 hour
Brush loaves with remaning Egg Beaters; sprmWe with seeds Bake at
375*F for 20 to 25 minutes or until done Remove trom sheets;
cool on wire racks
In shallow dish, beat FLEISCHMANN S Egg Beaters. van*) and cin-
namon Dip challah into mixture, turning to coat well In skiHet. over
medium heat, melt FLEISCHMANN S Sweet Unsafted Margarine Add
Chalah, cook for 3 to 5 minutes on each side or until golden brown
Serve with syrup, tarn or confectioner's sugar
Jt *w*. MM
Fleischmanns gives even meal a holiday flavor.
15C
D
umu Kftin
.>*
SAVE 15c
When you buy any package of
Fleischmanns Margarine
ft3Sfl34
Mil 0n cnann pw pwciuMw orafed
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IIXAS Mt


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, January 9,1987
MAIN BRANCH:
2808 Horatio St.
Tampa, Fla. 33609
Jewish Coi
XCB

Ma Touring Vaudeville Revue
Me Your Fantasy!
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"'; ; i
mr.jimiOi Catt| f ih. lttUt-l.%l)a-IO
Jointly ipi'ionl by Ih. Ml. Ctvncll >.
Cnunly anrt th. HI 11ib*rough Count, Vubllt li>i
r

Early Childhood
Session II Early
Childhood Enrichment Classes.
Jan. 12-March 20 (Make up March
23-April 3)
Fees: Members $35, non-
members $52.
For registration, all
preschoolers must be age ap-
propriate by Sept. 1, 1986.
South
12:30-1:15 Mickey Moose
Exercise (Ages 3 and 4 yean).
Spend a class with Miss Spanky,
enjoying participation and ex-
ploration on preschool gross
motor development equipment
Body awareness, balance and the
development of gross motor skills
will be stressed.
12:30-1:15 NEW. Gumby
Goo (Ages 3 and 4 years).
Imagination, creativity, fine
motor control and eye-hand coor-
dination will be enhanced through
manipulating and experimenting
with clay, pinch-dots, coil-pots and
jewelry will be crated, fired and
glazed.
TUESDAY
12:30 Ballet (Ages 3 and
4 years).
This children's ballet class is on-
going under the direction of Miss
Lu Trucker, and requires the fee
to be billed on a monthly basis, ac-
cording to how many times a week
the child will participate in the
class. Miss Lu will introduce them
to ballet, music rhythm expres-
sion, performing in front of an au-
dience, as well as giving them con-
fidence and poise.
Fees: 1 x/week: $18/members,
$27/non-members; 2 x/week:
$28/members, $42/non-members.
12:30-1:15 Tool Box (Ages 3
and 4 years).
This class is designed to aid
nimble fingers searching through
the tool box to discover the excite-
ment of using hammer,
screwdriver, and saw to construct
simple objects. Helps refine small
motor development and eye-hand
coordination.
WEDNESDAY
12:30-1:15 NEW. Earthy
eating.
Our Junior Chefs will experi-
ment with various healthy natural
foods while creating scrumptous
recipes. Fantastic and easy
recipes experienced emphasizing
basic math and science
fundamentals.
12:30-1:15 Mini-Moose Ex-
ercise (Ages 2 and 3 years).
12:30-1:15 NEW. Gumbys
Goo (Ages 3 and 4 years).
Imagination, creativity, fine
motor control and eye-hand coor-
dination will be enhanced through
manipulating and experimenting
wito clay, pinch-dots, coil-pots
and jewelry will be created, fired
and glazed.
THURSDAY
Ballet
This children's ballet class is on-
going under the direction of Miss
Lu Trucker, and requires the fee
to be billed on a monthly basis, ac-
cording to how many times a week
the child will participate in the
class. Miss Lu will introduce them
to ballet, music rhythm expres-
sion, performing in front of an au-
dience, as well as giving them con-
fidence and poise.
Fees: 1 x/week $18/members,
$27 non-members; 2 x/week
$28/members, $42 non-members.
12:30-1:15 NEW. Farmers
Market (Ages 3 sad 4 years).
This class will combine nature
and science principles, while our
Junior Fanners visit a nursery,
plant an outside garden, grow
plants for homes, with a "home-
grown" lunch at the end of the
session.
FRIDAY
12:30-1:15 Hiaay M. Tov
(Ages 3 and 4 years).
Shabbot and Holiday prepara-
tion through creative experiences:
including arts and crafts, cooking,
stories and drama. Experiment
with learning Hebrew colors,
numbers and body parts.
North
MONDAY
12:30-1:15 and 1:15-2
Ballet.
This children's ballet class is on-
going under the direction of Miss
Lu Trucker, and requires the fee
to be billed on a monthly basis, ac-
cording to how many times a week
the child will participate in the
class. Miss Lu will introduce them
to ballet, music rhythm expres-
sion, performing in front of an au-
dience, as well as giving them con-
fidence and poise.
Fees: 1 x/week $18/members,
$27/non-members: 2 x/week
$28/members, $42/non-members.
1:15-2 Puppet Playhouse
(Ages 3 and 4 years).
This class will combine imagina-
tion, exploration, while express-
ing individuality and creativity,
Pantomime, improvising, creation
of characters based on famous and
favorite fairy tales.
TUESDAY
10:15-11 Creepy Crawlers
(ages 6-18 months).
A fun way to strengthen attach-
ment between mother and infant.
Parents and children intereact in
a variety of gym activities.
11:15-12 Baby Biceps
(Ages 18-24 months).
Child and parent will be involv-
ed in perceptual motor and gross
motor stimulation exploratory ac-
tivities, and exercise for both
parent and child.
12:30-1:15 Mickey Moose
Exercise (Ages 3 and 4 years).
Spend a class with Miss Spanky,
enjoying participation and ex-
ploration on preschool gross
motor development equipment.
Body awareness, balance and the
development of gross motor skills
will be stressed.
1:15-2 Little Chiefs (Ages
3 and 4 years).
Development of motor learning
and body awareness, using fun-
damental gymnastic skills, with a
15 minute cool-down period of
storytelling.
12:30-1:15 Dinosaur Cook-
iog (Ages 3 and 4 years).
Based on the test name. This is
a craft and cooking class relating
to Dinosaurs, volcanoes, and other
scientific matter.
WEDNESDAY
12:30-1:15 and 1:15-2:00 Ballet
Eating (Ages 3 and 4 year.).
Our Junior chefs will experi-
ment with various healthy natoral
tftjl,llt*5 scrumptous
recipes. Fantastic and easy
sSawartt
ment activities and musical ht
**ts. Autoharp. pU^
guitar are incorporated
THURSDAY
e^-(AtM3and4yff.).
Spend a class with Miss Spanky
enjoying participation and ex
ploration on preschool gross
motor development equipment
Body awareness, balance and the
development of gross motor skiiu
will be stressed.
12:30-1:15 Fanners Market
(Ages 3 and 4 years).
This class will combine nature
and science principles, while our
Junior Farmers visit a nursery,
plant an outside garden, grow
plants for homes, with a "home
grown" lunch at the end of the
session.
1:15-2 Creative Creations -
(Ages 3 and 4 years).
A multitude of crafts for
children, using various medias to
create special and unusual cutsie
creative creations. Emphasizes
imagination, eye-hand coordina-
tion and refinement of small mus-
cle control.
FRIDAY
12:30-1:15 Hinay Ms Tov -
(Ages 3 and 4 years).
Shabbot and Holiday prepara-
tion through creative experiences:
including arts and crafts, cooking,
stories and drama. Experiment
with learning Hebrew colors,
numbers and body parts.
Teens
Teen functions are open to all
10th through 12th graders. These
programs include social, educa-
tional and recreational activities.
This year includes a wide variety
of all programs. If you need any
additional information, please feel
free to call the Teen Director.
Teen Council
The Teen Council serves as an
umbrella organization for the
various Tampa Youth groups. It is
made up of representatives from
each of Tampa's Youth groups.
One representative from each
youth group must attend the
meetings. This group meets in
order to plan Community Teen
activities.
Next Teen Council Meeting:
Dec. 2nd, 7 p.m., Main Branch.
TEEN CONFERENCE held in
January or February.
K6 Youth
2nd Home openings are still
available.
2nd Home Themes Offered are:
MAUN BRANCH
Monday Sports: Tuesday -
Arts and Crafts; Wednesday -
Drama; Thursday Cooking; Fri-
day Technical.
NORTH BRANCH
Monday Technical; Tuesday
- Cooking; Wednesday Sports;
Thursday Drama; Friday -
Crafts.
North Branch themes began in
Full Oct 1. Half Day rate for
these in Religious School or with
only half day needs, are available.
2nd Hosse still has openings at
the north branch and the south
branch.
2nd Home at the north branch
was very excited to move into the
new building. The children are en-
joying their thematic days and are
planning special activities for Arts
and crafts, Sports and Cooking.
2nd Home at the main branch
"* also been enjoying their
thematic days. Theyhavelearned
a lot of exciting recipes for the


mity Center
Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
ERHKT
NORTH BRANCH:
3919 Moran Road
Tampa, Fla. 33624
blidays. They look forward to
rama, Computers and Cooking
|Keep up the great work 2nd
Dme!
iNew Preschool
Class
Main Branch only
Playtots
;es 18-24 months
lust be 18 months by Jan. 1,
987
| Time: 9 a.m.-10:30 a.m., Tues-
y and Thursday
I Registration: $30
A parent-child class designed
w our youngest preschooler.
I Monthly Tuition: JCC Members:
/ice a Week, $45; Non-
embers: Twice a Week, $67.50.
jFor more information, call Cece
lurwitz, Early Childhood Direc-
\r, 872-4451.
Scouting
I The JCC continues to sponsor
cout programs.
| Cub Scouts: We will be having a
ub Scout orientation on Oct. 21
the North End and Oct. 23 at
le South end. Both orientation
pgrams are for boys 1st through
i grades and will be held at 7:30
[m. If you have any questions,
free to contact the JCC.
I Boy Scouts: If you are in-
krested in the outdoors, camping,
kture and meeting new friends,
^in the JCC, Boy Scout Troop no.
Please feel free to call the
:>uth Department for additional
formation. Fifth and Sixth
Fade boys. Troop meets on
nesdays from 7:30 until 9 p.m. at
hJCC.
;aisy Troop (Kindergarten
^ls): 3-4 p.m. Tuesdays.
Jrownies: 3-4 p.m. Wednesdays
itinuing sign up.
lirthday Bonanza
It's no secret that Birthdays at
\ JCC are the BEST! and the
piest for you. Reserve the date
1 be a guest at your own child's
thday party! Party package in-
ies: a party leader; a special
me; invitation filled in and
tiled; set up, serve, and clean-
c cake, ice cream, juice, party
f ors; and a terrific two hour fun
^_ party all for only $5 per
Qd! Parties are given for 4 years
k-12 year olds. They are usually
[ Sunday afternoons. You must
ke reservations at least two
eks in advance of desired date.
pi parties may be set up at an
fee. There must be a
num of 12 children. Parties
[not given on the Sabbath or on
rish Holidays. Parties are
__ble on a first come first serv-
[basis so hurry to reserve your
Ite. Members $5 per child/non-
embers $5 per child plus $20.
Health And
P.E.
TUESDAY
10:15-11 a.a. Creepy
awlera (6-18 months). A fun
pay to strengthen attachment
fetween mother and infant,
parents and children interact in a
riety of gym activities.
11:15-12 noon Baby Biceps
- (18-24 months). Child and
parent will be involved in percen-
tual motor and gross motor
stimulation exploratory activities,
and exercise for both parent and
child.
Call Bill, Health and P.E. Direc-
tor, for further information.
Open Basketball
Monday and Wednesday, 6-9
p.m. Adults only. Non-members
$2.
Fitness Day
The JCC will hold its annual
fitness day at the Main Branch
location on Feb. 22. Put your
child's strength to work in push-
ups, sit-ups, chin-ups, pull-ups,
running, accuracy throw, agility,
and endurance. Ribbons are given
to all participants. Registration
must be in by Feb. 18. Fees:
members $3, non-members $4.50.
Club Variety
Schedule 1986
Join this fun loving, active
group of 50 and over singles and
couples for a wide variety of ac-
tivities and warm frienship. Enjoy
picnics, sports, outings, theater
trips, game nights, lectures, wine
and cheese social hours and more.
Club Variety now meets 2nd
Tuesday of the month.
Dr. Osterweil
Speaks on
"Dynamics of
Intimacy'
.
The public is invited to hear a
talk for Club Variety on the
"-Dynamics of Intimacy." This
subject is a summary and discus-
sion of two articles that appeared
in the Atlantic Monthly, "In-
timate Partners Patterns in
Love and Marriage."
Dr. Jerry Osterweil, a graduate
of the University of Chicago,
came to Tampa from Washington,
D.C. with his wife, Evelyn. In
Washington he held the position
of Chief of Basic Research Review
Branch, National Institute of
Mental Health. He now is in
private practice at the University
Professional Building on Fletcher
Ave.
The lecture will be held at Con-
gregation Kol Ami, Wednesday,
Jan. 14 at 7:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. $1 Donation.
Jan. 28, 7:80 p.m.
Cheese, Games, JCC
Donation.
- Wine,
South, $5
North Branch
Adults At Leisure
Friendship Club
Come join us for our first
meeting, Jan. 8,10 a.m.-noon. For
further information call Mary
Surasky, 962-1466.
The Senior Advisory Council is ac-
tively meeting monthly to help in-
novate and implement Adult-at-
Leisure Programs. If you would
like to Join the Council and
become involved, please come
toour next meeting at the Main
JCC, Jan. 8,1 p.m. or contact An-
na Lee Markowitz, 251-1783.
JCC PRESCHOOL
FUNDRAISERS
Chanukah Gift Wrap
Jumbolog 40 square feet,
$2 per roll; Four roll pack,
$3.75 per pack; Bows, $1.50
per package; Gift tags, $1.50
per package.
!!CALLING ALL BUBBIES
AND ZADIES!!!
Volunteers needed at the
JCC Preschool. Please call
Cece Hurwitz at 872-4451 or
962-2863.
Attention All
College Students
Looking for a funtastic way to
spend your summer? The JCC
Summer Camp is now interview-
ing for camp counselors, junior
counselors, camp specialists and
lifeguards. Please contact Cece
Hurwitz at 872-4451.
The JCC's AUCTION '87
is coming in the Spring, but
don't wait! Tell as what yon
want to buy. and we will
find it for yon! Take full ad-
vantage of current tax law
by signing a contract before
January 1 by promising to
donate something to our
Auction.
Special thanks to Chabad Lubavitch for
Chanukah Menorah that which stood on
JCC grounds through Chanukah.

A Special Thanks to All the People who helped
to make our Annual Chanukah Festival the
success it was!
Louise Eatroff
Cheryle Chernoff
Jerilyn Goldsmith
Morris Hanan
Sheldon Barat
Johanna Barat
Liz Albert
Leslie Albert
Danny Salen
Rosemary Baron
Dorit Feldman
Patty Zimmerman
Jan Wuliger
Craig Berkowitz
Robyn Berkowitz
ZevHadash
ooooo.
Special thanks to
Barry, Joyce and Kevin Karpay
for sponsoring the JCC's Annual
Chanukah Festival.
Don't watch us grow .
Come grow with us
Become a JCC member now!


Page 8 The Jewish Floridiqn of Tampa/Friday, January 9, 19&7
ADL News
NEW YORK Four of the 10
events that had the most signifi-
cant impact on Jews during 1986
were connected with international
terrorism, according to Nathan
Perlmutter, national director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
They were the massacre of 21
Jews in an Istanbul synagogue,
Britain's breaking-off of
diplomatic relations with Syria
because of that nation's involve-
ment in terrorism, the American
bombing of Libya and the U.S.
sale of arms to "terrorist" Iran.
According to Perlmutter, "if
(the bombing of) Libya
represented American resolve
that we will not be intimidated by
terrorism, the sale of arms to 'ter-
rorist' Iran was a monumental
misjudgement. If there was a
retrieving virtue in trading arms
for hostages it was the indignant
reaction of the American people
a reaction so strong as to render
less likely renewed American
genuflection to terrorists."
Perlmutter's list of the most
significant events of 1986 follows:
1. The massacre of 21 Jews in
the Istanbul synagogue by Arab
terrorists. It underscored, as if
underscoring were needed, the lie
that Arab terrorism is really anti-
Israel and not anti-Semitic. And
the inane responses, including
former President Jimmy Carter's
that the reason for the blood-
splattered walls of the synagogue
and for its jaggedly torn bodies
was "lack of progress in the Mid-
dle East."
2. Relatedly, the exposure of the
Syrian connection to terrorism in
London, in Rome, in West Berlin.
The significance here is not so
much in the bloodiness of Syria's
hands as in Great Britain's im-
mediate breaking of relations with
Syria. Britain, once again, role
model.
3. The United States' bombing
of Libya. Terrorism has ever been
more vulnerable to retaliation
than to a deploring editorial.
4. And if Libya represented
American resolve that we will not
be intimidated by terrorism, the
sale of arms to terrorist Iran was
a monumental misjudgement. If
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there was a retrieving virtue in
trading arms for hostages it was
the indignant reaction of the
American people a reaction so
strong as to render less likely
renewed American genuflection
to terrorists.
5. Pope John Paul IPs visit to
the Central Synagogue in Rome.
A long, oh so long journey, some
2,000 years in the traveling. It
was a reminder of the long
darkness in Catholic-Jewish rela-
tions past, and a promise of a
potentially warmly-lit future.
6. The release of Natan Sharan-
sky and the Nobel Peace Prize to
Eli Wiesel, Sharansky, because no
matter the Soviet cage remains
bolted shut, his courage, his digni-
ty and his political acumen are in-
spiration for prisoners of cons-
cience the world over. Wiesel,
because his Jewish values are a
reflection of Judaism's most
cherished teachings, and because
he himself is a great teacher.
Humanity walks taller because
there is a Sharansky, because
there is a Wiesel.
7. The shame of Waldheim. Not
so much because the President of
Austria is a revealed liar; the real
shame of Waldheim is that no
matter he is a liar and on such a
subject! a majority of his coun-
trymen simply didn't care enough.
They voted the Nazi liar their ap-
probation. Waldheim shamed, the
Austrian electorate shamed.
8. In March, two Lyndon
LaRouche candidates prevailed in
the Illinois Party primaries.
Heady with victory, LaRouche
fielded 234 candidates in state
primaries. Only 13 managed to
make it to the November elec-
tions. All each and every one of
them were defeated. The
lesson? That the American people,
when the facts are given them, re-
ject bigotry. And significantly,
that the LaRouchites, on stage, in
the spotlight, are their own most
effective prosecutors.
9. The sentencing of 10
members of the Nazi-like group
known as The Order. The Justice
Department's vigorous prosecu-
tion of hate-activists stands as an
unmistakable warning to neo-
Nazis that bigotry-inspired crimes
will not be tolerated. Will, instead,
be vigorously prosecuted.
10. The new set of emigration
rules announced in November by
the Soviet Union. They augur
even fewer exit visas for those
seeking freedom. Through
November, 1986 only 873 Jews
were permitted to leave, a frac-
tion of the 400,000 seeking to
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breathe free. Gorbachev releases
a Sharansky, an Orlov, loosens the
leash on a Sakharov, a Bonner,
and basks in his "public relations"
victories. But the hundreds of
thousands who are not celebrities,
do not make headlines, but con-
tinue to molder in the Communist
prison-state they are the real
measure of his character.
Nineteen years after his death,
residents of Tampa and
Hillsborough County will join
together for an annual com-
memoration of Martin Luther
King, Jr. An interfaith service at
St. Paul's Ame Church, 506 Har-
rison St., Tampa, will take place
at 6 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 19. A
reception will follow the service.
According to Leslye
Winkelman, Commemoration Co-
Chairperson and Regional Direc-
tor of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, "The
golden values of Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. transcend racial
and religious lines. He was a man
of peace and a man of vision. It is
important that the entire com-
munity assemble to honor his
memory."
Because of King's hard work
and dedication, 1964 Civil Rights
Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act
became laws. He received the
Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 and
was a recipient of many of
America's highest honors. He was
assassinated in April 1968.
The life of Dr. King is being
commemorated every year with a
national holiday in his honor. This
year, the date of Jan. 19 has been
selected and the theme is "Living
the Dream: Let Freedom Ring."
Many government agencies and
community organizations are
sponsoring the celebration locally,
including the ADL; the Communi-
ty Relations Committee of the
Tampa Jewish Federation; the
cities of Plant City, Tampa and
Temple Terrace; Hillsborough
County; the Equal Employment
Opportunity Office-City of Tampa
and the Equal Employment Op-
portunity Office-Hillsborough
County; the Tampa/Hillsborough
County Public Library System;
the Greater Tampa Urban
League; the National Organiza-
tion for Women; the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews; and the University of South
Florida. The community-wide
celebration is entitled "Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Commemoration
and Black History Month Celebra-
tion." For more information, call
the ADL at 875-0750.
Vanunu:
'Not Guilty'
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mordechai Vanunu, the former
technician at the Dimona
nuclear facility, pleaded not
guilty to charges of treason,
grave espionage and passing
information without authoriza-
tion, as his trial opened of-
ficially in Jerusalem District
Court Dec. 28.
"He denied the facts in the
charge sheet," Vanunu's at-
torney, Aharon Zichroni, told
reporters after a 90-minute
closed session. The trial will
resume in six weeks. If con-
victed, Vanunu could face life
imprisonment.
The trial will be held in
camera and only the sentence
will be made public if the ver-
dict is guilty. The tightest
security was maintained to
seclude Vanunu from the
media as he was driven to
court at 7:30 a.m. local time
Sunday. The authorities took
extreme measures to avoid a
repetition of the incident of
Dec. 21 when Vanunu was
brought to court to be remand-
ed in custody for the duration
of the trial.


Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute Of
Religion Delegation Receives Audience
With King Juan Carlos Of Spain
Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, Pres-
ident of Hebrew Union College-
| Jewish Institute of Religion (pic-
tured in photo, right), led a group
[of delegates from the College-
I Institute who received an au-
dience with his majesty, King
Juan Carlos of Spain (pictured in
photo, left), at the royal palace in
Madrid. The official HUC-JIR
(delegation was returning from a
I "Week of Dedications" of new
I buildings on the Jerusalem cam-
pus of the College and was touring
Spain to observe and study the
Jewish heritage in that country.
The ceremony at the palace was
regarded as a significant news
event and was carried on national
Spanish television. Dr. Gottschalk
noted the purpose of the visit in
the following statement presented
| to the Spanish monarch:
Your Majesty Juan Carlos:
It is with a special sense of
pleasure that we thank you for
this audience which crownd our
ten day stay in your remarkable
country. This has been a most
memorable and highly infor-
mative visit during which we have
learned much about Spain, its
historical, cultural, political and
artistic background, and about the
Jewish experience in Spain then
and now.
We are gratified by what we
have learned about this new
democracy which, drawing from
'Foul Plays'
Winning Team
"A Society which pledges liber-
ty and justice for all can have no
room for prejudice in its game
plan. We are all part of Team
America, a diverse group made up
of people of all backgrounds:
blacks and whites, rich and poor,
Jews and Christians, men and
women, young and old. The team
members speak different
languages, have different ap-
pearances, and come from various
cultural backgrounds, but they all
play on the same team."
So reads the opening paragraph
of the grand prize winning essay
from the recently completed "U
You Really Believe in America,
Prejudice is Foul Play" essay con-
test. The contest, and accompany-
ing community education cam-
paign, was sponsored by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and the Tampa Bay Buc-
caneers, in conjunction with Asch
Advertising, Patrick Media Group
and Lorenzo's Restaurant.
Seventh grade student, Aaron
Rundus, of Mrs. Shirley
O'Sullivan'8 Young Junior High
School English class, was the
grand prize winner. Audra Perry,
also of Mrs. O'Sullivan's class,
was a winner in the seventh grade
category. Eighth grade winner
was Kelley Breckner of Vivian
Robinson's class at Madison
Junior High School, and the ninth
grade winner was Leroy Clark of
Margaret Zeller's Buchanan
Junior High School class. All four
students won trophies, souvenir
photos, Buccaneer windbreakers
and football game tickets, all of
which were presented during the
Dec. 14 Tampa Bay Buc-
caneers/Green Bay Packers pre-
game show. Additionally, all win-
ners, their teachers and parents,
will participate in a "Dinner with
the Bucs" at Lorenzo's
Restaurant. Lastly, Aaron Run-
dus, grand prize winner, received
a new bicycle.
In addition to the essay contest,
the campaign included billboards
starring Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Rod Jones and Ron Heller, which
sported the theme "If You Really
Believe in America, Prejudice is
Foul Play." These billboards have
been posted at 15 Hillsborough
and Pinellas County locations.
its great past, has brought a new
and vital perspective to the pre
sent and hope for the future. We
experienced during our trip what
has been called the golden age of
Jewish life in Spain. Synagogal,
artistic and religious artifacts at-
test to the greatness of that
period.
Our sadness resides in the
knowledge that so few of our peo-
ple are now here as survivors of
past periods of intolerance and as
witnesses, historically, to that
greatness. But much is being done
now in a new climate and with a
new generation to bring a better
life and greater future to Spain.
We commend and appreciate this
spirit and thank you for it.
We came to Spain directly from
Jerusalem where we have
dedicated a new set of learning
facilities of the Hebrew Union
College, America's oldest institu-
tion of higher Jewish learning. We
are devoted to the life of the mind
and the solutions that it can
generate to solve problems. We
are devoted to perpetuating the
Jewish heritage and its "mind,"
hopeful that it can guide us into a
safer and more prudent future.
We bring you greetings from
our constituency of 1.2 million
Reform/Progressive Jews globally
and thank you for this gracious
audience which we accept also on
their behalf.
7h& *Ar6of-
ffttmMm imUom tkmmiim
648 ffimtk J^^^nihm
fovn+Uy 2~mU'* 9*mm. .Wufi 879-3J57
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A unique opportunity exists to live In one
of Tampa's vintage buildings that has been
completely renovated by one of the city's
leading architects.
Located in the heart of Palms Ceia, on a
brick street, these rental flats combine the
ambience and character of an older build-
ing with the luxury of modem conveniences.
Amenities Include: ->ot bedroom suites with
celling fan and cwrafJktle bathroom; an
additional half bath with a pedestal sink;
some units have sun parlors with tiled
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heat and air; oak floors; 9' ceilings; off-
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at 2544275.

k
Rabbi Yossie Dubrowski, Rabbi of Congregation Bais Teffilah
and Executive Director of Chabad Lubaviteh, congratulating
Senator elect Bob Graham on hie recent election to U.S. Senate.
Senator Graham spoke to a group of students from the University
of South Florida on different topics including drug abuse. Chabad
has been very much involved with drug prevention and treatment.
(Photo By Mel Lohn)
ANNOUNCING
EXTENDED EVENING HOURS
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DAVID H. GOLDSTEIN, M.D.
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INTERNAL MEDICINE PULMONARY MEDICINE
2919 Swann Ave., Suite 202
Tampa 879-7726
Hamilton, Grant & Company, Inc.
OTC STOCKS
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Masters level Degree in Education Required.
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; Send Resume To:
Search Chairman
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
3303 Swann Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33609
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Page 10 The Jewish Florid'ian of Tampa/Friday, January 9, 1987
I----------- *
Congregations/Organizations Events
Art Festival Co-chairpersons Ellie Argintar and Sonya Miller.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Art Festival
The 14th Annual Temple Beth-
El Art Festival, 400 Pasadena
Avenue South, St. Petersburg,
will feature original paintings,
sculpture, ceramics, jewelry,
photography, wood and glass by
more than 50 of Florida's finest
artists.
The dates to remember are:
Saturday, Jan. 17, Gala Preview
Reception 7-10 p.m. $10 per
person.
Sunday, Jan. 18, (Open to the
public, free admission) 11 a.m.-5
p.m.
Monday, Jan. 19, (Open to the
public, free admission) 10 a.m.-5
p.m.
Monday, Jan. 19, 12:30 p.m.,
"Wearable Art Fashion Show and
Luncheon." Tickets are $7.
For more information contact
the Temple office at 347-6136.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI
Going Once, Twice, Sold!
I'm sure you've heard those
words before. Well, get ready to
hear those words once more,
when you attend Kol Ami
Sisterhood's Auction.
There'll be champagne,
refreshments, door prizes and fun
for all. It will be held on Saturday
evening, Jan. 10, at the Car-
rollwood Village Country Club.
The gallery to make note of will be
The Sakal Galleries, Ltd. of Fort
Lauderdale.
At 7:80 there will be a preview
and the auction will begin at 8:30
p.m. The cost will be $3.60 per
person. Please call Claudia Valins
at 961-2443 or Janet Cotxen at
963-5610 for a reservation.
Don't forget to mark your calen-
dars for this multi-media event.
There'll be hand made paper
assemblages, ceramics,
sculptures, plexiglass, graphics,
oils, enamels and much, much
more.
NORTH TAMPA REFORM
JEWISH ASSOCIATION
Continuing the custom of con-
gregant participation, the North
Tampa Reform Jewish Associa-
tion has called upon Dr. Hans
Juergensen to deliver the sermon
at their regular services on Fri-
day, Jan. 16.
Dr. Juergensen, professor of
humanities at the University of
South Florida, will follow the
Torah portion for that date. His
sermon will deal with the story of
Joseph and the blessing of Jacob
to Joseph's sons, as related in
chapter 48 of the book of Genesis.
Congregants and members of
the community are cordially in-
vited to attend at 8 p.m. at the
Masonic Community Lodge, 402
W. Waters Avenue.
HAPPY HEARTS
OF TAMPA BAY
The first meeting of the Happy
Hearts of Tampa Bay, a support
group to alleviate the fear and
reassure patients of any type of
heart trauma, will meet Tuesday,
Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. at the University
of South Florida Medical Clinic,
Lecture room 1005.
The group is under the direction
of the Cardiology Department at
the University. Dr. Stephen P.
Glasser, director of the division of
Cardiology, will be the guest
speaker.
For more information please
call Sydelle Berlin at 973-0202.
CONGREGATION
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Nathan I. Gordon
Scholar-in-Residence
This year's Nathan I. Gordon
Scholar-in-Residence will be
Pamela S. Feldman. The subject
matter: What Makes Jewish Art
Jewish?
On Friday, Jan. 16 at 8 p.m., a
survey of Jewish artists work
throughout history will be ex-
Elored, analysing cultural,
istorical and theological in-
fluences from early Jewish
manuscripts to modern art.
On Saturday, Jan. 17, from 4 to
5:30 p.m., the program will pro-
vide a brief survey of the works of
Jewish artists from ancient times
to the present. From 5:30 to 6:45
p.m. there will be a Havdalah ser-
vice. Then from 5:46 to 6:16 p.m.
there will be wine, cheese and
hors d'oeuvres.
Our deepest gratitude to
Nathan I. Gordon for his love of
Jewish learning that translates in-
to the Annual Scholar-in-
Residence.
Intermarried Couplet Group
Intermarried Couples frequent-
ly encounter special issues such
as: In what religion shall we rear
the children? How should we ap-
proach Christmas and Easter? To
what degree should you par-
ticipate in your spouse's religion?
And what do I say to may in-laws?
If you are seeking help with
these questions, you are invited to
join Rabbi Birnholz at 7:30 p.m. on
Monday evening, Jan. 12, at the
tirst Intermarried Couples Group.
No one will be judged. There will
be no right or wrong opinions.
Feelings will be respected, and
there will be no attempts to con-
vert. This is simply an opportunity
to share ideas and learn from each
other. Please call the Temple for
information.
Annual Sisterhood/Brotherhood
Dinner
On Tuesday, Jan. 13 at 6:30
p.m., Robert W. Merkle, U.S. At-
torney, Middle District of Florida,
will be the guest speaker at the
annual Brotherhood-Sisterhood
dinner. Brotherhood members
may call the Temple and make
their reservations. Sisterhood
members and non-affiliates may
send their check made out to the
Sisterhood for $9.25 to the Tem-
ple. Reservations deadline is Jan.
9. -------
Covered Dish Dinner
Sunday, Feb. 1 at 5 p.m. in the
Social Hall The Hospitality Com-
mittee invites you to a joyous
First Annual Event: A Covered
Dish Dinner and Wine Tasting.
There will be great food, delicious
wines and door prizes. This is
limited to the first 100 people, so
call the Temple now!
New Gifts
Continued from Page 1
New Gifts Program, we are ask-
ing, in addition to all agency
Board members, that anyone else
interested in participating in this
unique opportunity to stop by the
JCC to select several names that
you may recognize, to contact for
their 1987 Campaign gift. To be
successful, we need all the help we
can get!" concluded Crystal.
To voluntter and for further
details and information, call
Harold Abrams at the Federation
office, 875-1618.
Neal Crystal has served as a
past member of the Jewish Com-
munity Center Board of Direc-
tors, and was a past co-chairman
of Super Sunday.
He is vice president of Write Oc-
casions, and a member of Con-
gregation Rodeph Sholom, where
he has served on their Board of
Directors. Neal Crystal resides in
Tampa with his wife Ellen and
their two children, Michael, 11,
and Debra, 13.
Your child
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For more information,
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THE LAW FIRM OF
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WILLIAM E. HAHN
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DEBORAH F. FRICK
RICHARD W. BLYLER
ELLEN M.MATTHYS
JOSEPH M. FASI
GLENN M. BURTON


Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Community Calendar
Friday, January 9
Candlelighting tune 5:32 p.m.
6:30 p.m. Kol Ami Early Services
7 p.m. Temple Ahavat Sholom Singles
Saturday, January 10
Kol Ami Sisterhood Auction 7:30 p.m.
Sunday. January 11
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5FM 11 a.m.-l
p.m.
9 am. Bais Tefilah Special Service
11 a.m. Kol Ami USY Project
JCC Funday
5 p.m. Bais Tefilah Special Service
Monday, January 12
Noon, Tampa Jewish Federation/Women's Division
Board meeting
12:15 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Executive Committee
meeting
1:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Hadassah/Ameet Study Group.
Tuesday, January 13
Hadassah/Tampa Chapter Board meeting
6 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/B and P Board meeting
6:30 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Brotherhood-Sisterhood
Dinner
7:30 p.m. Brandeis Women Parenting Study Group
7:30 p.m. Hillel School Board meeting
8 p.m. Chabad Lubavitch Study Group
Wedneaday, January 14
Jewish Community Food Bank
11 a.m. National Council Jewish Women General meeting
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
4:45 p.m. Tampa Jewish Family Services Executive Com-
mittee meeting
7:30 p.m. Jewish Women Jewish Survival meeting
Rodeph Sholom Men's Club meeting
Thursday, January 15
10 a.m. Brandeis Women Art Study Group
5:30 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Happy Hour at
Crawdaddy's
5:50 p.m. JCC Executive Board meeting
8 p.m. JCC Board meeting
8 p.m. Rodeph Sholom United Synagogue Outreach
Program
Friday, January 16
('andlelighting time 5:37 p.m.
Kodeph Sholom Shabbaton Dinner
8 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Shabbat
8 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Scholar-in-Residence
Saturday, January 17
10 a.m. Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Sabbath
4 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Scholar-in-Residence
Sunday, January 18
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5FM 11 a.m-1
p.m.
1 p.m. Kol Ami Boneem
2 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles-Bowling at Crown
Lanes
7 p.m. Kol Ami Kadima and USY
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Adult Education
Monday, January 19
JCC Vacation Day Program
Hillel School Kindergarten and First Grade Conference
Day
8 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Board meeting
Tuesday, January 20
10:30 a.m. ORT/Bay Horizons Mid-year Planning
Meeting
4 p.m. Jewish Towers Board meeting
7 p.m. Happy Hearts of Tampa Bay
7:30 p.m. Brandeis Women Atlantic Monthly Study
Group
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Board of Education meeting
Wednesday, January 21
Jewish Community Food Bank
Hadassah/Tampa Chapter General meeting
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
Kol Ami Sisterhood Torah Fund Event
4:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation Executive Commit-
tee meeting
5:30 p.m. ADL Executive Committee meeting
7:30 p.m. ADL Education Committee meeting
7:30 p.m. Tampa Bay Area Singles Board meeting
Thursday, January 22
1:30 p.m. Jewish Towers Resident/Management meeting
7:3p p.m. Kol Ami Executive Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Fellowship meeting
7:30 p.m. Menorah Manor Finance Committee meeting
Friday, January 23
(andlelighting time 5:43 p.m.
6 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Shabbat Dinner
Kol Ami Youth Services
JWB Jewish Chaplains Council Keeps Chanukah
Jewish For Military Personnel Worldwide
NEW YORK More than 4,000
Jewish ceremonial objects and
holiday gift items were shipped by
JWB to Jewish military personnel
and their families around the
world and Jewish patients in VA
hospitals for the Dec. 26 com-
memoration of Chanukah, accor-
ding to Rabbi Barry H. Greene,
chairman of the JWB Jewish
Chaplains Council. Packages were
timed to arrive prior to the start
of the Chanukah celebration.
In his announcement, Rabbi
Greene praised the work of
members of the Council and voic-
ed personal satisfaction at the
membership's "unity of concern
that the religious needs of Jewish
chaplains, as well as men and
women in uniform and the
Veterans Administration
throughout the world, are being
met."
The Chanukah items were
carefully selected by JWB in an
effort to "help people, many of
whom live in temporary or tran-
sient homes, create a sense of
Jewishness for themselves and
their families during this impor-
tant season," Greene said.
The selection, which was pur-
chased with the support of JWB
Women's Organizations' Services
and through the efforts of Jewish
chaplains and lay leaders, includ-
ed Chanukah gelt, dreidlach,
menorot, Chanukah candles,
games for children, billfolds, wall
plaques and other decorative
items.
Sisterhoods, JWB Serve-A-
Committees. Jewish Community
Centers and individuals con-
tributed funds for Chanukah
packages in response to hundreds
of requests from chaplains and lay
leaders throughout the United
States, on ships at sea, and
wherever in the world there is a
U.S. military presence.
In one typical request, Ray E.
Blanton, Jr., a lay leader aboard
the USS Samuel Gompers, said
that "however good we are at
what we do is the direct result of
support and assistance we receive
from JWB, halfway around the
world. I always welcome a letter
or package from JWB because I
know there is help inside. Without
JWB, the military could forget
about having any type of religious
program for Jews in any branch of
the service."
JWB, central service organiza-
tion for 275 Jewish Community
Centers, YM-YWHAs and camps
in the United States and Canada,
is the U.S. government-accredited
agency providing religious,
Jewish educational and morale
services to Jews in the armed ser-
vices, their families and hospitaliz-
ed veterans, on behalf of the
American Jewish community. It
serves the armed forces through
the JWB Jewish Chaplains Coun-
cil, Armed Forces and Veterans
Services Committee, and
Women's Organizations' Services.
Marvin Pertzik is chairman of
the Armed Forces and Veterans
Services Committee. Rabbi David
Lapp is director of the Chaplains
Council and the AFVS Commit-
tee. The Chanukah gift program is
coordinated by Rabbi Nathan
Landman, deputy director of the
JWB Jewish Chaplains Council.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swmnn Avenue 251-4216 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:30 a.m., 5:46 p.m.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI CuiwiatiTe
3919 Moran Road 9624338 Rabbi H. David Rose, Cantor Sam Isaak Services:
Friday, 8 p.m.: Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Cssttsrratto
2713 Raysbore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, haoan William
Hauben Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Richard J. Bimholz. Rabbi Joan Glazer
Farber. Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION BAIS TEFFILAH Orthodoi
3418 Handy Road No. 103 Rabbi Yossi Dubrowski 962-2875 Services Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
NORTH TAMPA REFORM JEWISH ASSOCIATION
C/o Joseph Kerstein, 1448 W. Busch Boulevard, Tampa, Fla. 33618, 935-8866. Con-
gregants officiating, Vikki Silverman, Cantor. Services at 8 p.m., first and third Fri-
day of each month, Masonic Community Lodge, 402 W. Waters Ave. (at Ola).
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
P.O. Box 271157. Rabbi Yossie Dubrowski. Executive Director. 963-2317.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
13801 N. 37th St No. 1114. Rabbi Dovid Modrin, Program Coordinator. 971-6234.
Friday night Services one half hour after sunset. Tuesday night classes at 8 p.m.
BNAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION at U.8.F./U.T./H.C.C.
U.S.F.-CTR 2382 Tampa 33620 972-4433. Services and Oneg Shabbat Friday
evening 7 p.m. Sunday Bagel Brunches, 11:30 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
634-9162, United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Street, Sun City Center, Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECON8TBUCTIONIST COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
Etc UartJoaist Cambridge Woods 972-4433 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly
study discuason aeseioni, "Shabbat Experience," monthly services and dinner.
Bdfi ^iu.'Uft 9urjtwf 2>i'teeL3l
Providing Dignified Personalized Service
to our Jewish Community
555 Glen Avenue Southjampa
874-3330
Charles D. Segal Jonathan A. Fuss
Licensed Funeral Directors
Tampa's Only All Jewish Funeral Chapel
laRO-PROTCTIV CORPORATION
Underwriters' Laboratories Incorporated (UL).
approved
Burglar Alarm Systems Camera Surveillance Systems
Vault and Sale Alarms Card Access Systems
Holdup Alarms Automatic and Manual
Closed Circuit TV Systems F"e Ala,m Systems
The need lor advanced security systems has never been greater
more critical or in more immediate demand, than it is today
lCTRO-PftOTCTIV CORPORATION
1102 North "B" Street Tampa, Florida 33606
(813)251-0578
LOUIS ZIPKIN
QUALITY SCUfllTY SflVICS FOR VOUR BUSINESS AND HOrVK
Jewish Underground
Member Sentenced
TEL AVTV (JTA) Ira
Kappoport was sentenced to
30 months in prison and bound
over for an additional 18 mon-
ths by a Jerusalem District
Court. The Gush Emunim
emissary, who returned to
Israel from the U.S. last
month to face charges stemm-
real prison."
The American-born Rap-
Eoport was convicted of
elonging to a terrorist group
and participating in the ear
bomb attack that crippled
former Nablus Mayor Bassam
Shaka in June, 1980. The pro-
secution had demanded a
ing from his membership in a three-year jail sentence plus a
Jewish terrorist underground, two-year suspended sentence
told the court, "Prison
Israel is better than
abroad. Living abroad is
in
life
the
But the court decided other-
wise because Rappoport had
returned to Israel voluntarily.
The Jewish Theological Seminary
of America, the Southeast Region
Rabbinical Assembly & the Southeast
Region United Synagogue of America
proudly present
Ms. RUTH FAGEN
Inslructor, Department of Talmud,
Jewish Theological
Seminary of America
MYTH & REALITY:
The IMAGE
of the JEWISH HERO
THROUGH THE AGES
four midweek lectures
FREE SOCIAL HOUR follows
For transportation or more information
call any of the synagogues llisted here
MOM
JAN.
12
8 p.m.
TUES.
JAN.
13
8 p.m.
WEDS.
JAN.
14
8 p.m.
THURS.
JAN.
15
8 p.m.
IN THE WILDERNESS- MOSES:
Man or Demi-God to be held at
Congregation Beth Shalom,
1325 S. Belcher Rd Clearwater 531-1418
PROM PEOPLE TO NATION -
KING DAVID: Saint or Sinner
to be held at Congregation Kol Ami,
3919 Moran Rd., Tampa 962-6338
THE ORIGINS OP PLURALISM:
Hillel & Shammai: Controversies
for the Sake of Heaven? to be held at
Congregation B'nai Israel,
301-59th St. N., St Petersburg 381-4900
WHO SHALL LEAD US & WHY?
Rabban Gamliel & his Deposition
to be held at Congregation Rodeph Shalom,
2713 Bayshore Blvd., Tampa 337.1911
?


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, January 9, 1987
Lauren Stein
1
Brian Neuman
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
LAUREN STEIN
Lauren Samara Stein, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Stein,
will celebrate her Bat Mitzvah
Saturday, Jan. 10 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and Can-
tor William Hauben will officiate.
Lauren is in the 8th Grade at
Berkeley Preparatory School. She
is a student in the Rodeph Sholom
Religious School and a member of
Kadima.
Masny out-of-town guests will
be attending this special occasion
from Illinois, Pennsylvania, and
Florida, including Lauren's
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Milton Stein of Sarasota, and Mr.
and Mrs. Alex Goldberg of Pitt-
sburgh. Friends of the Bat Mitz-
vah and family will host a Shabbat
dinner and Sunday brunch for
these special guests.
Dr. and Mrs. Stein will host the
Oneg Shabbat, the Kiddush lun-
cheon, and a Saturday evening
reception and dinner in their
daughter's honor.
BRIAN NEUMAN
Brian Seth Neuman, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Arnold Neuman, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday, Jan. 17 at 11
a.m. at Congregation Schaarai
Zedek. Rabbi Richard Birnholz
and Rabbi Joan Farber will
officiate.
The celebrant is a seventh
grader in the Schaarai Zedek
Religious School and a member of
the Junior Youth Group. He is a
high honor roll student at Blake
Junior High where he is a member
of the band.
Brian has played baseball in the
Town and Country League for
five years, and has been named to
four all-star teams. Last spring he
was a finalist in the essay contest,
"What Freedom Means To Me,"
sponsored by the Sertoma Club of
Tampa.
In honor of the occasion, Mr.
and Mrs. Neuman and friends will
host the Oneg Shabbat following
Friday evening services. A Kid-
dush luncheon at Schaarai Zedek
will follow Saturday morning
services.
=
At a recent dinner-dance, Congressman Sam
Gibbons received the Jewish National Fund's
highest tribute, the "Tree of Life" Award.
Over 200 guests attended the gala reception at
the Hyatt Regency Tampa, downtown. The
monies received from the junction will go to
plant The Congressman Sam Gibbons
Woodland of It,000 trees in the American In-
dependence Park near Jerusalem. Pictured
left to right are Cantor William Hauben, Con-
gregatvm Rodeph Sholom; Herbert Swarz-
man, Dinner Co-chairman; Congressman
Sam Gibbons; Mrs. Richard Mensh, President
of the Gulf Coast Council-Jewish National
Fund; Rabbi Rafael G. Grossman, guest
speaker; Douglas Cohn, President of the Tam-
pa Jewish Federation; Les Hirsch, Dinner Co-
Chairman; and Leonard Kleinman, Dinner
Co-Chairman.
NORTHDALE OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
RICHARD S. DILLON, M.D.
AND
PAULA.SPORN.M.D.
ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THE OPENING OF THEIR OFFICE
AT
NORTHDALE PROFESSIONAL CENTRE
3910 NORTHDALE BOULEVARD
SUITE 206
TAMPA, FLORIDA 33624
OFFICE HOURS: 8:00-5:00
EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE
TELEPHONE:
(813)968-2340
DOES THE PLACE YOU HOLD YOUR EVENT
MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
OF COURSE IT DOES...
LET US PLAN SOME OF THE MOST IMPORTANT DAYS
OF YOUR LIFE. FOR WEDDINGS, BAR MITZVAHS, MEETINGS,
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THAT WILL MAKE YOUR EVENT MEMORABLE. FROM IM-
MACULATE SUITES FOR YOUR OUT-OF-TOWN GUESTS. TO
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FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 875-1555
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TAMPA
AIRPORT
Harriott
/


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xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
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INGEST IEID E3MHOOM6E_T9DX2F INGEST_TIME 2013-06-20T01:51:25Z PACKAGE AA00014305_00309
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES