The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00300

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text

Off Tampa
Volume 8 Number 19
Tampa, Florida Friday, September 5, 1986
Price 36 Cents
Tampa Jewish Federation Approves 1986-'87 Allocations
The Board of Directors of the
Tampa Jewish Federation recent-
ly approved the allocations to
local, national and overseas agen-
cies from the results of the 1986
campaign.
The allocations were based upon
a 1986 campaign total of
$1,100,000 which is $50,000 less
than was raised for the 1985 cam-
paign. The 1986 shortfall has
resulted in serious cut backs in
allocations and has prevented
many new programs from getting
under way, Federation officials
reported.
The budget and allocations pro-
cess began in April under the
leadership of Judith Rosenkranz
who served as the committee
chairman. Members of the budget
and allocations committee include:
Jolene Shor, Alice Rosenthal,
Doug Conn, Blossom Leibowitz,
Bill Kalish, Lee Tobin, Ronald
Rudolph, Jeremy Gluckman,
Bobbe Karpay, Dr. Irwin Browar-
sky, Bruce Silverman, Charles
Weissman, Myer Frank, Walter
Kessler, and Sam Blum
Reisman to Address Interagency
, *-.
Board Training Institute
Bernard Reisman, director of
the Hornstein Program in Jewish
Communal Service, Brandeis
University, will address the
Boards of Jewish Family Services,
the Jewish Community Center,
Hillel, the Tampa Jewish Federa-
tion, the Young Adult Division,
Young Leadership Development,
Women's Division, and Business
and Professional Network on Sun-
day, Sept. 21, at the Westahore
Marriott. "The program, which
will begin at 9 am., is an In-
teragency Board Training In-
stitute, whose purpose is to foster
greater agency communication
and cooperation," according to co-
chairmen, Franci Rudolph and
Joyce Swarzman.
The program's format will
primarily be experiential, an area
in which Dr. Reisman is a noted
authority. Throughout the pro-
gram, Board members will have
many opportunities to gain
greater depth and understanding
of each other and of the concept,
"community."
"The Institute is the first step
towards having the various
organizations communicate with
one another," commented
Rudolph. "The success will be
measured by how we implement
the concepts addressed the day of
the seminar and how we
cooperatively work together to
become a well-integrated Jewish
community," added Swarzman.
The cost for the Institute is $18
per person. Please RSVP to the
Tampa Jewish Federation,
875-1618, no later than Sept. 10 to
indicate whether you plan to
attend.
Bernard Reisman
More Evidence
Damages Waldheim's Many Denials
NEW YORK Kurt
Waldheim is identified in a
1938 photograph of
members of the Nazi Stu-
dent Union published by a
neo-Nazi newspaper in West
Germany this year. The
photograph shows the Nazi
Student Union on parade in
Vienna in 1938 being
escorted by Hitler's
brownshirted Storm-
troopers. Waldheim is iden-
tified in the front line of the
Nazi students.
Documents from Austrian
Argentina Seeks to Acquire
U.S.-Made AWACS From Saudis
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) Press accounts here
report that under a bilateral arms agreement currently be-
ing negotiated, Argentina seeks to acquire a U.S.-made
AWACS aircraft from Saudi Arabia, the World Jewish
Congress reported.
The negotiations are said to be in their early stages, but
the basis for the agreement was said to have been discussed
during President Raul Alfonsin's recent visit to Jiddah. I
the deal is concluded, Argentina would become the first
Latin American country to acquire the AWACS early war-
ning radar plane.
THE DEAL REPORTEDLY involves the sale by
Argentina to Saudi Arabia of two Mekko-42 type Navy
frigates. The AWACS aircraft and an undetermined
amount in cash would serve as payment for the two
frigates. Argentine government sources stated that within
the next few months a mission of Saudi business and
government officials will arrive in Buenos Aires to discuss
the matter more fully with their Argentine counterparts.
The AWACS aircrafts were originally sold to Saudi
Arabia following a bruising Congressional battle several
years ago to prevent the U.S. Administration from making
the sale to Saudi Arabia.
TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION
1986-87 BUDGET AND ALLOCATIONS
INCOME
1986 Campaign Results
ALLOCATIONS
Shrinkage (6 percent)
Campaign Expense
United Jewish Appeal
Jewish Community Center
Tampa Jewish Family Services
Hillel School '
TOP Jewish Foundation
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
River Garden Home for the Aged
High School in Israel
State Hillel Foundations
Menorah Manor
Florida Legislative Consultant
Sabbath Van Service
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
Bay Area Singles
Jewish Community Food Bank
JWB
Anti-Defamation League
United HIAS Service
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
American Jewish Committee
NJCRAC
Jewish War Veterans
Joint Cultural Appeal
Jewish Children's Service (Atlanta)
JESNA
American Jewish Congress
National Conference of Soviet Jewry
CLAL
Tampa Jewish Federation
$1,100,000
56,000
119,924
462,538
116,000
92,000
56,000
31,400
14,000
10,950
4,000
3,000
3,000
2,482
2,000
1,000
500
100
1,400
600
200
100
50
550
50
50
650
100
50
200
50
118,211
Hat Waldheim
einen Doppelganger ?
Foreign Ministry and court ar-
chives explicitly naming
Waldheim show Waldheim to
have been a member of three Nazi
organizations, including the Stu-
dent Union and the Storm-
troopers. According to these
previously released documents,
Waldheim became a member of
the Nazi Student Union on April
1,1938 and a member of the Nazi
Stormtroopers on November 18,
1938.
WALDHEIM HAS repeatedly
denied membership in Nazi
organizations: He wrote WJC
President Edgar M. Bronfman on
Mar. 7, "I was not a member of
the SA (Stormtroopers) or any
organization of the Nazi regime.'
He explicitly stated he was not a
member of the SA or the Nazi Stu-
dent Union in his formal defense
memorandum to the U.S. Justice
Department of Apr. 12.
He told the Associated Press on
April 9: "I was anti-Nazi. All this
is lies. I was never in the SA nor in
the Student Union.
On March 28, 1986, the neo-
Nazi paper Deutscher Aixzeiger
published the front page
photograph of the Viennese Nazi
students on parade.
Waldheim, the newspaper said,
"hides the facts of the picture,"
by denying he is in it. He is
challenged by Josef Tasler, a
former school colleague of
Waldheim, who "absolutely
recognizes the slender Waldheim
Did Austria's new president, Kurt Waldheim, have a twin? That
is what the headline asks above a photograph of Waldheim (cross
on shirt) in a neo-Nazi German publication dated March 8. The
photo is of Waldheim in Vienna in 1938 being escorted by Hitler's
brownshirt Stormtroopers.

in front of his heavy-set
brownshirt comrades."
TASLER SAYS: "Yes, that is
Kurti, no doubt. It can only be him
or a double."
In a mocking headline above the
photograph the newspaper
printed, "Did Waldheim Have A
Twin?"
Conciding with the release of
the photograph, the WJC again
called on Attorney General Edwin
Meese "to enforce the law and
place Waldheim on the "watch
list" of aliens excludable from the
United States."
In April, the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investiga-
tions concluded that under
American law, Waldheim should
be excluded as a "Nazi
persecutor."
1


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 5, 1986
i
I
F-
I
H
By Amy Scherzer
Introducing.. .Reiva Bobo
(Left to right) Rabbi Theodore Brod, Jill Levine, Shana
Levtne and Jonah Levine.
Masada B'not Mitzvah. Just back from a lovely experience are
Freda and Rabbi Theodore Brod. They met up with Dr. and
Mrs. Paal Robert Levine and family to officiate at the b'not mitz-
vah of their daughters, Jill and Shana Levine. The ruins of an an-
cient synagogue at Masada were the setting for the beautiful
ceremony. Five-year-old Jonah Levine also participated in the
service. The Brods and the Levines did some sightseeing too,
before returning to Tampa.
Liberty Party. On July 4, Dr. Richard and Kathy Matthews
were the hosts of a "Lady Liberty" party in honor of Susan Sex-
ton, circuit court judicial candidate. The lakefront get-together at
their new home on Saint Charlotte Drive in Lake Ellen Shores,
featured water sports, a cookout and evening fireworks. Dick was
boat captain and chef for the day. Son Iran and daughter Dara
supervised swimming races and games for the children.
Fashion maven. Congratulations to Kate Sinsley on behing
named to Robinson's of Florida's Fashion Board. Kate is the
daughter of Nina and Howard Sinsley and attends Plant High
School.
Dental kudos. We're happy to report that Dr. Robert Et-
tleman received a Fellowship Award from the Academy of
General Dentistry at their annual meeting. Rob, a graduate of the
University of Maryland dental school (1980), practices in Palm
Harbor. He completed more than 500 hours of continuing educa-
tion in the last 10 years and passed a fellowship exam to earn the
award.
Babyline. Say hello to David Leon Stenzler, born July 30 to
Dr. Stephen and Irene Stenzler and big sister, Ellen. He weigh-
ed 6 pounds, 15 oz. and his grandparents are Francis Stenzler
and the late Leon Stenzler, New York, and Rose and Sidney
Roth, Brooklyn.
Masol tov to Dianne and Ron Barnch on the birth of Ariel
Trad Barnch. Born August 3, she weighed 8V* pounds and was
greeted by her 2-year-old brother, Martin. Her proud grand-
parents are Mr. and Mrs. James Baruch, Sunrise, Florida, and
Ted Mohel, Hialeah.
Welcome to David Rafael BoniUa, born August 7 to Dr.
Maurice and Carol BoniUa. He weighed in at 8 pounds, 3 oz.; his
grandparents are Rath and Bob Poris, Farmington Hills, Mich.;
Dr. JsJsm BoniUa and Rosita Canales, both of Houston. David
has 3 great-grandmothers: Anita Diaz de Bonilla, Bogota, Col-
ombia; Gertrude Freedman, Brooklyn and Elynor Poris, New
York.
Ricki and Joel Kanter of Arlington, Va., announce the birth of
their son, Jeremy Brace on July 4. Maternal grandparents re
Joan and Richard Slacter, Clear-water (formerly of Tampa).
Paternal grandparents are Naomi and Burton Kantaer,
Highland Park, 111. Paternal great-grandparents are Beatrice
Kanter of Miami Beach and Henry Krakow of Danbury, Conn.
Grandma twice over. Freda Scott's two daughters gave birth
to sons 6 hours apart in 2 states. Staci and Pvt. 1st Class Ken-
neth Locard of Killeen, Texas, gave birth to Casey Shawn on
August 8 at 6 p.m. Then, at 1:55 a.m. Jeremy Kyle was born to
Lisa Michelle and Staff Sgt. Paul Holland at Maguire AFB,
New Jersey. (Jeremy has a two-year-old sister, Samantha Ann.)
The kids' grandparents are Freda Scott and Barry Segaa, and
Great-Grandma is Rebecca Haimovitx; all of Tampa. Both Casey
and Jeremy will be here in October to visit and be named at
Rodeph Sholom.
Scholars. This month the School Board of Hillsborough County
recognized the 1986 nominees in the Florida Academic Scholars
Program. We've told you about Craif Rothburd, but we forgot to
mention Lori Tepper, daughter of Elbie and Elliott Tepper, and
Jeffrey Wallace, son of Barbara and Irwin Wallace. Con-
gratulations to you all on your outstanding academic
achievements.
Continued on Page 10
By AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
A woman dedicated to the
synagogue, Reiva Bobo, will
preside over Congregation
Rodeph Sholom's Sisterhood dur-
ing the next two years. Bobo has
come out of the kitchen, at least
for a short time, to lead the
women of the congregation
through the many important pro-
jects which are the backbone of
this organization.
"My whole life has been with
the synagogue and the Sisterhood
since we moved into our present
building on Bay shore Boulevard,"
said Bobo. "Our children, Ralph
Silvis, Sheri, and Debora, have
been active with the USY, and my
husband, Sam, is a past president
of the Congregation and the
Men's Club."
Reiva took grat pride in explain-
ing the many functions of the
Sisterhood. A major fundraiser is
the catering for all the events
which take place in the synagogue
building, under the very capable
direction of Judy Schwartz and
Mimi Weiss. Sisterhood also spon-
sors a Sunday brunch, with
parents cooking, for USY and
Kadima members before they go
off to classes.
Besides maintaining the kit-
chen, the active women of the
Sisterhood stock the Judaica Shop
and also have a continuing sale of
stationery and invitations.
Part of the funds raised by
Sisterhood during the year is used
to subsidize scholarships for USY
Camp Ramah, USY Pilgrimage,
USY on Wheels, and the High
School in Israel program.
Through the efforts of the
Torah Fund committee Sisterhood
has exceeded its goals during the
past two years and they were able
to purchase a library shelf at the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America.
In the Spring the Florida
Branch Conference of Women's
League will be held in Tampa at
the Hyatt Regency Hotel.
The officers serving with Bobo
are four vice presidents, Mimi
Weiss, Claire Levin, Maxine
Solomon, and Betty Germain; cor-
responding secretary, Minna
Kune; recording secretary, Sue
Gamson; financial secretary
Esther Carp; treasurer, Linda
Blum; social secretary, Naomi
Chardkoff. Honorary president is
Lizzie Berger.
Sisterhood Honors Seminary's 100th Year
Through the efforts of the
Torah Fund Committee, Con-
gregation Rodeph Sholom
Sisterhood has contributed a
library shelf of books to the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America in celebration of its
100th anniversary.
The Seminary is an institution
dedicated to a Judaism firmly
grounded in love of God, Torah,
and Israel. It is committed to
scholarship as the means of
demonstrating the relevance of
eternal values to contemporary
life.
The Library, in addition to serv-
ing the needs of students and
faculty, has become a superior col-
lection of Hebraica and Judaica. It
is indispensable, not only to the
Seminary family, but to scholars
throughout the world. In addition
to its own unique collections, it
uses microfilm, computer
technology, and other contem-
porary devices to make all known
manuscripts and other rarities in
its field accessible to library users.
Diana Siegel, Benefactors chairman,and Betty Shalett, Torah
Fund chairman, present certificate from the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America to Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood President
Linda Blum.
This remarkable combination of
the ancient with the modern is
characteristic of the Seminary
.?
and of the Conservative move-
ment as it enters its second
century.
Financial Planning For Women
An innovative workshop series
entitled, "For Women: Dealing
With The Stress Of Financial
Realities and Planning," or
"What you always have needed to
know but somehow managed to
put off," is scheduled to begin
shortly.
Tampa Jewish Family Services
will offer a six week experiential
workshop including topics such as
investment, tzedakah, retirement,
real estate, legal issues, consumer
credit and clinical issues.
An impressive list of panelists
include Diane Bubose of Raymond
James, Inc., Naomi Korn, Dennis
Schulman, Cindy Sper, Sam
Reiber, Mary Jennus and Kav
Lillie.
The full panel will attend the
first and last sessions, with in-
dividual panelists offering their
expertise at intervening weeks.
A great need and interest in this
program has been identified in the
community. "Homework" will
consist of completion of a con-
fidential financial statement, will
preparation, and identification of
future goals.
The workshop will begin on
Thursday, Sept. 4 and continue
for six Thursdays through Oct. 9,
and will be held at the Jewish
Community Center. For reserva-
tions and more information,
please contact Naomi Korn, at
TJFS, 251-0083.
Let The
Tampa Airport Marriott
Cater Tib
Y>ur Every Need.
Our professional staff, attentive service and gracious
accommodations will make a success of your Wedding,
Bar Mitzvah, Banquet, Business Meeting or Reunion.
We also provide outside catering services. See our Catering
Department for information or please call 879-5151.
TAMPA
AIRPORT
Marriott






'

Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Alice RoMnthal
Mimi Aaron
Deborah EisenaUdt
Women's Division Present Officers
The Women's Division of the
Tampa Jewish Federation has a
major role in contributing to the
growth and vitality of the Tampa
Jewish community. Often through
a woman's involvement, the
education of the family comes,
which fosters greater commit-
ment and awareness of Jewish
values and continuity. A fun-
damental question which needs to
be addressed is, "How can women
not give of themselves and their
funds for Jewish survival?" Under
the leadership of incoming
Women's Division President,
Alice Rosenthal, and her ex-
ecutive board, the Women's Divi-
sion will continue to convey the
message that women should stand
up and be counted as separate
individuals.
Alice, who has been an active
member of Women's Division for
several years, is a dynamic and
capable leader to guide and direct
the future course of this Division.
She is past Campaign Vice Presi-
dent and former chairman of the
Ruby Division. Her involvement
with other community organiza-
tions, including the Jewish Com-
munity Center, where she serves
on the executive board, ORT and
Rodeph Sholom, gives her a broad
perspective and sensitivity to the
Jewish community.
Working with Alice are cam-
paign vice presidents, Aida
Weissman and Ellen Stern. Aida
is serving her second year as Cam-
paign Vice President. She has
been active in Women's Division
for almost six years, chairing
almost all of the dollar divisions.
She is involved with ORT, where
she has served as the President
and she is currently on the ex-
ecutive board of the Tampa
Jewish Federation. Ellen has
chaired both the Ruby and Dia-
mond Divisions of the Women's
Division. She is on the boards of
both the Jewish Community
Center and the Tampa Jewish
Federation.
Jolene Shor, former president
of Women's Division, is the
Leadership Development Vice
President and will be responsible
for the education and develop-
Jewish Day Schools
Increase Identity
A recent study conducted by the
Jewish Education Service of
North America indicates that
graduates of Jewish schools such
as the Hillel School of Tampa have
a stronger Jewish identity.
The study, directed by Dr. Sol
Ribner compared the strength and
nature of the commitment of
those with "intensive" and ^less
intensive" Jewish educations. In
both groups, the majority of the
respondents were Conservative
Jews.
The intensive group was better
able to integrate Jewish ex-
periences into secular life. They
belonged to more Jewish
organizations, contributed more
heavily to Jewish causes, and
were more likely to have visited
Israel than the less intensive
group. They were significantly
more likely to make Judaism an
integral part of their family lives,
and showed greater interest in
their children's future
commitment.
Contrary to widespread belief,
the hours spent at Jewish studies
did not adversely affect general
educational achievements.
Ninety-four percent of the inten-
sive groups graduated from col-
lege, compared to seventy-two
percent of those with a less inten-
sive Jewish education. Ninety-five
percent of the intensive group
were in professional or
managerial positions.
ment of women in this communi-
ty. Jolene is also a past campaign
vice president. She is currently on
the board of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, the Jewish Family
Services and is on the UJA Na-
tional Women's Cabinet.
Debbie Gitomer has been ap-
pointed as Community Education
Vice President along with Michele
Goldstein. Debbie is the secretary
of the Jewish Community Center
and has worked on previous
Women's Division campaigns.
Michele has planned Women's
Wednesday in the past and is
employed as a case worker for
Jewish Family Services.
Mimi Aaron and Patty Kalish
will serve as Social Projects Vice
Presidents. Mimi and Patty have
both chaired several of the dollar
divisions for the Women's Divi-
sion, including the Pearl and Sap-
phire Divisions.
Deborah Eisenstadt, President
of the Women's Business and Pro-
fessional Network is the B and P
Vice President of the Women's
Division.
Nadine Feldman, former chair-
man of the Ruby Division will
serve as the Secretary for
Women's Division. Nadine is a
former chairman of the Ruby and
Sapphire Divisions of the
Women's Division and is a
member of the board of the Jewish
Community Center.
The following individuals will
also be working with Alice to en-
sure a successful year: Kay
Jacobs, Rhoda Karpay, Bobbe
Karpe, and Ann Rudolph, who are
board members at large; Blossom
Leibowitz and Lois Older are
representatives to the Council of
Jewish Federation's Women's
Division Board; Lili Kaufmann
and Jolene Shor serve on the Na-
tional UJA Women's Division
Cabinet, Lib Kaufmann, Blossom
Leibowitz, Alice Rosenthal, Mar-
sha Sherman, Jolene Shor, Ellen
Stern and Aida Weissman repre-
sent Tampa on the Regional UJA
Women's Division Cabinet.
The Suicide and Crisis Center of
Hillsborough County has schedul-
ed its next training course for
volunteers who are interested in
becoming para-professional crisis
counselors. The course will begin
Monday, Oct. 6, and will run
through Nov. 17.
The course is designed to teach
participants how to sharpen
listening and communication skills
as well as how to facilitate helping
an individual through a crisis.
Anyone interested in register-
ing for the course or in providing
other volunteer time to the Center
should call Marilyn Schoch, Coor-
dinator of Volunteers, at
238-8411.
The Suicide and Crisis Center is
a United Way agency that
operates a twenty-four hour crisis
line for Hillsborough County.
ANDREW M.HIRSCH
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
IB
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Page 4 The Jewish FJoridian of Tampa/Friday, September 5,. 1986
IHf
Just Who Was
Arrogant in Helsinki?
The Soviets are saying this week that the
Israelis with whom they met in Helsinki last
week were "arrogant, and that is why they
abruptly ended the meeting 90 minutes after
it started. The Soviets are saying that they
have no plans to resume any talks with the
arrogant Israelis at any time.
The Israelis are saying that they were
"bound" to talk to the Soviets about the
status of Soviet Jewry that they can hold
no discussion at whatever level with the
Soviets unless they are asked to make an in-
telligent response about the future of so
many Soviet Jews who are suffering either
in limbo or in frank imprisonment for having
asked permission to emigrate to Israel.
We are saying that it is the Soviets who
were arrogant for thinking they could broad-
cast to the world their intention of resuming
talks (if not ties) with the Israelis at the
same time that their real plan was to arrive
in Helsinki, present to the Israelis a single-
item agenda of their own the status of
their real estate in Israel and refuse to
listen, except in stony silence, and then walk
out on the agenda of the other party.
Avoiding Second Blunder
That, of course, is life Kremlin-style but
not anywhere else in the free world.
Helsinki is the place where the Soviets
hoped to broadcast the propaganda that they
are the free world, too, tovarish.
Finally, we are saying that the Soviets will
have a lot of things to say to Israel in the
near future, stony silence and their
abominable behavior in Helsinki not-
withstanding. Not to mention their threat
that nothing more will be heard from them
on the subject.
After all, the subject is not peace or
freedom or Soviet Jews so far as the Soviets
are concerned. The subject is the Middle
East, where they committed the diplomatic
blunder of the age back in 1967 when they
severed their ties to Israel. They want back
into a part of the action there after nearly 20
years of being locked out.
The Soviets do not want to repeat another
blunder in Helsinki, which this time took on-
ly days to be understood by the rest of the
world and to backfire.
Homage to Yeshiva
Philatelists experience a special excite-
ment when a new stamp is issued. But when
the United States issues a postage stamp in
September honoring the first president of
Yeshiva University, Dr. Bernard Revel,
many Americans, philatelists or not, will
have cause for pride.
The occasion will be the 100th anniversary
of Yeshiva University in New York City.
Gov. Edwin W. Edwards of Louisiana has
seen fit to issue a proclamation taking note
of that distinguished Jewish institution of
higher learning and its special celebration.
And Dr. William J. Bennett, U.S.
Secretary of Education, will be featured
speaker at a special Centennial convocation
in New York on Sept. 18.
Memorable Milestone
Gov. Edwards, in his proclamation, notes
OewisH Floridian
Of Tampa
that Yeshiva University is represented by
many alumni throughout this state," and he
has bid the citizens of Louisiana to "take due
recognition of this most memorable
milestone."
And a memorable milestone it is indeed,
for Yeshiva University dates its founding
from the establishment of Yeshiva Etz
Chaim in September, 1886. In the beginning
a small school on New York's Lower East
Side, it later merged with the Rabbi Isaac
Elchanan Theological Seminary. Yeshiva
University grew out of that merger.
Incredible Development
Today, the University comprises 15
schools, divisions and affiliates. There are
five undergraduate schools (four for men,
one for women), seven graduate and profes-
sional schools and three affiliates, with a
total enrollment of some 7,000 men and
women.
The University's full-time faculties
number nearly 1,400. And it boasts four
campuses in New York City, as well as af-
filiated units in Los Angeles and Israel.
The postage stamp in honor of Dr. Revel,
the appearance of Secretary of Education
Bennett at the Centennial celebration Sept.
18, Gov. Edwards' proclamation these
and a host of other stellar happenings yet to
occur are all clearly deserved honors for an
institution which continues to grow and to
bring the Jewish community in particular
and Americans in general a sense of higher
education in their midst at its best.
Still Making Deals
Emile Zola understood his fellow-
countrymen best when he rather contemp-
tuously called them a nation of shopkeepers.
That observation still stands France in good
stead. At the same time that the French
make loud noises about anti-terrorism,
Foreign Minister Jean-Bernard Raimond
has been meeting with PLO representatives
to assure them that his government wants
the PLO to be "associated with an overall
settlement" in the Middle East.
Never mind that Prime Minister Jacques
Chirac insists that he opposes the creation of
a Palestinian state. The separation of prin-
ciples between Chirac and Raimond is the
political result of a very close election last
time the French went to the polls.
What we've got here is more than an un-
fortunate difference of opinion. What we've
got here is shopkeeperism, pure and simple.
The French may talk anti-terrorism. But
they've yet to stop trying to make deals with
terrorists.
Larouche Candidates
They Seem To Be Wilting on the Vim
PHILADELPHIA In
the recent spring primary
election in Pennsylvania,
only one candidate from the
LaRouchian slate managed
a victory a Democratic
state comitteeman from
Bucks County according
to a recently released
analysis prepared by the
Philadelphia Chapter of the
American Jewish
Committee.
Despite the number of can-
didates fielded including those
for governor, the Senate, the
State House and Democratic
State Committee the
LaRouchian political influence
would seem to be "off the radar
screen" for 1986, the analysis
adds.
Ronald L. Kaiserman, co-
chairman of the AJC chapter's
Urban Affairs Committee, reports
that the Jewish community re-
mains watchful of the anti-Semitic
and extremist strains in much of
the LaRouche ideology, and will
continue to monitor the impact of
LaRouchian candidates here and
across the country.
OFFICIALS OF the
Philadelphia Chapter of the AJC
One Pennsylvania Democratic
Party staffer told the American
Jewish Committee that in Penn-
sylvania, whether in the Eastern
or Western part of the state, rural
or urban, "nobody seemed to be
buying them," referring to
LaRouche candidates.
LaRouchian extremist rhetoric
was significantly muted in the
primary, the AJC report con-
tinues. Paul Kirk, Democratic Na-
tional Committee chairman,
recently issued a warning in the
Congressional Record that
"political extremism of any form
must never be ignored or taken
for granted." He asserted that
LaRouchians were "participating
in American politics under clouds
of fraud and false pretense,"
alluding to LaRouchian tactics of
deceptive political practice.
races, and elsewhere were not im-
pressive, there may be concern in
future Democratic races in the
state, the analysis adds. Accor-
ding to one political expert, in
1972 there were nine member*
running for the State House
without opposition; in 1986, there
were 67 members running unop-
posed either in the primary or the
general election, and where there
was opposition, it was only from
LaRouchians.
In his opinion, the Democratic
and Republican parties alike
should assume the responsibility
to run credible opposition to pre-
vent extremist candidates and fr-
inge groups from entering the
political mainstream.
"IF THE RIGHT configuration
of circumstances occurs," this
source told the AJC, "we could
----------- auurue toiu uits /wi>, wc ww
THE PARTY, caught by sur- see a surprise that we had in II
prise with an early spring victory linois in the spring." "If a party's
by a LaRouchian in Illinois, now
sees that "education is inocula-
tion, and has been informing its
chairmen and rank and file about
the LaRouche party challenge.
According to a national
American Jewish Committee
analysis, "Lyndon LaRouche and
the Politics of Deception "
published last May, LaRouche's
current political vehicle, the Na-
responsibiiity of recruiting can-
didates to run on the ballot isn't
fulfilled, it leaves the door open
for people to sneak in" to the pro-
cess. "This year, in the primary,
we had incumbents, sacrificial
lambs, and fanatics" on state
tickets.
What concerns those who track
elections in Pennsylvania
rmiaaeipnia (Jhapter of the AJC ;r wx, uie wa- "-" "\ *_ \Tfuoan.
have spoken with Democratic Par ^.^ocratic Policy commit- throughout the m^
ty leadership in Philadelphia Har- *%. ?*y we" ""dead the un- P**l of *. {
FKF.DK SHOCIIKT
Kdilor and PuMuher
Huiinea. Office m)H Horatio Street. Tampa. Fla 3:MOV
Telephone M72 4470
Publication >ice I'M NK 6 St. Miami. Fla 33132
SUZANNK MHUCHKT AlillKK.Y HAUBKNST1X K
Kecutive Kdilor Kdilor
The Jewiah Floridiaa Dote Not Gaaraalee The Kaihrath
_ Of TheMerrhaadW Advecliaed In lU I olu.
PubluhadBi Waakiy Plu. I Additional Edition on January 31 1 Ml hv Th. J,.h ___i -*..
Postmaster. Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian
d'reV" SS^gtS?,3T*:i "SL-eZZ+m? "ft 52 "". 'uHscrined
per vea, J deduced ,r,m K ZXEL.12^^^^J^^^T^^t
Friday, September 5, 1986
Volume 8
1 ELUL 5746
Number 19
ty leadership in Philadelphia, Har
risburg, and Washington, as well
as with political and media ex-
perts since the May primary, to
assess the impact of LaRouche
forces and evaluate their future
strength. While no one has track-
ed all the Pennsylvania races, key
Democratic Party officials and
staff expressed their delight at
defeating LaRouchian candidates
in races around the state, par-
ticularly since county chairmen
had been alerting party members
and the public to the deceptive
tactics of LaRouchian candidates
since well before the May
primary.
sophisticated voter into believinir
it is an affiliate of the Democratic
Party."
It is precisely this tactic that the
party has been figTting
throughout Pennsylvania^ Some
iSffl L** beliefs IS:
mcluded anti-Semitism ("the U S
H'0"L8t "obby,"), denial of
Holocaust history, and diatribes
against the queen of England
mixed m with propaganda alSsi
international drug trade
the
worldwide terrorism
pornography.
and
AJC noted that extremists, like
LaRouchians, consider anyone
"fools and dupes who don t agree
with them." To groups who feea
off hatred and resentment at tne
economy or the frustrations oi
life, the extremists' simplism
solutions give comfort.
While analysts, party officials,
and others agree that "the odds of
LaRouchians winning are very
small" through the 1980s in Penn-
sylvania and elsewhere, the at-
traction evident in areas affected
by economic dislocation in I
Dy economic aisiocauon m -*
Pr/i a i ^e URouchian races in farm Mi **<* rust belt must
rmiaaeipnia, Pennsylvania State ** addressed, Kaiserman said.


Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5

Mrs. Richard Fisher
Weddings
FISHMANFISHER
Michelle Dawn Fishman and
Richard Fisher were married on
Saturday evening, August 16, at
the University Club of Tampa.
Michelle is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel E. Fishman and
the granddaughter of Mrs. Claire
Rossin, Tampa, and Mrs. Shirley
Fruchtman of Miami.
Rick's parents are Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Fisher of Fort Lauder
dale, and his grandparents are
Mrs. Ida Diamond, Margate,
Florida, and Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Fisher, Nashville, Tennessee.
The maid of honor was the
bride's sister, Jennifer Fishman of
New Orleans. Bridesmaids were
Dawn Levison and DeeAnn
Winsett, both of Tampa, and
Michele Popkin of Paramus, New
Jersey.
Mark Fisher of New York City
served as his brother's best man
with groomsmen Dan Gitlitz,
Plantation, Florida, Ira Levin, St.
Petersburg, and Michelle's
brother, Jeffrey Fishman of
Tampa.'4*"
Michelle carried her mother's
handkerchief and a good luck pen-
ny given to her by Rick's mother.
The wedding rings used in the
ceremony were those of the
groom's parents.
Out-of-town guests were Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Katsoff, Mr. and
Mrs. George Kline, Mr. and Mrs.
Abe Spevack, and Mrs. Mary
Neff, all of Philadelphia; Miss
Elise Lebow and Miss Mimi Brody
of Somerville, MA; Dr. and Mrs.
Arthur L. Brody, Bethlehem, PA;
Mr. Morris Maltzer, Sinking Spr-
ing, PA; Mr. Peter Brody,
Washington, DC; Mr. and Mrs.
Merton D. Minsky, Brockton, MA;
Miss Barbara Minsky, Norwood,
Mass; Mr. Steven Minsky,
Cranberry, NJ; Mrs. Gary
Davidoff, Ann Arbor, MI; Mrs.
Esther Lander, Riverdale, NY;
Mrs. Annette Rolnick, Long
Beach, NY; Dr. A. David Rossin,
Los Altos Hills, CA; Mr. Barry
Draft, Chicago; Mr. and Mrs.
Dave Fisher, Cincinnati; Mr. and
Mrs. Benjie Lebow and Jeffrey,
Manchester, NH; Mr. David Git-
telman, Miami; Dr. and Mrs.
Joseph Maltzer, Longboat Key;
and Mr. and Mrs. Mort Present,
Sarasota.
Parties given were a shower in
Fort Lauderdale by Mrs. Robert
Grenitz, Mrs. David Jackowitz,
and Mrs. Paul Tekel; a shower in
Tampa by Mrs. Myer Frank, Mrs.
Lawrie Glickman-.-'and Mrs. Bar-
bara Marks; a dessert party after
the rehearsal idaaeDfafCioung
friends and relataeA^Lfre bride
and groom by Jennifer JJishman;
the rehearsal dinner at Harbour
Island Hotel by Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Fisher; and the dinner
reception at the Univeristy Club
by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fishman.
After an Alaskan cruise honey-
moon, the newlyweds will be at
home in South Miami.
KARBAL-VIDAL
Renee Louise Karbal and
Robert John Vidal were married
Sunday, August 17 at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom. Rabbi Ken-
neth Berger and Cantor William
Hauben officiated.
Renee is the daughter of Albert
and Judy Karbal of Oak Park,
Michigan. She is employed by
Econo Auto Painting.
Robert is the son of Henry and
Betty Vidal of Tampa. He is
employed by Columbia Jobbing
Company.
Following the ceremony a din-
ner reception was held at Rodeph
Sholom.
The couple will hve in Tampa.
PADVA-GELLIS
Sharon Ruth Padva and Charles
Stephen GeUis were married
Saturday, August 16 at the home
of Charles Gellis in carroUwood.
Rabbi Steven Kaplan, director of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
at the University of South
Florida, officiated.
The bride is the daughter of
Mrs. Idell Port of Chicago, Il-
linois. The groom is the son of
Mrs. Alice Hovan of Coral Gables,
Florida.
Sharon is an English teacher at
Ben Hill Junior High in Car-
roUwood. Charles is the regional
director for B'nai B'rith for the
West Coast and South Dade Coun-
ty, Florida. The couple will live
temporarily in Tampa and will be
relocating to Miami.
A triptych by internationally noted artist,
John Beardsley, was dedicated to the hap-
piness of the residents of Mary Walker Apart-
ments Aug. 18. The large colorful painting
titled "Memories" hangs in the lobby. Pic-
tured at the ceremony were Tom Vann, Mark
Seelig, Jane Howard, president of the Resi-
dent's Association; Juliet Rodriquez, Amy
Beardsley, daughter of the artist; Lois Older,
Fran Grace, and Ronald Rudolph.
Vereen As Actor/ Humanitarian
Ticket sales and reservations
for the Menorah Manor Guild
Gala, "Pippin" starring Ben
Vereen, are moving extremely
well towards the sellout goal, says
Sue Schecter, Chairman.
When this musical comedy,
"Pippin," premiered on Broad-
way in 1972, the New York critics
declared "Pippin" a hit and Ben
Vereen a superstar. Now, for the
first time since he electrified
Broadway with his performance,
Vereen is recreating his Tony
Award-winning role on a national
tour. On November 8 at Ruth
Eckerd Hall, he'll once again play
the leading player, head of a small
troupe of actors, singers and
dancers engaged in telling a fin-
ciful tale about Charlemagne's
first-born son, Pippin. "Pippin"
won awards for direction,
choreography, sets, lighting and
Vereen's performance.
In addition to his ac-
complishments as an outstanding
performer, Verren has also been
honored for his humanitarian ac-
tivities: In 1978 he was the reci-
pient of Israel's Cultural Award;
in 1979 he was the recipient of
Israel's Humanitarian Award, and
in 1988 the Eleanor Roosevelt
Humanitarian Award. The
NAACP awarded Ben. for two
consecutive years, its prestigious
Image Award, 1978 and 1979. He
has been appointed American
Heart Association's Heart Cam-
paign chairman and for the past
four years, has been the Interna-
tional Chairman for SIDS, Sudden
Infant Death Syndrome. In 1985
he became National Chairman for
the Captain KID Safety Program.
With five children, Vereen was
awarded the 1985 "Father of the
Year" award.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 5, 1986
Hillel School of Tampa Opens The '86-'87 School Year
Teachers and students arrived
at the Hillel School of Tampa on
the morning of Aug. 25 to start
their current school year.
All children encompasses
grades K-8 with an average of 12
students per class. "Our main ob-
jective is to offer a bi-cultural pro-
gram geared to the individual
needs of all children," said Scharf.
The offerings include a superior
secular program as well as ex-
panded physical education ac-
tivities, such as tennis and
swimming.
The educational "package" in-
cludes a process of Jewish
character shaping and the
development of a sensitivity to
one's own Jewish identity and
heritage.
The 1986-87 program of study
covers the following major areas:
Language Arts in both English
and Hebrew, General and Jewish
Social Studies, Science, Math,
Speech, Drama, Physical Educa-
tion, Ancient, Traditional and
Modern Jewish Literature in-
cluding Biblical texts, Mishna and
Gemara, Jewish Customs, and
Liturgy.
A selection of electives includes
Comparative Religion, Family
Life Education and the Arts. The
school also has a guidance depart-
ment and a 1:7 student to teacher
ratio.
a
el
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Left to right, seated: Mrs. Liora Doron (Hebrew), Mrs. Sylvia
Rtchman (Hebrew and Judaic Studies), Rabbi Theodore Brod (Bi-
ble and Germara), Mrs. Jewell Knotts (Language Arts), Mrs.
Rochelle Lewis (Hebrew and Judaic Studies) and Mrs. Laura
Kreitzer, President of the Board of Directors. Standing: Mr.
Joachim Scharf, Headmaster, Mrs. Sharon Lancz (General and
Judaic Studies), Ms. Vickie Tasker (Science), Mrs. Saralee Black
(Kindergarten Center), Mr. Lewis Bush (Social Studies), Mrs.
Lynn Reiber (Language Arts), Mrs. Rochelle Herzog (General
and Judaic Studies), Mrs. Stephanie Josefsberg (Assistant), Mrs.
Dorothy Clements (General Studies), Mr. Agostino DeGennaro
(Math). Absent: Mrs. Priscilla Taylor (Administrative Assistant)
amd Mrs. Linda Evans (School Secretary).
200 Leaders of American Jewry to Participate In
Hebrew Union College Dedication Ceremonies
Approximately 200 leaders of
the American Jewish community
are scheduled to attend a "Week
of Dedication" in Jerusalem,
Israel, Nov. 2-9, hosted by
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion. Hebrew Union
College will dedicate two new
buildings, the Skirball Center for
Biblical and Archaeological
Research and Museum and the
Mildred and Bennett Trupin
Family Torah Center, on the cam-
pus of its Jerusalem School. In ad-
dition, the College has begun to
erect a major library facility which
will be completed in the near
future.
(Also scheduled for dedication is
a youth center/hostel constructed,
adjacent to the Hebrew Union
College campus, by the World
Union for Progressive Judaism.)
The Week of Dedication will in-
clude a regular meeting of the Col-
lege's Board of Governors, dinner
at the Knesset with the Prime
Minister, a reception hosted by
the President of Israel, and
meetings with leading per-
sonalities in the Israeli govern-
ment, the Jewish Agency and the
Israel Movement for Progressive
Judaism.
The Jerusalem School of
Hebrew Union College was found-
ed in 1963, and is today a focus of
education and culture for hun-
dreds of American and Israeli
youth and adults, as well as pro-
viding a mandatory first year of
study for HUC rabbinic, cantorial
and religious education students.
The Jerusalem School serves as
the academic center for American
young people, including those
spending a year at the Reform
kibbutzim of Yahel and Lotan,
enrolled in various programs in
Israel co-sponsored with the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, offers special study
opportunities for youth affiliated
with the Israel Movement for Pro-
gressive Judaism, and has
developed an increasingly broad
program of art exhibits, special
lectures, religious services and
other projects geared to the
general Israeli public. In addition,
the Jerusalem campus is home to
the Nelson Glueck School of
Biblical Archaeology, which has
undertaken major excavations at
several sites in Israel, and con-
ducts a special program of rab-
binic studies for native-born
Israelis.
"The wide scope of activities
undertaken by the Jerusalem
School," Dr. Gottschalk explain-
ed, "has put tremendous strain on
its original facilities and
necessitated our launching this
building program. We have been
heartened by the support for our
activities in Israel, and believe the
Jerusalem School not only forms a
crucial component of our
students' education, but is making
a genuine contribution to the
quality of life in Israel."
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion is the na-
tion's oldest institution of higher
Jewish studies. It trains rabbis,
cantors, religious school profes-
sionals, Jewish communal
workers and graduate and post
graduate scholars at its four cam-
puses in Cincinnati, New York,
Los Angeles and Jerusalem.
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The Alexander Muss High School in
Israel Linkages In Jewish Identity
By NINA SINSLEY
Tuesday, Aug. 12 was the date
of a dialogue with the newly arriv-
ed headmaster of Hillel School of
Tampa, Joachim Scharf. The
meeting was held to discuss op-
portunities for furthering Jewish
identity among the teenagers.
Since Scharf was already
familiar with the Alexander Muss
High School in Israel program it
was natural to explore ways of fin-
ding new sources of funding to
enable Tampa Jewish educators to
participate in the upcoming High
School in Israel Educators pro-
gram. The program runs from
Dec. 21, 1986 through Jan. 7,
1987.
Local high school juniors and
seniors fas well as soDhomores at
the end of their year) are eligible
to select one of the five to eight
week sessions. In Israel they earn
home school credits while ex-
periencing an international
award-winning inter-disciplinary
academic core program.
This comprehensive program
provides cultural, social, recrea-
tional and academic components
along with the bonus of earning up
to six college credits.
One of the advantages of the
program is the regard colleges
hold for high school students who
have successfully completed this
type of foreign study.
Students and educators now
is the time to reserve the best ses-
sion for you.
In (his historic photograph, Zionist leader Theodor Herd and
members of the World Zionist Organization pose on the parcel of
land where now stands the Jerusalem campus of Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Left to right: Joseph
Seidener, member of the World Zionist Organization; Dr. Moses
Schnirer, member of the World Zionist Organization executive;
Dr. Theodor Herd; David Wolffsohn, second president of the
World Zionist Organization; and Max Bodenheimer, one of the
founders of the World Zionist Organization.
Cypress Travel Center Inc.
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1
Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
A Mirage Becomes A Reality
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
"Making the desert bloom" has
apparently become too jaded a
challenge for the Jewish National
Fund. Now the JNF has made a
reality of an even more far-
fetched mirage: a swimming and
boating lake in the torrid and
once-desolate Arava desert.
To the visitor coming upon the
lake in the Timna Valley park
after driving for sweltering miles
on the ruler-straight Arava road,
a sense of the ultimate fata
morgana is almost inescapable.
The 17-dunam kidney-shaped
lake blends into the surrounding
rocky landscape dotted with
acacia trees, all in the middle of
literally nowhere.
The lake was formally pro-
nounced open recently, in a water-
side ceremony attended by JNF
officials, parents and children
from the settlements of the local
Eilat region, and Avram Chudnow
of Milwaukee, who has pledged $1
million, the largest contribution
made by an individual in the
history of the JNF, to make the
New Director of CJF
Israel Office Announced
NEW YORK Carmi
Schwartz, executive vice presi-
dent of the Council of Jewish
Federations, has announced the
appointment of Stephen G. Don-
shik as director general of CJF's
Israel Office. Dr. Donshik will
replace Martin S. Kraar, who
leaves to become executive vice
president of the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Detroit.
The Israel Office of CJF was
reopened in 1985 after a hiatus of
13 years. The goal of the Office is
to serve the needs of the Jewish
Federations of North America in
relation to Israel, arranging for
exchange programs in human ser-
vices, screening Israeli schlichim
to American communities and
other such functions. The Office
also serves to keep key Israelis
more informed and aware of the
agenda, services, programs and
issues of the North American
Jewish Federation movement,
thus improving the effectiveness
of dialogue and cooperation bet-
ween the two communities.
"The CJ*V office in Israel lias
enhanced the relationship bet-
ween North American Jewish
Federations and Israel and fulfills
specific program functions for
CJF member Federations,"
Schwartz said.
Dr. Donshik comes to his new
post directly from the United
Israel Appeal office in Jerusalem,
where he was Director of Pro-
gram Evaluation. From 1980 to
1983, he served as executive
director of the Jewish Family Ser-
vice of New Haven, CT.
Previous to that. Dr. Donshik
was a professor for several years
at the Wurzweiler School of Social
Work in New York City. He main-
tained his interest in the academic
world as an adjunct professor
there and at Queens College and
Southern Connecticut State
University School of Social Work.
Dr. Donshik received a BS in
Social Welfare and an MSW from
Adelphi University, a certification
in Jewish Communal Service from
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, and a DSW
from Wurzweiler School of Social
Work of Yeshiva University.
Barbara Bush, wife of Vice President George Bush, is shown with
r. Shirley Meyer, medical director of ALYN Hospital for
Physically-Handicapped Children, and Mickey, during her visit
m Jerusalem. The Vice President and his wife were guests of the
government during their recent stop in Israel as part of his Mid-
dle East tour to study the possibilities of peace there.
Business
Loans
$26,00042.5 million
SB A loans prepared
Small Business
Investment Company
loans arranged
Ventura Capital
RAD Funding
Business Capital Corp.
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Tamps, Florida 33634
Tamp. 885-8951
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[JACKAGING
|:]ROWARD
[JAPER a
jjACKAGING
lake a reality. Chudnow summed
up his commitment to developing
the lake and the Timna park with
the words: "I am a man of the
Arava."
World JNF chairman Moshe
Rivlin, speaking at the ceremony,
told Chudnow, who has already
paid $350,000 and plans to com-
plete the rest of his pledge within
two years, that the JNF would do
all it can to turn the Negev into a
Garden of Eden.
Rivlin recalled David Ben
Gurion's vision of a blooming
desert, which Israel's first Prime
Minister considered essential to
the survival of the State. "We can
do the unbelievable," he said.
The JNF excavated the land,
lined the bottom of the hollow
with polyurethane to prevent the
water from seeping into the soil,
and piped in brackish water that is
plentifully present under the
ground.
Estimates put the total amount
of brackish water under the arid
ground of the Negev as high as
some 70 billion cubic meters, says
Menahem Perlmutter, director of
the Jewish Agency's Negev
engineering department, the man
who first fired Chudnow's love for
the Arava in 1988.
Perlmutter, who works in close
cooperation with the JNF, told the
JTA that as a result of research by
Israel Prize winner Yoel de
Malach of Kibbutz Reviv, local set-
tlements use the high salinity
brackish water to irrigate such
crops as grapes, peanuts and
cotton.
One of the local settlements,
Kibbutz Eliphaz, also operates the
Timna park in addition to its
grueling agricultural work under
the fierce Arava sun. Chudnow
was visibly moved during a tour of
the three-and-a-half-year-old kib-
butz, which moved into its perma-
nent quarters in July on land
prepared by the JNF one of the
many extensive land development
projects of the JNF in the Negev.
"The future of Israel is in the
Negev," Chudnow said, commen-
ting to the JTA. As though the
reason for his commitment should
be obvious, he said: "Well, the
Negev is the biggest part of the
country."
Chudnow, in addition to
donating money himself, also
travels all over the United States,
attracting other donors "like a
missionary," in the words of JNF
U.S. executive vice president Rab-
bi Samuel Cohen to raise the $3.5
million needed to complete the
park's development.
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A land developer and president
of a construction company back in
Milwaukee, Chudnow said: "I
have a developer's eye and can see
the potential of raw land." He
believes that the park will help
strengthen the local economy,
providing jobs, attracting more
settlement and tourism, and
"making it possible for people in
the area to live happily.'
The JNF created the park in the
Timna Valley some 30 kilometers
north of Euat to encompass the
majestic King Solomon Pillars
towering natural columns formed
by wind erosion over the millennia
and the ancient Timna copper
mines which date back to
prehistoric times.
The area also boasts serious ar-
chaeological sites an intact cop-
per smelting furnace, the oldest
one ever found, and ancient Egyp-
tian wall drawings depicting the
goddess Hathor, chariots and men
hunting the local wildlife. All the
evidence points to the fact that
.
Timna was a busy industrial area
4,000 years ago.
So far, 11 kilometers of road
have been built by the JNF
throughout the park since 1977 to
enable the 130,000 annual visitors
to Timna to reach all the in-
teresting sites. The JNF hopes to
build a further four kilometers as
well as a visitors center and camp-
ing site at the lakeside when the
funds can be found.
The lake is divided into two sec-
tions, with two dunams set aside
for swimming, and a large section,
with its own wooden jetty, offer-
ing boating and fishing facilities.
The Timna lake, which had only
been a dusty plan till Chudnow
pressed for its construction in
1983, was full of young, splashing
children when the guests arrived
for the opening ceremony. After
the local Kibbutz Yotvata
children's choir had performed an
elegant undulating dance entitled
"Water," they too plunged in to
cool off.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 5, 1986
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
REBECCA JACOBSON
Rebecca Michelle Jacobson,
(laughter of Stephen and Rena
Jacobson will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah Saturday,
September 6 at 11 a.m. at Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek. Rabbi
Joan Farber will officiate.
The celebrant will enter the
eighth grade at Coleman Junior
High School in the fall. She has
received awards in Oral Inter-
pretation and Science Fair at
Berkeley Prep, as well as awards
in horse back riding and
swimming.
Friends and family of the
celebrant will host the Oneg Shab-
bat on Friday, Sept. 5 immediate-
ly following Sabbath services.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Jacobson and
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Sussman,
grandparents of Rebecca; and
family and friends from Tampa,
Miami, Savannah, and
Philadelphia.
STEPHANILEOPOLD
Stephani Kim Leopold,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gerry
Leopold, will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on Satur-
day, September 6 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and Can-
tor William Hauben will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
Rodeph Sholom Religious School
and she is treasurer of Kadima.
Stephani attends Ben Hill Junior
High School where she is in the
8th Grade. She is a city bowling
champion in the singles and
doubles division.
Mr. and Mrs. Leopold will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion and a
reception Saturday at the Tampa
Airport Marriott hotel. A cocktail
party will be given in Stephani's
honor on Saturday evening at the
Leopold home. The hosts are
Gladys and Bob Leitman, Judy
Garcia, Sandy and Ira Smith, Ann
and Bob Troner, Linda and Sam
Blum, Annice and Lloyd Burak,
and Rachel and Mark Rabinovitz.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Chuck Kaplan, Drs.
Gary and Ann Kaplan, Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Nachman, Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Fineman, Mr. and
Mrs. Carlos Zeller, Mrs. Tillie
Feldman, and Mrs. Celia
Kaminsky.
STEVEN MALTER
Steven Joel, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Harvey Malter, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah
Saturday. September 6, at 9:30
U.S. Group Provides Grant
To Sugar Cane Workers
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish World Service,
the Boston-based international
development organization, has
provided a grant of $5,000 to a
group representing sugar cane
workers in the Philippines.
The grant was given to the Na-
tional Federation of Sugar
Workers, a non-governmental
group formed several years ago in
an effort to raise the standard of
living of sugar cane workers, ac-
cording to Laurence Simon,
AJWS president.
SIMON RETURNED recently
from a visit to the Philippines. He
was accompanied by AJWS ex-
ecutive committee members
Herbert Weiss, a Boston at-
torney, and Warren Eisenberg,
director of the International
Council of B'nai B'rith.
The grant to the Federation,
based on the island of Negros,
some 350 miles south of Manila, is
to aid in a farm lot program
designed to diversify crops in
Negros.
According to Simon, sugar cane
workers and their families suffer
from poverty and malnutrition,
and the farm lot program seeks to
provide proper guidance for rice
and corn crops to be developed
during the months when sugar
cane is not grown in Negros.
Simon and the delegation also
met with Philippine President
Corazon Aquino, who welcomed
AJWS involvement in self-help
rural programs that will assist
farmers with seeds, tools and
technical assistance to grow food
to sustain their families and sell in
the marketplace.
SIMON TOLD the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that, during
the 10-day visit to the Philippines,
the three-person group also met
with members of the Philippine
Jewish community at a reception
hosted by Israeli Ambassador Uri
Gordan. There are an estimated
350 Philippine Jews.
In addition, Simon said one host
of the AJWS trip to the Philip-
pines was Minister of Agrarian
Reform, Sonny Alvarez, a
member of the Cabinet of the
Aquino government. "We are fin-
ding great levels of cooperation
from the government," Simon
said.
But Simon pointed out that the
food lot program is merely a
short-term solution to the pro-
blems facing sugar cane workers
in Negros. He said there are
substantial quantities of land
thousands of acres that are now
being foreclosed on by banks and
ready for redistribution by the
government.
Some of the land was left by
owners who fled the country dur-
ing the downfall of the former
government of President Ferdi-
nand Marcos. AJWS hopes to pro-
vide additional funds and
agricultural assistance to persons
with the newly acquired land.
Simon said AJWS has been in con-
tact with Israel agricultural ex-
perts in an effort to have them
provide assistance to the people of
Negros.
Party Doves
Defended
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Labor Party Secretary General
Uzi Baram has taken issue public-
ly with Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin over the Minister's tough
remarks against party doves who
have pressed for recognition of
Palestinian self-determination.
Baram, himself a dove, said the
argument within labor over the
Palestinian problem was
legitimate, and there was no need
for name-calling.
Rabin, in a speech, said that
those in the party who called for
recognition of Palestinian self-
determination were calling "for
the strengthening of the PLO and
of termrinm." \
Artists To Gather
JERUSALEM (JTA) Ar-
tists and scholars will gather at
the Ein Kerem Center for the Per-
forming Arts for a program
dedicated to the subject of Jewish
heritage and the arts. The pur-
pose of the gathering, to begin
this week, is to explore the "com-
mon path of Jewish heritage in
new and creative ways," accor-
ding to Philip Diskin, artistic
director of the center.
Rebecca Jacobson
a.m. at Congregation Kol Ami.
Rabbi H. David Rose and Cantor
Sam Isaak will officiate.
The celebrant is a graduate of
the Kol Ami Religious School. He
is an active member of the
Kadima Youth Group, serving as
secretary. He is in 8th Grade at
Ben Hill Junior High School. He
has achieved Life Rank in Boy
Scout Troop 58.
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Malter will
host the Oneg Shabbat on Friday
evening. They will host a recep-
tion and luncheon Saturday at the
Hyatt Regency Hotel and a dinner
party for out of town family and
friends at their home Saturday
evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Aaron, Dr.
and Mrs. Richard Kanter, Dr. and
Mrs. Arthur Simon and Mr. and
Mrs. Max Zalkin will host a Sun-
day morning brunch for out of
town guests at the Aaron home.
Special guests will include
grandparents Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Hodor, Coconut Creek,
and Mrs. Shirley Lamoncheck,
Miami Beach; Barry, Lynn and
Michele Malter, Bethesda,
Maryland; Howard, Zena, Sandy
and Andy Hodor, Gainesville;
Elliot, Ellen, Larry and Matthew
Bernstein, Miami; Bernie and
Shirley Barish, Woodmere, New
York; Rosalind Luck, Boston; Irv-
ing and Edythe Goldstein Pem-
broke Pines; Hilda Malter, Miami
Beach; Manny and Ann Malter,
Miami Beach and Sylvia and
Henry Fischler, Lauderdale
Lakes.
JODI COHN
Jodi Ellyn Cohn, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Cohn, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah Saturday, September 13 at
9:30 a.m. at Congregation Kol
Ami. Taking part in the service,
will be Randi Cohn, Michelle Nan-
nis, Kevin Cooper, and Richard
Nannis, all of whom will read from
the Torah. Rabbi David Rose and
Cantor Sam Isaak will officiate.
Jodi is a graduate of Kol Ami
Religious School, and will con-
tinue her Jewish Studies in Kol
Ami Hebrew High Class. She also
is a member, and treasurer of
Kadima, and attends Ben Hill
Junior High. She is an Honor Stu-
dent whose interests are swimm-
ing, soccer, and professional
modeling.
In honor of the occasion Mrs.
Adina Fellheirner, will host the
Friday evening Oneg Shabbat and
Saturday Kiddush. Jodi will be
honored Saturday Evening with a
Dinner Party for all friends and
relatives.
Special relatives include grand-
parents Mrs. Adina Fellheirner of
New York, and Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Cohn of Clearwater;
great uncle Theo Fellheirner,
uncles Morris Fellheirner and
Alan Cohn of New York, great un-
cle and aunt Mr. and Mrs. Shlomo
Fledel of Lod, Israel. Other out of
town guests and relatives include
aunt Jette Natt, of New York; Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Schwartz of New
York; Mrs. Louise Ringel of
Brunswick, Ga. and Mrs. Peggy
Zell of Jacksonville, Fla.
SHAM HOROWITZ
Shari Michelle Horowitz,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irving I.
Horowitz will be called to the
Stephani Leopold
Steven Malter
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah Saturday,
Sept. 13 at 11 a.m. at Congrega-
tion Schaarai Zedek. Rabbi Joan
Glazer Farber will officiate.
Shari is a student in the
Schaarai Zedek Religious School
and is active in the Junior Youth
Group. She attends Eighth Grade
at Greco Junior High School.
Mr. and Mrs. Horowitz will co-
host an Oneg Shabbat Friday
Shari Horowitz
evening and a Kiddush on Satur-
day following services in honor of
the occasion.
Special guests will include
grandmother Ruth Dreyfuss of
Sunrise, and grandfather Murray
Horowitz of Lakeland; uncle and
aunts, Larry and Carol Dreyfuss
of Coral Springs, Florida, Sonya
Horowitz of Birmingham, and
Susan Hammer of New Jersey.
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Jewish Floridian of Tampa


Friday, Se]
.
,
.
Koziy Cozy in Costa Rica
But in 1983, Bonn Refused To Extradite Him
e Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
NEW YORK (JTA) -
West Germany refused to
ask for the extradition of a
wartime killer of a four-
year-old Jewish child
despite an American re-
quest that it do so, an of-
ficial of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council disclosed
Moreover, Justice Department
documents show that the West
German government refused the
request aitnougn it agreed with
American authorities that the
child had indeed been murdered
by the accused individual.
KALMAN SULTANIK, a vice
president of the World Jewish
Congress and chairman of the
Memorial Council's Committee on
Anti-Semitism, released the
Justice Department documents.
The documents which it had ob-
tained under the Freedom of In-
formation Act reveal that in
1982 the Justice Department had
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asked the West German govern-
ment to extradite and prosecute
Bohdan Koziy. who had been
stripped of American citizenship
which he had obtained after con-
cealing his war-time criminal
activities.
Koziy had taken part in various
anti-Jewish actions during the
war as a member of the Ukrainian
police, which operated under Ger-
man direction.
In 1949 Kosiy came to the
United States under the Displaced
Persons Act and became a
naturalized citizen in 1956. The
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations (OSI) filed
a complaint seeking his
denaturalization in 1979, and,
following a trial in the federal
district court in West Palm Beach,
Florida, the court on March 29,
1982 issued its decision revoking
the citizenship of Koziy.
Eye-witness testimony at the
trial described Koziy snatching
the four-year-old daughter of a
local Jewish town doctor and
dragging her to the police station.
The witnesses described the little
girl pleading for her release, cry-
ing, "Mother he's going to shoot
me," and "I want to live."
IN JULY, 1982 the OSI wrote
to the Ministry of Justice in West
GErmany to suggest that Koziy
be extradited for "personally and
single-handedly" murdering the
little girl "by shooting her at
point-blank range." In the letter,
the OSI also referred to Koziy ac-
tively participating in the murders
of members of another Jewish
family.
But the German Foreign Office
handed a diplomatic note to the
American Embassy in Bonn on
March 28, 1983 in which it ex-
pressed its refusal "to initiate ex-
tradition proceedings in this
case."
The note conceded that "There
is no doubt as to Koziy's participa-
tion in the two aforementioned
shooting incidents." However, it
characterised the crimes as
"manslaughter" rather than
murder because the killings could
not be shown to have involved
"cruelty, iniquity, lust for murder
and base motives."
AS A RESULT, the German
document said the crimes are no
longer prosecutable since "the
statute of limitations has already
rendered them void since the spr-
ing of 1960."
"Cruelty," according to the
diplomatic note, "would exist only
if the perpetrator, beyond the pur-
pose of executing the killings, had
imposed special pain or torture on
the victims out of a mentality en-
tirely devoid of feeling or mercy."
The note argued that no such
assumption can be made and "the
fact that one of the victims was a
four-year-old child in itself does
not suffice to establish a deter-
mination of a cruel or underhand-
ed killing."
Similarly, the note said "the
available documents do not show
any indications that, according to
the meaning of the law, Koziy
acted out of a lust for murder,
that is, an unnatural enjoyment of
the destruction of human beirurs."
FOLLOWING THE German
refusal to request extradition, the
Justice Department obtained a
court order of deportation against
Koziy and in June 1984 the United
States District Court awarded to
the government almost $19,000 in
costs to be paid by the defendant.
During the past summer, Koziy
escaped to Costa Rica where he is
reportedly living in a luxurious ha-
cienda and operating a coffee
plantation. Last Saturday,
however, Costa Rican Deputy In-
terior Minister Alvara Ramos an-
nounced the government was
seeking a court order to expel
Koziy. In expressing "outrage and
indignation at this callous miscar-
riage of justice," Sultanik said
that he was especially concerned
in view of the "dear-cut nature of
this case."


*'
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 5, 1986

Jewish Chaplains, Military Lay Leaders, JWB Makes Plans For
Jewish Military Personnel, Families To Mark High Holy Days
NEW YORK, N.Y. Jews in
the U.S. armed forces stationed
throughout the continental U.S.
and around the world, their
families and patients in Veterans
Administration hospitals will be
able to observe the Jewish New
Year (Rosh Hashanah) and the
Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur)
with the assistance of Jewish
chaplains, lay leaders and
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council.
The announcement was made by
Rabbi Barry H. Greene, chairman,
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council.
This year Rosh Hashanah
begins at sundown on Friday, Oct.
3, and ends at dark on Sunday,
Oct. 5. Yom Kippur begins with
the chanting of "Kol Nidre" on
the evening of Sunday, Oct. 12
and concludes at nightfall on Mon-
day, Oct. 13.
For High Holy Days, according
to Rabbi David Lapp, director,
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council,
Largest Class of Jewish Cadets
Since WWII Enters West Point
WEST POINT, N.Y. Twnty-
two Jewish men and women are
entering the United States
Military Academy at West Point
as members of the Class of 1990.
This is the largest number of
Jewish cadets to enter a single
class since World War II.
The total number of Jewish
cadets who have announced their
affiliation with the Jewish com-
munity has reached a total of 58
cadets, also the highest level in
decades.
A special welcoming ceremony
for the new Jewish cadets was
held at the West Point Jewish
Chapel. Well wishers, community
members and representatives of
the Jewish War Veterans were in
attendance.
At the ceremonies each new
Jewish cadet was presented with
an inscribed edition of the Siddur
for Jewish Personnel in the Arm-
ed Forces.
The Class of 1990' I Jewish
members consist of 18 men and
four women. The majority, 13,
come from New York, New Jersey
and Massachusetts. Four are from
California, four from the south
and one is from the midwest.
"The Jewish Chapel greatly
enhances the lives of the Jewish
cadets and community at West
Point," Herbert M. Ames, Presi-
dent of the West Point Jewish
Chapel Fund, states.
Ames noted, "There is normally
a loss of roughly 20-30 percent of
all cadets during their first year.
This past year, not a single Jewish
cadet departed. Parents tell us
repeatedly, the Chapel helps their
children, giving them the strength
and courage to complete the dif-
ficult first year.
"One of the original intentions
of the Chapel was to provide a
religious home that serves to
welcome members of the Jewish
faith to West Point. The Chapel is
cited as a significant factor for the
growing number of Jewish cadets
at West point."
Our Gang
Continued from Page 2
Veep. Good luck to Dana Hirsch, daughter of Lynn and
Richard Hirsch, who will serve as vice president of the student
body of Coleman Junior High this year. Dana is an honor student
in the 8th grade.
Native son. Welcome home to Abe Marcadis, son of Rachel
and Sam Marcadis. Abe left after high school to study at Emory
University where he received his BS and MD. He completed
general surgery residencies at Emory and USF, then took his
plastic surgery training at Baylor University in Houston. He's
now practicing in Tampa, with Dr. Maurice Novic.
Needless to say, his family is delighted to have him home. And
just as delighted about his forthcoming marriage to Betsy Zack.
Best wishes for a great future.
Community Calendar
Friday, September 5
9:30 a.m. Tampa Jewish Federation/Women's
Division Campaign Cabinet
Candlelighting time 7:27 p.m.
Sundaj, September 7
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5-FM 11
a.m.-l p.m.
Jewish Commuity Center Fun Day
9 a.m. Kol Ami Religious School Orientaion and
Brunch
9 a.m. Rodeph Sholom Religious School begins
9 a.m. Schaarai Zedek Religious School begins
9 a.m. Schaarai Zedek Brotherhood Brunch
1 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Council
2 p.m. Hadassah/Shalom Brandon Membership
Tea
8 p.m. Kol Ami/Jewish Community Center Adults
at Leisure Gala Ball
Monday, September 8
10 a.m. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter Board meeting
12:15 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Executive Board
meeting
1:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board
meeting
7:30 p.m. Hadassah/Ameet Study Group
8 p.m. Kol Ami Men's Club Board meeting
Tuesday, September 9
6 p.m. B&P Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Hillel School Board meeting
7:30 p.m. ORT/Evening Re-enrollment
8 p.m. Chabad Lubavitch Couples Study Group
8 p.m. Kol Ami Membership Coffee
Wednesday, September 10
Jewish Community Food Bank
11:30 a.m. National Council Jewish Women Open-
ing meeting
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
6:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Family Service Board
Orientation
7:80 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Men's Club meeting
7:30 p.m. Jewish Women for Jewish Survival
Thursday, September 11
10 a.m. Brandeis Women Showcase
5 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Council
7:50 Kol Ami Board meeting
8 p.m. Brandeis Women Showcase
Friday, September 12
Candlelighting time 7:19 p.m.
Saturday, September 13
8 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Bid and Buy Auction
8:45 p.m. Kol Ami Congregational Social
Sunday, September 14
Tune in "The Sunday Simcha" WMNF 88.5-FM 11
a.m.-l p.m.
Jewish Community Center Youth, Tween, Teen
Fun Day
Tampa Jewish Federation Board Institute/Orlando
10:30 a.m. Kol Ami Men's Club meeting
1 p.m. Kol Ami Boneem
2 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Council
7 p.m. Kol Ami USY and Kadima
Monday, September 15
7:30 p.m. Brandeis Women Short Stories
8 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Board meeting
Tuesday. September 16
10:30 a.m. ORT/Bay Horizons Re-enrollment
Luncheon
4 p.m. Jewish Towers Board meeting
Wednesday, September 17
Jewish Community Food Bank
10 a.m. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter General
meeting
12:30 p.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites
4:30 p.m. Tampa Jewish Federation Executive
Committee meeting
5:30 p.m. ADL Executive Committee meeting
7:30 p.m. Tampa Bay Area Singles Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Sisterhood Re-enrollment
meeting
Thursday, September 18
5 p.m. Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Council
5:50 p.m. Jewish Community Center Executive
Committee meeting
8 p.m. Jewish Community Center Board meeting
Friday, September 19
Candlelighting time 7:10 p.m.
"U.S. Air Force Chaplains Joel R.
Schwartzman in Greece, and
Selwyn Geller and Elliott Marmon
in England will provide all U.S.
Jewish Air Force personnel and
their families with High Holy Day
liturgical services.
"Senior Jewish Chaplain Philip
Silveretein in Heidelberg wiD
coordinate High Holy Day ser-
vices with U.S. Army Jewish
Chaplains Nosson Sachs, Richard
White, and Howard Schwartz
covering Nuremberg, Heidelberg,
Stuttgart, Frankfurt and Munich
and U.S. Army Chaplain Dennis
Beck-Berman who will conduct
services for military assigned to
all of Northern Italy.
"Chaplain Sanford H. Shudnow
of the Sixth Fleet will provide
Jewish Navy personnel with JWB
High Holy Day prayer books,
kipot (skull caps), taleisim (prayer
shawls) and other Jewish supplies
for those unable to attend shore
religious services but required to
be on duty at sea."
"Since there are only 48 full-
time Jewish military chaplains on
active duty with American forces
and 13 more at Veterans Ad-
ministration hospitals," said Rab-
bi Greene, "the JWB/Jewish
Chaplains Council will help
mobilize 136 part-time and 112
reserve chaplains as well as 138
lay leaders to conduct Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur ser-
vices at every base where Jews
serve."
"In Europe," he added, "High
Holy Day services will take place
in Spain and Turkey, as well as
Germany, Greece, Italy, and
England. In the Far East, there
will be services in Korea, Japan,
Guam, the Philippines and
Okinawa."
In its role as a full support
system of Jewish chaplains and
lay leaders, the JWB/Jewish
Chaplains Council will provide
JWB calendars 1986-87, inspira-
tional literature, Selihot (peniten-
tial prayers), cassettes, and, as
needed, ram's horns (shofrot),
prayer shawls (talitot) and skull
caps (kipot).
Traditionally, the first of the
services will occur on the island of
Guam in the South Pacific, just
east of the International Date
Line. Since services follow the
sun, Pearl Harbor in Hawaii will
be the last base to sound the
shofar blast trumpeting the end of
the High Holy Days.
The full-time and part-time
Jewish chaplains covering the VA
hospitals have made plans to pro-
vide religious services for all
hospitalized veterans. Am-
bulatory patients will be provided
the opportunity to attend services
in the hospital chapels and bedrid-
den patients will receive special
coverage by the chaplains.
"Break-the-fast" suppers for
military personnel and VA pa-
tients arranged by the chaplains
will mark the conclusion of Yom
Kippur.
All of the U.S. services en-
courage and foster liberal leave
and pass policies for Jewish per-
sonnel and in many instances, ser-
vice men and women who cannot
get home for the holidays are in-
vited to share the warm "home
hospitality" of Jewish families in
the locale where they are station-
ed. Frequently, single men and
women are guests of Jewish
military families on their bases.
Local Jewish communal
organizations cooperate fully in
holiday planning for service per-
sonnel with the Jewish chaplains,
the JWB Jewish/Chaplains Coun-
cil, the Armed Forces and
Veterans Services Committee,
and JWB's Women's Organiza-
tions' Services.
JWB is the association of 275
JCCs, YM-YWHAs and camps in
the U.S. and Canada with a consti-
tuency of more than one million
Jews, a major source of Jewish
educational and cultural program-
ming for North American Jewry,
and the U.S.-Government ac-
credited agency for serving
American Jewish military families
and hospitalized VA patients.
It is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJA-Federation
of Greater New York, Jewish
Community Centers and YM-
YWHAs, and JWB Associates.
To place a Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah announcement in the
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
please have information,
(typed/double spaced), in
the office, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, Florida
33609, three weeks prior to
the event.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swmnn Avenue 261-4215 Rabbi Samuel Malhnger Services: Friday, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:30 a.m., 5:46 p.m.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Coaaarvatto
3919 Moran Road 9624338 Rabbi H. David Rose, Cantor Sam Isaak Services
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 am.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM rwmiatlu
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 887-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, hastan William
Hauben Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:16.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Refona
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Richard J. Bimholi. Rabbi Joan Glaier
Farber. Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION BAI8 TEFFILAH Orthodox
8418 Handy Road No. 103 Rabbi Yosai Dubrowaki 962 2376 Services Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
NORTH TAMPA REFORM JEWISH ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 317. Tampa, Fla. 38618, 961-7622. Congregants officiating, Vikki Silver-
man, Cantor. Services at 8 p.m., first and third Friday of each month, Masonic Com-
munity Lodge, 402 W. Waters Ave. (at Ola).
CHABAD LUBAVrrCH
PO. Box 271157. Rabbi Yoaaie Dubrowaki, Executive Director. 963-2317
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
13801 N. 37th St. No. 1114. Rabbi Dovid Moclrin, Program Coordinator. 9714234
Friday night Services one half hour after sunset. Tuesday night classes at 8 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION at U.S.F./U.T./H C C
U.S.FCTR 2382 Tampa 38620 972-4433. Services and Oneg Shabbat Friday
evening 7 p.m. Sunday Bagel Brunches, 11:30 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
634-9162. United Community Church, 1501 La Jolla Street, Sun City Center Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECONSTRUCTIONI8T COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
Reconitructioaiat Cambridge Woods 972-4433 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly
study discuason sessions. "Shabbat Experience," monthly services and dinner.


Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Congregations/Organizations Events
CONGREGATION KOL AMI
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Congregation Kol Ami's
Religious School will begin the
new school year with a Family
Brunch and Orientation Program
this Sunday, Sept. 7. Classes will
meet at regularly scheduled times.
Rabbi H. David Rose, Educa-
tional Director, will welcome
parents and children in the Sanc-
tuary. Following separate class
and parent orientations, families
and teachers will meet in the
Social Hall for Brunch. Sylvia
Levy and Debby Greenberg are
chairmen of this opening
program.
The School Board and staff look
forward to welcoming our con-
gregational family back from
vacation as we celebrate the
beginning of another year of
study.
Let's Put The Sin Back
Into Synagogue
The first Session of Kol Ami
"U" will meet on Saturday, Sept.
27 at 10 p.m. before Selichot Ser-
vices. This session will be a Rosh
Hashana experience utilizing
Biblical and Rabbinic texts to shed
light on the ultimate purpose of
the High Holy Days. Much
fascinating discussion will take
place as togehter we delve into the
issue of Jewish Guilt, Repentance
and how we should approach the
High Holy Day Season.
Humorous, challenging thought-
provoking discussions will take
place this evening. Please join us
at Kol Ami and enjoy.
The Sisterhood of Congregation
Kol Ami Presents:
HEARTY APPETITE!
A Kosher Cookbook filled with
favorite and treasured recipes
from members of our Congrega-
tion, as well as individuals from
our Jewish Community. Displayed
are delicious contemporary, and
also very traditional recipes,
along with Laws of Kashrut, and a
holiday section filled with home-
tested Passover recipes.
This Cookbook will become
available for the first time on
Sept. 17 at the Sisterhood Re-
enrollment at the Home of Doris
Field. The Cookbookfs) may be
purchased at Congregation Kol
Ami in the amount of $10 each, or
by writing to Congregation'Kol
Ami Sisterhood, 3919 Moran
Road, Tampa, Fla. S3618, and
enclosing a check in the amount of
$11.75 each, including postage,
along with the name and address
of where you would like the
Cookbook(s) mailed.
For further information please
contact Karen at the Congrega-
tion Kol Ami office at 962-6338.
NORTH TAMPA REFORM
JEWISH ASSOCIATION
Special Children's Service
September S
A unique Shabbat service,
especially for children, will be con-
ducted by the North Tampa
Reform Jewish Association on
Friday, Sept 5. According to
Vikki Silverman, who serves as
the congregation's cantor, the
creative service will last for about
half an hour and will also be at-
tended by members of the
religious school faculty.
This children's service is one of
several to be held throughout the
year, particularly in celebration of
major holidays. Families are urg-
ed to attend these interesting and
colorful evenings.
Services will take place at the
Masonic Community Lodge, 402
W. Waters Avenue (at Ola) and
will be followed by an Oneg Shab-
bat. For any further information
please phone Claudia Edenson at
962-3900 or Adrienne Golub at
961-7522.
TAMPA CHAPTER
OF HAD ASS AH
Opening Meeting
The Challenge of Aging
An award winning documen-
tary videotape "The Challenge
of Aging: Jewish Ethnicity in
Later Life" will be presented at
the opening meeting on Wednes-
day, Sept. 17 at 10 a.m. in the
Aronovitz Library of the JCC. It
was the winner of the Silver
Award at the 1985 International
Film and TV Festival in New
York. Jack Saul was a co-producer
of the film.
Lillian Middleton, a clinica'
social worker and assistant pro-
fessor at USF Medical School will
join us to answer questions and
lead a lively discussion about the
challenge of aging. She is also an
assistant Clinical Services Coor-
dinator at the Suncoast Geron-
tology Center (USF) where she
performs patient evaluations,
care, and education. She is very
familiar with Alzheimer's disease.
Please join us and bring a
friend. Visitors are welcome.
Blanche Spivack and Margery
Stern are the Program Vice
Presidents in charge of the ar-
rangements for this thought-
provoking program.
President Nancy Mizrahi, will
be giving a brief report on the
highlights of the recent Hadassah
national convention in Miami
Beach. Tampa Chapter led the 25
chapters in the Florida Central
Region by winning five out of six
awards available in Membership
and Fundraising areas. They
received the Hadassah Medical
Organization Medallion of Merit
given to chapters who go over
their goal by 20 percent. The
awards will be presented to Lil
Bregman and Dorothy Skop who
are the Membership vice
presidents and to Bert Green and
Esther Carp who are Fundraising
vice presidents. They coordinated
the team efforts needed to win
these awards. Also attending the
convention were Bernice Starr,
Mimi Weiss, Ellie Fishman, Nina
Bernstein, and Honey Minkin of
Ameet North Chaper.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
OPENING MEETING
On Wednesday, Sept. 10, the
Tampa Section of the National
Council of Jewish Women will
host its opening meeting and lun-
cheon for the year. The Embassy
Suites Hotel on W. Cypress
Avenue will be the location for the
day's activity. There will be a
Social Hour at 11:30 a.m. and
Lunch will be served at noon.
The program for the day is en-
titled "Meet Your Mayoral Can-
didates Sandy Freeman and
Helen Chavez." This program
should be very interesting and in-
formative. The National Council
wants to remind everyone to be
sure to register and vote.
The cost for the luncheon is $15.
Make your reservation now by
calling Elaine Baach at 839-2234.
TAMPA BAY JEWISH
SINGLES COUNCIL
Touch Football Game
A Co-Ed Touch Football Game
is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 7 at
Anderson Park in Tarpon Spr-
ings. Meet at 1 p.m. for an after-
noon of action packed fun. Come
to play or just watch either way
you'll have fun.
Happy Hour
September's first Happy Hour
will be at Uptown's at the Holiday
Inn at 4601 34th Street South in
St. Petersburg on Thursday, Sept.
11 beginning at 5 p.m. and lasting
until when ever! Remember to
look for the TBJSC host or
hostess wearing a carnation.
Bowling Party
A fun afternoon of bowling is
planned for Sunday, Sept. 14 at
Shore Lanes, 1445 U.S. 19 South
in Clearwater. Meet at 2 p.m.
Happy Hoar
The Marriott at 1001
Westshore Boulevard in Tampa is
the place to be on Thursday, Sept.
18 starting at 5 p.m. and going on
to??? Cathy Smith will host the
Happy Hour this week. See you
there!
For more information on any
event contact Jeff at 585-1888 in
Pinellas or Cathy at 969-3441 in
Hillsborough.
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
Bid 'N Buy Auction
Once again an exciting evening
is in store for Rodeph Sholom
members at its third Annual Auc-
tion on Saturday evening, Sept.
13 at 8 p.m. The evening promises
to be an exciting one for all atten-
ding who will have the opportuni-
ty to bid on a variety of items
ranging from a leisure week's stay
on the St. Pete beaches to a
homemade Gourmet Kosher
Dinner.
The highlight of the evening will
feature a raffle ticket drawing of
which the winner will become the
proud owner of a 1986 Chrysler
LeBaron Convertible. Second and
third prizes will be drawn
throughout the evening while the
Men's Club hosts a Cash Bar and
Sisterhood provides food and
refreshments.
If you hold a raffle ticket or por-
tion of a ticket, admission will be
free, otherwise a $5 donation is re-
quested. There is still time to pur-
chase tickets by contacting Bob
Wolf at 876-8780. We welcome
the entire community to bring
their friends and join in the fun.
Religious School Information
The Rodeph Sholom Religious
School will have its opening ses-
sion on Sunday, Sept. 7 for
students in grades Pre-
Kindergarten through eighth
from 9 a.m.-Noon.
High School classes for grades
nine through twelve will begin
Monday evening, Sept. 8 at 7 p.m.
For more information on
registration, please contact Karen
Patron at the synagogue office.
BRANDEIS WOMEN'S CLUB
Brandeis Women's Club of
Tampa is open to all women who
are interested in lectures and
discussions on various topics.
Dues are $15. The first study
group of the year will be on
"Parenting" and is scheduled for
the second Tuesday of the month
at 7:30 p.m., beginning on Oct. 7.
The meeting will be at the home of
Mrs. Albert (Norma) Felsenthal,
3119 Samara Dr. in Carroll wood.
Guest speakers at that meeting
will be Drs. Stewart and Cindy
Levinson Novick, Clinical
Psychologists who will discuss
"Adjusting to the new Baby."
The November meeting will be
led by Nancy Evers, former Direc-
tor of Teenage Crisis Prevention
Program, who will speak on
"Teenagers in Crisis." In
January, Mary Murray, executive
director of the Suicide and Crisis
Center, will speak on Drug Abuse.
In February, Mary Agresti,
Clinical Supervisor at the Suicide
and Crisis Center, will discuss
Community Resources available
in Tampa. Dale Johnson, Aging
Service Coordinator for the Tam-
pa Jewish Family Service, will
speak on the problem of the aging.
All members and prospective
members are invited.
Study group Showcase, Thurs-
day, Sept 11, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. in
Carrollwood Recreation Center.
Corner Orange and McFarland
Rds.
Topic: Jewish Short Stories No.
1, Penguin Book of Jewish Short
Stories used. Date time, first
Monday at 7:30 p.m. at Members'
homes.
Topic: Contemporary
Literature. Date and time, second
Thursday at 9:30 a.m. at Fairway
Villas Clubhouse.
Topic: Art Group. Date and
time, third Thursday at 10 a.m. at
Beis Teffillah. Subjects: Oct. 16,
Remembrance of Chagall; Nov.
The JWV Albert Aronountz Post No. S7S and Ladies Auxiliary
presented many gifts of comfort items to the patients from the
Nursing Home Care Unit of the James A. Haley Veterans'
Hospital in Tampa. Inez Joseph, Supervisor of the NHCU, ac-
cepted the gifts from VAVS Representatives Jerry and Minnie
Posner. Left to right: Orvilie Repenn, Dave Wallace, Posner,
Joseph, and Posner. (VA Photo by Warren Boutchia)
20, Art Tour; Jan. 15, Japanese
Art; Feb. 19, Flowers in Art;
March 16, Art Tour, April 16,
Cezanne; May 21, Gaugin.
Topic: Atlantic Adventure,
third Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
members homes. Subject: current
lead articles from Atlantic
monthly.
Topic: Pot Pourri, fourth Tues-
day at 10 a.m. to be announced.
Oct. 28, Wok Cooking; Nov. 25,
Stained Glass; Dec. 23, Porcelain
and Glass; January 27, Poetry;
February 24, Visit Artist's Studio;
March 24, Flower Arranging;
Apr. 28, Pottery; May 26, Visit a
TV Studio.
Topic: Jewish Short Stories No.
2, fourth Tuesday at 10 a.m. at
members' homes.
TEMPLE AHA VAT SHALOM
JEWISH SINGLES
Please join us on Saturday,
Sept. 20, for a splashingly good
time under the stars! We'll pro-
vide the charcoal, marshmaUows,
and soda. All you need is a desire
for frolicking good fun, a $3 dona-
tion, and the following options!
BYO Picnic (hamburgers, hot
dogs, etc.), towel, swimsuit, etc.
We'll start at 5:30 p.m. and go un-
til whenever. Watch for the signs
as we'll be meeting at a picnic
shelter on the south side of the
Courtney Campbell Causeway, ap-
proximately half-way between
Tampa and Clearwater. For more
information, please call Sandy at
797-3536.
HADASSAH
Membership Tea
Brandon Shalom Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their Sixth An-
nual Membership Tea on Sunday,
Sept. 7 from 2-4 p.m. For further
information, please call Marcia
Nelson at 681-1026 or Selethel
Musy at 689-0092.
The Sunday Simcha
WMNF Radio (88.5-FM) an-
nounces a new name and time for
its Jewish program. "The Sunday
Simcha," formerly named "The
Jewish Sound," will air every Sun-
day from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., hosted
by Mike Eisenstadt. The program
is a lively mix of Jewish music,
humor, culture, and discussion.
WMNF has had a Jewish pro-
gram for over five years, but it
was last December that Mike
Eisenstadt became the host and
producer. Mike was interested in
renaming the program, and
several weeks ago he asked
listeners to suggest a new name.
After receiving over one hundred
suggestions (some funny, mostly
serious), it was decided that "The
Sunday Simcha" best describes
the program.
A highlight of every program is
"Mazel Tov" time at 11:45. The
segment has become increasingly
popular as more and more
listeners are calling and writing
Mike to give their "mazel tovs."
By including announcements of
meetings, events, and news of in-
terest to the Jewish community,
"The Sunday Simcha" provides
the role of a community bulletin
Doard. Frequent guests discuss a
wide variety of issues, ideas, and
concerns of the Jewish communi-
ty, and, by including a lot of
diverse Jewish music and comedy
the program is always fun
listening.
Eisenstadt encourages anybody
with announcements, ideas, or in-
put to write to him at the station:
"The Sunday Simcha," WMNF
Radio, 3838 Nebraska Avenue,
Tampa, FL 39603.
Obituaries
SUGLIA
Roaattnd. 63, of Tampa, died Tueaday.
Augutt 12, 1986. She wintered in the Tam-
pa Bay area for aeren year* and waa
boueewife She ii aurroed by bar huaband,
Victor, two eooa, Philip and Joaaph, both of
gjjaaMaaa Mich.; one brother, Hymaa
Weiner of Delray Beach; and four
grandchildren.
GBEENBEKGBK
William, 84, of S001 DeLeon St. in Tampa,
diedWedneeday.Augut27, 1966 Hewaia
reaident of the Tampa Bay area for 12 yean
and a member of Congregation Rodeph
Sholom. Ha ia eunriTed by hia wife, Irene,
one eon. Dr. Robert A. of Tampa; two
daughter!, Judith Roalyn Scfawarta of
Cheeterfteld. Mo., and Linda Carol Kaplan
of Atlanta; two aiatera; and five
grandchildren.
^eu'Lih ^Dantxal X^.mcLsm
Providing Dignified Personalized Service
to our Jewish Community
555 Glen Avenue South.Tampa
874-3330
Charles D. Segal Jonathan A. Fuss
Licensed Funeral Directors
Tampa's Only All Jewish Funeral Chapel


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, September 5,1986
*
.
JCC Ballet
Program
The JCC has offered a suc-
cessful dance program under the
tutelage of Mrs. Lucrecia Trucker
(Ms. Lu).
Ms. Lu begins her fourth season
at the JCC offering classical ballet
instruction to children ages three
years and up and to adults. Fees
are billed monthly by the JCC.
Ballet classes follow the semester
schedule and do not meet during
JCC vacation days or vacation
camp weeks.
Classes:
Pre-School: Main Branch, Tues-
day/Thursdays, 12:45-1:80 p.m.
and 1:30-2:15 p.m. North Branch,
Monday/Wednesday, 12:15-1 p.m.
and 1-1:45 p.m.
Youth: Main Branch, Tues-
day/Thursday, 3:15-4:15 p.m. and
4:15-5:15 p.m. North Branch,
Monday/Wednesday, 3:15-4:15
p.m. and 4:15-5:15 p.m.
Adult: Evening classes
available, call the JCC. Main
Branch, Tuesday/Thursday,
9-10:30 am.. North Branch, Mon-
day/Wednesday, 9-10:80 am.
Youth Programs
THE BERKELEY PROGRAMS
Our Berkeley program is
designed especially for Berkeley
Kindergarteners in the half day
school program. The children are
picked up at school at noon and
brought to the JCC. They eat
lunch and participate in special
craft projects and outdoor ac-
tivities. They may be picked up
between 2 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. at
the JCC or they may stay for our
afternoon second home extended
day program available until 6 p.m.
Music
Piano Guitar Suzuki Violin.
Individual Instrument Instruc-
tion. Beginners through Advanc-
ed Children through Adults.
These lessons are available at
the Main Branch and the North
Branch. To set up your instruction
days and time please call Ellen at
the JCC.
SCOUTING
The JCC continues to sponsor
Scout programs:
Cub Scouts: if interested please
phone Ellen at the JCC.
Boy Scouts: If you are in-
terested in the outdoors, camping,
nature and meeting new friends.
Join the JCC, Boy Scout Troop
No. 46. Please feel free to call the
Youth Department for additional
information. Fifth and Sixth
Grade boys. Troop meets on
Tuesdays from 7:30 until 9 p.m. at
the JCC.
Daisy Troop (Kindergarten
girls): 3-4 p.m. Tuesdays.
Brownies: 3-4 p.m. Wednesdays
continuing sign up.
CLUB "45f"
A new idea! Especially for 4th, I
5th and 6th graders Club "456"
is a cool co-ed club to join.l
Meets once or twice per month on
Thursday evenings 5:80-7:30 p.m.1
Have dinner and discuss topics of i
interest and work on projects.
Sometimes we'll take a short field
trip, sometimes we'll play on the!
computers, or go swimming. It'll
be great fun so come on join the
club the only dub "Club
466"!
Club meetings take place at the
Main JCC and the North end.
With enough support we can ar-
The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece
range to have a North Branch and
Main Branch club.
Club yearly membership is 830
members, S45 non-members, in-
cludes membership and activities
at meeting.
Call the Center now to join!
Meeting dates are planned for
Thursdays, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Sept.
18, Oct. 16, Oct. 30, Nov. 18, Dec.
11, Jan. 8, Jan. 29, Feb. 19, Mar.
5, April 9, May 7 and Sunday, May
30 Final Crab Event
These dates can be expanded
upon in order to allow for further
trips and activities. Give us your
ideas!
fweens
Tweens involve the 7th, 8th,
and 9th graders in social, educa-
tional, and recreational activities.
This year we have a wide variety
of programs. All programs are
geared towards lots of fun at
nominal fees. If you need more in-
formation about the Tween pro-
grams, please feel free to call the
Tween Department at the JCC.
September 3, 10, 17 Wednes-
day evenings, in September,
7-8:30 p.m. Members $6, non-
members $7:50.
Babysitting Class involves in
class time preparing for Red
Cross Certification in babysitting,
the student will learn procedures
in diapering, emergency pro-
cedures, first aid, and more. All
students are certified at the end of
the class and put on the JCC. Job
list
Sept. 14 Kick off Day Join
us at the JCC for our annual kick
off day. We will have a day full of
races, contest, prises, arts and
crafts and such more.
Teens
Teen functions are open to all
10th through 12th graders. These
programs include social, educa-
tional, and recreational activities.
This year includes a wide variety
of all programs. If you need any
additional information, please feel
free to call the Teen Director.
TEEN COUNCIL
The Teen Council serves as an
umbrella organisation for the
various Tampa Youth groups. It is
made up of representatives from
each of Tampa's Youth groups.
One representative from each
youth group must attend the
meetings. This group meets in
order to plan Community Teen ac-
tivities and to open lines of com-
munication between the Jewish
Youth groups in the city. If you
are in the 9th-12th grades and
would like to be involved in Com-
munity Teen programming please
phone the Teen Department at the
JCC. This could be a great oppor-
tunity for joint progress with
other Jewish Youth Groups.
Teen Council is meeting on
Tuesday evenings from 7 until
8:30 p.m. at the JCC on Sept. 9.
DANCES AND
SPECIAL EVENTS
Sept 14 Sunday, Kick Off day
This is full of fun and enjoy-
ment by all. Races, singing, danc-
ing, contests and more. Tune: 1-3
p.m. Fee: Members $2, non-
members |4.
WORKOUT AMERICA
This Special Early bird offer ex-
tends to current and new
members during JCC Membership
Month (September). Reduced
rates for JCC members available
year round.
Upon membership we will
schedule your appointment for a
thorough pre-fitness screeining
exam and stress test (no charge!):
and allow our nationally certified I
staff to set you up on your own in-
dividualized training program.
Enjoy unlimited aerobic classes, a
dip in the pool, sauna, whirlpool or
steam rooms. Come enjoy and
achieve the best health of your
life.
The JCC offers to its member- '
ship the opportunity to participate
in reduced group rate member-
ships offered by Workout
America, Inc. Workout America,
Inc. is an independent company
which offers exercise facilities and
programs to its members. Any ar-
rangements for membership in or
use of Workout America, Inc.
facilities shall be solely with
Workout America, Inc., even
though the JCC may at times
assist in facilitating such ar-
rangements. The JCC assumes no
liability in connection with
Workout America, Inc. and ex-
pressly disclaims any warranties
or liabilities in connection
therewith.
JCC ENDOWMENT FUNDS
BUILDING ENDOWMENT
IN MEMORY
OF JANE KENDBICK8,
JAN WULIGERS MOTHER
Lee M. Tobin
Dr. and Mrs. Morris Hanan
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Goldstein
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Meyerson
Dr. and Mrs. Steven Field
Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Peled
Ms. Sandra Wuhger
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Wuhger
Dr. and Mrs. Steve Kreitier
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Goldsmith
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eatroff
Jolene Shorr
Johanna Barat and Family
Vivian Hughes
Renee'MiOer
Ray Haitow in memory of Sam Haitow
Edward Chitayat Donation
Mr. and Mrs. Tim Ayres Donation
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eatroff in
memory of Herman Herahey
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eatroff in honor
of the anniversary of Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Oltman
CAMP SCHOLARSHIP
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Goldsmith in
honor of Wendy Shapiro Klein, Jim
Valde* and Bev Yeshion for Jill's ter-
rific summer
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eatroff in i
memory of Ellen Berkowitx I
W are proud to ba aponeor of Ik*
lit Annual Tampa Jewisa Community Center Golf Tournament
Southeast Bank
(813) 223-2346
KFHutton
BabLavia BebBeraar
HWTT REGENCY4TAMrA
*!** ClTV?
McDonald's
1,
State VACUUM Of TAMPA. INC
J14J W. Eiaaidj' Boulevard
e}tatal tUi X**p*t
DaaaatuHaakiaaandSaUa
T-tlAiW:
II
Tha Jewiea Comnmnity Caatar Wlehee to axpraaa t
appreciation to tha aponaora and vohintaara of our
Firat Annual Golf Tournament
C^rV(jrQ4;iL4Q4U^ibSi
Mark Malt zer Low gross 71
Barry Kerpey Low rwt TO
7U Swish Community Center
NOW OFFERS AT REDUCED RATES I
MEMBERSHIP TO WORKOUT AMERICA
Workout America nd the JCC Is proud to off* you tha boat health
of your life at SPECIAL SAVINQSI
LOCATED AT:
GRAND PLAZA, Next to Chevy's 14469 N. Dat* Msbry Hwy.
962-1511
Enjoy: HEALTH SWIMMING AEROBICS
6:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m. Dally
Spacious and well-appointed
locker room areas
Thorough Pre-Fltness
Screening
Individualized exercise
programs
Monitoring of all program
participants
Fraa, fully staffed chlldcare
facility
Optional private European
training rooms
Licensed, certified massage
therapist on staff. Offering
both one half hour and full
hour sessions
LOOK AT THESE SAVINGS!!!!
Offering 16,000 square fast of
workout sraaa
Heated Indoor lap and
recreational pool
Therapeutic Whirlpool
Swedish Dry Sauna
Staam Rooms
State of tha art equipment Unas
Including Nautilus, Universal,
Paramount and extensive
free weight areas
Private Aerobics area offering
a nationally certified staff and
50 + classes par week
WnMHtMiwbirahlp
JCC
1>Sa
Claflaffi
1 Yea*
"UrtyBktT
ICC Mawtjir Bate
Up During Septombi
11 SI
$150 yearly renewal baaed on 50 memberahip unit*.
Special JCC Open House
Tours & Camp Workout
September 2nd 30th
Monday Thursday 9:00 10:00 a.m.
Sunday, September 7th, 6 8 p.m.
Sunday, September 21 at, 6-8 p.m.
*or drop by anytime 6:30 a.m. -10 p.m.
'Free Child Care available
'Bring workout attire, swim wear, towel
For further details please pick up Information sheet available at tha
JCC North and Main Branch at Workout America.
This Special Early Bird offer extends to currant and naw members
during JCC Membership Month (September). Reduced rates for JCC
members available year round.
You ore cordially invited to attend a .
4>4* -8/tjiJL t
v&fHezs tswMo mxsxo
SEPTEMBER 7, 1986
8:00 P.M.
BALLROOM 0ANCIN6
SPECIAL JEWISH NUSIC HOUR
SEMI FORMAL ATTIRE
DESSERT AND COFFEE SERVED
JCC Membera: *o/aialae. 7'ceveeea
Nonmenbere: SSMagtea; SI 1 /couple.
<
Sponsored by the JCC ftdults-at-Leisure Program
For H-* SO and over croud, lb be held at
Congregation Kol Ami 9019 floran Road
XSVP Z7Z-44SI
September Is JCC Membership Month


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Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
Mrs. Richard Fiaher
Weddings
FISHMAN-FISHER
Michelle Dawn Fishman and
Richard Fisher were married on
Saturday evening, August 16, at
the University Club of Tampa.
Michelle is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel E. Fishman and
the granddaughter of Mrs. Claire
Rossin, Tampa, and Mrs. Shirley
Fruchtman of Miami.
Rick's parents are Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Fisher of Fort Lauder-
dale, and his grandparents are
Mrs. Ida Diamond, Margate,
Florida, and Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Fisher, Nashville, Tennessee.
The maid of honor was the
bride's sister, Jennifer Fishman of
New Orleans. Bridesmaids were
Dawn Levison and DeeAnn
Winsett, both of Tampa, and
Michele Popkin of Paramus, New
Jersey.
Mark Fisher of New York City
served as his brother's best man
with groomsmen Dan Gitlitz,
Plantation, Florida, Ira Levin. St.
Petersburg, and Michelle's
brother, Jeffrey Fishman of
Tampa;H"
Michelle carried her mother's
handkerchief and a good luck pen-
ny given to her by Rick's mother.
The wedding rings used in the
ceremony were those of the
groom's parents.
Out-of-town guests were Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Katsoff. Mr. and
Mrs. George Kline, Mr. and Mrs.
Abe Spevack, and Mrs. Mary
Neff, all of Philadelphia; Miss
Elise Lebow and Miss Mimi Brody
of Somerville, MA; Dr. and Mrs.
Arthur L. Brody, Bethlehem, PA;
Mr. Morris Maltzer, Sinking Spr-
ing, PA; Mr. Peter Brody,
Washington, DC; Mr. and Mrs.
Merton D. Minsky, Brockton, MA;
Miss Barbara Minsky, Norwood,
Mass; Mr. Steven Minsky,
Cranberry, NJ; Mrs. Gary
Davidoff, Ann Arbor, MI; Mrs.
Esther Under, Riverdale, NY;
Mrs. Annette Rolnick, Long
Beach, NY; Dr. A. David Rossin,
Los Altos Hills, CA; Mr. Barry
Draft, Chicago; Mr. and Mrs.
Dave Fisher, Cincinnati; Mr. and
Mrs. Benjie Lebow and Jeffrey,
Manchester, NH; Mr. David Git-
tehnan, Miami; Dr. and Mrs.
Joseph Maltzer, Longboat Key;
and Mr. and Mrs. Mort Present,
Sarasota.
Parties given were a shower in
Fort Lauderdale by Mrs. Robert
Grenitz, Mrs. David Jackowitz,
and Mrs. Paul Tekel; a shower in
Tampa by Mrs. Myer Frank, Mrs.
Lawrie Glickman-.-and Mrs. Bar-
bara Marks; a dessert party after
the rehearsal lddW(tr)arcung
friends and relatofis^the bride
and groom by Jeimuer-Jpahman;
the rehearsal dinner at Harbour
Island Hotel by Mr. and Mrs.
Nathan Fiaher; and the dinner
reception at the Univeristy Club
by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fishman.
After an Alaskan cruise honey-
moon, the newlyweds will be at
home in South Miami.
KARBALVIDAL
Renee Louise Karbal and
Robert John Vidal were married
Sunday, August 17 at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom. Rabbi Ken-
neth Berger and Cantor William
Hauben officiated.
Renee is the daughter of Albert
and Judy Karbal of Oak Park,
Michigan. She is employed by
Econo Auto Painting.
Robert is the son of Henry and
Betty Vidal of Tampa. He is
employed by Columbia Jobbing
Company.
Following the ceremony a din-
ner reception was held at Rodeph
Sholom.
The couple will live in Tampa.
PADVA-GELLIS
Sharon Ruth Pad va and Charles
Stephen Gellis were married
Saturday, August 16 at the home
of Charles Gellis in carrollwood.
Rabbi Steven Kaplan, director of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
at the University of South
Florida, officiated.
The bride is the daughter of
Mrs. Idell Port of Chicago, Il-
linois. The groom is the son of
Mrs. Alice Hovan of Coral Gables,
Florida.
Sharon is an English teacher at
Ben Hill Junior High in Car-
rollwood. Charles is the regional
director for B'nai B'rith for the
West Coast and South Dade Coun-
ty, Florida. The couple will live
temporarily in Tampa and will be
relocating to Miami.
A triptych by internationally noted artist,
John Beardsley, was dedicated to the hap-
piness of the residents of Mary Walker Apart-
ments Aug. 18. The large colorful minting
titled "Memories" hangs in the lobby. Pic-
tured at the ceremony were Tom Vann, Mark
Seelig, Jane Howard, president of the Resi-
dent's Association; Juliet Rodriguez, Amy
Beardsley, daughter of the artist; Lois Older,
Fran Grace, and Ronald Rudolph.
Vereen As Actor/ Humanitarian
Ticket sales and reservations
for the Menorah Manor Guild
Gala, "Pippin" starring Ben
Vereen, are moving extremely
well towards the sellout goal, says
Sue Schecter, Chairman.
When this musical comedy,
"Pippin," premiered on Broad-
way in 1972, the New York critics
declared "Pippin" a hit and Ben
Vereen a superstar. Now, for the
first time since he electrified
Broadway with his performance,
Vereen is recreating his Tony
Award-winning role on a national
tour. On November 8 at Ruth
Eckerd Hall, he'll once again play
the leading player, head of a small
troupe of actors, singers and
dancers engaged in telling a fin-
ciful tale about Charlemagne's
first-born son, Pippin. "Pippin"
won awards for direction,
choreography, sets, lighting and
Vereen's performance.
In addition to his ac-
complishments as an outstanding
performer, Verren has also been
honored for his humanitarian ac-
tivities: In 1978 he was the reci-
pient of Israel's Cultural Award;
in 1979 he was the recipient of
Israel's Humanitarian Award, and
in 1988 the Eleanor Roosevelt
Humanitarian Award. The
NAACP awarded Ben. for two
consecutive years, its prestigious
Image Award, 1978 and 1979. He
has been appointed American
Heart Association's Heart Cam-
paign chairman and for the past
four years, has been the Interna-
tional Chairman for SIDS, Sudden
Infant Death Syndrome. In 1985
he became National Chairman for
the Captain KID Safety Program.
With five children, Vereen was
awarded the 1985 "Father of the
Year" award.
We Bring
Our Store
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Shop at home for the largest selection
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We Serve Hebrew National &
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Full Bakery on Premises...
Rye, Challah, Bagels, Danish,
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Page 4 The Jewish F>ridian of Tampa/Friday, September 5, 1986
Just Who Was
Arrogant in Helsinki?
The Soviets are saying this week that the
Israelis with whom they met in Helsinki last
week were "arrogant, and that is why they
abruptly ended the meeting 90 minutes after
it started. The Soviets are saying that they
have no plans to resume any talks with the
arrogant Israelis at any time.
The Israelis are saying that they were
"bound" to talk to the Soviets about the
status of Soviet Jewry that they can hold
no discussion at whatever level with the
Soviets unless they are asked to make an in-
telligent response about the future of so
many Soviet Jews who are suffering either
in limbo or in frank imprisonment for having
asked permission to emigrate to Israel.
We are saying that it is the Soviets who
were arrogant for thinking they could broad-
cast to the world their intention of resuming
talks (if not ties) with the Israelis at the
same time that their real plan was to arrive
in Helsinki, present to the Israelis a single-
item agenda of their own the status of
their real estate in Israel and refuse to
listen, except in stony silence, and then walk
out on the agenda of the other party.
Avoiding Second Blunder
That, of course, is life Kremlin-style but
not anywhere else in the free world.
Helsinki is the place where the Soviets
hoped to broadcast the propaganda that they
are the free world, too, tavarish.
Finally, we are saying that the Soviets will
have a lot of things to say to Israel in the
near future, stony silence and their
abominable behavior in Helsinki not-
withstanding. Not to mention their threat
that nothing more will be heard from them
on the subject.
After all, the subject is not peace or
freedom or Soviet Jews so far as the Soviets
are concerned. The subject is the Middle
East, where they committed the diplomatic
blunder of the age back in 1967 when they
severed their ties to Israel. They want back
into a part of the action there after nearly 20
years of being locked out.
The Soviets do not want to repeat another
blunder in Helsinki, which this time took on-
ly days to be understood by the rest of the
world and to backfire.
Homage to Yeshiva
Philatelists experience a special excite-
ment when a new stamp is issued. But when
the United States issues a postage stamp in
September honoring the first president of
Yeshiva University, Dr. Bernard Revel,
many Americans, philatelists or not, will
have cause for pride.
The occasion will be the 100th anniversary
of Yeshiva University in New York City.
Gov. Edwin W. Edwards of Louisiana has
seen fit to issue a proclamation taking note
of that distinguished Jewish institution of
higher learning and its special celebration.
And Dr. William J. Bennett, U.S.
Secretary of Education, will be featured
speaker at a special Centennial convocation
in New York on Sept. 18.
Memorable Milestone
Gov. Edwards, in his proclamation, notes
OfewisH Floridian
Of Tampa
Hu>inn> Officr 2HOM Horatio Strwt. Tampa. r'la .uwni
Tefephon* HTi 44711
Publication (Wit* 120 NK 6 St Miami. Fla HIM
SUZANNK SHCKHKT AIII.HKY HAUBK NSTCXK
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OfTW MarrfcaadW A4 vrrtiard la Ita ( olum.
PubluWd Bi-WaahiyPhi. 1 Additional Edition 00 January 31. 19M by Tha Jawu* Florid-n of Tampa
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Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
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MIHM KIPTION HATKS il^al Anal I Yrar Minimum Suharnptmn f7.lMiAnnual U.M
llul ill I own Upon hVtjucV
t, ~,; .5. Th gar1"""w,,h ,hr J,m,"h '"">" r,mp, ***** *.
p raw ,, o>du ..M,,NUrh.,uWr,pn ,h..|d .n.i(l Th.-.l,w.,h Kfc.nd.an ..r lb.. r^ra..n *
Friday, September 5,1986 1 ELUL 5746
Volume 8 Number 19
that Yeshiva University is represented by
many alumni throughout this state," and he
has bid the citizens of Louisiana to "take due
recognition of this most memorable
milestone."
And a memorable milestone it is indeed,
for Yeshiva University dates its founding
from the establishment of Yeshiva Etz
Chaim in September, 1886. In the beginning
a small school on New York's Lower East
Side, it later merged with the Rabbi Isaac
Elchanan Theological Seminary. Yeshiva
University grew out of that merger.
Incredible Development
Today, the University comprises 15
schools, divisions and affiliates. There are
five undergraduate schools (four for men,
one for women), seven graduate and profes-
sional schools and three affiliates, with a
total enrollment of some 7,000 men and
women.
The University's full-time faculties
number nearly 1,400. And it boasts four
campuses in New York City, as well as af-
filiated units in Los Angeles and Israel.
The postage stamp in honor of Dr. Revel,
the appearance of Secretary of Education
Bennett at the Centennial celebration Sept.
18, Gov. Edwards' proclamation these
and a host of other stellar happenings yet to
occur are all clearly deserved honors for an
institution which continues to grow and to
bring the Jewish community in particular
and Americans in general a sense of higher
education in their midst at its best.
Still Making Deals
Emile Zola understood his fellow-
countrymen best when he rather contemp-
tuously called them a nation of shopkeepers.
That observation still stands France in good
stead. At the same time that the French
make loud noises about anti-terrorism,
Foreign Minister Jean-Bernard Raimond
has been meeting with PLO representatives
to assure them that his government wants
the PLO to be "associated with an overall
settlement" in the Middle East.
Never mind that Prime Minister Jacques
Chirac insists that he opposes the creation of
a Palestinian state. The separation of prin-
ciples between Chirac and Raimond is the
political result of a very close election last
time the French went to the polls.
What we've got here is more than an un-
fortunate difference of opinion. What we've
got here is shopkeeperism, pure and simple.
The French may talk anti-terrorism. But
they've yet to stop trying to make deals with
terrorists.
Larouche Candidates
They Seem To Be Wilting on the Vim
f*C
KKKI) K SHCKHKT
KdilorandPiibl.h*r
PHILADELPHIA In
the recent spring primary
election in Pennsylvania,
only one candidate from the
LaRouchian slate managed
a victory a Democratic
state comitteeman from
Bucks County according
to a recently released
analysis prepared by the
Philadelphia Chapter of the
American Jewish
Committee.
Despite the number of can-
didates fielded including those
for governor, the Senate, the
State House and Democratic
State Committee the
LaRouchian political influence
would seem to be "off the radar
screen" for 1986, the analysis
adds.
Ronald L. Kaiserman, co-
chairman of the AJC chapter's
Urban Affairs Committee, reports
that the Jewish community re-
mains watchful of the anti-Semitic
and extremist strains in much of
the LaRouche ideology, and will
continue to monitor the impact of
LaRouchian candidates here and
across the country.
OFFICIALS OF the
Philadelphia Chapter of the AJC
have spoken with Democratic Par-
ty leadership in Philadelphia, Har-
risburg, and Washington, as well
as with political and media ex-
perts since the May primary, to
assess the impact of LaRouche
forces and evaluate their future
strength. While no one has track-
One Pennsylvania Democratic
Party staffer told the American
Jewish Committee that in Penn-
sylvania, whether in the Eastern
or Western part of the state, rural
or urban, "nobody seemed to be
buying them," referring to
LaRouche candidates.
LaRouchian extremist rhetoric
was significantly muted in the
primary, the AJC report con-
tinues. Paul Kirk, Democratic Na-
tional Committee chairman,
recently issued a warning in the
Congressional Record that
"political extremism of any form
must never be ignored or taken
for granted." He asserted that
LaRouchians were "participating
in American politics under clouds
of fraud and false pretense,"
alluding to LaRouchian tactics of
deceptive political practice.
THE PARTY, caught by sur-
prise with an early spring victory
by a LaRouchian in Illinois, now
sees that "education is inocula-
tion," and has been informing its
races, and elsewhere were not im-
pressive, there may be concern in
future Democratic races in the
state, the analysis adds. Accor-
ding to one political expert, in
1972 there were nine members
running for the State House
without opposition; in 1986, there
were 67 members running unop-
posed either in the primary or the
general election, and where there
was opposition, it was only from
LaRouchians.
In his opinion, the Democratic
and Republican parties alike
should assume the responsibility
to run credible opposition to pre-
vent extremist candidates and fr-
inge groups from entering the
political mainstream.
"IF THE RIGHT configuration
of circumstances occurs," this
source told the AJC, "we could
see a surprise that we had in Il-
linois in the spring." "If a party's
responsibility of recruiting can-
didates to run on the ballot isn't
fulfilled, it leaves the door open
chairmen and rank and file about for people to sneak in" to the pro-
the LaRouche party challenge.
According to a national
American Jewish Committee
analysis, "Lyndon LaRouche and
the Politics of Deception "
published last May, LaRouche's
current political vehicle, the Na-
cess. "This year, in the primary,
we had incumbents, sacrificia
lambs, and fanatics" on
tickets.
state
What concerns those who track
elections in Pennsylvania
current political vehicle the Na- elections in rennsyivwu --
tional Democratic Policy commit- throughout the country is thIV
too "_-......ii i ____i _* _...u f~i*\rra fannlQBles-
tee "may well mislead the un-
sophisticated voter into believing
it is an affiliate of the Democratic
Party."
It is precisely this tactic that the
party has been fighting
throughout Pennsylvania. Some
ed all the Pennsylvania races, key 8t*ndaTd LaRouchian beliefs have
Democratic Party officials and Included anti-Semitism ("the U.S.
staff expressed their delight at
defeating LaRouchian candidates
in races around the state, par-
ticularly since county chairmen
had been alerting party members
and the public to the deceptive
tactics of LaRouchian candidates
since well before the May
primary.
Zionist lobby,"), deni| of
Holocaust history, and diatribes
against the queen of England!
med,n with propaganda againsi
the international drug trade
worldwide terrorism, 7nd
pornography.
PvKCwJe ^ouchian races in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania State
peal of such fringe candidates.
AJC noted that extremists, liw
LaRouchians, consider anyone
"fools and dupes who don t agree
with them." To groups who feet
off hatred and resentment at tne
economy or the frustrations oi
life, the extremists' simplistic
solutions give comfort.
While analysts, party officials,
and others agree that "the odds ot
LaRouchians winning are very
small" through the 1980s in Penn-
sylvania and elsewhere, the at-
traction evident in areas affected
by economic dislocation in the
farm belt and the rust belt must
be addressed, Kaiserman said.