The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00298

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text


Off Tampa
Volume 8 Number 17
Tampa, Florida Friday, August 8, 1986
Price 35 Cents
Spotlight On...
Joachim Scharf, Hillel
School Headmaster
The building is going up. Work began on the Jewish
Community Center North End site July 15 and the
committee is looking at the progress. Standing on
the foundation of the classrooms are (left to right)
Martin Pear, executive director of the Jewish Com-
munity Center; Stanford Solomon, Rabbi David
Rose of Congregation Kol Am, Jack Koth, Mark
Rosenthal, Lee Tobin, president of the Jewish Com-
munity Center; Leah Davidson, and Barry Kar-
pay, chairman of the building committee. Photo,
Audrey Haubenstoek.
Interagency Board Orientation Planned
Sunday, September 21, the
Tampa Jewish Federation, in
cooperation with the Jewish Com-
munity Center, Hillel School of
Tampa, and Jewish Family Ser-
vices, will host an interagency
board institute at the Westshore
Marriott, beginning at 9 a.m. and
concluding at 3:30 p.m. Dr. Ber-
nard Reisman, Director of the
Hornstein Program in Jewish
Communal Service, Brandeis
University, will be the scholar-in-
residence, according to Joyce
Swarzman and Franci Rudolph,
co-chairmen of the program.
Tourism Minister Sharir
Replaces Resigned Modai
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Avraham Sharir (Likud
Liberal), the Minister of Tourism, was appointed
Minister of Justice, too, in place of his party colleague, Yit-
zhak Modai. Sharir's appointment was announced by the
Cabinet and is expected to be ratified by the Knesset
without difficulty.
MODAI WAS FORCED to resign last week, under
threat of being fired by Premier Shimon Peres, whom he
had publicly insulted. The Likud says Modai will return to
the Cabinet, and to the Justice Ministry, following the rota-
tion of the Premiership in October. But Labor has said it
will oppose his return.
Sharir said Sunday that while he would be holding the
portfolio temporarily (pending Modai's return), he would
work as though it is permanent." He vowed that the
Tourism Ministry and tourism industry "which I love and
believe in" would not suffer.
The Cabinet Sunday also approved the appointment of
Moshe Nissim, the Finance Minister (Likud Liberal), as a
member of the ten-member Inner Cabinet in place of
Modai.
The planning committee, which
is comprised of representatives
from the boards of Women's Divi-
sion, Women's Business and Pro-
fessional Network, the Young
Adult Division, Young Leadership
Development, the Federation, the
Jewish Community Center, Hillel
School, and Jewish Family Ser-
vices, has planned a program
which they hope will be both infor-
mative and enriching. Com-
mented Swarzman, "The board
institute will provide an oppor-
tunity for agency boards to in-
teract." Rudolph said that she
hoped the leadership would leave
the conference with a better
understanding of "community."
The cost for the program is $18
per person. For further informa-
tion, please contact the Tampa
Jewish Federation, 875-1618.
By AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
"Small classes and caring
teachers which make a comfor-
table learning experience is the
bonus of attending the Hillel
School of Tampa," said Joachim
Scharf, new headmaster of the
school.
"In a time when the society at
large is looking for answers for
the future and a suitable learning
environment for its children, the
Hillel School of Tampa offers a
positive alternative learning ex-
perience within a Jewish
framework. The Day School
system in the United States has
the very important task of sen-
sitizing Jewish children to the
basic concepts of Judaism in an
American pluralistic society,"
Scharf said as he surveyed his new
surroundings on this second day
on the job.
Praising the many opportunities
for growth and meaningful ex-
periences Scharf said, "I want to
help develop a first class Day
School system and I look forward
to working with the members of
the Board of Directors who have
shown such a strong commitment
of Jewish Day School education."
Believing in having an in-
dividual program geared to the in-
dividual needs of the students,
Joachim said, "We should attempt
to create a community in which
students at similar levels and with
similar interests can be brought
together for common
experiences."
There will be a strong emphasis
on applying the knowledge gained
in the classroom experience and
within the Jewish tradition to the
challenges faced in everyday liv-
ing in American society.
With these goals the function of
the school will be to build a well-
rounded individual who has ac
quired a good strong
knowledgeable Jewish foundation
with a balanced understanding of
family and ethnic roots.
The Hillel package of superior
secular education, competitive
with the best private schools, and
Joachim Scharf
a meaningful Jewish education,
with emphasis on the centrality of
Israel and Hebraic studies,
presents the students with an in-
tellectual challenge. It should also
cater to students on different
levels, including the gifted and
those who excel. The program
should provide preparation for life
as an American and a Jew and at
the same time meet the expecta-
tions and demands of the best in-
stitutions of higher learning.
As a starting point Scharf
"would like to concentrate on
three areas: creative enrichment,
focusing on music, drama, and the
arts; the integration of formal and
informal education; lunch time
club activities; and enhancing
parent programs in the school,
and working closely with the Tam-
pa Jewish Federation, the Jewish
Community Center, and the Tam-
pa Jewish Family Services."
Other goals to be considered
are:
Further expansion of math,
computer, and science programs.
Introducing electdves to in-
clude Comparative Religion,
Judaism and Modern Man, Jewish
Continued on Page 6
Rosenne Recovering
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Meir Rosenne, Israel's Am-
bassador to the United States,
was expected to be released from
the hospital Tuesday after
undergoing single bypass heart
surgery last week. The 55-year-
old Ambassador is "feeling very
good," Israel Embassy
spokesman Yosef Gal said Mon-
day. According to Gal, Rosenne
underwent surgery at
Georgetown University Hospital
July 22.
Vice President George Bush,
who was this week in Israel,
visited Rosenne last Friday. He
reportedly brought with him
President Reagan's wishes to
Rosenne for a speedy recovery.
The Ambassador's surgery was
kept "a secret" in order not to
cause undue worry to his daughter
in Israel.
Ut (
AMMO1
Tampa Jewish
ommunity Center
PEBBLE CREEK
>LF and COUNTRY CLU
SUNDAY AUGUST 24 1986


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, August 8, 1986
Harmony. The list of degrees, titles, honors and awards con-
tinues to grow for Leslie Reicin Stein. Recently, she was elected
President of the Industrial Relations Research Association for
Central Florida. This prestigious organization provides a nonpar-
tisan forum for the free discussion and exchange of ideas and in-
formation within the labor-management community. The IRRA is
founded upon the assumption that periodic gatherings of neutrals
with management and labor representatives will result in more
harmonious labor management relationships.
A senior attorney for General Telephone, Leslie specializes in
labor, employment and regulatory law. She is also an Adjunct
Professor of Law at Stetson University College of Law and Chair
of the City of Tampa Civil Service Board.
Super Salesman. There have been so many accomplishments
and awards for Bill Barnes this year! In addition to being one of
Fidelity Union Life's top 15 agents and a member of its Leaders
Forum, he was also invited to attend the Million Dollar Round
Table Annual Meeting in Orlando last month. Forty countries and
6,000 members were represented.
Bill is also president of the Tampa Association of Life Under-
writers and vice president of College Tuition Planning Inc., a
company formed to provide expertise on the financial aid process,
from application to award.
A Gentleman and a scholar. We are proud to tell you that
Jeremy H. Nelson, son of Dr. Carnot and Alice Nelson, has
received a three-year Navy ROTC scholarship at the University of
Rochester. Currently a sophomore and history major, Jeremy is a
graduate of the Hillel School and Tampa Prep. He will spend six
to eight weeks on active duty every summer, and after graduation
will be commissioned an ensign and will serve at least four years
active duty and two years in reserves.
Dentist of the Year. Remember Dr. Fred Lebos, a Tampa den-
tist for over 50 years? Well, we have just heard that he was named
Dentist of the Year by the Florida Dental Congress. Terrific! He
has been practicing in Vero Beach for the last six years.
Career Movers. Mazol tov and good luck to three outstanding
men on the move: Don Weinbren was named a member of the
Trenam, Simmons, Kemker, Scharf, Barkin, Frye and O'Neill law
firm.
Bart Haskins has been appointed to represent the Florida
region to the Advisory Council to Management of Merrill Lynch &
Co. Burt is a Vice President in the Tampa office and is a certified
financial manager. Larry Cyment has been promoted to regional
director for Medical Care International. MCI owns and operates
the Ambulatory Surgery Center on Fletcher Avenue that Larry
has managed since 1980. In his new position, he will oversee the
development of new surgery centers in the state.
Good citizens. The Ladies Auxiliary of the Albert Aronovitz
Post No. 373 have had a very busy summer. On July 3 they par-
ticipated in a naturalization ceremony at Ashley Plaza Hotel.
Later that month Minnie Posner awarded Laurie Danese Lasser
a scholarship from the Department of Florida Ladies Auxiliary,
Jewish War Veterans. Laurie is a student at USF in the College
of Nursing specializing in psychiatric nursing.
Verkauf family update. You can see why Arline is so proud of
her family. Sixteen-year old Leslie will be a senior at Berkeley
Prep this fall, where she will serve as vice president of the Stu-
dent Forum. The pitcher for the Berkeley Girls Softball Team for
the past two years, she has been asked to be part of the All-City
Softball Team in Berkeley's league. She is also a new member of
the National Honor Society.
Stefanie is getting ready to return to the University of Penn-
sylvania for her sophomore year.
Dr. Barry Verkauf, besides being Dad to these great girls, is
co-director of Humana Women's Hospital's in vitro fertilization
program, the first of its kind in the Tampa Bay Area.
ViVe delighted to share your pride, Arline
Turkel Family News. Congratulations to Kenny Tnrkel on his
graduation from the AB Freeman School of Business of Tulane
University. And, well done to Nancy Tnrkel, who was awarded
her master's degree in Speech Pathology. Her thesis was "A
Longitudinal Study of an Autistic-Like Toddler's Communication
Development." Nancy is moving to Atlanta to work in her field.
Kenny and Nancy are the children of Sandy and Dick Tnrkel.
Correction:
Dr. Richard Weinberg, previously credited in this column for
the development of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, studied
under Dr. Charles D. Spielberger who is known worldwide for
developing STAI, a USF news release said otherwise.
A Tisha B'Av Message
By
DR. JOSEPH STERNSTEIN
President, Jewish National
Fund
Tisha B'Av, the Jewish day of
mourning the destruction of the
First and Second Temples of
Jerusalem, will be observed this
year on Thursday, August 14.
The destructions of the
Temples, first by the Babylonians
and then by the Romans, are not
the only calamities that
distinguish this tragic day in
Jewish history. On the Ninth of
Av, Jerusalem was seized in the
Bar Kokhba war and turned into a
pagan city where Jews were not
allowed. Also on this day, in 1492,
the Jews were expelled from
Spain during the Inquisition.
Tisha B'Av has thus become a day
of mourning the great persecu-
tions suffered by the Jewish peo-
ple, including the loss of national
independence and the sufferings
in exile.
But as we mourn the tragedies
of old, we are now sustained by
the redemption of the Jewish
homeland. It is our obligation to
Wedding
Mrs. Ronald Steven Parker
WOOLF-PARKER
Andea Alby Woolf and Ronald
Steven Parker were married
Saturday, July 26 at Congrega-
tion Schaarai Zedek. Rabbi An-
drew Hillman officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Walter M. Woolf of Tam-
pa. Andrea is the granddaudghter
of Betty Woolf and Lilian
Weinberg.
The bridegroom is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Rochkind of
Coral Gables.
Andrea is a teacher in Orange
County. Ron is senior accountant
for Florida Auto Auction. The
couples will live in Orlando.
continue developing this land left
desolate for centuries, thus fulfill-
ing the dreams of our ancestors.
Those dreams are being realized
today as the Jewish National
Fund works at transforming
Israel into a thriving Jewish state.
JNF is now developing the in-
frastructer of rural villages; pro-
viding urban areas with forests
and parks; supporting agricultrual
research that has helped farmers
reap produce from the desert, and
meeting the critical needs of the
citizens of Israel by preparing the
land for housing, industry and
recreation.
During Tisha B'Av, we
remember the tragedies our
forefathers suffered and the will it
took to survive them. Yet while
we mourn their tribulations, we
also hail their perserverance with
a continued commitment to their
ancient dream.
Reaganites Downplay Talks
Between Hassan, Peres
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Against the background
of the surprise visit to
Morocco by Israeli Prime
Minister Shimon Peres last
week, the Reagan Ad-
ministration is playing down
the significance of a
previously-planned trip to
the region by Vice President
George Bush.
Bush, who will visit Israel, Jor-
dan and Egypt beginning this
week, will be the first senior U.S.
official to travel to those countries
since Secretary of State George
Shultz visited there last year. But
a senior Administration official
cautioned Tuesday against expec-
tations of "dramatic initiatives."
"I THINK we're emphasizing
here the depth of the continuity of
American interests in the region,"
the official said at a briefing. He
stressed that while extensive
discussions were expected on the
outcome of the talks between
Peres and Moroccan King Hassan
II, the Administration was view-
ing the first public visit by an
Israeli leader to an Arab country
other than Egypt as significant
less for its lively results than for
"the fact that it took place."
Having asserted a high profile
in past Middle East peace efforts
that ended in impasse or failure,
the Administration appears to be
distancing itself from the most re-
cent development, as it waits to
assess the outcome.
White House and State Depart-
ment officials, while praising the
Peres-Hassan talks, have main-
tained that the initiative had come
entirely from the two leaders
themselves. The Administration
official on Tuesday said the U.S.
was informed of the meeting just
"a few days" before it took place.
THE OFFICIAL said, in
response to a question, that the
Vice President's visit in Israel
the first leg of his week-long Mid-
dle East tour beginning July 27
will also include discussion of
allegations about Israeli spying in
this country and the current in-
vestigation into alleged illegal ac-
quisition by Israel of American
technology for the production of
cluster bombs.
SINGLES: Attend fabulous Labor Day Weekend
sponsored by JNF Southern Region at Camp Blue Star,
Hendersonville, N.C. Your $300 cost ($200 Is tax
deductible) could be investment of your life!
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Information A Reservations
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Let The
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Our professional staff, attentive service and gracious
accommodations will make a success of your Wedding,
Bar Mitzvah, Banquet, Business Meeting or Reunion.
We also provide outside catering services. See our Catering
Department for information or please call 879-5151.
TAMPA
AIRPORT
Harriott



iHcnorah
J3SWS
CXjt home for Jewish living
UPD4TE
Friday, August 8, 1986/The Jewiab Floridian o* Tampa Page 3
Free Courses For Senior
Citizens Offered At USF
Menorah Manor Guild Gala
Ben Vereen In 'Pippin'
The news is out: Ben Vereen in
the sparkling production of "Pip-
pin" will be the scheduled pro-
gram for the Menorah Manor
Guild Gala on Saturday,
November 8, at Ruth Eckerd Hall.
Sue Schechter, Ways and
Means chairman, announced that
this major fund-raising event is
already well underway with ad-
vance reservations and checks for
tables of eight being received by
ticket chairmen Shirley Solomon
in Tampa 251-1550, Leila
Lawrence in Clearwater
446-7778, and Marilyn Benjamin
in St. Petersburg 345-3544.
Menorah Manor Guild is
vigorously sponsoring the Four
M's: Making Menorah Manor
Mobile through the pruchase of a
much needed van to transport
residents to community activities
enriching the scope of the
residents' daily experiences.
Tickets for the Gala benefit are
$125 per person. A cocktail sup-
per catered by the Wine Cellar
Restaurant, music, and dancing in
Sue Schechter
The Great Room will follow the
happy production of "Pippin."
Vereen will appear in the leading
role which catapulted him to star-
dom in the Broadway production.
Five Tony Awards were won by
St. Joseph's Hospital News
Going back to school means
more than new clothes and shoes.
Children must meet state health
requirements and be current on
immunizations before they can
enter school or day care in the fall.
Parents can beat the back-to-
school crunch by making an ap-
pointment soon with their
pediatricians.
Area pediatricians on staff at
St. Joseph's Hospital are helping
parents learn about school health
requirements and children's
health needs in a special Pediatric
Care program. During four con-
secutive weekends July 26-27,
Aug. 2-3, 9-10, and 16-17 -
pediatric office staff and St.
Joseph's staff and volunteers will
answer parents' questions in
health information centers set up
in Tampa Bay Center and Univer-
sity Square Mall. Area Wendy's
restaurants also will distribute
fliers about the program.
Materials to be distributed in-
clude a checklist for parents
noting health care requirements
for children of various ages.
Parents are encouraged to
develop an ongoing relationship
with their pediatricians,
specialists who are skilled in
monitoring childen's growth and
development.
For more information, or to be
referred to a physician, call St.
Joseph's Care Line, 870-4444.
Freh Homemade Soaps
The Best in Breakfast
Superlative Sandwiches
Tampa's Best Flmpanados
Fresh Deli At Unbelievable Prices
NOVA SABLE WHITE FISH
CHUBS HERRING
Carry Out and Catering Available
this smash musical, directed and
choreographed by Bob Fosse.
Those who have a conflict with
the date may wish to purchase
tickets for family members or
business associates as a contribu-
tion to the specific purchase of a
van for the Menorah residents.
The Dress Circle block of seats
held for the Guild Gala is limited.
Call now for reservations. Formal
invitations wilh be sent early in
August for the November special
event.
Committee members from Tam-
pa are Loretta Linsky, Shirley
Solomon, Doris Rosenblatt,
Marilyn Weissman, Lee Kessler
and Bobbie Karpay; from clear-
water are Guild president, Ida
Michels, Chairman Sue Schechter,
Edie Seligman, Sally Siegel, Del
Krug, LeUa Lawrence, Joan Ben-
jamin and Bobbie Keiden; from
St. Petersburg are Marilyn Ben-
jamin Sonya Miller, Thelma
Rothman, Judy Davis, Donna
Orns and Elsie Estroff.
Free college courses are
available to senior citizens at the
University of South Florida under
Florida's tuition waiver program.
Registration and orientation for
fall will be held for senior citizens
only at 10 a.m., Friday Aug. 22,
on the second floor of the Univer-
sity Center at USF's Tampa
campus.
The tuition waiver program is
for Florida residents who are 60
years of age or older. They may
take regular credit courses on a
space available basis without pay-
ment of fees. Participants in the
program attend regular classes
but do not take exams or receive
college credit.
Past program participants are
available at the orientation-
registration session to serve as ad-
visers to newcomers. Free college
classes taken have ranged from
computer science to music
appreciation.
For further information about
the tuition waiver program, call
Lifelong Learning at USF in Tam-
pa, 974-2403.
Holiday Wishes in 5757
From Our House To Yours..,
Our High Holiday Issue Will be Published
October 3...
What A Wonderful Way
to Send Greetings
To All Your Friends...
Call 872-4470 Today
To Reserve Your Space
DEADLINE: September 24.
Jewish Floridian of Tampa




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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, August 8, 1986
Israel and Gabon:
The Thaw Freezes Up Again
(Mr. Foxman is associate na-
tional director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'ritk and head of its Interna-
tional Affairs Division. Ms. Dit-
chek is associate director of the
Middle Eastern Affairs
Department.)
By ABRAHAM H. FOXMAN
And JANICE DITCHEK
Over the past decade and a half,
the relations of black African
states with Israel have often been
shifting, reflective of changing
political realities and based on
motives that can, at best, be term-
ed curious.
Case in point: the tiny republic
of Gabon, which, along with a
number of other African states,
began sending signals of interest
in restoring diplomatic ties with
Israel shortly after the Camp
David peace treaty was signed in
1979. This had followed nearly a
decade of broken relations bet-
ween the black African states and
the Jewish one, a "freeze," as
Gabon's President Omar Bongo
called it, imposed by Arab
pressure in the form of a 1973
Organization of African Unity
resolution that banned ties with
Jerusalem after Israel "occupied
African territory" (the Sinai).
Seventeen African states had
severed diplomatic ties with Israel
at that time.
Peace, the return of the Sinai,
the memory of 20 years of Israeli
aid programs, and a disenchant-
ment over unfulfilled Arab pro-
mises had all contributed to the
post-Camp David thaw.
In the case of Gabon, the signals
of an interest in resuming rela-
tions became noticeable in the late
1970's when President Bongo
began to realize the possible ad-
vantages to his country in Israel's
productive aid programs for
developing nations. The point of
curiosity, however, has been the
gradual turn over the past four
years from warm relations to cold,
between Gabon's capital,
Libreville, and Jerusalem.
Israel's aid provides a constant,
which has been unaffected by the
swings of Bongo's policy toward
Israel, r or nearly three decades,
Israel has shared its experience in
adapting Western technology to
the needs of an underdeveloped
area through successful
cooperative programs in the Third
World, particularly in black
Africa. Israel's huge effort in-
cludes professional and technical
training in Africa as well as in
Israel. The entire program com-
prises a wide range of projects in
agriculture, food production,
water resource development,
building communication and
transportation systems, and in the
initiation of health care and
literacy programs, which include
the opening of clinics and youth
centers.
In May, 1979, two months after
Camp David, President Bongo's
wife received medical treatment
at Jerusalem's Hadassah
Hospital. Early in 1981, Bongo
dispatched a secret mission of top
Gabonese officials to Israel to ex-
plore the means of ending the past
decade's freeze. Shortly
thereafter, an Israeli interest see-
Records Back to '38
Waldheim's Application, Photo to SS
NEW YORK Kurt
Waldheim is identified as a
member of Hitler's
"Brownshirt" storm-
troopers in a 1940 court
document published by a
neo-Nazi newspaper in West
Germany this year.
The document is the first show-
ing Waldheim's Nazi affiliations
that bears his photograph.
Waldheim's passport-size picture
appears in the right-hand corner
of the document which bears bis
name at the top.
The document Waldheim's
"personal questionnaire" from his
1940 application for a court posi-
tion was published on Apr. 4 of
this year in Munich by the neo-
Nazi National Zeitung newspaper.
WALDHEIM has repeatedly
denied membership in Nazi
organizations. He wrote WJC
President Edgar M. Bronfman on
March 7, "I was not a member of
the SA (stormtroopers) or any
organization of the Nazi regime."
He explicitly stated he was not a
member of the SA or the Nazi stu-
dent union in his formal defense
memorandum to the U.S. Justice
Department of Apr. 12.
He told the Associated Press on
Apr. 9: "I was anti-Nazi. All this is
lies. I was never in the SA nor in
the student union."
The 1940 document lists
Waldheim as a member of the SA
and the Nazi student union.
In the box on membership in
Nazi affiliated organizations,
Waldheim is identified on the
form as an SA Mann (SA man)
having joined on November 18,

4. Ma
i*ta<
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1938. He is listed as belonging to
the NSStudentenbund (Nazi stu-
dent union) as of April 1, 1938.
WALDHEIM's membership in
the stormtroopers came less than
a week following the infamous
Kristallnackt (Night of Broken
Glass) the reign of terror
eJewisH Floridian
Of Tampa
HuainaatOffirr 2NOK HoraUoStrart. Tampa. Kla J3COV
Tilaphom H72 4<70
Publication(Mfic* 120 NK6S1. Miami. Fla 33132
FREDK SHOCHKT SUZANNK SHOCHKT AUDKKY HAUBKN.STOCK
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Pubuahad Bi Waakiy Ptua 1 Additional Edition on January Jl. 1086 by The Jawiah Floridian of Tampa
Sarond Claaa Poalafta Paid at Miami. Pla USP8 471-910 ISSN 87SO-6063
Postmaster: Send address changes to Tha Jawiah Floridian, persecutor."
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
SUHSt KlrTION HATKS ll.nral Area) 2 Vaar Minimum Subwiption (7 IKHAnnual .l Mil
( hit of Town Upon Kequ**l
Tm- JfNMa Floridiai. maintain* no lr* 1ml Proplr rtrnviiut lh paprr who have noi .uhv nl-,1
dirarllv mrr nrbacrmer* throuirh arranjtrnwni with ihr Jrwnh Krdrration ol Tampa wnrrrhv *2 2
paf vaar i deducted from their ri>n(rihulion< (or mharriptmn i.i ihr paper \n\imr winhmit I"
.aiweUui h. snIi. n|,i.n .h.miii ...ni.i iii lh.< Iei*h Kl.iri.li.n ..r rhe rVdrralion
against Austrian and German
Jews spearheaded by the SA.
Under Nazi Party rules,
Waldheim must have applied in
May of 1938 to be accepted in the
SA and submitted an "Aryan"
certificate along with a certificate
of "good conduct."
Coinciding with the release of
the document, the WJC again call-
ed on Attorney General Edwin
Meese "to enforce the law and
place Waldheim on the 'watch list'
of aliens excludable from the
United States."
In April, the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investiga-
tions concluded that under
American law, Waldheim should
be excluded as a "Nazi
Friday, August 8, 1986
Volume 8
3 AB 5746
Number 17
Quarter-Million Gilt
HARTFORD (JTA) A gift
of $250,000 has been made to the
Hartford University Maurice
Greenberg Center for Jewish
Studies by Simon Konover, a
West Hartford realtor.
tion was allowed to open in Gabon;
later in the year Bongo received
Ariel Sharon, then-Minister of
Defense, and with him a premise
of Israeli military and economic
aid that soon became a reality.
The second turn of events began
in May, 1982, when following the
announcement of Zaire's decision
to reestablish full diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel, Gabon froze all
talks on such rapprochement. Still
accepting Israeli aid, Gabon
reduced the status of Israel's in-
terest section to that of non-
resident, forcing the single
representative to conduct his af-
fairs from the neighboring Ivory
Coast with only an occasional visit
to Libreville.
In 1986 the Israeli represen-
tative was denied entry into
Gabon altogether. No reason was
given at the time for this move or
for the subsequent refusal of
Gabon's ambassador in the Ivory
Coast to publicly acknowledge his
Israeli counterpart.
The situation became clearer,
however, when on May 5, PLO
chairman Yasser Arafat was
welcomed at Gabon's airport by
President Bongo for a three-day
visit. After two days of official
talks between the two men, it was
agreed that diplomatic relations
between Gabon and the PLO
would be established, that the ter-
rorist organization would open an
"embassy" in Libreville, and that
economic cooperation would en-
sue. At the same time, Bongo
notified Israeli authorities that he
would not restore official ties with
Jerusalem because of his "obliga-
tion toward Moslem solidarity.
It is interesting to note on this
last point that Gabon is commonly
referred to as the "Bastion of the
Cross in Africa" due to its
predominantly Christian popula-
tion some 180,000 Catholics
and 50,000 Protestants, compared
to a mere 3,000 Moslems. But it
might also be noted that President
Bongo is a former Christian who
converted to Islam in 1973.
(Israel's willingness to share its
agricultural and technological
know-how has never been in-
fluenced by the religious composi-
tion of recipient African states.)
Most African nations have been
mindful of Israel's positive role;
many have quietly resumed con-
tacts and others have reestablish-
ed full diplomatic relations with
the Jewish state. The obvious con-
trast between Israel's record and
the failed promises of the Arab
governments leads many
observers to ask what benefits
President Bongo expects to reap
for his people in pursuing his pre-
sent policies.
ALM Antillean Airlines
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DELIGHTFUL FOOD
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on request.
DELIGHTFUL FLIGHT
Bright, pleasantly appointed Super 80s, one of the most
sophisticated jets in the sky. Quiet. Roomy. We reduced the
seating from 172 to 142 for an uncramped, uncrowded,
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in first class.
DELIGHTFUL DESTINATIONS
Aruba. Bonaire. Curacao, where there's plenty of sun,
cooling tradewinds, beoches, casinos, comfortable accom-
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DELIGHTFUL VACATION PACKAGES
&
e,
from *# 9 including airfare from Miami
From fampa and Orlando, odd $70.00 (IT6UVI1G01O)
ire from <#97 including airfare from Miami
From fampa ond Orlando, add S7O00 (fWMiGOiM)
u racao from *30?r including airfare from Mtomi
From fampa and Orlando, odd $7000 0T6IW1GO1N)
PLUS BONUS FEATURES...
4 days/3 nights per person, double occupancy, EP. Four
and seven nights packages also available at bargain rates.
Daily flights to ABCs depart Miami at 2:00 PM.
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Your Travel Agent Knows!
ANTILLEAN AIRLINES
THE AIRLINE Of THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN
.fc-_


Friday, August 8,1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
Women's League Survey Indicates Increasing
Use of Biblical Names For Newborn Children Business Card Directory
NEW YORK, N.Y. "Rachel"
and "Adam" were the most
popular names selected by Jewish
families for their newborn
children in 1985-86, according to a
random survey conducted by the
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism.
In response to questions posed
to the Women's League 28
Branch Presidents in the United
States and Canada, the
Presidents said that "Rebecca,"
"Jonathan," and "Daniel" came
in second as Hebrew choices, with
"Jessica" and "Michael" selected
for English names.
The survey results were
gathered by Women's League's
Reading and Editorial Commit-
tee, which produced Welcome To
The World, the organization's
new Jewish Baby Record Book.
The data was based on new babies
named in Conservative synagogue
ceremonies in the United States
and Canada during 1985-86.
"Biblical names proved to be the
most frequent ones selected,
whether for the child's Hebrew or
English name," noted Selma
Weintraub, Women's League
President. Mrs. Weintraub in-
dicated that Jewish custom re-
quires that children be given both
a Hebrew and an English name.
"Our survey shows that an in-
creasing number of parents are
using a Hebrew name for both the
English and Hebrew designa-
tion," she said.
Mrs. Weintraub attributed this
greater use of Hebrew names to
the strong traditional feeling
among American Jews, to kinship
with the State of Israel, and to a
general sense of closeness within
the Jewish family. She stressed
that, in most cases, Ashkenazi
Jewish families still try to name a
newborn after a deceased relative
or to use a derivative of that
relative's first name. "This is
done to perpetuate the memory of
the generation which has passed
in the generation of the future,"
Mrs. Weintraub explained. Accor-
ding to custom, Ashkenazi Jews
name children after a deceased
relative, while Sephardic Jews use
the names of the living.
The four-color Jewish Baby
Record Book. Welcome To The
World, was illustrated by Glenn
Wolff and designed by Art Direc-
tor Carol Isaak.
The volume, produced this year
by Women's League, sells for
$12.95, with quantity discounts
available. The book may be pur-
chased at Conservative
Synagogue Judaica Shops or by
ordering from Women's League
for Conservative Judaism, 48
East 74 Street, New York, NY
10021.
??????+?'
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council Set
Up To Serve Military Personnel
NEW YORK, N.Y. A new
body, to be known as the
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council,
has been organized by represen-
tatives of the three major rabbinic
groups in American Jewish life.
The newly-established Council
will serve Jewish chaplains in the
U.S. military and Veterans Ad-
ministration and Jewish military
personnel and patients in VA
hospitals. Each of the three rab-
Business
Loans
$25,000-$2.5 million
SB A loans prepared
Small Business
Investment Company
loans arranged
Vantura Capital
RAD Funding
Business Capital Corp.
5130 Elaenhower Blvd., Suit. 300
Tampa, Florida 33634
Tamp. 885-8951
Cl.arw.tef. 441-4114
Aak for Joseph Apter
binic groups may endorse its own
candidates for chaplaincy service.
The JWB/Jewish Chaplains
Council will maintain an active
liaison with the Chiefs of
Chaplains of the Air Force, Army,
Navy and VA; visit and consult
with Jewish chaplains, lay leaders,
installation chaplains, command
personnel, and major commands;
assist the military and naval lay
leader/reader program; supervise
and support Jewish chaplains in
the reserve program and part-
time chaplains; reach out to
Jewish cadets and midshipment in
the nation's service academies;
conduct an annual chaplain's
career development workshop;
Jackson Praises
Meetings
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
Rev. Jesse Jackson praised the
meetings in Morocco between
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres and
King Hassan II as well as Egyp-
tian President Hosni Mubarak's
support for the talks.
This occurred last week during
a celebration of the 34th anniver-
sary of the Egyptian revolution at
the Egyptian Embassy, according
to Hyman Bookbinder of the
American Jewish Committee.
We Bring
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issue a Jewish calendar-diary,
periodic newsletter, leaflets for all
Jewish holidays and other publica-
tions; respond to chaplains' and
lay leaden/readers' requests for
supplies, and serve as an advocate
for Jewish personnel in the U.S.
armed forces.
The Council will be comprised of
four representatives from each of
the three rabbinic groups plus
four members of an active-duty
chaplains advisory group. Two
representatives from each group
will make up the executive com-
mittee of the Council.
Rabbi Barry Hewitt Greene, of
Short Hills, N.J., will be chairman
of the new Council, and Rabbi
Aaron Landes, of Elkins Park,
Pa., is chairman of the executive
committee. Rabbi David Lapp is
director of the new Council and
also of JWB's Armed Forces and
Veterans Services. Rabbi Nathan
Landman is deputy director.
Details of the arrangement
were worked out at a meeting of
the folllowing representatives of
the three rabbinic groups: Rabbi
Herschel Schacter, Bronx, and
Rabbi Abraham Avrech,
Brooklyn, Rabbinical Council of
America (Orthodox); Rabbi
Landes and Rabbi Matthew H.
Simon, Rockville, Md., Rabbinical
Assembly (Conservative); and
Rabbi Greene and Rabbi Frank W.
Waldorf, Brookline, Mass., Cen-
tral Conference of American Rab-
bis (Reform).
"The unity which has marked
service to the Jewish military
chaplaincy for almost 70 years
continues," Leonard Rochwarger,
Buffalo, N.Y., communal leader
and JWB president, said.
"We are extremely gratified
that the representatives of the
three major rabbinic bodies in
America have exhibited such
superb statesmanship in organiz-
ing the JWB/Jewish Chaplains
Council. The American Jewish
community can be assured that its
men and women in uniform, their
families and hospitalized VA pa-
tients will continue to get the full ,
range of services that they have
always received."
In addition to its role as the U.S.
Government-accredited agency
for serving the Jewish educa-
tional, recreational and morale
needs of American Jewish
military personnel, their families,
and patients in VA hospitals, JWB
is the association of 275 Jewish
Community Centers, YM-YWHAs
and camps in the U.S. and Canada
and is a major Jewish educational
and cultural resources for North
American Jewry.
JWB is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJA-Federation
of Greater New York, JCCs and
Ys, and JWB Associates.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, August 8, 1986
Community Calendar
Friday, August 8
Candlelighting time 7:55 p.m.
Sunday, August 10
Tune in "The Jewish Sound" WMNF 88.5 FM
10:30 a.m.-l p.m.
11 a.m. North Tampa Reform Jewish Association
Family Picnic.
Monday, August 11
JCC After Camp Begins :
1:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board
meeting
4:30 p.m. Mary Walker Board meeting
Tuesday, August 12
11 a.m. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Hillel School Board meeting
8 p.m. Chabad Lubavitch Couples Get-Together
Wednesday,August 13
Jewish Community Food Bank
8:30 p.m. Bais Tefilah Special Service
Thursday, August 14
7 a.m. Bais Tefilah Special Service
Friday, August 15
Candlelighting time 7:49 p.m.
Sunday, August 17
10:30 a.m.-l p.m. Tune in "The Jewish Sound"
88.5 FM
Kol Ami Teacher Work Day
Jewish Community Center Pool and Fun BBQ
Tuesday, August 19
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Board of Education
Wednesday, August 20
Jewish Community Food Bank
5 p.m. Hillel School Get Acquainted BBQ and
Picnic
5:30 p.m. ADL Executive Committee meeting
7:30 p.m. Bay Area Singles Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Jewish Women Jewish Survival
Thursday, August 21
5:50 p.m. Jewish Community Center Executive
Board meeting
8 p.m. Jewish Community Center Board meeting
8 p.m. Kol Ami Membership Coffee
Friday, August 22
Candlelighting time 6:42 p.m.
Congregations/Organizations Events
BAIS TEFILAH
The ninth day of the Hebrew
month of Av (Aug. 14) is the sad-
dest day on the Jewish Calendar.
The holy Temple was destroyed
and burned. As a result, Jews over
the world fast from sunset on
Tuesday the thirteenth until 8:43
on Wednesday the fourteenth.
Services will be held on Wednes-
day, Aug. 13 at 8:30 p.m. followed
by the Aychao. Thursday morning
Aug. 14 Shachris will begin at 7
a.m. and Mincha services will
commence at 7 p.m.
Wishing everyone an easy fast!
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
UPDATE
Opening date for the North
Tampa Reform Jewish Associa-
tion Religious School is scheduled
for Sunday, Sept. 21. Parents are
reminded that a 10 percent tuition
discount is available for those
children registered by Aug. 10.
This early registration may be ac-
complished at or before the barbe-
que pot-luck picnic to be held on
Sunday, Aug. 10, starting at 11
a.m. at White Sands Beach in
Carroll wood.
The Religious School faculty in-
cludes several well known
members of the Jewish communi-
ty: Sunni Zions, pre-kindergarten,
kindergarten; Betsy Singer, first
grade, second grade; Mark
Schwartz, third grade, fourth
grade; Vikki Silverman, fifth
grade, sixth grade, music, pre-
bar/bat mitzvah. Each of these
teachers will be responsible for in-
structing in both Hebrew and
Judaic studies for their respective
grades. Elizabeth Geisler is aide
and office assistant.
For further information about
Religious School, please call Dr.
Maurice Shaw at 963-2861 or
Vikki Silverman at 949-1909.
Additional details regarding the
barbeque can be obtained by call-
ing Dr. Claudia Hohn at 962-3900
or Adrienne Golub at 961-7522.
All interested Jewish people are
welcome.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
CHAVURAH
Forms New Chapter
The Reconstructionist Com-
munity Chavurah, building on its
great success, announces the for-
mation of a Lakeland chapter. The
Chavurah is one of three major
Reconstructionist groups in the
Excellence
And
Flexibility
The Hillel School of
Tampa'8 program works,
because we combine only
the best in Jewish and
General studies through
8th Grade. National
testing indicates our
students achieve well
above their grade level in
every area.
Our program is flexible as
well as excellent. Students
may enter even the highest
grades with little or no
knowledge of Hebrew.
Through a dual-track
system they take Jewish
studies in English until
individual instruction
brings their Hebrew up to a
sufficient level.
the
Hillel
School
of Tempo
1UI-
r syrr
For further information,
call the school at 875-8287.
HILLEL SCHOOL OF TAMPA IOWA TESTS OF BASIC SKILLS
SUMMARY OF SCONES (ISM
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Mr. ar*W .1u6.nl. tcorae are dHtefWM kecwM tfcey 9W arid* IMt*. All .cor., .t.
^ZJLf^, qu.....nt. ..OHM 10. m 9>* students. Or**. TI 2 .cM ... from INS.
state, and provides study/discus-
sion sessions, monthly services,
and social functions. Members are
those who are not affiliated with
other synagogues, or those who
are and wish to supplement their
synagogue involvement
Dues for the 1986-1987 year are
$35 per person, with all rabbinic
services provided for its members.
For information, literature, and
membership applications, please
call the office at 972-4433.
HILLEL USF/UT
Ready For New School Year
The Hillel Foundation at USF
and UT is preparing for another
successful year of student pro-
gramming. A wide range of
religious, social, educational,
counseling, and cultural events
are planned, with undergraduate
and graduate students from all
backgrounds welcome.
Most exciting is the building
campaign now underway, with the
planned facility to be located with
other campus religious centers.
Those students wishing to join us,
or parents wishing to help with
our binding campaign are asked to
call the office at 972-4433.
HADASSAH
Brandon Shalom Chapter
Brandon Shalom Chapter of
Hadassah is planning a luncheon
and pool party for prospective
new members during our
membership drive. The party will
be on Tuesday, Aug. 12, from
noon until 3 p.m. If you are in-
terested in joining a lively, grow-
ing chapter of Hadassah and live
in East Hillsborough, please call
the following members for more
information and to make
reservations.
Joanna Ronay 689-3458 or
Selethel Musy 689-0092.
TEMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM
JEWISH SINGLES
Camping Trip
Labor Day Weekend
We're off to the Anastasia
State Recreation Area, near St.
Augustine, for a wonderful 4-day
camping trip! Departing Friday,
Aug. 29, and returning on Mon-
day, Sept. 1 (holiday), the whole
weekend costs only $50/adult and
$25/child (5-13). This fee includes
camping fees, dinners Friday,
Saturday, and Sunday, breakfasts
Saturday, Sunday, and Monday,
and gas money for the drivers
we'll be carpooling. Camping gear
is not required and all you have to
bring is a cooler of beverages, a
little extra money for sightseeing
St. Augustine (optional) and the
desire for a good time. Please call
Sandy at 797-3586 for more
information.
Spotlight
Continued from Page 1

Civics, and an additional foreign
language at the upper level, such
as French or Spanish.
Have a Family Life Education
elective for those in the upper
grades in cooperation with the
Tampa Jewish Family Services.
Work closely with national
organizatic ns, Jewish institutions
of higher learning, the Tampa
Rabbinic Association, the Univer-
sity of South Florida, and the
University of Tampa.
Joachim Scharf and his wife,
Claire, have moved to the Tampa
Bay area from the Northeast.
During the last 16 years he held
the headmaster post at the Albert
Einstein Academy (elementary
and junior high school) in Wilm-
ington, Delaware, and the
Solomon Schecter Day School of
Essex and Union (kindergarten
through 12th grade) in Cranford,
New Jersey. While in Delaware
Scharf was also the dean of the
Delaware Campus of Gratz Col-
lege of Philadelphia. The Scharfs
are not strangers to the west
coast of Florida, having vacation-
ed here for many years and being
impressed with the Jewish com-
munity and the geographic
location.
Jerusalem Book Fair Next Apr. 6
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
13th International Book Fair will
be held in the city's convention
center from April 6 to 12, 1987.
Mayor Teddy Kollek has announc-
ed. The Jerusalem Book Fair has
been constantly growing, and the
number and variety of par-
ticipants are expected to exceed
the nearly 1,000 publishers from
40 nations who attended
Jerusalem's most recent biennial
book fair in 1985.
Since the first Jerusalem Book
fair 23 years ago, the Book Fair
has evolved two special themes:
international publishing and the
involvement of the younger
generation of publishers and
editors.
Bar Mitzvah
SAMUEL SILVER
Samuel Jerome Silver, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Larry M. Silver, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah, Saturday, Aug. 16 at 10
a.m. at Congregation Rodelph
Sholom. Rabbi Kenneth Berger
and Cantor William Hauben will
officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
1986-87 Rodeph Sholom Pre-
Conflrmation class and he is
secretary of USY. Samuel attends
ninth grade at Buchanan Junior
High School. He is an Honor Roll
student and has received awards
for poetry and posters.
Mr. and Mrs. Silver will host the
Kiddush luncheon following the
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception Saturday evening
at their home.
Special guests will include God-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Lazarus; grandfather, Mac
Hopkins, great uncle and aunt,
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fried, and
other relatives from Miami,
Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania.
Samuel Silver
To place a Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah announcement in the
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
please have information,
(typed/double spaced), in
the office, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, Florida
33609, three weeks prior to
the event.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:30 a.m., 6:46 p.m.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Co-amative
8919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H. David Rom, Cantor Sam Iaaak Service*:
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Csaesrvativ*
2713 Bayabore Boulevard 8871911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, haxxan William
Hauben Service*: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m Daily: Minyan, 7:16.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Herbert Drooi. Rabbi Joan Glaaer Farber. *
Servicea: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:80 a.m.
CONGREGATION BAIS TEFF1LAH Orthodox
3418 Handy Road No. 103 Rabbi Yoeei Dubrowaki 962-2376 Services Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
NORTH TAMPA REFORM JEWISH ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 817, Tampa, Fla. 33618,961-7622. Service! at 8 p.m., first and third Friday
of each month beginning July 18; Masonic Community Lodge, 402 W. Waters Ave.
(at Ola).
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
P.O. Box 271167. Rabbi Yoeaie Dubrowaki, Executive Director. 968-2317.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
13801 N. 37th St. No. 1114. Rabbi Dovid Mockin, Program Coordinator. 971-6234.
Friday night Service* one half hour after sunset. Tueaday night rlsaann at 8 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at U.S.F./U.T./H.C.C. Cambridge Wood* 14240
North 42nd Street 972-4433. Servicea and Oneg Shabbat Friday evening 7 p.m. *
Sunday Bagel Brunches, 11:90 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
684-9162, United Community Church, 1601 La Jolla Street, Sun City Center, Ser-
vice*: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
Reconstructionist Community Chavurah Reconatructioniat Cambridge Woods*
972-4488 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly study sessions, weekly "Shabbat Ex-
perience," monthly service* with dinner


Friday, August 8, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
Women's League For Conservative
Judaism Reports Increased Voluntarism
NEW YORK, N.Y. The new
Jewish woman of today, proud of
her Jewish identity, has assumed
the leadership in building a strong
Judaism in the home and com-
munity and thus serves as a "role
model" for her children.
This active participation in
Jewish life, practicing religious
Judaism at home and in the
synagogue, while simultaneously
combining the responsibilities of
motherhood, work and volun-
tarism, appears to be on the in-
crease, especially among younger
women.
"There exists a new vitality in
our Branches in the U.S. and
Canada," reported Selma Wein-
traub of Hartsdale, N.Y., Presi-
dent of the Women's League for
Conservative Judaism. "Our
members are concerned about the
reality of increasing intermar-
riage and assimilation among
young people. They see that the
best answer is to build a positive
Jewish home, to be active in one's
synagogue, and to be concerned
about the problems and issues
confronting society."
"By setting examples for her
children, the woman builds a
desire for Jewish identity within
her children," added Mrs. Wein-
traub. "It is essential that the
man of the family becomes an ac-
tive partner in the process."
The new trend of increased
voluntarism among today's
Jewish women came to light dur-
ing a recent four-day conference
of Branch Presidents of the
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism in Long Beach,
N.Y. The participants included na-
tional officers, chairmen of the
organization's 24 departments,
and professional staff. Discussed
were programs concerning educa-
tion, religious activities, and com-
munal service.
The Women's League consists
of 800 Affiliates in Conservative
Synagogues in the U.S., Canada,
Mexico, Puerto Rico and Israel,
serving a membership of 200,000.
Although some Branches still
reported problems regarding
voluntarism, the inlfux of younger
women in many communities was
viewed by Women's League
leaders as extremely encouraging.
In recent years, as women have
returned to either part-time or
full-time work, voluntarism in
many organizations has suffered.
"I get angry when women use
their new economic involvement
as an excuse not to participate in
Jewish life," asserted Cory
Schneider of Harrisburg, Penn-
sylvania. "I'm not too busy to be
Jewish and build a Jewish future
for the next generation. I want to
create a community of dedicated
Jews so that my children will have
other Jews to grow up with."
A similar view was expressed by
Portland, Oregon's Carole Rots-
tein, who desires to be a role
model for her child. "I want her to
grow up Jewishly and know who
she is," Mrs. Rothstein stated.
She indicated that voluntarism in
the Pacific Northwest Branch was
on the increase, especially among
younger mothers.
She urged that special attention
must be given to young mothers
and their needs by conducting
outreach programs. "We must
Newsman Blitzer Dropped
From Journalists in Bush Party
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Jerusalem Post's
Washington correspondent,
Wolf Blitzer, was dropped
at the last moment from
U.S. Vice President George
Bush's party visiting the
Middle East this week,
although Blitzer is an
American citizen and an ac-
credited White House
correspondent.
Bush arrived in Jerusalem Sun-
day at the start of a four-day visit
to Israel after which he will be go-
ing on to Jordan, Egypt and
possibly Morocco.
Blitzer, who also writes for
several other newspapers, was
told that he could not accompany
the Vice President as he would not
be welcome in Jordan.
THE REPORTER, who had
originally been invited by Bush to
join his entourage, had received a
visa to Jordan personally signed
by the Jordanian Ambassador to
Washington, who had given
Blitzer his "strong assurances" of
a welcome in Amman.
0ROWARD
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Only a few hours before the trip,
Blitzer was informed by Stephen
Hart, Assistant Press Secretary
to the Vice President, that Hart
had been told during his
preparatory trip to Amman that
Blitzer would not be welcome
because he would be writing about
the trip for an Israeli paper, the
Jerusalem Post.
Blitzer, however, says that he
had personally clarified this point
with the Jordanian Ambassador
to the U.S., Mohammed Kamal,
who himself had cleared the pro-
blem with Jordan's Foreign
Minister Taher El Masri.
continue to have early religious
services and junior congregational
services, and to encourage family
worship. We should also develop
open dialogue with our teenagers
and perhaps establish Jewish liv-
ing guidelines with their
cooperation."
Credit for the building of a
strong Jewish family life was at-
tributed to a vital Day School
system, according to Ontario
Branch President Marsha Cohen.
"In Toronto we actively engage in
raising the Jewish consciousness
in the comunity we're not
afraid to be Jews," she stressed.
"More than 55 percent of our kids
are involved in Day School and
part-time Jewish education," she
explained. In addition, Mrs.
Cohen pointed to active youth pro-
grams in the synagogues and the
presence of three generations at-
tending worship services
grandparents, parents and
children.
Mrs. Cohen stated that 75 per-
cent of the women in her Branch
work. "This is a sophisticated
woman, in the business world,
working at home, with limited
time, who still works in the
Branch to build a larger Jewish
family life. Frequently I hear a
woman say to me, "I'm bringing
my kids up Jewishly. I want to in-
still a sense of morality, Jewish
identity. I want to prevent an
intermarriage."
In the Southern Branch another
force drives Jewish families
together. "Anti-Semitism,
religion in the schools make our
kids unhappy," according to
Marilyn Liberman of Knoxville,
Tennessee. "This produces a lone-
ly Jew, eager to affiliate. We have
a deep commitment to Judaism.
Many of our Jews are not holiday
Jews only." .
Mrs. Lieberman, whose
daughter is a new rabbinical stu-
dent at The Jewish Theological
Seminary, admitted that
volunteers are still difficult to ob-
tain. "In the south there are many
single women, who must work,
and don't have the energy when
they come home. Yet they need to
connect with other Jews and don't
want their children to assimilate,"
she explained.
Mrs. Lieberman stated that one
solution has been to encourage the
participation of single women in
synagogue activities by conduc-
ting evening sessions and making
them welcome, even if they can
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only give to their Sisterhoods a
few hours per week.
Preoccupation with economic
needs has also produced some
voluntarism problems on Eastern
Long Island. "We no longer look
for a full voluntarism and really
accept part-time participation,"
noted Gloria Cohen, herself oc-
cupied fully in management of a
Drug firm in Smith town. "Despite
difficulty in being involved,
women still want their children to
maintain a strong Jewish identi-
ty," Mrs. Cohen emphasized.
Another view was expressed by
Sally Hagan of Woodland Hills,
California, who said, "Sisterhoods
must continue to show that they
are no longer a kiddush cookies
and fund-raising organization. We
must educate and inform the
women of our communities that
we are a status group willing to
keep our Judaism alive and well
for our families, especially our
children, and that their participa-
tion in these efforts is needed in
order for all of us to do the proper
job and hopefully succeed.'
Obituaries
MARENUS
Hannah H., 80, of Tampa, died Tuesday. Ju-
ly 22, 1986 She had lived in the Tampa Bay
area for four years and was a retired book-
keeper. She was a member of Congregation
Schaarai Zedek and the Over 50 Havarah.
She is survived by two sons. Jim of Tampa
and Alan of, Edison, N.J.; one daughter,
Jane Ketover of Tampa; one sister, Edith
Davis of Elizabeth, N.J.; and seven
grandchildren.
LYNN
Ben, 77, of Valrico, died Thursday, July 24,
1986. He was a resident of the Tamba Bay
area for 30 years before moving to Valrico
five years ago. He was the owner and
operator of a restaurant supply retail com-
Ql. He was a member of Congregation
elph Sholom, past president of Hillel
School, past president of Asolo State
Theatre Guild, and was on the board of
directors of the Playmakers theatre group.
He had also received honors from the
United Jewish Appeal and was a trustee for
the University of Tampa. He is survived by
his wife, Linda; two sons, Robert J. and
Gerald, both of Tampa; a daughter, Kim
Dudding of Valrico; and a sister, Pauline
Bierick of W. Orange. N.J.
WEIL
Robert M., 78. of 520 El Sereno Place, Tam-
pa, died Saturday. July 26,1986. A native of
Gladwin, Mich., and coming from
Milwaukee, he had lived in the Tampa Bay
area for 15 years. He was a real estate
salesman. He is survived by his wife
Dorothy; one daughter, Mimi Siegel of Tam-
pa; a son, Thomas Weil of Santa Cruz,
Calif.; and three grandchildren.
KRONE
Irving, 76, of Tampa died Monday, July 28,
1986. An area resident since 1962, he was a
retired Deputy of the State Hotel
Restaurant Commission. He was a member
of the Congregation of Rodeph Sholom and
the John Darling Lodge 154 F. 6 A.M. He
was also the former chairman for SCORE.
Chapter 203, where he was an active
counselor since 1976 and was preaentlh
publicity chairman. He was active in area
theatre and he filmed commercials. He was
a former member of the Board of Directors
of the Tampa Community Theater, and he
read and taped programs for the blind at the
University of South Florida. He is survived
by his wife, Sylvia; two sons, Norman of
Sugarland, Texas and Gerald of New York
City; step-son, Richard Farber of Athens,
Ga.; step-daughter, Bonnie Talley of
Kemah. Tx.; five grandchildren and a great-
grandchild.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridiaaf Tampa/Friday, August 8, 1986

-'-*
The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece
The Tampa JCC's 1986 AFTER CAMP CAMP Is Here
Shalom, My
Welcome to After Camp Camp! There are only
two weeks left until school starts. Join us at the
JCC for loads of fun with fantastic field trips, ex-
travagant events, and adventurous activities. The
themes for camp are Science and Technology; Arts
and Literature; Florida fun; and Surf and Nature.
There is definitely something for Everyone.
It's going to be Great! So don't hesitate, put your
swimsuit and towel back in that back pack, let's
get going. Sign up now. You won't want to miss
this much fun. Call Ellen at 872-4451 for more
information.
Facts and Fees Camp is open for all
kindergarten through sixth graders. Camp runs
Monday to Friday, Aug. 11-22. Our doors are open
from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. The formal camp program
wdl be from 9 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Transportation
from and to Kol Ami will be provided at 8:15 a.m.
and 5:30 p.m. You Must register your child for
camp. Registrations must be received by Aug. 4.
Fees: $160 Members, $240 Non-Members.
Daily Fee: $20 Members, $30 Non-Members.
Early Bird: Registrations received by July 28
$145 Members, $217.50 Non-Members.
(Registrations received after Aug 4. are subject
to a $40 late fee!)
Please remember: Send a dairy lunch and a drink
and a bathing suit and towel each day. Your child
may sign up for one of the following specialty
areas: Science, Computers, Arts and Crafts,
Reading and Drama, Nature, or Sports.
Day Care services for After
Camp Camp will be held for $3. an
hour or $10 for the week. Please
Registration Form
Return by Aug. 4
Fees should accompany form.
Name_____________________
Address.
Phone__
Emergency No.
Birthdate____
Grade_______
----I would like to register for After Camp Camp Aug.
----I only wish to register for one day or part of the
camp. Which day(s)___________________________
----I need transportation to/from Kol Ami.
----I am a Center member.
----Aug. 20 ONLY Epcot Day-$27.50 Member, $41.25
Non-Member.
----Full Camp. Member: $160, Non-Member $240.
----Early Bird-Registration received by July 28.
Member: $145, Non-Member: $190.
----Daily Fee: Member $20, Non-Member $30. No. of
Days_____________________________________
----Late Fee-Registration received after Aug. 4 $40!
----Aug. 20 only, $27.50 Members; $41.25 Non-
Members
Total amount enclosed $_______________________
I give my child, permission to participate in the
JCC's After Camp Camp program and allow him/her to
leave the JCC premises on field trips connected with the
camp.
Signature________________________________
Date ______________________________
My child's preferred specialty area is______________
note that
costs.
these are additional
JCC
YOUTH/TWEEN/TEEN
EVENTS
The Youth/Tween/Teen Depart-
ment is looking for game items
such as Trivial Pursuit, Monopoly,
Clue, Sorry, Aggravation, and
other board games that are in
good condition and contain all
materials for use. We are also
looking for television sets, ping-
pong table and pool table to be
donated to the youth gameroom.
Also used furniture in good
condition.
Please remember that all items
donated are tax deductible and if
you have any items that you are
willing to donate please call Ellen
Silverman at the Center,
872-4451.
The Tween and Teen Depart-
ment have been providing sum-
mer parties at the Center. Those
of you that have attended any of
these parties, know what fun and
excitement it is meeting other
Tweens and Teens from other
JCCs. Please do not get left out of
future activities for the end of the
summer.
The programs are held at the
Center and the cost is Members $2
and Non-Members $3. Please call
Ellen Sihrerman if you are in-
terested in any of the programs or
all of them.
Bronx Pool Dance with DJ,
Wednesday, Aug. 27 at 8 p.m.
Please RSVP to Ellen by Aug.
21 at the Center, 872-4451.
THE SECOND HOME
ENRICHMENT PROGRAM
The Second Home program is
designed to be a second home to
all of the participants. We offer
after-school pick up at area
schools and a full afternoon (2-6
p.m.) of fun activities to
kindergarten through sixth
graders. The children receive a
snack and then are directed to
participate in the day's activities.
Our highly qualified staff works
closely with the group to establish
a "family" atmosphere. The
children may get help with
homework or other projects. The
Second Home children may opt to
participate in the ballet, music,
and physical education classes,
but must sign up for those
separately. As part of the enrich-
ment program for Second Home
we will invite specialists in at least
twice a week to oversee activities
in subjects like science, drama,
ceramics, computers, etc. The Se-
cond Home group participates in
special JCC events also. It is the
perfect way to spend the after-
noon especially for school-aged
children with working parents.
The program will run at both the
Main JCC and the North Branch.
Second home begins on Aug. 25
and runs every school day except
when the Center is closed. For
more information as to which
schools we can arrange transpor-
tation from, please contact the
JCC.
Weekly fee for Members,
$26.50; Non-members, $40.
Transportation fee is Members,
$20; and Non-Members, $30 a
month.
Children may come on a daily
basis with prior notice to the
Center.
CAMP NEWS
Camp K'TonTon has been hav-
ing a wonderful second session.
Along with visiting "Mr. Music"
at the Baldwin-Fletcher Music
Center, we went to the Peninsular
Branch Library Storytime and
some of us inspected the Fire Sta-
tion nearby. We are also an-
ticipating the great time that our
Lowry Park Cookout will bring in
the final week of camp. All in all,
we've had great fun on our trips,
but we've also been excelling in
our swimming skills as well as
learning new crafts, and meeting
new friends.
CAMP CHAI NEWS
As our summer camp comes to a
close, Kinneret group with
Sharlena, and Suzanne, and Sara,
Beryl, Damon, Nicky, Brian,
Adam, Jeffrey, Eric, Kalisha and
Ellen have had a wonderful time
together. We have gone on field
trips, horseback riding, and a
beautiful overnight, which we all
enjoyed. If we are not out on field
trips, we are swimming, or
Judaics, Bev the nurse, and arts
and crafts, computer, karate, and
dance. We have a lot to do every-
day and we come home tired and
enjoying it.
We hope that everybody is hav-
ing a wonderful time and will have
a wonderful and safe summer.
Hello! We are Yershalayim, one
of the kindergarten groups at the
JCC camp. Our names are Lind-
say, Ian, Mark, Ryan, Lauren,
Tamar, Sarah, Charlie, Jeremy,
Elliott and Aaron. We have had a
really fun summer.
During the day, we go swimm-
ing, have sports, tennis, com-
puters, arts and crafts, drama,
ballet, karate, Judaica, nurse, and
lots of fun.
We've gone on great trips in-
cluding Harbour Island,
horseback riding, cookouts, parks,
Tampa Main Library, and Captain
Memo's Pirate Ship.
We are looking forward to our
second overnight in a couple of
days. We know it will be as much
fun as the last one. Mindi Herman
Senior Counselor, Dorina
Schusler Junior Counselor.
The Bet Shemas group has
many accomplishments to boast
about. First, Mimi has learned to
swim and Corey scored the fastest
time running the obstacle course.
Benjamin and Justin are always
putting lots of effort into their art
projects. Jared and Andrew are
quite enthusiastic about karate.
Reena, Karin, and Alana are com-
peting for the JCC prima ballerina
position. Jessica taught us the
"Walk of the Cat." Last, but cer-
tainly not least, Sophia was a
great "Gingerbread Man" and did
not get eaten by any animals.
The second session for Gail and
Amadeo's group started off with a
field trip to Clearwater cruise
with Captain Memo. He guided us
Tampa Jewish
Community Center
GrLT _J :00AM
11:30 AM
ft)
REGISTRATION/BREAKFAST
TSE-OFF
1:00 PM LUNCH
1:30 PM AWARDS AND DOOR PRIZES
>

SPONSORS
CILVER- S2S0.00
INCLUDES PROGRAM AD, SIGNAGE ON
SPONSORED HOLE S ENTRY OF TWO
GOLFERS.
GOLD- $500.00
INCLUDES PROGRAM AD, SIGNAGE ON
PONSORED HOLE t ENTRY OF FOUR
GOLFERS.
INDIVIDUAL- $60.00
INCLUDES GOLF, CART, MEALS A
PRIZES.
C.44I PEBBLE CREEK
"* GOLF and COUNTRY CLUB
SUriDflY AUGUST ei I966
through treacherous waters and
safely returned us home. We've
been busy with sports and games,
special art projects and having fun
at the pool. Future field trips in-
clude horseback riding and a trip
to Sand Key.
Let's not forget our overnight
on July 29. We will have an even-
ing swim, watch movies and make
smores. Hope to see you there!
Haifa group consists of
Stephanie, Rosie, Laurie, Holly,
Bat-chen. Erica, Sara, Michael,
Phillip, Adam, Mike, David,
Daniel, Brett, Ami, Michael, head-
ed by Amy and Chuck. Some
special events this month are: Up-
per Tampa Bay, Harbour Island,
Sleep Over, competitive games.
Competitive games we've played
against the other second grade
group Eiolat. Both groups par-
ticipated in soccer and kickball.
Haifa's favorite activity is floor
hockey.
Dorit and Craig would like to
welcome the new campers who
have joined us for toe second
session.
In the first session, we had fun
at our sleepover at Lithia Springs.
The kids enjoyed sleeping in tents,
swimming in the springs, and hav-
ing a cookout. Last week we made
Falafel for lunch. They were
tasty!
We are looking forward to
another great two weeks at camp.
MACCABEES
We have done many activities in
the last couple of weeks like bowl-
ing, roller skating, movies, going
to the beach, playing golf, Adven-
ture Island. We are loking for-
ward to our North Carolina trip
for a week.
SABRAS
The Sabras have now had ex-
perience working with the K'Ton-
Ton and Chai camps. We have had
great beach days at Ft. DeSoto
and St. Petersburg and trips to
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement Our trip to North
Carolina should prove to be as
good or even better than the
Atlanta trip.
SPECIAL CAMP AREAS
We're well into the second ses-
sion and having a terrific time.
During our Health time we've
learned about Nutrition and have
just begun a unit on Dental Care.
Thanks go to Drs. Pross, Kantor,
Tindell, Wiener, and Krosne for
supplying the toothbrushes we us-
ed for our younger campers.
All our campers have done a
great job of staying healthy which
make my job fun. Bev Yeshion
Camp Nurse.
We've had a very busy, fun-
filled summer in arts and crafts.
All the campers enthusiastically
participate in various types of art
projects. So far, just to name a
few, we have made bug catchers,
first aid boxes, name plates, sand
candles, key chains, jewelry
boxes, and our very own yar-
mulkes. Although our summer is
flying by, the art room is still buzz-
ing with excitement. After all,
there are many ways to "unlock
your imagination through art."
Terri Friedman
ADULTS AT LEISURE
Fall Classes
South End
Main Branch Adult Education
Classes
Monday Ceramics 9
a.m.-12 noon. Carol Skelton,
Instructor.
Knit/Crochet 11 a.m.-l p.m.
Anna Lee Markowitz, Instructor
(No Adult Ed. Fee) $10 non-
members.
Fiber Art 12-4 p.m. Carol
Skelton, Instructor. Needlepoint,
macrame, fiber sculpture, class
outings.
Tuesday Painting 9
a.m.-4 p.m. Beverly Rodgers, In-
structor. Includes oil, acrylic. For
beginners and advanced.
Wednesday Sewing 1-4
p.m. Claire Wichman, Instructor.
For beginners and advanced.
"Includes $15 Adult Ed. Fee,
which may be waived. Consult
with instructor.
JEWISH CULTURE CLUB
Take pride in your Jewish
heritage, learn more about the
richness of Jewish culture and
share your knowledge and ex-
periences. Plan to attend our mon-
thly Jewish Culture Club.
Every third Friday at 1 p.m.
Join our warm circle of Jewish
friends for the joy of Yiddish con-
versation. Bring a dessert to
share. Coffee served. Free to
Jewish Community Center
members, $2 non-members.
August 15, September 19.


Full Text
Friday, August 8, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
Women's League For Conservative
Judaism Reports Increased Voluntarism
NEW YORK, N.Y. The new
Jewish woman of today, proud of
her Jewish identity, has assumed
the leadership in building a strong
Judaism in the home and com-
munity and thus serves as a "role
model" for her children.
This active participation in
Jewish life, practicing religious
Judaism at home and in the
synagogue, while simultaneously
combining the responsibilities of
motherhood, work and volun-
tarism, appears to be on the in-
crease, especially among younger
women.
"There exists a new vitality in
our Branches in the U.S. and
Canada," reported Selma Wein-
traub of Hartsdale, N.Y., Presi-
dent of the Women's League for
Conservative Judaism. "Our
members are concerned about the
reality of increasing intermar-
riage and assimilation among
young people. They see that the
best answer is to build a positive
Jewish home, to be active in one's
synagogue, and to be concerned
about the problems and issues
confronting society."
"By setting examples for her
children, the woman builds a
desire for Jewish identity within
her children," added Mrs. Wein-
traub. "It is essential that the
man of the family becomes an ac-
tive partner in the process."
The new trend of increased
voluntarism among today's
Jewish women came to light dur-
ing a recent four-day conference
of Branch Presidents of the
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism in Long Beach,
N.Y. The participants included na-
tional officers, chairmen of the
organization's 24 departments,
and professional staff. Discussed
were programs concerning educa-
tion, religious activities, and com-
munal service.
The Women's League consists
of 800 Affiliates in Conservative
Synagogues in the U.S., Canada,
Mexico, Puerto Rico and Israel,
serving a membership of 200,000.
Although some Branches still
reported problems regarding
voluntarism, the inlfux of younger
women in many communities was
viewed by Women's League
leaders as extremely encouraging.
In recent years, as women have
returned to either part-time or
full-time work, voluntarism in
many organizations has suffered.
"I get angry when women use
their new economic involvement
as an excuse not to participate in
Jewish life," asserted Cory
Schneider of Harrisburg, Penn-
sylvania. "I'm not too busy to be
Jewish and build a Jewish future
for the next generation. I want to
create a community of dedicated
Jews so that my children will have
other Jews to grow up with."
A similar view was expressed by
Portland, Oregon's Carole Rots-
tein, who desires to be a role
model for her child. "I want her to
grow up Jewishly and know who
she is," Mrs. Rothstein stated.
She indicated that voluntarism in
the Pacific Northwest Branch was
on the increase, especially among
younger mothers.
She urged that special attention
must be given to young mothers
and their needs by conducting
outreach programs. "We must
Newsman Blitzer Dropped
From Journalists in Bush Party
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Jerusalem Post's
Washington correspondent,
Wolf Blitzer, was dropped
at the last moment from
U.S. Vice President George
Bush's party visiting the
Middle East this week,
although Blitzer is an
American citizen and an ac-
credited White House
correspondent.
Bush arrived in Jerusalem Sun-
day at the start of a four-day visit
to Israel after which he will be go-
ing on to Jordan, Egypt and
possibly Morocco.
Blitzer, who also writes for
several other newspapers, was
told that he could not accompany
the Vice President as he would not
be welcome in Jordan.
THE REPORTER, who had
originally been invited by Bush to
join his entourage, had received a
visa to Jordan personally signed
by the Jordanian Ambassador to
Washington, who had given
Blitzer his "strong assurances" of
a welcome in Amman.
0ROWARD
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Only a few hours before the trip,
Blitzer was informed by Stephen
Hart, Assistant Press Secretary
to the Vice President, that Hart
had been told during his
preparatory trip to Amman that
Blitzer would not be welcome
because he would be writing about
the trip for an Israeli paper, the
Jerusalem Post.
Blitzer, however, says that he
had personally clarified this point
with the Jordanian Ambassador
to the U.S., Mohammed Kamal,
who himself had cleared the pro-
blem with Jordan's Foreign
Minister Taher El Masri.
continue to have early religious
services and junior congregational
services, and to encourage family
worship. We should also develop
open dialogue with our teenagers
and perhaps establish Jewish liv-
ing guidelines with their
cooperation."
Credit for the building of a
strong Jewish family life was at-
tributed to a vital Day School
system, according to Ontario
Branch President Marsha Cohen.
"In Toronto we actively engage in
raising the Jewish consciousness
in the comunity we're not
afraid to be Jews," she stressed.
"More than 55 percent of our kids
are involved in Day School and
part-time Jewish education," she
explained. In addition, Mrs.
Cohen pointed to active youth pro-
grams in the synagogues and the
presence of three generations at-
tending worship services
grandparents, parents and
children.
Mrs. Cohen stated that 75 per-
cent of the women in her Branch
work. "This is a sophisticated
woman, in the business world,
working at home, with limited
time, who still works in the
Branch to build a larger Jewish
family life. Frequently I hear a
woman say to me, "I'm bringing
my kids up Jewishly. I want to in-
still a sense of morality, Jewish
identity. I want to prevent an
intermarriage."
In the Southern Branch another
force drives Jewish families
together. "Anti-Semitism,
religion in the schools make our
kids unhappy," according to
Marilyn Liberman of Knoxville,
Tennessee. "This produces a lone-
ly Jew, eager to affiliate. We have
a deep commitment to Judaism.
Many of our Jews are not holiday
Jews only." _
Mrs. Lieberman, whose
daughter is a new rabbinical stu-
dent at The Jewish Theological
Seminary, admitted that
volunteers are still difficult to ob-
tain. "In the south there are many
single women, who must work,
and don't have the energy when
they come home. Yet they need to
connect with other Jews and don't
want their children to assimilate,"
she explained.
Mrs. Lieberman stated that one
solution has been to encourage the
participation of single women in
synagogue activities by conduc-
ting evening sessions and making
them welcome, even if they can
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only give to their Sisterhoods a
few hours per week.
Preoccupation with economic
needs has also produced some
voluntarism problems on Eastern
Long Island. "We no longer look
for a full voluntarism and really
accept part-time participation,"
noted Gloria Cohen, herself oc-
cupied fully in management of a
Drug firm in Smithtown. "Despite
difficulty in being involved,
women still want their children to
maintain a strong Jewish identi-
ty," Mrs. Cohen emphasized.

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Sally Hagan of Woodland Hills,
California, who said, "Sisterhoods
must continue to show that they
are no longer a kiddush cookies
and fund-raising organization. We
must educate and inform the
women of our communities that
we are a status group willing to
keep our Judaism alive and well
for our families, especially our
children, and that their participa-
tion in these efforts is needed in
order for all of us to do the proper
job and hopefully succeed."
Obituaries
MARENUS
Hannah H., 80, of Tampa, died Tuesday. Ju-
ly 22, 1986. She had lived in the Tampa Bay
area for four years and was a retired book-
keeper. She was a member of Congregation
Schaarai Zedek and the Over 50 Havarah.
She is survived by two sons. Jim of Tampa
and Alan of Edison, N.J.; one daughter,
Jane Ketover of Tampa; one sister, Edith
Davis of Elizabeth, N.J.; and seven
grandchildren.
LYNN
Ben, 77, of Valrico, died Thursday, July 24,
1986. He was a resident of the Tamba Bay
area for 30 years before moving to Valrico
five years ago. He was the owner and
operator of a restaurant supply retail com-
pany. He was a member of Congregation
Rodelph Sholom, past president of Hillel
School, past president of A solo State
Theatre Guild, and was on the board of
directors of the Playmakers theatre group.
He had also received honors from the
United Jewish Appeal and was a trustee for
the University of Tampa. He is survived by
his wife, Linda; two sons, Robert J. and
Gerald, both of Tampa; a daughter, Kim
Dudding of Valrico; and a sister, Pauline
Bierick of W. Orange. N.J.
WEIL
Robert M., 78. of 620 El Sereno Place. Tam-
pa, died Saturday, July 26,1986. A native of
Gladwin, Mich., and coming from
Milwaukee, he had lived in the Tampa Bay
area for 15 years. He was a real estate
salesman. He is survived by his wife
Dorothy, one daughter, Mimi Siege! of Tam-
pa; a son, Thomas Weil of Santa Crux,
Calif.; and three grandchildren.
KRONE
Irving, 76, of Tampa died Monday, July 28,
1986. An area resident since 1962, he was a
retired Deputy of the State Hotel
Restaurant Commission. He was a member
of the Congregation of Rodeph Sholom and
the John Darling Lodge 154 F. A A.M. He
was also the former chairman for SCORE.
Chapter 203, where he was an active
counselor since 1976 and was presentlh
publicity chairman. He was active in area
theatre and he filmed commercials. He was
a former member of the Board of Directors
of the Tampa Community Theater, and he
read and taped programs for the blind at the
University of South Florida. He is survived
by his wife, Sylvia; two sons, Norman of
Sugarland, Texas and Gerald of New York
City; step-son, Richard Farber of Athen
Ga.; step-daughter, Bonnie Talley <
Kemah. Tx.; five grandchildren and a greai
grandchild.

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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, August 8, 1986
-v
Community Calendar
Friday, August 8
Candlelighting time 7:55 p.m.
Sunday, August 10
Tune in "The Jewish Sound" WMNF 88.5 FM
10:30 a.m.-l p.m.
11 a.m. North Tampa Reform Jewish Association
Family Picnic.
Monday, August 11
JCC After Camp Begins
1:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board
meeting
4:30 p.m. Mary Walker Board meeting
Tuesday, August 12
11 a.m. Hadassah/Tampa Chapter Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Hillel School Board meeting
8 p.m. Chabad Lubavitch Couples Get-Together
Wednesday,August 13
Jewish Community Food Bank
8:30 p.m. Bais Tefilah Special Service
Thursday, August 14
7 a.m. Bais Tefilah Special Service
Friday, August 15
Candlelighting time 7:49 p.m.
Sunday, August 17
10:30 a.m.-l p.m. Tune in "The Jewish Sound"
88.5 FM
Kol Ami Teacher Work Day
Jewish Community Center Pool and Fun BBQ
Tuesday, August 19
7:30 p.m. Kol Ami Board of Education
Wednesday, August 20
Jewish Community Food Bank
5 p.m. Hillel School Get Acquainted BBQ and
Picnic
5:30 p.m. ADL Executive Committee meeting
7:30 p.m. Bay Area Singles Board meeting
7:30 p.m. Jewish Women Jewish Survival
Thursday, August 21
5:50 p.m. Jewish Community Center Executive
Board meeting
8 p.m. Jewish Community Center Board meeting
8 p.m. Kol Ami Membership Coffee
Friday, August 22
Candlelighting time 6:42 p.m.
Congregations/Organizations Events
BAIS TEFILAH
The ninth day of the Hebrew
month of Av (Aug. 14) is the sad-
dest day on the Jewish Calendar.
The holy Temple was destroyed
and burned. As a result, Jews over
the world fast from sunset on
Tuesday the thirteenth until 8:43
on Wednesday the fourteenth.
Services will be held on Wednes-
day, Aug. 13 at 8:30 p.m. followed
by the Aychao. Thursday morning
Aug. 14 Shachris will begin at 7
a.m. and Mincha services will
commence at 7 p.m.
Wishing everyone an easy fast!
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
UPDATE
Opening date for the North
Tampa Reform Jewish Associa-
tion Religious School is scheduled
for Sunday, Sept. 21. Parents are
reminded that a 10 percent tuition
discount is available for those
children registered by Aug. 10.
This early registration may be ac-
complished at or before the barbe-
que pot-luck picnic to be held on
Sunday, Aug. 10, starting at 11
a.m. at White Sands Beach in
Carrollwood.
The Religious School faculty in-
cludes several well known
members of the Jewish communi-
ty: Sunni Zions, pre-kindergarten,
kindergarten; Betsy Singer, first
grade, second grade; Mark
Schwartz, third grade, fourth
grade; Vikki Silverman, fifth
grade, sixth grade, music, pre-
bar/bat mitzvah. Each of these
teachers will be responsible for in-
structing in both Hebrew and
Judaic studies for their respective
grades. Elizabeth Geisler is aide
and office assistant.
For further information about
Religious School, please call Dr.
Maurice Shaw at 963-2861 or
Vikki Silverman at 949-1909.
Additional details regarding the
barbeque can be obtained by call-
ing Dr. Claudia Hohn at 962-3900
or Adrienne Golub at 961-7522.
All interested Jewish people are
welcome.
RECONSTRUCTIONS
CHAVURAH
Forms New Chapter
The Reconstructionist Com-
munity Chavurah, building on its
great success, announces the for-
mation of a Lakeland chapter. The
Chavurah is one of three major
Reconstructionist groups in the
Excellence the
And HiBel
Flexibility School
of Tompo
The Hillel School of
Tampa's program works,
because we combine only
the best in Jewish and
General studies through
8th Grade. National
testing indicates our
students achieve well
above their grade level in

every area.
Our program is flexible as
well as excellent. Students
may enter even the highest
grades with little or no
knowledge of Hebrew.
Through a dual-track
system they take Jewish
studies in English until
individual instruction
brings their Hebrew up to a
sufficient level.

For further information,
call the school at 875-8287.
HILLEL SCHOOL OF TAMPA IOWA TESTS OF BASIC SKILLS
SU MM AS Y OF SCONES (1SM)
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1000 loarai unevailebl* at press Maw
IHIIM *t*T < '<* *< ** "' "
grada students. Grada* la!
taaearaaarafromlOOS;
state, and provides study/discus-
sion sessions, monthly services,
and social functions. Members are
those who are not affiliated with
other synagogues, or those who
are and wish to supplement their
synagogue involvement
Dues for the 1986-1987 year are
$35 per person, with all rabbinic
services provided for its members.
For information, literature, and
membership applications, please
call the office at 972-4433.
HILLEL USF/UT
Ready For New School Year
The Hillel Foundation at USF
and UT is preparing for another
successful year of student pro-
gramming. A wide range of
religious, social, educational,
counseling, and cultural events
are planned, with undergraduate
and graduate students from all
backgrounds welcome.
Most exciting is the building
campaign now underway, with the
planned facility to be located with
other campus religious centers.
Those students wishing to join us,
or parents wishing to help with
our binding campaign are asked to
call the office at 972-4433.
HADASSAH
Brandon Shalom Chapter
Brandon Shalom Chapter of
Hadassah is planning a luncheon
and pool party for prospective
new members during our
membership drive. The party will
be on Tuesday, Aug. 12, from
noon until 3 p.m. If you are in-
terested in joining a lively, grow-
ing chapter of Hadassah and live
in East Hillsborough, please call
the following members for more
information and to make
reservations.
Joanna Ronay 689-3458 or
Selethel Musy 689-0092.
TEMPLE AHA VAT SHALOM
JEWISH SINGLES
Camping Trip
Labor Day Weekend
We're off to the Anastasia
State Recreation Area, near St.
Augustine, for a wonderful 4-day
camping trip! Departing Friday,
Aug. 29, and returning on Mon-
day, Sept. 1 (holiday), the whole
weekend costs only $50/adult and
$25/child (5-13). This fee includes
camping fees, dinners Friday,
Saturday, and Sunday, breakfasts
Saturday, Sunday, and Monday,
and gas money for the drivers
we'll be carpooling. Camping gear
is not required and all you have to
bring is a cooler of beverages, a
little extra money for sightseeing
St. Augustine (optional) and the
desire for a good time. Please call
Sandy at 797-3536 for more
information.
Spotlight
Continued from Page 1

Civics, and an additional foreign
language at the upper level, such
as French or Spanish.
Have a Family Life Education
elective for those in the upper
grades in cooperation with the
Tampa Jewish Family Services.
Work closely with national
organizations, Jewish institutions
of higher learning, the Tampa
Rabbinic Association, the Univer-
sity of South Florida, and the
University of Tampa.
Joachim Scharf and his wife,
Claire, have moved to the Tampa
Bay area from the Northeast.
During the last 16 years he held
the headmaster post at the Albert
Einstein Academy (elementary
and junior high school) in Wilm-
ington, Delaware, and the
Solomon Schecter Day School of
Essex and Union (kindergarten
through 12th grade) in Cranford,
New Jersey. While in Delaware
Scharf was also the dean of the
Delaware Campus of Gratz Col-
lege of Philadelphia. The Scharfs
are not strangers to the west
coast of Florida, having vacation-
ed here for many years and being
impressed with the Jewish com-
munity and the geographic
location.
Jerusalem Book Fair Next Apr. 6
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
13th International Book Fair will
be held in the city's convention
center from April 6 to 12, 1987.
Mayor Teddy Kollek has announc-
ed. The Jerusalem Book Fair has
been constantly growing, and the
number and variety of par-
ticipants are expected to exceed
the nearly 1,000 publishers from
40 nations who attended
Jerusalem's most recent biennial
book fair in 1985.
Since the first Jerusalem Book
fair 23 years ago, the Book Fair
has evolved two special themes:
international publishing and the
involvement of the younger
generation of publishers and
editors.
Bar Mitzvah
SAMUEL SILVER
Samuel Jerome Silver, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Larry M. Silver, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah, Saturday, Aug. 16 at 10
a.m. at Congregation Rodelph
Sholom. Rabbi Kenneth Berger
and Cantor William Hauben will
officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
1986-87 Rodeph Sholom Pre-
Confirmation class and he is
secretary of USY. Samuel attends
ninth grade at Buchanan Junior
High School. He is an Honor Roll
student and has received awards
for poetry and posters.
Mr. and Mrs. Silver will host the
Kiddush luncheon following the
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception Saturday evening
at their home.
Special guests will include God-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Lazarus; grandfather, Mac
Hopkins, great uncle and aunt,
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fried, and
other relatives from Miami,
Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania.
Samuel Silver
To place a Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah announcement in the
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
please have information,
(typed/double spaced), in
the office, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, Florida
33609, three weeks prior to
the event.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swum Avenue 261-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:30 a.m., 6:45 p.m.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI 0WaHw
8919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H. David Roae, Cantor Sam Iaaak Service*:
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM 0Ufa
2713 Bayabore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, haaan William
Hauben Servieaa: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m Daily! Minyan, 7:16.
CONGREGATION 8CHAARAI ZEDEK Refer*
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Herbert Drooi. Rabbi Joan Glaier Farber.
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m
CONGREGATION BAIS TEFFILAB Orthodox
3418 Handy Road No. 103 Rabbi Yoaii Dubrowaki 962-2376 Services Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
NORTH TAMPA REFORM JEWI8H ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 817, Tampa. Fla. 33618,961-7622. Serviceaat 8 p.m., first and third Friday
of each month beginning July 18; Masonic Community Lodge, 402 W. Waters Ave.
(at Ola).
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
P.O. Box 271167. Rabbi Yoeeie Dubrowaki, Executive Director. 963-2317.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
13801 N. 37th St. No. 1114. Rabbi Dovid Mockin, Program Coordinator. 971-6234.
Friday night Service* one half hour after sunset. Tuesday night classes at 8 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at U.S.F./U.T./H.C.C. Cambridge Woods 14240
North 42nd Street 972-4483. Services and Oneg Shabbat Friday evening 7 p.m.
Sunday Bagel Brunches, 11:30 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OP SUN CITY CENTER
684-9162, United Community Church, 1601 La Jolla Street, Sun City Center, Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
Reconstructionist Community Chavurah Reconstructionist Cambridge Woods*
972-4488 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly study sessions, weekly "Shabbat Ex-
perience," monthly services with dinner.


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