The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00292

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
mm
^Jemsti ncridliari

Of Tampa
Volume 8 Number 11
Tampa, Florida Friday, May 16, 1986
AM
Price 35 Cents
After Forty Centuries
Its Great To Be Thirty-Eight
Davidson Chairman Annual Tampa Jewish Community's Tribute
Combined Meeting
Leah Davidson, chairman of the
Planning Committee for the An-
nual Combined Meeting of the
Tampa Jewish Federation, the
TJF Women's Division, the
Jewish Community Center, the
Tampa Jewish Family Service,
and the Hillel School of Tampa,
has announced the meeting will be
held Thursday, June 5, 8 p.m. at
the new Ashley Plaza Hotel
downtown.
The officers and Board of Direc-
tors of the community agencies
will be elected and installed in
brief ceremonies. Awards honor-
ing individuals who made outstan-
ding contributions to each
organization will also be
presented. The program will
highlight the importance of
volunteers in our community. A
dessert buffet will follow.
Agency representatives serving
on the planning committee are
Jolene Shor, Women's Division;
Laura Kreitzer, Hillel School; Lee
Tobin, Jewish Community Center;
Audrey Haubenstock, Tampa
Jewish Family Services; and Leah
Davidson and Judith 0.
Rosenkranz, Tampa Jewish
Federation. Assisting the Com-
mittee are agency directors, Gary
Leah Davidson
S. Alter, Rhoda Davis, Martin
Pear, Dr. Anschel Weiss, and
Rabbi David Brusin.
Reservations may be made by
check to the Tampa Jewish
Federation. Cost of the buffet
dessert is $8 per person. For fur-
ther information, please call the
Federation office, 875-1618.
The Business and Professional
Women's Network, sponsored by
the Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division has planned a
cultural evening for Monday, May
19. After dinner, and a short
business meeting, a program on
two cultural topics in a discussion
group format will be held.
The membership and guests will
have their choice of one of two
study groups:
A Book Review, led by Mrs.
Joyce Weissman, widely known
throughout the community for her
review of books. The book, "A
Constant Reminder," by Issac
Charchat will be reviewed. While
Memorial to Nazis Draws Ire
VIENNA (JTA) A
memorial tablet and a street name
honoring Austrian Nazis has
drawn the ire of the Yugoslavian
government and triggered a
dispute in the city of Linz. The
two altercations are unrelated
but, according to one Vienna
newspaper, they show a lack of
sensitivity in dealing with the
past.
The memorial tablet, at the
Austrian Military Academy in
Wiener Neustadt, honors Maj.
Gen. Alexander Loehr, recognized
as the founder of the Austrian Air
Force in 1935. In 1941, he gave
orders to bomb Belgrade,
resulting in the deaths of
thousands of civilians. He was ex-
ecuted as a war criminal in
Yugoslavia in 1947.
DEFENSE MINISTER
Friedhelm Frischenschlager has
refused orders to have the tablet
removed. He claims it honors
Loehr as the father of the
Austrian Air Force, not his war-
time activities, and was, in any
event, donated by a private
organization
To Israel In A Weekend Celebration
Saturday night May 17, at Con-
gregation Rodeph Sholom at 8:30
p.m. a short memorial ceremony
for the Israeli Fallen Soldiers will
officially open the weekend
celebration for Israeli In-
dependence Day.
The highlight of the evening will
be a concert by Ruthi Navon,
Israeli Songstress, who was
described by the New York Times
as "A native of Haifa with ex-
pressive eyes and a voice like a
bell. Ruthi is equally at home
rendering a Hasidic medley, a
crackling "Don't Let it Rain on
My Parade," the plaintive ballad
"Feelings" and a spirited tune
from "Pippin."
The Daily News added to the
above by writing "It is Ms. Navon
who shines suddenly and unex-
pectedly with strong, sure, sen-
sitive, and contemporary vocal
styling in a soft-rock number en-
titled "Young Days" that's up
beat and gives the evening its real
lift."
Ruthi Navon
The second part of the evening
will give the audience the oppor-
tunity to enjoy themselves with
dancing to the sound of "Orson
Skorr's Orchestra." A cash bar
and hors d'oeuvres will add to the
evening.
The Saturday night Gala
Celebration will be followed by a
Sunday Festival which will take
place at the JCC on Sunday, May
18 from 12:30-4:30 p.m. this part
of the celebration is a Family
Festival which enables the partici-
pant to experience Aliya to Israel
and to take part in Israeli oriented
activities.
Food booths as well as rides for
youth and adults will be available.
Performance by various enter-
tainers including Orson Skorr's
Orchestra will perform
throughout the day.
Our Tribute to Israel hopefully
will entertain and enlighten our
Community. Tickets for Saturday
night will be $8 and $10. They are
available at the Jewish Communi-
ty Center; Congregations Kol
Ami, Schaarai Zedek, Rodeph
Sholom, and the Hillel School.
Tickets will be available at the
door for $10 and $12.
Business and Professional Women's
Network Plan Cultural
Discussion Group Meeting
Third Annual Jewish Singles Conference
June 7-8 At Sheraton Sand Key
the book is not required reading
for the evening's program, a copy
may be secured from the Tampa
Public Library, or to purchase a
copy, call the Federation office for
details, 875-1618.
An Art Discussion, led by Mrs.
Lois Berghoff, owner of Soho
South Gallery, Clearwater
"Investing in Art." Learn how to
begin collecting on your budget.
All working women are invited
to the meeting which will be held
in the Library and the Conference
Room on the Jewish Community
Center campus. Cost of the
catered dinner is $6.60*, reserva-
tions, call 875-1618.
The Tampa Bay Jewish Singles
Council is proud to announce its
sponsorship of the Third Annual
Jewish Singles Conference. The
conference will take place during
the weekend of June 7-8, at the
Sheraton Sand Key, 1160 Gulf
Blvd., Clearwater Beach.
The weekend, a highlight on our
annual calendar, will include
Saturday night Havdala Service,
followed by a dance featuring live
entertainment.
Sunday's all-day conference will
begin with a morning fitness
class, and morning workshops.
This will be followed by a brunch
featuring keynote speaker, Dr.
Menten Told
He's 'Unwanted'
BRUSSELS (WNS) Pieter
Menten, the Dutch Nazi war
criminal responsible for the killing
of 120 Jews in Podhoroce, Poland,
during World War II, has been
declared an unwanted person by
the Belgian authorities, official
sources said here. Menten, who is
86 years old, has tried over the
past few weeks to settle in a
residential section north of Arv
werp, near the Dutch border,
the mayor and a large number of
inhabitants have protested
against Menten's presence in
their midst
Anschel Weiss, director of the
Tampa Jewish Family Services
who will discuss the "Successful
single and the establishment of a
significant relationship."
Workshops will also be offered
during the afternoon hours.
Last year over 250 Jewish
singles attended the Singles Con-
ference which was held at the Don
Cesar Hotel. "The conference this
year will offer a diversified selec-
tion of workshops with broad in-
terests. We are expecting atten-
dance to be very close to the 300
mark," said Richard Myers, presi-
dent of The Tampa Bay Jewish
Singles Council.
Sunday morning workshops are:
relaxation through massage;
Stress Management; Overcoming
shyness; Israel and Terrorism;
and Beginning Tennis Clinic.
Sunday afternoon workshops
are: Interesting Jewish Customs;
Fun Things to do around the Tam-
pa Bay area; The astrological
guide to love; Quality Relation-
ships; and Advance Tennis Clinic.
Each participant will be able to
attend one morning, and one
afternoon workshop.
The Sheraton is offering a
special discount to conference at-
tendees who spend Saturday
night at the hotel. The rate will be
$68. and reservations will be
handled directly through the
hotel. Please call the Sheraton at
595-1611 for room reservations.
The fees for the Conference and
dance are: The complete weekend:
$37.50 members, $47.50 non-
members; The Dance only: $12.50
members, $17.50 non-members;
The Workshops and Brunch only:
$27.50 members, $32.50 non-
members.
An RSVP is required by May 23.
Higher prices will be charged for
at the door registration. Please
call The Tampa Jewish Communi-
ty Center, at 872-4451 for a reser-
vation form or additional
information.
i
\
i
1


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, May 16, 1986
H

V
1>
Co-Authors. A major publisher has contracted with Rabbi
Steven Kaplan, Hillel director at USF and UT and Rabbi of the
Reconstructionist Community Chavurah, and his wife Lynn, a
doctoral student in clinical phychology at FIT, to publish the book
they've co-authored: New Approaches in Pastoral Counseling.
The text is intended as a work manual for clergy, providing an
understanding of behavior disorders and methods used to effec-
tively treat them. The book will serve as a springboard for their
next work, Handbook of Judaism and Psychology, now being
edited.
Honored scholars. Eleven students were recently inducted in-
to Tampa Prep's most prestigious organization, the National
Honor Society. New members include Eliaha Cohen, daughter of
Patti and Mark Cohen and William Wall, son of Mrs. Heidi
Wall. To be admitted, members must meet high standards in
academics, leadership and community service. They assist the
school administration in many areas, including admission tours.
Mazol tov to you both.
Honored professor. We are so pleased and proud to tell you
that Bernard Lax, a professor with USF's College of Education,
has been presented with the Division of Student Affairs' Outstan-
ding Faculty Award as a result of his activities in support of
troubled and handicapped students. In 1970, Professor Lax
founded the Paraprofessional Counseling Service and Helpline
with the aim of providing crisis counseling to students. He has re-
mained as the services' advisor since their inception. He is also
credited with starting the tape bank for blind students in 1972
and with advocating increased building accessibility. And for 8
years, Prof. Lax has served on the student council for exceptional
children.
Outstanding Ovations for Orator. There is no debating that
congratulations are due for Matt Hilk, son of Penny and Lee
Hilk. A junior at Tampa Prep, Matt was named "Outstanding
State Senator" at the recent National Forensic League's (NFL)
State Student Congress and will compete at the NFL National
Congress in Tulsa, Oklahoma in June. This makes Matt the No. 1
Student Congress Person in the state!
Matt also took first place in the State Oratorical Contest for the
Key Club held in Orlando last month. Over 112 Key Clubs par-
ticipated and an audience of over 1,400 voted him this honor.
Next week in Baltimore, Matt will debate "Resolved: There Is
No Such Thing as a Just War" at the National Catholic Forensic
League's Lincoln-Douglas debate. (Tampa Prep junior William
Wall will also participate in this national event as part of a tradi-
tional debate team. ... So, don't argue with these guys!)
A big hello to a little lady. Welcome to Rebecca Sarah Mar-
cadis, born on May 1 to Margot and Ralph Marcadis. She weigh-
ed 6 lbs. at birth and was eagerly awaited by her grandparents
Eva and Bill Gmman and Rachel and Sam Marcadis. Her
delighted great-grandparents are Mrs. Abe Marcadis, Mrs.
Ralph Bobo and Mrs. Nathan Gall.
Baltimore born. Congratulations to Jean net te and Kenny
Karpay on the birth of Caleb Michael on April 17, weighing 8
lbs., 9 ozs. His thrilled grandparents are Bobbe and George Kar-
pay in Tampa and Leslie and Harry Maddox in Lakeland. His
great-grandparents are Mrs. Rose Karpay in Hollywood; Anne
and Nate Denenberg in Hewlett, N.Y. and Jeannette and Leslie
Anderson in Mayfield, Ky.
Extra mazol tov to an extra special great-grandmother. We
missed Rae Lionel last week we announced Matthew Benjamin
Karpay's birth. Excuse me, and enjoy your first great grandchild!
Cohen kudos. We hear really wonderful things about Meryl
Cohen, daughter of Dr. Albert and Rosalie Cohen and about An-
drew Cohen, son of Edith and Harold Cohen. Although not
related, both are seniors at Berkeley Prep! Meryl is going to Har-
vard in the fall and Andrew will be attending Yale. They both
recently exhibited their artwork at "Concepts '86," the Art Show
coordinated by Andrew, president of the Berkeley Art Club. As
Blue Ribbon finalists, both their works went to New York to be
judged, and Andrew received recognition at the national level.
Meryl, president of the National Honor Society and captain of
the tennis team, is a National Merit Scholar and has just received
a merit scholarship from Deluxe Check Printing Corp. Andrew,
captain of the swim team and a SERVE volunteer tutor, is also a
National Merit Scholar. Wow, I could fill pages and pages about
these two terrific kids ..
Good luck to you both in all your future endeavors; you've made
your parents and friends and all of us very, very proud.
Meet the authors. "Coping With Kids and Vacation" is the ti-
.' tie of the new book written by Elaine Fantle Shimberg and Lin-
da Albert and published by Ballantine Books. The authors will be
appearing on Channel 10 (WTSP)'s "Murphy in the Morning" at
10 a.m. on May 27. They will be at the "Bookseller" store on Mac-
Dill from 6-9 p.m. on May 28 and at Walden Books in the
Westshore Plaza from noon till 2 p.m. on May 29. The paperback
Spotlight On ... Lisea Leonard
By AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
Summer is just around the cor-
ner and now is the time tc brush
up on those swimming skills that
have been forgotten all winter. To
get you back in the swim is Lisea
Leonard, a 1985 physical educa-
tion graduate of the University of
South Florida. Lisea is the aquatic
director and the assistant physical
education director at the Jewish
Community Center.
Now that the pool is open there
is a swimming program for
everyone from the age of six mon-
ths on, since swimming is a sport
which has no age limits.
If team sports are for you there
is the Jewish Community Center
Swim Team. This group meets
each Sunday at 1 p.m. When the
Summer Camp begins the team
will meet in the early mornings
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.
To join the team you must be at
least five years old and be able to
swim the length of the swimming
pool.
"We will be team oriented, but
competition is not our only goal.
The swimmers will be improving
their endurance and their stroke
mechanics," said Leonard.
"For the more advanced swim-
mer we will offer a scuba course in
cooperation with World of Water.
The JCC is the place for the pool
and classroom work, with an open
water dive planned at the end of
the course. The students will need
their own equipment such as a
snorkel, fins, mask, and wet suit.
World of Water will supply the air
tanks and the BCD's (buoyancy
control device) for your use,"
Lisea said.
"With the Tampa area sur-
rounded by water, swimming
skills are a must and there are
beginner and intermediate swim-
mer classes for children and
adults, and an aqua exercise class
for seniors.
The tiniest swimmers will have
their time in the pool also. Aqua-
Tots, those babies six months to
24 months, will be taught pool
safety, to go under the water, to
jump off the side of the pool, and
to hold on to the side of the pool
and kick, all with mother at their
side," said Leonard.
No camp is complete without a
swimming program, and the JCC
Summer Camp is no exception.
The Water Safety Instructors are
ready to teach and test the
campers for each level of
achievement.
Aquatics is not the only activity
keeping Lisea busy. She instructs
some of the physical education
classes at the Hillel School of
Tampa and teaches pre-school
children at the Jewish Community
Center and at Congregation Kol
Ami.
There is hardly an age group
that Leonard hasn't touched
upon. If your tot is not into swim-
ming yet the Creepy Crawler set,
six months to 18 months, interacts
with Mom at Congregation Kol
Ami. Later in the day there is In
and Out Action, 18 months to 24
months, for the socializing
toddler.
The serious gymnast, ages six
years to 14 years, has two days a
week at the Jewish Community
Center to work on the balance
beam, vault, and mats doing floor
exercises and perfecting their
skills on the equipment.
For a healthy start, four morn-
ings a week aerobics will keep you
fit. Lisea teaches from 9 a.m. to
10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday
at Kol Ami and Tuesday and
Thursday at the JCC.
With the emphasis these days
on physical fitness Lisea Leonard
and Bill Suskauer, director of
physical education, have a pro-
gram to match your time and
style. For more information on
any of these programs, and more,
please call the Jewish Community
Center, 872-4451.
Chabad Lubavitch and the Tampa Jewish Community Center co-
sponsored a community Matzah Bake-In in Conjunction with an
open house at the Jewish Community Center prior to Passover.
The program began with a short film and culminated with mak-
ing, baking and eating! Other projects made during the day were
Matzah covers and planters. A sing-a-long was also enjoyed.
Religious school classes, adult and youth members of the Jewish
Community Center participated in the pre-Passover experience.
(Pictured left to right) Leslie Feldman, Beth Goldstein and
Miriam Goldstein.
Continued on Page 6
.
Let The
Tampa Airport Marriott
Cater Tb
>ur Every Need.
Our professional staff, attentive service and gracious
a^mrnodations will make a success of your Wedding,
Bar Mitzvah, Banquet, Business Meeting or Reunion.
We afeo provide outside catering services. See our Catering
Uepartment for information or please call 879-5151.
wWMttmott


MM*

Yom Hashoah
Observance
Friday, May 16, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa PggeJL
The annual Yom Hashoah
Observance, sponsored -by (he
Community Relations Committee
of the Tampa Jewish Federation
was recently held at Congregation
Rodeph Sholom, and attracted an
audience of over 300 people. Ron
Pross and Ralph Steinberg,
chairmen of the program, com-
mented that the Holocaust is one
of the darkest periods in man's life
and the fact that so many people
attended the program indicates
that the issue still burns deeply in
the souls of our Jewish people.
Rabbi Steven L. Jacobs, the son
of a Holocaust survivor was the
keynote speaker, who discussed
his perception of the Holocaust
from both an academic and per-
sonal perspective. His comments
were a reminder that Jews need
to take responsibility for
themselves, because the tragic
years of the Holocaust can be
repeated, if we remain silent and
disassociate ourselves from
organized Jewish life.
In addition to Rabbi Jacobs
remarks, 21 survivors, living in
the Tampa Bay area lit sue of the
seven candles in the community
menorah, reminding us of the
6,000,000 Jews who lost their
lives in concentration camps.
Julian Lane, former mayor of
Tampa and former State Senator,
lit the seventh candle, which sym-
bolized the lives of the millions of
non-Jews, who also perished dur-
ing Hitler's regime.
Yom Hashoah is the second pro-
gram sponsored by the Communi-
ty Relations Committee. The next
program will deal with
Black/Jewish Relations. The Com-
munity Relations Committee is
chaired by Nat Doliner and Rabbi
David Rose. Also on the board
are: Bill Kalish, Ron Pross, Sam
Reiber, Leah Davidson, Linda
Goldstein, Alice Rosenthal, Ralph
Steinberg, Betty Shalett and
Leslye Winkelman.
Women's Division To Hold Model
Kibbutz At Israel
Independence Day Celebration
A model Kibbutz will be held on
the grounds of the Jewish Com-
munity Center campus on Sunday,
May 18 during the celebration of
Israel Independence Day.
The project is being chaired by
Adrienne Ness on behalf of the
Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division; sponsoring
organizations of the model Kib-
butz are the Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division,
Tampa Jewish Federation, Young
Adult Division, and the Business
and Professional Women's
Network.
"Over 200 starter plants will be
planted," stated Adrienne Ness,
"we hope everyone will stop at
our Kibbutz and plant a flower on
behalf of Israel Independence
Day."
Also planned for the day are
several films on Israel, sponsored
by the Tampa Jewish Federation.
The films will be a part of the all-
day film festival to be held in the
Aronovitz Room at the JCC.
The first Seder at Menorah Manor, led by ex-
ecutive director Edward W. Vinocur.
Menorah Manor
Celebrates First Passover
The annual celebration of
Passover had a very special mean-
ing this year for the 116 Residents
of Menorah Manor, as this was the
Home's first observance.
During the April Resident
Council Meeting, Congregation
B'nai Israel Sisterhood, Presi-
dent, Mrs. Bunnie Katz presented
the Home with a Seder Plate,
Matzoh Cover and Elijah's Cup,
all beautifully decorated in blue
and white (which just so happens
to be the Home's colors). In her
presentation Mrs. Katz noted that
the Sisterhood was pleased to be
assisting in helping to establish a
traditional holiday for the
Menorah Manor Family.
Rabbi Jacob Luski presented a
series of inaervice training ses-
sions to assist the Home's staff in
understanding the Holiday, the
traditions and meanings of
Passover, and what should be ex-
pected. In his role as Chairman of
the Vaad Ha Kashrut, Rabbi
Luski also assisted in the supervi-
sion of the staff in their spring
cleaning of the entire Home,
especially in the kitchen to assure
that it was free of all "hametz"
and the Laws of Kashruth were
being observed.
Traditional Seders were held
the first two evenings. The first
by the Home's Executive Direc-
tor, Edward W. Vinocur and the
second evening Seder by
Volunteer, Max Roth. Resident
members of the family also shared
in participating in each Seder in-
cluding many staff members who
came back to the Home on their
off time to watch the service and
assist the Residents in par-
ticipating during the service.
Many of the recipes for the week
of Passover were family recipes
from some of the Residents of the
Home.
As Passover concluded st sun-
down on Thursday everyone felt
very special to have been able to
be a part of the Home's first
joyous Passover.
Former mayor of Tampa, Julian Lane lights
the seventh candle during the Yam Hashoah
observance at Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Holocaust survivors participating in the
ceremony included: Mortiz PUa, Mr. and Mrs.
Alfred Wasserberger, Mr. and Mrs. Moses
Reiber, Herta PUa, David Zohar, Mr. and
Mrs. Mendal Riba, Cantor William Hauben,
Philip hanger, Jack Rosen, Henry and Ghana
Zyndorf, Sylvia Richman, Judith Pressman,
Sam Gross, Henry and Sylvia Zyndorf, Milia
Parnes, and Aaron Berger.
bV^M HI W*v svsiHH
Community members participating in the
Yom Hashoah program were (from left) Judith
0. Rosenkram, Scott Baskin, Rabbi David
Rose, Cantor William Hauben, Rabbi Kenneth
Berger, Rabbi Steven Jacobs, Judge Ralph
Steinberg, Rabbi Herbert Drooz, Dr. Ron
Pross, and Nat Doliner.
Photos: Audrey Haubenstock.
QUALITY DENTAL CARE
AT A COST
YOU CAN
SMILE
ABOUT!
PERSONAL DENTAL PLAN
Need personal dental coverage and a fresh clean smile? Then you will love
American Dental Plan's excellent benefits and low monthly rates. Our goals
are; attractive appearance, quality oral health, and affordable dentistry.
The American Dental Plan provides:
EXAMS .............. NO CHARGE
X-RAYS.............. NO CHARGE
CLEANINGS.......... NO CHARGE
FLUORIDES.......... NO CHARGE
FILLINGS .............HALF PRICE
EXTRACTIONS.........HALF PRICE
BRACES...............SAVE $500
PLUS SAVINGS UP TO 50% ON ALL OTHER TREATMENT
MAIL TO: HICKMAN ft ASSOCIATES
1509 S. Clark Ava.
Tampa, FL 33609
Or Call: 870-2057
870-2113
SAVE NOW...MAIL TODAY
American Dental Plan provides HAPPY HEALTHY SMILES for just $6.95 per
month. Most people are concerned about the high price of dental neglect and
want a good oral appearance.
Group and Family Coverages are also available.
Join the thousands who are now smiling while reducing their dental bills. Send
us your request today for more information without obligation!
Name.
Age.
Mailing Address
City__________
State.
.Zip.
Home Phone.
Business Phone.



Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, May 16, 1986
Judge To Ponder Evidence
In Case Against War Criminal
CINCINNATI (JTA) -
The two-week deportation
hearing against a 62-year-
old construction worker ac-
cused of persecuting in-
mates at a Nazi labor camp
during the Holocaust
recently concluded here,
leaving the fate of Leonid
Petkiewytsch in the hands
of Judge 0. John Brahos.
He is not expected to render
a decision until early
September.
Petkiewytsch, a resident of the
suburban community of Fin-
neytown, is accused by the
government of having concealed
his past war-time activities when
he applied for entry into the coun-
try in 1955, and having par-
ticipated as a guard at the Kiel-
Hassee camp in the "persecution
of persons because of their race,
religion, national origin and
political opinion under the direc-
tion of the Nazi government of
Germany."
TESTIFYING in his own
defense, Petkiewytsch admitted
having served as a guard at the
labor camp in Germany, but claim-
ed, according to a report in The
American Israelite here, that he
never persecuted prisoners. In ad-
dition, he denied that he concealed
information from American
authorities when he applied for a
visa to enter the U.S.
The Kiel-Hassee labor camp,
one of the lesser-known camps
run by the Nazi war machine, had
an average population of some
1,800 persons. There are
estimates that 550 died there; 150
by execution. The Jewish popula-
tion there was relatively small,
with most arriving in the last
months of the war. About 160
Jewish prisoners were liberated
from the camp in April, 1945.
Petkiewytsch is not a U.S.
citizen, and it was his attempt in
1982 to become a naturalized
citizen that alerted an immigra-
tion official to his past activities.
He apparently indicated on the
1982 application that he had been
a labor camp guard. The official
alerted the Justice Department's
Office Of Special Investigations in
Washington.
PETKIEWYTSCH, whose twin
brother Goerge Perke of Western
Hills also provided testimony, told
the immigration hearing that he
and his parents fled Poland, fear-
Diva Sills
Gets Top Award
NEW YORK (JTA) Bever-
ly Sills, general director of the
New York City Opera, received
the American Society for Tech-
nion Women's Division's Medical
Engineering Program Award,
presented at its annual luncheon
in New York.
1HC
ing the Russian forces. His father
had been serving as a mayor of a
town under Nazi occupation, the
Israelite said in its extensive
coverage of the hearing.
He and his brother were later
assigned jobs by the Germans at
the Kiel-Hassee camp, they said.
They told the court that they were
given little choice in the matter:
either go as guards or as
prisoners.
Issued carbines and uniforms,
the brothers testified that they
escorted prisoners back and forth
from Keil for daily work details,
patrolled the perimeter of the
camp, and did other chores. They
asserted they never beat
prisoners or participated in any
executions.
While the brothers said the
camp was like an ordinary jail, six
Jewish survivors of Kiel-Hassee
provided testimony about the
brutal conditions of the labor
camp.
BOTH BROTHERS denied
concealing the fact that they fail-
ed to alert U.S. authorities in 1955
that they had been arrested and
imprisoned by the British for
three years for possible war
crimes. Judge Brahos informed
Petke before his testimony that
information he provided could be
used against him by the govern-
ment at a later date.
The U.S. official whom the
brothers say they presented the
British imprisonment documents
to is Marvin Hickman, who was
vice consul in Germany in 1955.
He testified at the hearing that,
according to documentation on
the visa application, Petkiewytsch
did not present the British
documentation. Hickman said he
would not have approved the visa
application had he known of
Petkiewytsch's past activities.
Brahos estimated that it will
take four to five months before he
reaches a decision. This time will
include post-trial presentations by
both sides. Afterwards, appeals
can be expected, which could go to
the Supreme Court.
IF PETKIEWYTSCH is found
guilty of persecuting persons
because of their race, religion and
political opinion under the direc-
tion of the Nazis, there can be no
"discretionary relief on the part
of the judge, according to U.S.
law.
However, if the judge were to
find Petkiewytsch not guilty on
that account and guilty of having
concealed information about his
past wartime activities when he
applied for entry into the U.S., he
can apply "discretionary relief
and suspend deportation, the
Israelite explained.
American Israelite editor
Phyllis Singer, who attended and
reported on the hearing, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
public reaction from both the
Jewish and general communities
was mixed. "Most of all, there was
disinterest," she said.
eJewish Floridian
Of Tampa
HuainraaOffirr 2XOx HoralK) Slrrl .Tampa Kb I INN
Trlrptwnr M144W
Publication (M(ic 120 NK 6 Si Miami. Kb .I3IJ2
KHKItK SH(K HKT KUZANNK MHOCHKT AUDKKY HAOHKNSTtX'K
Kdilor and Hubliahrr Kirrulivr Kdilor Kdiloi
f 'ad Snocnal
Th Uwiah Klonaua Doaa Nat (iaaraata* Tar Ka.fcn.tr.
Of Th* MtrraaaaW Ad vrniwd la lu Calaana
Pubhahed Bi-Wackly Plua 1 Additional Edition on January 31. 1886 by Tha Jewish Klondian of Tampa
Second Claaa Poalag* Paid at Miami. Fla. USPS 471-910. ISSN 8760-5063
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
si MM HI\'\ ION KATKS <\ahm\ Vfa.il' War Minimum Stilt*, rip.ion 17 00. Annual M '.m
'Kit nt Town I pOD K*MjurM
fhr Jewish Kloridiaii maintain* rM trw h*.i I'-opt** rermvinK th** paper *hi< ha*i* tni mihwnlnul
dirrrtiv are ybflcflhm through arranjO'mt-nt *ith the .Ji-wih riilrraiiori nl Tump., w run-in v 111
per var i* drdu 1 mu el event *ttnM*rtptMf1 houM < not ,U The JewiMfl H Surrounded by a photo exhibit of Soviet Jews
in the rotunda of one of the U.S. House of
Representatives' office buildings, Con-
gressman Dante Fascell (D., Fla.) reads a list
of some 80 names of Refuseniks, ending with
the words, 'Next Year in Jerusalem.' The
South Florida Representative, who is chair-
man of the House Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, participated in a pre-Passover program
sponsored by the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry in conjunction with the Congres-
sional Wives for Soviet Jews, of which Mrs.
Fascell is a member. A former chairman of the
Commission on Security and Cooperation in
Europe, Fascell has been honored for his conti-
nuing efforts in behalf of Soviet Jewry. He met
with a number of Soviet refuseniks during a
visit to the USSR last month.
Holtzman Urges
U.S. Open Secret Files on Nazis
Friday, May 16,1986
Volume 8
71YAR5746
Number 11
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman called
on the United Nations Mon-
day to open to the public its
more than 40,000 secret
files on Nazi war criminals.
Holtzman's call, made during a
rally across the street from Sie
UN headquarters, followed a
similar official request last week
by Israel's UN Ambassador
Binyamin Netanyahu in a letter to
Secretary General Javier Perez de
Cuellar.
"Sadly, the spirit of Bitburg is
still alive today," Holtzman
declared at the rally, referring to
President Reagan's visit last year
to the military cemetery in Bit-
burg, West Germany, where
members of the Waffen SS are
buried. The President's visit
created an outcry in Jewish and
non-Jewish communities in this
country and abroad.
"The Kurt Waldheim affair -
the indifference, and even sup-
port, of world leaders over his
Nazi past and his 40 year cover-up
of it shows that the spirit of Bit-
burg lives on," Holtzman
declared.
SHE SAID the fact that
Waldheim finished first in
Austria's Presidential elections
Sunday shows that "Austrians
have given a wanted Nazi war
criminal the opportunity to be
elected to lead their country." She
added: "Even more appalling has
been the reaction of many world
leaders. West German Chancellor
(Helmut) Kohl, the architect of
Bitburg, has spoken in
Waldheim's defense, calling those
who criticized Waldheim's war-
time service arrogant."
Menachem Rosensaft, founding
chairman of the International
Network of Children of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors, also de-
nounced Kohl for publicly defen-
ding Waldheim as "a great
patriot."
"One year after Kohl and Presi-
dent Reagan honored the memory
of dead Nazi soldiers at Bitburg,"
Rosensaft declared, "Kohl is pay-
ing public tribute to a living
former Nazi officer who has been
exposed as a proven liar and ai>
Helmut Kohl called
criticism 'arrogant.'
cused war criminal."
"Today," Rosensaft said, "we
demand that Waldheim be barred
from entering the U.S. regardless
of whether or not he is elected
President of Austria."
AYALL SCHANZER, the U.S.
chairman of the North American
Jewish Students' Network, an-
nounced that his organization is
undertaking an international cam-
paign to divert Waldheim's
$100,000 annual UN pension to
several groups of Jewish and non-
Jewish survivors of Nazi brutality
in Greece and Yugoslavia, where
the former Secretary General
served during World War II.
Meanwhile, Israeli and UN of-
ficials said that a reply to Israel's
request that the UN "take im-
mediate steps necessary to insure
free access of the general public"
to the secret files on Nazi war
criminals, might take "some
time" because a decision involves
more than 18 member-
governments of the now-defunct
UN War Crimes Commission
which compiled the files on the
more than 40,000 war criminals.
Proceedings Dropped Against
Mayor Who Had Unique Plan
BONN (JTA) The State Prosecutor in Dusseldorf
has dropped legal proceedings against Count Wilderich von
Spee, former Mayor of Korschenbroich, who remarked to
the town council s financial committee last year that the
way to balance the municipal budget was to "kill a few rich
Jews."
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY concurred in the deci-
sion to end the proceedings after von Spee was fined 90,000
Marks (about $41,000) which he donated to a children's
cancer hospital. The Dusseldorf Jewish community had fil-
ed charges against him for incitement to racial hatred. But
the prosecution concluded that the anti-Semitic remark
was an insult to Jews for which von Spee was fined but
not incitement.
Von Spee was forced to resign as mayor when he lost
the support of his political party, the ruling Christian
Democratic Union (CDU), which initially had defended him.
His remark was the subject of a special debate in the
Bundestag on resurgent anti-Semitism in the Federal
Republic of Germany.


JNF Transforms Jerusalem
To A Rhapsody Of Green
Friday, May 16, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5

Visitors to Jerusalem are
regularly astounded at its splen-
dor of green, but foliage and the
Holy City were not always
synonymous. Years after Israel
gained its independence, travelers
to Jerusalem were greeted with a
view of the old-new biblical town
surrounded by barren hills whose
dominant colors were yellow and
white. The Jewish National Fund,
responsible for afforestation and
land reclamation in Israel, has
since added liberal splashes of
green to the Israeli capital by
ringing its residential suburbs
with a magnificent forest crown.
That crown has helped city plan-
ners map the development of the
capital's new outlying suburbs
since the reunification of
Jerusalem in 1967. And, as the
forests fill out with recreational
facilities, Jerusalemites are
steadily enjoying a better quality
of urban life.
Jerusalem's afforested area ex-
pands over 7,600 acres, with an
additional 2,500 acres yet to be af-
forested. When planting is com-
pleted, there will be a green link
connecting the Jerusalem Forest,
in the western part of the city,
with new woodlands in Ramot,
Pisgat Ze'ev, French Hill, Maale
Adumin and the Peace Forest op-
posite the Old City, and extending
to East Talpiot and Gilo on the
southern edges of the city.
The Jerusalem Forest
The Jerusalem Forest, often
described as the "green lung" of
Jerusalem, was planted in the
1950's and 60's with local
Mediterranean species of trees.
The region was once covered with
indigenous oaks and pistachio
trees, destroyed during the
Roman-Byzantine era in an at-
tempt to render the land
uninhabitable, and by unrestricted
felling and overgrazing during the
Islamic and Turkish era. Most
newly-planted trees are
Jerusalem pine, integrated with
olive trees, pomegranates, grape
Play Will Be
Shown To
'Closed' Viewers
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Rainer
Werner Fassbinder's play, "Gar-
bage, the City and Death," which
was taken off the boards in
November after protests by the
Jewish community and others that
it was anti-Semitic, will be shown
shortly for "closed audiences."
This was announced by Guen-
ther Ruehle, the artistic manager
of Frankfurt's municipally-
supported Kammerspiel (litle
theatre), where it was originally
scheduled to premier October 31.
Jewish protesters occupied the
stage and prevented the perfor-
mance, and a heated dialogue en-
sued between them and members
of the audience.
The protesters' contention that
the play is anti-Semitic is rooted
primarily in the fact that the main
protagonist is a heartless and
nameless real estate speculator
referred to only as "the rich Jew."
Ruehle, under pressure from the
Jewish community and various
political figures abandoned plans
in November to show the play.
Now he has announced that a
study of legal implications
demonstrates that performing it
for "closed" audiences the term
was not defined by him would
be in accordance with the laws of
the Hesse Federal State.
Frankfurt municipal authorities,
however, still hold to the belief
that such performances of the
play are illegal.
vines and almonds creating,
especially in springtime, a rhap-
sody of green.
Throughout the Jerusalem
Forest, considerable evidence
testifies to ancient agricultural
farming. There are also ancient
stone presses, once used for
treading grapes, which were
grown on terraced ledges
throughout the Jerusalem hills.
The forest hosts many national
monuments, including Mount
Herzl, the burial ground of
Israel's national leaders, and Yad
Vashem, the Holocaust Martyrs'
and Heroes' Memorial. Many pic-
nic areas and sporting facilities
are also located in Jerusalem's
woodlands, visited especially on
Independence Day by tens of
thousands of residents flocking to
their leafy boughs for the nation's
traditional "Barbecue Day."
Peace Forest
After the Six-Day War, JNF ac-
tivities were directed to the
eastern part of the capital op-
posite the Old City walls, near
Abu Tor. This is the site of the
Jerusalem Peace Forest, planted
to symbolise the city's reunifica-
tion. Many famous foreign leaders
and personalities have planted
tens of thousands of trees, with
their own hands, within this
woodland.
Planting forests in the vicinity
of developing towns is a novel ele-
ment of JNF afforestation, which
has traditionally concentrated on
barren hillsides unsuitable for far-
ming and far from centers of ur-
ban population. Today, the sound
of children's voices rising from
Park Gilo is evidence that many
neighborhood families use the
park's recreation facilities, built
of wood from thinned-out JNF
forests. Park Gilo overlooks a
breathtaking panorama of the
Jerusalem skyline and the
playground is one of the most
popular in Israel.
Ramot Park, on the city's
western limits, also features
sophisticated playground
facilities. Many new groves have
recently been added to this
woodland, including an area
planted by children living in
Ramot, in memory of four young
Ramot residents who were recent-
ly killed by an Egyptian soldier at
Ras Burka in Sinai. Groves have
also been planted by the Japanese
Makuyas, Christian Zionist
Friends of Israel, and by the com-
munity of Morocco in memory of
King Mohammed V, who defend-
ed his country's threatened
Jewish community against
Hitler's Germany.
A Cedar Planted By Herzl
The historical decision to af-
forest Jerusalem was made by
Theodor Herzl in 1898, during his
visit to Motza, on the western ap-
proach to the city, where he
planted a cedar with his own
hands. After the cedar was
destroyed, the first British High
Commissioner, Herbert Samuel,
planted a tree in the same spot.
Since then, Motza has become a
traditional planting site for
Presidents of the State of Israel.
The greening of Jerusalem com-
menced after the British con-
quered Palestine in 1917, and in
1918 trees were planted in the
name of Evelyn de Rothschild. In
those years, Ben Yehuda, the
founder of the modern Hebrew
language, suggested that forests
< .
\
In the mountains southwest of Jerusalem, shown above, JNF has
planted a memorial forest to the six million Jews who perished
during the Holocaust.
and parks should be planted to
make the town more beautiful. In
1920, Rachel Yanait, wife of
Israel's second President, Yitzhak
Ben Zvi, initiated tree nurseries in
the capital's Mea Shearim
quarter, in the courtyard of the
Bezale) School of Art and in
Talpiot. The trees planted in
Jerusalem came from saplings
grown in the tree nurseries of
Kiryat Anavim, Atarot and
Hulda, near Lod.
Large scale afforestation of
Jerusalem, however, began only
after independence with the
establishment of the Jerusalem
Forest, and has continued ever
since. The most recent forest to be
added is the IDF Forest in
memory of Israel's fallen soldiers,
located on the southern perimeter
of the city between Gilo and Kib-
butz Ramat Rachel. At the plan-
ting ceremony, Chief of Staff
Moshe Levy referred to the trees
as symbolizing the roots struck by
the Jewish people in their
homeland and eternal capital,
Jerusalem. Planting forests in
Jerusalem not only improves the
environmental life for the city's
inhabitants, but also represents a
permanent return to the land,
made green once again after
generations of neglect.
I

(!
t
IF YOU'RE EATING A
HIGH FIBER BRAN FLAKE
THAT'S
ii
(
IF IT'S HIGHEST IN FIBER
AND BEST TASTING.
THATSPOST.
You've got the right idea. You're eating a high fiber cereal because
you know how beneficial a high fiber diet can be.
But do you know theres a bran flake that's highest in fiber, best
tasting and absolutely Kosher?
Its Post* Natural Bran Flakes
Post* has more fiber than the other leading bran flake. And Post"
is oven toasted. So every flake is crispy, golden and delicious.
Now that you've decided to have a high fiber bran flake, make sure
its Post* Natural Bran Flakes. The best tasting, highest fiber bran
flake.
61906 General Foods Corporation
FOODS
Where keeping Kosher is a ddicJous tradition.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, May 16, 1986
Rabbinic Student At Hebrew Union College
Reports On Year Spent In France
The French Jewish community
is alive and healthy though not
without serious challenges ac-
cording to David Kudan, a rab-
binic student at the Cincinnati
campus of Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion.
David bases his assessment upon a
year spent at the Mouvement Juif
Liberal de France, one of two
large and growing congregations
in Paris affiliated with the World
Union for Progressive Judaism.
David, the son of Rabbi Harold
L. Kudan, spiritual leader of Con-
gregation Am Shalom in Glencoe,
Illinois, took a leave of absence
from his rabbinic studies in fall
'84, to spend a year's internship at
the 500-member congregation
which is housed in an ultra-
modern building in a new commer-
cial area overlooking the Seine.
He was greatly aided in this
endeavor by a grant from the Na-
tional Federation of Temple
Sisterhoods and additional finan-
cial support from the World
Union.
With the help of an intensive
course in French at the Sorbonne,
David plunged into a full range of
rabbinic duties. During the course
of the year, he worked with youth
groups, taught seven different
Hebrew classes, sat in on sessions
of the Liberal rabbinic courts, led
services on shabbat and holidavs.
David Kudan
delivered the weekly d'var Torah,
and participated in community
events and plans for the
synagogue's school.
"The french Jewish communi-
ty," David explained, "numbers
almost 700.000 mostly concen-
Ask Your Congressman
SAM GIBBONS RESPONDS
Quality Care Under Medicare
Dear Congressman Gibbon*:
I am concerned that the continu-
ing emphasis on cost containment
under the Medicare program and
budget cuts will compromise the
quality of care for Medicare reci-
pients as a result of these efforts.
What is being done to assure quali-
ty care for Medicare patients?
-M.S.
Dear M.S.:
I appreciate your concern for
the quality of service people may
receive due to certain Medicare
regulations. Please be assured
that I, too, share these concerns.
The Ways and Means Commit-
tee's Subcommittee on Health is
carefully examining the Presi-
dent's budget proposals to ensure
that, while there may be room for
reform, there are no arbitrary
slashes to the Medicare program.
Although the Administration's
plans include slowing the growth
of Medicare, I don't believe that
balancing the budget on the
shoulders of Medicare
beneficiaries is a good health
policy.
The Ways and Means Commit-
tee's Subcommittee on Health is
also addressing the issue of quali-
ty care under the Medicare pro-
gram. Hearings will be held to
focus on the "Medicare Quality
Assurance Act of 1986," which
would:
require the Department of
Health and Human Services to
come up with a plan to refine the
existing hospital payment system
by 1988 so that payments would
better account for severity and
complexity of illness.
require hospitals to give pa-
tients a written statement of
rights, including a right to appeal
a decision by the hospital to
discharge the patient.
bar the hospital from billing
the patient for charges incurred
within three days of such a
challenged discharge. The rele-
vant peer review organization
would have to decide the issue
within that time.
prohibit hospitals from rewar-
ding physicians for meeting
specific length-of-stay or cost-of-
care targets.
require peer review organiza-
tions to investigate patient com-
plaints about the quality of care.
This bill contains a number of
other provisions to assure quality
of care and to improve access to
appropriate post-hospital care.
I am supportive of these efforts
to insure the quality of care under
the Medicare program. There is a
natural tension between contain-
ing costs and maintaining quality.
It's time to balance the budget
debate with provisions to protect
quality.
SAM GIBBONS
Congressman, U.S. House
of Representatives
Washington, D.C., 20515
trated in the Paris area. I believe
their future is bright, but there
are some danger areas.
"Anti-Semitism," he continued,
"has not abated; it is very real.
Our congregation received several
threatening phone calls, and the
theatre showing the film, Shoah,
was bombed. A significant percen-
tage of the community's
resources, therefore, must be
devoted to physical security on a
scale we Americans could never
imagine. The memory of the
Holocaust is also far more alive
for the French Jews. I en-
countered many people, for exam-
ple, who would not allow their
names to appear on the member-
ship list of any Jewish organiza-
tion. The distrust of the police and
other authorities is still very much
with them.
"The second major problem,"
he added, "is the tremendous lack
of training opportunities for
Jewish professionals. There is no
Liberal Jewish seminary in all of
France."
On the positive side, David cited
the resurgence of interest in
Jewish roots and Judaism, the
revitalization of the community by
the melding of the Sephardic and
Ashkenazic populations, and the
great surge in Jewish intellectual
activity with a new emphasis on
translating and making available
traditional Jewish texts, as well as
novels, poetry and the arts.
"The French Jews have evolved
a distinct culture," he explained,
"authentically Jewish, but dif-
ferent from ours. I was greatly-
impressed by their attachment to
Jewish tradition and sources.
"Philosophy and literature are
taken very seriously," he con-
tinued, "and learned individuals
are highly respected. People do
not discuss their professional lives
in the synagogue," he added.
"Worship does not mix with earn-
ing a living."
David found it particularly ex-
citing to see how the large
Sephardic and older Ashkenazic
populations have forged
themselves into one French
Jewry, each respecting the other's
culture and traditions. The
prayerbook used by Liberal con-
gregations, for example, draws
together elements from the
Sephardic and Ashkenazic liturgy.
Temple Executive Director
Temple Israel of Greater Miami seeks Dynamic,
experienced Executive Director. Qualifications
must include strong fiscal and business
management skills; fund raising skills; and
membership solicitation and development
skills.
To apply send resume and salary history in
confidence to: Search Committee, Temple
Israel, M.P.O. Box 011191, Miami, FL 33101.
SeaEscape Will Pty %u to
>
Cruise a
When >ou uil it the regular tarn between
April! and June 30. WH6. they'll pjy you half
your tore to uil again between Jury I and
September 30. 1966.
This Spring pay the regular fare of S79 Adult
or $66 Senior Citizens (55+ I.
On your first sailing, you'll receive a trawl
dltme
- >. I, I l
Senior Citizens fare, good for a second
SeaEscape this summer
As a special bonus. KIDS 17 & UNDER
CO FREE (one per adult) from now until
September 30. 1986
Group* of 20 or am pay only M7
ling, you
check worth $40 off the adult or S33 off the
Price UdaaV*:
.1 Generous Buffets Dance Bands
Caharets/Cala Revues Big Band Mondays
Non-Stop Entertainment Casino Rin
Dmco 'Pubs and Clubs
ForReaervatioBaaakfor:
Pkyllia Bematcin: 839-4233 -10 am -10 pro
or 879-8022 9 am -5 p.m.
Deck Sport s/ftiol Games
rbrttanes
free Bus Service
rVom Selected Runts
IW. hf.iKx.ipr Lid
Tampa's Only One Day Cruise
OHrr taint on Tlmpj.
I Srjl.xjpt unit
llHMii.rMncik Iiavdu V A
Isaac^._
mos m enna a.
turn lioi
!'. iiMn Hilumji
The community's greatest need,
David feels, is for committed,
trained personnel rabbis, can-
tors, teachers and social workers.
i was happy to spend the year
in Paris as a representative of the
World Union and American
Jewry, and as an expression of our
concern for the future of the
Jewish community in France. And
while I think there is a short-term
need for other American Jewish
professionals to serve here, in the
long-run, the community must
produce its own leadership.
"Here is where American
Jewry," he continued, "with our
vast resources can provide the
support and training. There is a
trend, already, to send young peo-
ple to our Jewish camps and to our
schools of Jewish studies. This
should be encouraged and expand-
ed as much as possible.
"I believe," David concluded,
"that with the proper nuturing,
Prance could become the center of
Liberal Judaism in Europe."
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion is the na-
tion's oldest institution of higher
Jewish studies. It trains rabbis,
cantors, religious school
educators, communal workers and
doctoral and post doctoral
scholars at its four campuses in
Cincinnati, New York, Los
Angeles and Jerusalem.
Israel, Uruguay
Issue Statement
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Presidents of Israel and Uruguay
issued a joint statement here Sun-
day affirming the warm friend-
ship between their countries, their
support for the Middle East peace
process and support of the Con
tadora process to end conflicts in
Central America.
The statement was released as
President Julio Maria Sanguinetti
of Uruguay ended his five-day of-
ficial visit here, hosted by Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog. It referred to
the problems of Third World and
developing nations and agreed
that both Israel and Uruguay
should assist those countries.
ALM Antillean Airlines
TO THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN
/
%
frbtfJ 2#
DELIGHTFUL SERVICE
Courteous, attentive, knowledgeable multi-lingual cabin
crews who speak your language and care for your every
need.
DELIGHTFUL FOOD
Ah. the meals. Complete and satisfying. Prepared to please
by the finest airline Chefs north of the equator. Special meals
on request
DELIGHTFUL FUGHT
Bright, pleasantly appointed Super BO'S, one of the most
sophisticated jets in the sky. Quiet. Roomy. We reduced the
seating from 172 to 142 for an urcramped, uncrowded.
uncreased trip. Widest economy seats available and wider
in first class.
DELIGHTFUL DESTINATIONS
Bonaire. Curacao, where there's plenty of sun.
cooling trodewinds. beaches, casinos, comfortable accom-
modations, duty-free shops, and more.
DELIGHTFUL VACATION PACKAGES
l/Jonaire from OOY including airfare from Miami
From lompa and Orlando, odd $70.00 (TWM1G01M)
Curacao from OOV including airfare from Miami
From Tampa and Orlando, odd $7000 (rtoUrfiGOiN)
PLUS BONUS FEATURES..
4 days/3 nights per person, double occupancy. EP. Four
and seven nights packages also available at bargain rates
Daily flights to ABC's depart Miami at 2:00 P.M.
Jhe Your Jtavel Agent Knows!
ANTILLEAN AIRUNE8
THE AIRLINE OF THE DUTCH CARIBBEAN



Friday, May 16, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
Terrorism Poses Dilemma For America's Leaders
Jewish Chaplain Tells 1986 JWB Convention Here
TORONTO, Canada "A ma-
jor dilemma for America's
military and civilian leaders is
how to develop a response to ter-
rorism that doesn't say, 'we're go-
ing to fight fire with fire,'"
Chaplain Arnold E. Resnicoff told
a session at the 1986 Biennial
Convention of JWB, taking place
here at the Sheraton Convention
Centre.
"And why not fight fire with
fire?" he asked. "Because it would
play into terrorists' hands by
destryoing America's image as a
truly moral force for hope in the
world.
"The terrorists want us to aban-
don our values. They want to
show that we are no better than
they are. The fact is there is a dif-
ference and we are better than
they are. It is this fact which
makes us a force with which the
terrorists must contend. We still
do give hope. Our image still does
government which is fighting us
end the fight."
The rabbi shares a strong
message of hope. "The United
States," he told the JWB
delegates, "is the most moral
country in the world. Perhaps the
most moral country in the history
of the world. Our leaders are con-
stantly struggling with the right
questions and continually facing
hard questions of national securi-
ty within the context of the
dreams of our nation's founders,
and the very best ideals of its
citizens today.
"If civilians could listen to the
discussions going on among our
top military leaders, they would
be inspired. In our country, values
and dreams are still important.
And those who understand this
fact know as well that we remain a
force for hope in the world.
"Our challenge as Jews and
commander in the U.S. Navy
Chaplain Corps. He currently
serves as an instructor at the
Navy's Chaplain School in
Newport. He teaches a new elec-
tive course at the Naval War Col-
lege: "Force and Faith: Religion,
War, and Peace." This is the first
time such a course has been of-
fered at any of the high-level
military educational institutions.
Chaplain Resnicoff s work -
like that of all Jewish chaplains
assigned to military or Veterans
Administration posts is sup-
ported by JWB's Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy.
the leadership network and cen-
tral service agency for 275 JCC's,
YM-YWHAs and camps in the
U.S. and Canada, serving more
than one million Jews.
JWB also provides North
American Jewry with informal
Jewish education and Jewish
culture through the JWB Lecture
Bureau, Jewish Media Ser-
vice/JWB, JWB Jewish Book
Council, JWB Jewish Music Coun-
cil and Israel-related projects.
JWB is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJA-Federation
Campaign of Greater New York,
Jewish Community Centers and
YM-YWHAs and JWB
Associates.

Hussein Furious Over Peres'
'Secret Contacts' Statements
JERUSALEM (JTA) King; Hussein of Jordan is
furious over a statement by Premier Shimon Peres that
"secret contacts between Israel and Jordan" have taken
It is JWB, he told the delegates E^ fa ******* of *** diplomacy, Voice of Israel
which "is the reason that Jews Rad,0_reP0rtod-
serving in the military do not
leave the larger Jewish communi-
ty. TTiey are remembered, and
honored, for their service to their
country."
JWB is the U.S. government-
IT SAID THE Jordanians lost no time in registering
their anger with the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem.
Hussein was especially unhappy with the publication of
Peres' remarks on the eve of an Arab summit meeting
scheduled to be held in Fez, Morocco over the weekend. He
&2&XEZXZS ^""'T^tSr* ^^.7=: emphrficlly denied .ny contact, with toel.
r._i.* *- #___a___j _. -. session is to try to make our r*H fight for freedom. And so, our
values perhaps even more than
our lives become targets of ter-
rorist attacks."
Chaplain Resnicoff was in
Beirut, Lebanon, on the day when
terrorists took the lives of 241
Americans in 1983. He and a
Catholic chaplain, Father George
Pucciarelli, were among the first
to reach the building that was hit.
At the request of the White
House, Chaplain Resnicoff set his
feelings down on paper. That
report was read aloud by Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan in his address
to an annual convention of Baptist
ministers in Washington, D.C.
The subject of the JWB session,
"American Dreams, Jewish
Prayers, and Terrorist
Nightmares," was based on
Chaplain Resnicoff s research at
the U.S. Naval War College in
Newport, R.I., and dealt with
challenges we face when we con-
sider counter-terrorist strategy.
"We speak of 'ethical' dilemmas
in terms of structuring a response
to terrorism. But ethics is normal-
ly applied to actions to what we
do. There are also dangers linked
to morals, and to faith to how
we feel, and even how we dream.
"On a moral level, we must
guard against losing our sense of
moral outrage. Our country is
sometimes criticized for speaking
out against terrorism, and yet not
taking concrete action. It is im-
portant to understand, however,
that talk and no action is still
much better than no talk and no
action.
"We must continue to be
outraged and revolted by the ac-
tions of men and women who
murder innocents. Terrorists
would like to confuse us and con-
vince us that all violence is ter-
rorism at heart or that all
prisoners are 'hostages.'
"We sometimes hear the ex-
pression, 'one man's terrorist is
another's freedom fighter.' We
must reject that notion. Perhaps
one man's rebel is another's
freedom fighter but both rebel
and freedom fighter can cross a
line where either one becomes a
terrorist, juat as a soldier can
cross a line and become a
murderer.
"One of the biggest problems
facing us is the question we must
answer: 'Are we at peace or are
we at war?' If we are at peace, and
terrorism is a crime, then we must
think in terms of capturing and
trying individuals for their act.
"But if terrorism is a war if
certain countries think they have
found a way to wage war against
us without suffering the conse-
quences then we face a dif-
ferent situation. In war we do not
seek to capture the individual
soldier whose bullet has taken the
lives of our fighters. Instead, we
act in a way which will make the
try
contribution to our nation's strug-
gle. Americans must learn from
the beauty of those faiths, tradi-
tions, and heritages all her
citizens represent."
Rabbi Resnicoff is a lieutenant
religious, Jewish educational,
recreational and morale needs of
Peres cautioned that whatever progress was made with
recreational and morale needs of Jordan was characterized by mutual understanding rather
t^t&ZfiSJBZZ ?T F P"****** ? Yitzhak ShaW.the
VA patients. Likud leader, seemed to confirm that contacts had been
At the same time. JWB enriches "^l fte asserted that they had failed to produce any
Jewish educational experiences as tanpo'e results.
The Healthiest Traditions
StartWith
Fleischmann's Margarine and Egg Beaters.
\
j
v
x
**'
j
Fleischmann's
-KX>t corn of
Margarine
^ic!manns
-100&
come*
r0arin
'SSBKU
U Certified Kosher
sgpsu-*-
v
sstMtSST
ml*odou"nW
v.teasp
MocK&
(recipes
SSsSSfSffS1'
sss. _.-H-asr.

I0*18' c<*JnnS le"10"' S>nn 4 des'*1
II s i good lime id
. with
schmann s Margan *
Bciteri They re period loi delicious bin
Fleischmann s Margarine is made from 100' corn oil and tag
Bealcrv .
cholesterol So il yi lion, one
thing s lor certain Tl
lasleolFleischwanr >
Fleischmann's Gives
Every Meal A Holiday Flavor.
15C
<^
jwa
SAVE 15c
When you buy any package o<
Fleischmann's Margarine
V
i
>...
MM One caueon e> pmnkd pmauct
nkcjM Ann omi uk ctmMuM kM C*>
MMHOWUHB tM'ctfM kMknM
praMMM laMennmcM GMMUS
tt> M fm*urv K~ Mr Uu M> tM C
MMMg (H. III MW M WIMM'tM
MMi*Ml4 CaiKtMi Mc
UMSCOrMMOS NC DtPl Wl (I mso
II us :we*
A3M50t>
'2900
'


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, May 16, 1986
22 Jewish Cadets To Be Commissioned
As Officers, JWB Reports
NEW YORK, N.Y. Twenty-
two Jewish cadets three women
among them will graduate this
month from three U.S. service
academies and be commissioned
as officers, Rabbi Barry Hewitt
Greene, of Short Hills, N.J., chair-
man, JWB Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy, reports.
Wedding
Announcement
MANDELBAUM-FELSER
Reva Ilene Mandelbaum,
daughter of Florence and Alvin
Mandelbaum, of Tampa, and An-
drew Jacob Felser, son of Mar-
jorie Felser of Baltimore,
Maryland, and Louis Felser,
Denver, Colorado, were married
April 12, at Congregation
Schaarai Zedek. Rabbi Herbert
Drooz officiated.
Maid of honor was Eileen
Rosenfeld of New York City, and
bridal attendants were Erica
Mandelbaum and Susanna Felser.
Best man was Lawrence Felser of
Ithica, N.Y., and ushers were Sam
Mandelbaum of Tampa; and Bert
Mandelbaum of Sherman Oaks,
California.
Guests of honor were grand-
mother Anne Mahr of Baltimore;
uncle Jack Mandelbaum of Palm
Beach; aunt and uncle Irene and
Lou Kalman of Hallandale.
Reva is employed by Johns
Hopkins University as coor-
dinator of their National Gifted
program. She is also a performing
musician.
Andy is an attorney, a senior
associate with Gordon and
Heneson.
The couple will live in Steven-
son, Maryland.
STONEOSIASON
Kimberlee A. Stone and Lee
Osiason were married May 3 at
the Sonesta Beach Hotel, Key Bis-
cayne, with Rabbi Frank Sun-
dheim officiating.
Kim is the daughter of Muriel
Stone, Cashiers, North Carolina,
and Henry Stone, Miami, and the
granddaughter of Anne Nisen-
shal. Lee is the son of Lillyan and
Elliott Osiason of Tampa.
Matron of honor was the bride's
sister Lynda Stone of Miami, and
bridesmaids Lisa Stone, Gwen
Madsen, Gail Appel of Miami;
Sheri Stone, Beth Stone, and Mar-
jorie Rawn of Atlanta, Crystal
McCall of Ocala.
Best man was the groom's
brother-in-law Hugh Rawn.
Ushers were David Stone,
Howard Aberman, Ned Berndt of
Miami; Dr. Todd Rosenthal,
Steven Osiason, Neal Osiason of
Tampa; and Mark Rifkin of
Waltham, Massachusetts.
The couple will live in Miami.
Engagement
Announcement
WEISS-LINSKY
Alice and Kenneth Weiter-
shausen of Palm Harbor, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Cynthia Ann, to Mit-
chell William Linsky, son of
Loretta and Marshall Linsky,
Clearwater.
Cynthia is the granddaughter of
Mrs. Floyd Weiss and Mrs. Mable
Gibson. Mitchell is the grandson
of Mrs. Max Green.
Cynthia received an associate of
science degree from the Universi-
ty of South Florida and is
employed at Smith Barney.
Mitchell is a graduate of the
University of Florida and is
employed at Tampa Wholesale
Plumbing.
A November wedding is planned
at Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Representatives of JWB will
present complimentary copies of
the latest Jewish Publication
Society translation of The Torah
(The Five Books of Moses) to the
Jewish officers at the bac-
calaureate services.
The presentation of The Torah
to each of the Jewish cadets is
part of the intensified year-round
program of outreach and service
to the Jewish personnel provided
by the JWB Chaplaincy Commis-
sion and Jeish communal leaders
at or near the service
installations.
Greene observes that "the
Jewish consciousness of the
cadets has been raised significant-
ly by the work of JWB, the
Jewish chaplains and Jewish lay
leaders."
"By serving these people we
heighten their receptivity to the
role of Jewish lay leaders," he
adds. "These cadets will not only
be in positions of Jewish leader-
ship within the U.S. armed forces.
They are also potential leaders for
positions in their civilian com-
munities after they leave the
service."
The three Jewish women cadets
among the graduates are: Barbara
Lynne Burgess, Fort Lauderdale;
Jan Alexander Tavrytzky,
Federal Valley, Washington, U.S.
Air Force Academy, and Sharon
R. Alman, Trumbull, Conn., U.S.
Naval Academy.
The 22 newly-commissioned
Jewish officers include nine at the
U.S. Military Academy, West
Point, N.Y., seven at the U.S. Air
Force Academy, Colorado Spr-
ings, Colo., and six at the U.S.
Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.
The Holy Scriptures will be
presented by JWB at each of the
academies' baccalaureate
services.
The first of these will take place
at the U.S. Naval Academy in An-
napolis on May 18. Col. Harry Lin-
dauer, USA (Ret.) is the Jewish
lay leader at the Naval Academy.
Baccalaureate services at the
U.S. Military Academy at West
Point will take place on May 21.
Chaplain Marc Abramowitz is the
Jewish chaplain.
Chaplain Joel Schwartzman,
Major, who serves personnel at
the U.S. Air Force Academy in
Colorado Springs, announced that
baccalaureate services there will
take place May 25.
The 22 Jewish officers among
the graduates are:
U.S. Military Academy: Eugene
A. Baker, Neptune, N.J.; Andrew
S. Eiseman, Gaithersburg, Md.;
David M. Gordon, Ontario,
Canada; Norman C. Massry,
Saratoga, N.Y.; Edward T.
Motley, Buena Park, Calif.; Marc
A. Moyer, Millersville, Pa.; Bruce
Ollstein, Washington, D.C.; Peter
A. Rosen, Overland Park, Kans.,
and Daniel C. Stredler, Yorba Lin-
da, Calif.
United States Naval Academy:
Sharon R. Alman, Trumbull,
Conn.; Louis P. Feuchtbaum, Spr-
ing Valley, N.Y.; Gary I. Gerson,
Chatsworth, Calif.; David L.
Jacobson, Haines City, Fla.; Mark
S. Meltzer, Philadelphia, Pa., and
Justin I. Miller, Laguna Beach,
Calif.
United States Air Force
Academy: Brent Andrew
Beecham, Atlanta, Ga., Barbara
Lynne Burgess, Fort Lauderdale,
Fla.; Lawrence Andrew Cooper,
Lido Beach, N.Y.; Michael Seth
Fisher, Smithtown, N.Y.; Robert
Alan Rosenthal, Chantilly, Va.;
Jan Alexander Tavrytzky,
Federal Way, Washington, and
David Weintraub, Bowie, Md.
JWB promotes Jewish educa-
tion both in the military and
civilian communities. It is the
agency accredited by the U.S.
government and mandated by the
American Jewish community to
serve the religious, Jewish educa-
tional and morale needs of U.S.
Jewish military personnel, their
families and VA hospitalized
patients.
At the same time, JWB is the
leadership network of and central
service agency for 275 Jewish
Community Centers, YM-YWHAs
and camps in the U.S. and
Canada, serving one million Jews.
It provides Jewish educational
and cultural experience for North
American Jewry through the
Jewish Media Service/JWB, JWB
Lecture Bureau, JWB Jewish
Book Council, JWB Jewish Music
Council, and Israel-related
activities.
JWB is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJA-Federation
Campaign of Greater New York,
Jewish Community Centers and
YM-YWHAs and JWB
Associates.
Spring is a wonderful time to fall in love
and share the summer with someone.
We are four melee (3 edorable Jewish Mensch and
1 slick well mennered Cetholic) 29-31, very attractive,
all professionals and very single. None of us have been
married.
We ere tired of bars, people blowing smoke in our
fecee and bimbos.
If you are a femele, 22-28, ettrective, ethletic,
articulate and enjoy the finer things of life, we ere
inviting you, along with three other femalee for a
relaxing afternoon of water skiing and BBQ'd food.
You must have It together, be heppy with youreelf,
but desire to share your life with eomeone special
some dey.
If you would like to meet, respond as Individuals
with note, work phone end picture. Same will be
exchanged to satisfy mutual curiosity.
The day of the Weter Ski-BBQ will be in early June
and will be set sfter we speak to you.
NOTE: We definitely are not nebiehee. If you're
what we're looking for, teke e chance. Your Mome will
love ue!
Nice Guys
MAIL TO: P.O. Box 24414
Tampa, FL. 33622-4414
Sephardi Chief Rabbi Mordechai Eliahu and YosefShapira, the
Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi, signing the 'chametz' sale note in the
presence of the new Finance Minister Moshe Nissum on the eve of
Passover.
San Francisco s Mayor Dianne Feinstein recently visited Israel
for the first time as guest of 'sister city' Haifa Mayor Aryeh
tmrel (left) meeting with Technion President Josef Singer
(center) to discuss scientific and academic exchange and Israel's
high-tech research and industry, and touring Technion's campus
and the Coler-California Visitors Center.
JEWELERS
Bar Mitzvah & Bar Mitzvah Gifts
Our Specialty
Jeff 8i Suanne Abeles
The Promenade
10330 N. Dale Mabry Suite 150 Tampa, Florida 33618 (813) 961-0097
'" ----T|ul[|-------------------------l~L[~U~LI~B~J~L-_"_"____I _1___________
>* "
r



Friday, May 16, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 9
Holocaust Studies: The Next Stage
Dr. Klein is director of the Inter-
national Center for Holocaust
Studies of the Anti-Defamation
League ofB'nai B'rith, a depart-
ment of the agency'8 Inter group
Relations Division.
By DENNIS B. KLEIN
"The Holocaust needs to re-
main a part of our shared remem-
brance of human failure and the
capacity that exists for the
destruction of human life and
dignity. Students need to face the
enduring strengths and fragile
conditions that exist in contem-
porary society and become aware
of the web that we call civilization
and how easily it can be torn
asunder."
This recommendation, made
recently by the Carnegie Founda-
tion for the Advancement of
Teaching, has provided much of
the inspiration behind the growth
of Holocaust studies in the last
two decades.
Today, more and more students
in these programs, born after the
fact, are literally untouched by the
Holocaust. Educators are
therefore looking for new ap-
proaches to explain this
phenomenon in modern history.
Many of the young students are
non-Jews, adding another dimen-
sion to curriculum planning.
Until now, certain aspects of
Holocaust studies have tended to
confuse and misrepresent the
historical record.
For example, there has been a
penchant for generalizing about
the perpetrators, emphasizing
their guilt. A moralizing tone has
often governed teaching, framing
discussions in terms of evil and
good. In trying to understand the
tragedy, it is natural tojeel rage
and sorrow, but defining the
Holocaust as a 20th century
morality play could sabotage ef-
forts to encourage a broad par-
ticipation in acquiring knowledge
about the Holocaust.
The tendency to assign collec-
tive responsibility is most ap-
parent in discussions of the Polish
people and the Catholic Church.
Both groups have been linked to
the Nazis, either as sympathizers
or as collaborators. With the
detachment of 41 years after the
Holocaust, and with the accumula-
tion of eyewitness accounts and
other documentation, distinctions
can now be made without losing
sight of the actual widespread
complicity. Making these distinc-
tions would alter the tone in the
classroom from passion and com-
passion to a more appropriate
tone of critical thinking and self-
reflection.
Common preconceptions about
the Catholic church's role are bas-
ed in part on the impact of Rolf
Hochhuth's controversial play,
The Deputy. Hochhuth portrayed
Pope Pius XII as indifferent to the
suffering of the Jews and fearful
that open opposition to Nazi
genocide would imperil the
church. In addition, he depicted
the Pope as so eager for the defeat
of Bolshevik Russia by the Ger-
0ROWARD
[JAPER &
Packaging
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 800 432 3706
Hroward
[JAPER a
Packaging
man army, that he was reluctant
to criticize the Nazis and their
anti-Jewish policies. Hochhuth's
position condemns the inaction of
church authorities as malevolent.
New research presents the reac-
tion of the Pope and other church
leaders to the Holocaust as com-
plex and varied. For example, in
some countries (e.g., France and
the Netherlands) bishops openly
condemned Nazi actions against
Jews. In others (e.g., Slovakia)
they were more passive, and in
still others, particularly Poland,
the bishops could do nothing
because they and their people
were victims of Nazism.
Some church leaders rescued
Jews and spoke out against Nazi
brutality. Recent studies illustrate
that some members of the
Catholic hierarchy remained
silent or indifferent to the plight
of Jews out of fear of Nazi ter-
rorism rather than out of
malevolence. Others tried to do
what they could but had limited
options and an awareness of the
consequences of spurning Nazi
policies. Still others especially
among the laity were not fully
aware of the extent of Hitler's
campaign against the Jews. There
were many who reacted just as
Hochhuth portrayed them: indif-
ferent, if not hostile, toward Jews.
Since most people are at least
aware of the Holocaust, the prin-
cipal question no longer concerns
the extent and evil of the
systematic genocide of the Jewish
people. Rather', the aim now is to
define precisely who participated
in the organized acts of
belligerence, and why. John T.
Pawlikowski in The Challenge oj
the Holocaust for Christian
Theology, points out that a severe
judgment about Pope Pius XII's
lack of concern for Jews is pre-
judicial and simplistic. The Pope,
he says, disapproved of the Nazis'
anti-Jewish plans and undertook
some concrete efforts to save
Jews. He was neither indifferent
nor anti-Semitic. But, the author
notes, the fact remains that
Vatican diplomacy during the
period was inadequate, marked by
excessive prudence and reserve.
According to John Morley, author
of Vatican Diplomacy and the
Jews During the Holocaust, that
reserve derived from an ec-
clesiastical and personal pattern
of not "offending" any nation.
John S. Conway's The Nazi
Persecution of the Churches,
19SS-1H5 makes the point that the
first victims of Nazi genocide
were not Jews, but the Polish in-
telligentsia, including the clergy.
The Nazis considered the Poles as
inferior as well as a threat to Ger-
man moral strength. This study
deepens our knowledge of the
essential racial ideology that pro-
pelled the Nazi quest for cultural
and physical supremacy.
Pointing to those within the
church who were victimized or
who sheltered Jews may seem like
an attempt to excuse the church
as a whole, including those who
did support or at least acquiesce
to the "Final Solution." However,
acknowledging that Catholics
behaved in diverse ways is not a
blanket pardon for all individuals
and actions. A critical examina-
tion of complicity is an ethical ad-
vance, since the alternative
ostracizing individuals because
they belong to a certain group
was the foundation of the Nazi
ideology about Jews. We need to
discern the patterns of involve-
ment to better define those actual-
ly involved in the genocidal
policies. Catholicism itself is not
to blame. Christian anti-Semitism
did not prescribe force against
Jewry. On the contrary, Christian
theology demanded Jewish
preservation so that Jewish ex-
istence could testify, by its
"degraded presence," to the
triumph <>f Christianity.
Vni? reTTPwerr^nqiiln- into the
individual's involvement in the
destruction of European Jewry
stands a better chance than did
previous efforts to establish a
resilient framework for examin-
ing the Holocaust. The same is
true for incorporating Holocaust
studies in a new synthesis of social
studies.
Currently, the Holocaust is
usually taught as a unit for a
number of weeks or for an entire
semester a response to the
general tendency toward
specialization in teaching. On the
college level, there are separate
programs for women's studies,
labor studies, black studies and
Jewish studies. Holocaust studies
have also become an independent
field.
Perhaps as a consequence of the
'back-to-basics" movement, there
m-
majority of Nazi assaults,
eluding the annihilation of Jews
far from the front lines, were, in
fact, totally unconnected with the
necessities and the conditions of
war.)
Other historical and cultural
links are vital. Even a separate
chapter in general history texts
devoted to the Holocaust is a step
in the right direction. And while it
might be easier to develop
teaching materials for a separate
curriculum, such a curriculum sus-
tains a particular view of the
Holocaust which wrongly implies
that the "Final Solution" was a
historical aberration. Restored to
its historical contexts, the
Holocaust would become mean-
ingful for the uninitiated and the
unconvinced.
Nuke Disaster
Sparks Debate Over
Power Future in Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A debate is shaping up in
the government over the
issue of nuclear power
is a growing interest now in syn plants in Israel. Officials in-
fhesizing history and making it sist the decision should be
made on the basis of the
future energy needs and
economic factors rather
than the concerns raised by
the nuclear accident in
Chernobyl, the Ukraine,
recently.
The Cabinet is divided. Gad
Yaacobi, Minister for Economic
Planning, and Gideon Patt,
Minister of Science and
Technology, advise against the
purchase of nuclear reactors. But
Energy Minister Moshe Shahal
said it must not be ruled out under
pressure of the disaster in the
Soviet Union.
whole" again. This synthesis
could incorporate what we have
learned about the Holocaust into a
new mainstream that would il-
lustrate the underlying
discontents of Western
civilization.
Presented as the emblematic
fact of the 20th Century, the
Holocaust would make clear that
our religious heritage, our codes
of law, and our technological ad-
vancements have produced
destructive consequences as well
as productive ones. Moreover, the
Holocaust would shed light on the
twin legacies of the enlighten-
ment: The mastery of nature and
the subjugation of human life.
The challenge for the future is
then to define the links between
the Holocaust and the ideas and
events of Western civilization. To
say that the Holocaust has strictly
chronological relationships is not
enough: The program to destroy
European Jewry occurred during
World War II and certainly has a
relationship to that war, but the
war alone does not explain the
Holocaust. (The overwhelming
YAACOBI NOTED at Sunday's
Cabinet meeting that oil prices
are expected to stabilize at a low
level and stay there for some time.
"To say the least, it is much less
urgent to take decisions concern-
ing this matter (nuclear reactors)
now than it was two years ago,"
he said.
Patt pointed out that a reactor
would have to be located
somewhere in the northern Negev
Robert A. Levin
Andy Lewis
Robert K. Bargar
L. Mark Carron
EF Hutton & Company Inc.
102 W. Whiting St., 2nd Fir.
Tampa. FL 33602
Telephone (813) 223-4946
Florida Wats Line: 1-800-282-5871
Nat'l Wats Line: 1-800-237-8610
Randy M. Freedman
Lynch
One Tampa City Center
Tampa. FL 33602
813-273-8586
Buy One
Get One
FREE
Drive Thru Window
6 Flavors Daily
Original Carrollwood
Shopping Center
Corner Linebaugh A
Dale Mabry
968-8015
KOSHER
YOGURT
Any Cup Yogurt
Tastes Like Ice Cream with Hall the Calories
Not Good With Other Offers
tor satety reasons. But such a site
would add 60 percent to the
nominal price of a reactor because
of the high cost of providing water
a coolant On top of this, he said,
there was the cost of defense ana
security measures owing to the
proximity of the reactor to the
Egyptian border.
Shahal insisted that Israel
should continue to gather infor-
mation and weigh the situation
"without unnecessary public
statements." He said the pro-
blems of security and the price of
oil were considerations.
BNAIBRTTHS
NM
MAJOR
MEDICAL
INSURANCE
The "More For
Your Money" PUtn
ThotGwesYou
\\nd Your Family:
More Control:
Ybu Choose The Doctor
>bu Choose The Hospital
You Choose The Deductible
a You're Covered Wherever You
Gowhen you travel or move,
your protection goes with you.
More Protection:
B High Lifetime Benefit
a Dental Option
Ambulatory Surgical Benefits
Second Surgical Opinion Benefits
BnaitfU-fc yu#
COMWrtyMfiXOM
MODAS-12t77 >inimn
Available to Bnni B'rith member*
under age 65 and their families.
We enrol newrnernben.
For detail* contact:
CARLE.STEINMAN
1408 N. Westahore Blvd.
Suite 600
Tamps, Florida 33007
Off. 872-7941
Res. 887-3812
PineUas 822-2708
YES, I'm interested in Bnai
B'rith. "More For Your Money"
I Major Medical Plan. Pteaae
contact me personally or
by mall.

I
I
I
I
i IK >ME I "MONK
NAME
ADDRESS
cm STATE/ZnV


Page 10 J^ej^s^oridian of Tampa/Friday, May 16, 1986
Freda Rosenbaum Honored
At Hadassah Donor Luncheon
The highlight of the Donor Lun-
cheon of the Tampa Chapter of
Hadassah on April 15 at the Car-
rollwood Golf and Tennis Club
was a presentation to Mrs. Freda
Rosenbaum. Freda has been an
active member of Hadassah for
over 60 years and recently
celebrated her 90th birthday. This
past year Freda has been in
charge of bulk mailings, the
telephone committee, and
nominating committee, in addi-
tion to being active on the donor
committee for her chapter.
Members of Freda's family at-
tending were her brother, Mr.
Mannie Marks and her son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Larry Rhodes. Mrs. Ruth
Glickman and Freda's son, Larry
presented her with framed cer-
tificates showing equipment pur-
chases for Hadassah Hospital in
honor of her birthday. Another
large contribution was made to
Youth Aliyah in her honor.
Surprise presentations were
also made to Mr. Sam Fishman
and Mr. Al Mizrahi for their help
with the very successful Ad Book
project. Tribute was paid to Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Fishman for being
Founders.
Judy Tawil, the mistress of
ceremonies introduced the follow-
ing participants in the program
Mrs. Bert Green, Mrs. Anne Spec-
tor, Mrs. Evelyn Lopez, Mrs. Nan-
cy Mizrahi, Mrs. Ellie Fishman,
Mrs. Esther Carp, Mrs. Lil
Bregman, Mrs. Dorothy Skop,
Mrs. Freda Brod, Mrs. Margery
Stern, Mrs. Harriett Glaser.
Mrs. Marilyn LeVine, an officer
of the Florida Central Region of
Hadassah, shared a slide presen-
tation she compiled entitled
"Hadassah Makes History." It in-
cluded world highlights and
Hadassah events of the last seven
decades with appropriate music of
each decade.
Certificates were presented to
Silver and Golden Angels and ap-
Freda Rosenbaum
preciation expressed to all donors.
An example was given of how our
support of Hadassah hospitals
enables their Oral Surgery
Department to help 300 new pa-
tients yearly. Their faces have
been damaged from accidents, life
saving surgery, and congenital
disease. Various techniques in-
cluding oral surgery and facial
prosthesis methods help patients
have normal lives instead of living
as social outcasts.
Members saluted for their work
on the Donor and Ad Book Com-
mittees were: Terry Medgebow,
Ad chairman; Nancy Mizrahi, Ad
Book editor; Donor Secretary,
Bernice Starr; Donor Treasurer,
Sylvia Gertzman; Donor Chair-
man, Ruth Glickman; and
members of the Donor and Ad
Book Committee, Ellie Fishman,
Margery Stern, Harriett Glaser,
Bert Green, Esther Carp, Alice
Israel, Freda Rosenbaum, and
Shirley Le wen thai. The team ef-
fort of many members enabled
Tampa Chapter of Hadassah to
surpass their goals for the year.
.
Our Gang
Continued from Page 2
is available in all area book stores including Haslam's and B.
Dalton's.
Welcome to Dr. and Dr. Krinsky and their two-year-old
son, Benjamin. They moved to Tampa last June from New
Haven, Conn., and are still eagerly exploring our community and
beaches, and getting to meet new friends. Andrew is an
obstetrician-gynecologist in practice with Mark Maltzer, MD in
Brandon, and Adrienne is a dentist in general practice with
Robert Farber, DDS. The Krinsky family lives in Temple Ter-
race and we're delighted to have you here.
Hey gang, send your news, tell us about graduation and college
plans, c/o Our Gang, The Jewish Floridian, 2808 Horatio St.,
Tampa, FL 33609.
lCTRO-PROTCTIV COflPOfWION
Underwriters' Laboratories Incorporated (UL).
approved
Burglar Alarm Systems Camera Surveillance Systems
Vault and Safe Alarms Card Access Systems
Holdup Alarms Automatic and Manual
Closed Circuit TV Systems F,r Alarm Systems
The need lor advanced security systems has never been greater,
more critical or in more immediate demand, than it is today.
lCTflO PAOTCTIV COftPOfViTION
1102 North "B" Street Tampa, Florida 33606
(813)251-0578
LOUIS ZIPK IN
QUfXlTV SCUfllTV S6RVICCS fOfl VOUfl BUSINESS AND HONK
was
The theme
from
'I Lift My Lamp"
a poem by Emma
Lazarus for the Statue of Liberty.
Hadassah founder, Henrietta
Szold and Emma Lazarus were
among those volunteers helping
Jewish immigrants get settled and
learn English during the late
1800's. Gold gift bags tied with
red, white, and blue ribbons car-
ried out the theme along with
centerpieces showing the Statue
of Liberty, American and Israeli
flags. From Henrietta Szold
Hadassah draws its inspiration
and two-fold ideal of service to
Israel and enrichment of our lives
as American Jewish women who
support democracy and justice.
Applications Available Now for National Council of Jewish
Women Scholarships
year, the Tampa Section awarded 11 scholarships to deserving
Jewish students enrolled in college. In accordance with its
perpetual goals of furthering education, these scholarships are of-
fered annually by the Tampa Section. These scholarships are not
only offered to^ntermg freshmen, but also to upper classmen and
graduate students.
Applicants and their families must be residents of Hillsborough
County. Awardees must maintain a 2.5 or better scholastic
average and must show evidence of financial need. All informa-
tion is strictly confidential. Any interested students may apply, by
mail, for further information and applications to: Mrs. Ina
Haubenstock, Chairman, 49 Martinique, Tampa, Florida 33606.
The deadline for completed applications is June 1.
These scholarships are made possible through the generosity of
several local families and the National Council of Jewish Women
members. They are: The Esta Argintar Memorial Scholarship,
The Lillian Stein Memorial Scholarship, The Victor Brash
Memorial Scholarship, The Rebecca and Joseph Wohl Memorial
Scholarship and The Rabbi David L. Zielonka Scholarship, funded
by the Tampa Section.
Harry B. Smith Named Chairman Of Weizmann's
Florida Region Estates Planning Committee
Attorney Harry B. Smith, a
past president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, has
been named Chairman of the
Estates Planning Committee for
the Florida Region of the
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science.
"We are pleased and honored to
have Mr. Smith as chairman of the
Estates Planning Committee,"
said Rowland Schaefer, the In-
stitute's Florida Regional chair-
man. "The committee brings a
new dimension to our fund-raising
efforts which help support the
Bar Mitzvah
Announcement
Mark Shukovsky
MARK SHUKOVSKY
Mark Aaron Shukovsky, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Shukovsky,
will celebrate his Bar Mitzvah on
Friday, May 16 at 8 p.m. and
Saturday, May 17 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and Can-
tor William Hauben will officiate.
Mark is in the 7th Grade at
Wilson Junior High School where
he participates in the gifted pro-
gram and the Math League. He is
a Principal and a High Honor Roll
student. He was a participant in
the County Science Fair at the
Regional level. He has won State
level recognition in the Duke
University Talent Identification
program. Mark has been a
member of the Greater Tampa
Swim Association for seven years
and has accumulated many medals
and awards.
Leonard and Nora Shukovsky
will host an Oneg Shabbat and
Kiddush luncheon following the
services.
Special guests will include
grandmothers Florence Shukov-
sky and Miriam Kanton of New
York; uncles David Shukovsky of
Chicago; Dr. Edward Shukovsky
of Stamford, Connecticut
Weizmann Institute and its 700
ongoing scientific research
projects."
Mr. Smith is founder and part-
ner in the law firm of Smith and
Mandler in Miami. He currently
serves as a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Board
and Executive Committee as well
as the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies.
Mr. Smith is a member of the
University of Miami Citizens
Board, vice president of the
United Way of Dade County and a
member of the Board of
Overseer's of the Heller Graduate
School of Brandeis University.
Other community activities in-
clude service as a member of the
Boards of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee, the
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
and Temple Beth Sholom of Miami
Beach.
Mr. Smith is a past president of
the Miami Beach Bar Association,
the Civic League of Miami Beach
and the Palm, Star and Hibiscus
Islands' Associations. He also
served as chairman of the Ad-
visory Committee on Community
on the Middle East for the Council
of Jewish Federation.
The Weizmann Institute of
Science, located in Rehovot,
Israel, 15 miles southeast of Tel
Aviv, is one of the foremost scien-
tific research centers of the world
today. Its scientific research pro-
jects range from cancer and multi-
ple sclerosis to aging and solar
energy.
For additional information
regarding the research activities
at the Weizmann Institute, write
to Mrs. Lee Millman, executive
director of the Florida Region of
the American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute, 1550 N.E.
Miami Gardens Drive, Suite 405,
N. Miami Beach, FL 33179 or
telephone 940-7377 in Dade Coun-
ty or 462-3722 toll-free in
Broward County.
Honorary Member
GENEVA (JTA) Zvi
Hersch Drukman, a well-known
Jewish journalist and a former
Geneva correspondent of the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, was
made an honorary member of the
Journalistic Association which is
accredited to the United Nations
here. At the age of 80, Drukman is
also the doyen of the Association.
The Rumanian-born journalist
writes for Jewish publications in
Switzerland, France, Germany
and Israel.
To place a Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah announcement in the
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
please have information,
(typed/double spaced), in
the office, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, Florida
33609, three weeks prior to
the event.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday. 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:80 a.m., 6:46 p.m.
CONGREGATION EOL AMI CsnseuaUi.
3919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H. David Rose. Cantor Sam Iuak Service.:
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM ftggjsa
2713 Bayabore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, hanan William
Hauben Service* Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:16.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2877 Rabbi Herbert Droot. Rabbi Joan Glaser Farber.
Service* Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION BAI8 TEFFILAH Orthodox
8418 Handy Road No. 108 Rabbi Yotai Dubrowski 962-2876 Service! Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
P.O. Bos 271167. Rabbi Yoeaie Dubrowaki, Executive Director. 963-2317.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
18801 N. 37th St No. 1114. Rabbi Dovid Mockin, Program Coordinator. 971-6234.
Friday night Service* one hah* hour after aunaet. Tuesday night claeaea at 8 p.m.
B'NAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at U.S.FAI.T./H.C.C. Cambridge Wooda 14240
North 42nd Street 972-4483. Service, and Oneg Shabbat Friday evening 7 p.m.
Sunday Bagel Branches, 11:80 *m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
684-9162, United Community Church, 1601 La Jolla Street, Sun City Center, Ser
: Friday, 8 p.m.
EECONSTRUCTIONIST COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
Reconstructiorort Community Chavurah Reconatructioput Cambridge Wooda*
9724488 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly study stasiona. weekly "Shabbat Ex
" monthly service, with dinner.


Friday, May 16, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
MA Y
Community Calendar
today's Tmm i- "Th
Jewuk Sod" WMNF
MS KM IfcM %MA
p.m.
CaadMifMag Umi
Friday, May 1, 7:53
p.m.
Friday, May U, 7:17
ML
Friday. May 30, 8:01
pm.
.JEWISH NATIONAL-m,
FUND MISSION TOlD
I ISRAEL
I allday Jewish
I COMMUNITY CENTER
I ISRAEL
I INDEPENDENCE DAY
19-11:00 KOL AMI
I RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
IGRADUATION
25
I JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER 8LEEPOVER
WEEKEND
10:00 JEWISH WAR
VETERANS
AUXILIARY GENERAI
MEETING
HILLEL DINNER
JEWISH NATIONAL 19
FUND MIS8ION TO
ISRAEL
8.-M SCHAARAI
ZBDEK BOARD OF
TRUSTEES MEETING
i *
MEMORIAL DAY 26
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER 8LEEPOVER
WEEKEND
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER CLOSED
5:30 BUSINESS AND
PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN GENERAL
MEETING
20
27
LAG B'OMER
1:30 JEWISH TOWERS
BOARD MEETING
7:00 JEWISH WAR
VETERANS GENERAL
MEETING AT KOL AMI
10:00 'JEWISH
COMMUNITY FOOD
BANK
10:00 HADASSAH/TA
MPA CHAPTER
REGULAR MEETING
1240 KA SENIOR
SOCIALITES
1:00 CLUB VARIETY
PICNIC
21
t:30 NATIONAL )
COUNCIL JEWISH AO
WOMEN POST BOARD
MEETING
10:00 'JEWISH
COMMUNITY FOOD
BANK
10:00 RODEPH
SHOLOM
SISTERHOOD BOARD
MEETING
22
5:50 'JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
EXECUTIVE BOARD
MEETING
7: KOL AMI
FELLOWSHIP
MEETING
29
7:30 ADL PARLOR
MEETING
JEWISH NATIONAL
FUND MISSION TO
ISRAEL
8:00 KOL AMI
SISTERHOOD
SHABBAT
8:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK FAMILY
SERVICE
16
17
KOL AMI YOUTH
CULMINATION
DINNER
23
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER SLEEPOVER
WEEKEND
7:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDIK
BROTHERHOOD
INSTALLATION
DINNER
30
8:00 RODEPH
SHOLOM/TAMPA
JEWISH FAMILY
SERVICE SHABBAT
8:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK
CONSECRATION
24
31
May
Congregations/Organizations Events
NORTH TAMPA REFORM
JEWISH ASSOCIATION
A meeting will be held on Sun-
day, June 1 at 7 p.m. at the Lake
Magdelene Manor Club House.
The meeting is open to all persons
interested in the development of a
Reform Congregation on the
north side of town.
For more information please
call Vikki Silverman, 949-1909, or
Adrienne Golub, 961-7522.
HILLEL SCHOOL
"Spring Starlight Cruise"
WATCH OUT, LOVE BOAT! It
will be "Bon Voyage" time when
the Hillel School of Tampa sets
out on its "Spring Starlight
Cruise," Sunday, May 25, at 7
p.m. The paddleboat "Southern
Belle" has been chartered to sail
from Harbour Island for an even-
ing of music and fun, with
cocktails and Kosher buffet din-
ner, catered by the Airport
Marriott.
As a departure from its tradi-
tional dinner dance, the commit-
tee has arranged for a casual,
nautical theme for the annual
fund-raising event. Cruisewear
will be in style and entertainment
will indue dancing and "ship-
board" activities. The cruise is
open to the community, and fur-
ther information is available from
the school office at 875-8287.
HADASSAH
The Tampa Chapter will hold
its installation luncheon for the in-
coming officers of 1986-87 in the
library of the JCC at 11 a.m.
(NOTE TIME CHANGE) on
Wednesday, May 21.
Guest speaker and installer will
be Lisl Schick of Clearwater, im-
mediate past president of the
Florida Central Region of
Hadassah and currently Speaker's
Bureau chairman for the region
and a national board member of
Hadassah.
Members and guests are invited
to join us for this festive occasion.
Cost of the luncheon is $4; an
assortment of kosher deli sand-
wiches from Sunset Deli will be
featured. Please call Freda Rosen-
baum at 879-3244 or Dorothy
Skop at 839-0167 for your
reservation.
Officers to be installed are: Nan-
cy Mizrahi, Esther Carp, Bert
Green, Dorothy Skop, Lil
Bregman, Dorothy Garrell,
Margery Stern, Blanche Spivack,
Claire Levin, Sadie Wahnon, Alice
Israel. Freda Brod and Ellie
Fishman.
Brandon Shalom Chapter
Honor Banquet and Installation
Ceremony Wednesday, May 21, at
the Ramada Inn on Brandon
Boulevard in BrajidoiuTbera will,
be a donor banquet at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by an open meeting at
"**'v* -.jrHKr
3
Participants in the program of Tampa Chapter's recent donor
luncheon included: (Standing left to right), Nina Bernstein, Har-
riett Glasser, Judy Taunt, Nancy Mizrahi, Esther Carp, Dorothy
Skop, Lil Bregman, Anne Spector, Syd Fridkin. (Seated left to
right) Ellie Fishman, Bert Green, Sid Bleendes, Margery Stern,
and Freda Brod. Participants not in photographs are Ruth
Glickman and Marilyn LeVine.
7:30 p.m. The Kegional Advisor
for our chapter, Mrs. Billee Erdee
of Winter Haven, Florida, will in-
stall the officers for the coming
year. Mrs. Joanne Ronay, Chair-
man for Jewish Education, will
present a skit, assisted by the
daughters of Mrs. Marcia Nelson,
incoming President for 1986-87.
For further information, please
call Selethel Musy at 689-0092, or
Marcia Nelson at 681-1026.
RODEPH SHOLOM
Installation Of New Officers
Chairman of the Board, Louis
Morris; President, Bernice Wolf;
President-Elect, Martin Solomon;
Vice Presidents, David Linsky,
Michael Schwartz; Treasurer,
Richard Gordimer; Financial
Secretary, Jay Markowitz; Recor-
ding Secretary, Sherry
Friedlander; Corresponding
Secretary, Michael Linsky.
Installation of the elected of-
ficers will take place Friday even-
ing, June 6, as part of the Shabbat
Services.
Please Join Us For:
L'Chvod HaTalmidim
"In Honor of our.Children"
DATE: Friday, May 23
TIME: 8 p.m.
Final Awards and Presentations
to be given. June and July Bir-
thdays will be honored.
Oneg Shabbat sponsored'by the
Religious School Parents. This is a
simcha you won't want to miss!
mi i ....."" mm^f^mmwmm
w/photo/no kut Photo B
TAMPA BAY JEWISH
SINGLES COUNCIL
Single* Go To Services
Congregation B'nai Israel and
Rabbi Luski invite all Jewish
Singles to "Daven at the Kotel" at
this very special Shabbat service
Friday, May 16, celebrating
Israel's Independence Day. Con-
gregation B'nai Israel is located at
301 59 Street North, in St.
Petersburg. Services begin at 8
p.m. and an Oneg Shabbat for
Singles will follow. For more in-
formation contact Cathy Smith at
969-3441.
Memorial Day Weekend Picnic
Sun and Fun with Friends, new
and old, Sunday, May 25. There
will be plenty of food, drinks,
sports, games and fun. Children
are welcome. Meet us at Brooker
Creek Park at 10:30 a.m. Advance
reservations need to be made by
May 20, to the Tampa Jewish
Community Center, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, FL 33609: Attn:
Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Coun-
'cil. Fee: $4 members, $6 non-
members and $2.50 for children
over 5. Raindate: Monday, May
26.
Happy Hour
Our second Happy Hour this
month will be at Studebakers,
2516 Gulf to Bay Blvd. in Clear-
water beginning at 5 p.m. and
continuing into the evening on
Thursday, May 22. Please identify
yourself to the TBJS host or
hostess who is wearing a carna-
tion. They will be able to introduce
.you to other happy hour seekers.
Jewish 20's
Jewish 20's, a new part of the
Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Coun-
cil, announces our first social
event: a beach party on Dunedin
Beach, Sunday, June 1 from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. We're part of the
growing Jewish 20's singles com-
munity. What we'd like is you to
be part of us, part of our social
and cultural activities designed to
bring Tampa Bay's Jewish 20's
together.
Our goal is to create a large,
comfortable group of friends who
can share the social and cultural
opportunities the area has to
offer.
Plan to join us Sunday, June 1
tor our beach party on Dunedin
Beach from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Take part in volleyball, backgam
mon, smash ball, windsurfing,
trivial pursuit, frisbee tossing,
music or conversation.
We'll be at the first left after the
bridge; signs and balloons will be
posted.
Bring food and drink and join in
the festivities!
For more information, call Greg
(Hillsborough) 985-8914, Ed
(Pinellas) 596-3197, or Grant
(Pinellas) 441-2315.
HILLEL SCHOOL
Einstein Visits
Hillel students were visited by
Dr. .Albert Einstein, one of the
greatest scientific geniuses of all
time.
Accomplished actor and
playwright, David Fendrick,
brought his one character
nationally-toured show, to the
school for an afternoon of wizar-
dry which both taught and
fascinated, intrigued and
challenged students from the
fourth through eighth grades.
Using Einstein's own letters
and manuscripts, and drawing
from personal interviews of peo-
ple who knew the master, Dn
David Fendrick actually
transforms himself into Albfrt
Einstein before your eyes. He in-
volved the students in fascinating
and intimate conversations on
questions'bf Einstein's own life
and what he would think about
relevant issues today.
Dr. Fendrick appeared as part
of the Cultural Arts Program in-
itiated this year at Hillel. He also
discussed with students the life of
an artist-playwright, and
demonstrated how he becomes
another character through
makeup, voice and body changes,
and a thorough knowledge of the
person whose character he
assumes.
Fendrick's Einstein, in its
premiere year, was the first one-
man show selected for the Am-
phitheatre at the nationally
famous Chautauqua institute.
Hopefully, Dr. Fendrick will
return to Hillel next year with his
most recent commissioned work,
a one-character play on the
American patriot Thomas Paine,
commissioned by the Smithsonian
Institution in Washington, D.C.
!Bed Nuclei
4 N- .-
Chapel services available in Tampa.
Jonathan A. Fust
Owner
Funeral Director
4100-16th Street N.
81. PateraWrt. FL MTOS
Dedicated to serving
Our Jewish Community
+*
247-1772


i



Pagg 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, May 16, 1986
PRESCHOOL
EARLY BIRD
REGISTRATION EXTENDED
With the recently announced
plans to build four additional
classrooms at our North Branch
JCC Pre-School, early bird
registration has been extended to
June 1.
Consult the new Pre-School sup-
plementary brochure for details
regarding new class offerings.
YOUTH
BIRTHDAY BONANZA!
Be a guest at your own child's
party! Have your child's party at
the Center and have a ball! You
choose the theme, and the rest is
up to us. The party package in-
cludes: a party leader to lead the
activities; invitations filled-in and
mailed out; set-up, serve, and
clean-up; cake, ice cream, juice,
and party favors; and a terrific
two hour party all for only $4
per child! There is a miminum of
10 children, and reservations for
parties must be made at least two
weeks in advance of desired date.
Now our birthday parties are
reflecting the creativity of our
talented Youth Director! How
about an evening party in the
gym? How about an evening party
in the gym? Or, you might con-
sider a pool party! Use your im-
agination. We welcome
suggestions!
For the best party you'll ever
have, call Tami at the Center.
Reservations accepted on a first
come, first served basis and are
held on Sundays only.
The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece

38
ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE
WEEKEND
May 17th and 18th, 1986
In honor of Israel's Independence
let us celebrate together!
SATURDAY NIQHT GALA:
May 17th, 8:30 p.m.
A unique evening of exceptional entertainment
featuring a concert performed by Israeli song-
stress Ruthi Navon, followed by hors d'oeuvres,
cash bar, and dancing to the sounds of the
Orson Skorr Orchestra. Congregation Rodeph
Sholom, 2713 Bayshore Blvd.
SUNDAY FAMILY FESTIVAL:
May 18th, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
An afternoon filled with fun and excitement
for everyone. Be a part of the JCC's version
of Israel for a day. Experience all aspects of
Israel through all of your senses.
Saturday night tickets sold the the JCC, Hillel,
Congregations Kol Ami, Rodeph Sholom, Schaarai Zedek.
For further information contact the JCC at 872-4451
General Admission $10.00 per person in advance, $12.50 at the door
Friend $25.00 per Ticket Patron $50.00 per Ticket Sponsor $100.00 per Ticket.


May 18 Coauamnity Yea
Haatznuat Celebration
May 30 4-year old Pra-
School Graduation
Jan* 1 Pre-School Early
Bird Reparation ends
Jane 1 Wacky Olynipiea
June 7 FANTASIA (JCC
AUCTION)
June 7-8 Single Weekend
at Sheraton Sand Key
Jane 9-12 Saper Special
Saauner Sport* Spectacular
("Before Caatp" Caaap)
June IS Opening Caaap
Family Day
FANTASIA NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
GENERAL NEWS
CONTACT: MARY LATHE
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
(813)872-4461
FANTASIA 1986 AUCTION
ADVANCE RESERVATIONS ARE NOW DUE FOR
FANTASIA, THE 1986 AUCTION TO BENEFIT THE
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF TAMPA. THIS
FUNDRAISING EVENT, TO BE HELD ON SATURDAY,
JUNE 7 AT THE HYATT REGENCY TAMPA, WILL
SHOWCASE OVER 175 "GOODS AND SERVICE"
DONATIONS.
BEGINNING AT 7:30 P.M. GUESTS WILL PREVIEW
OVER 126 ITEMS ON DISPLAY IN THE SILENT
AUCTION, WHILE ENJOYING COCKTAILS AND HORS
D'OEUVRES. FOLLOWING DINNER. GUESTS WILL
PARTICIPATE IN A LIVE AUCTION OF OVER 30 UNIQUE
AND UNUSUAL GIFTS, WHICH WILL BE CONDUCTED
BY ZEN PASTERNACK.
FANTASIA WILL BE HOSTED IN THE HYATT GRAND
BALLROOM AND SEATING IS LIMITED TO 400
PERSONS. IN ADDITION TO THE NEARLY 300 GUESTS
OF OUR 27 HONORARY CHAIRMEN, THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER BOARD OF DIRECTORS HOPES
TO ATTRACT A CAPACITY CROWD TO TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF THE MANY ITEMS AVAILABLE AT
BARGAIN PRICES.
FANTASIA BROCHURES WILL ONLY BE ADVANCE-
MAILED TO THOSE GUESTS RESPONDING BY MAY 28,
1986.
JOIN US FOR THE FUN AND FABULOUS BARGAINS
OF FANTASIA ON JUNE 7!
SENIORS
THE SENIORS ARE
MOVING FOR THE SUMMER
All JCC Senior classes and pro-
grams will have a temporary new
home for the summer. Starting in
June and ending in August, we
will be offering all our activities at
the Jewish Towers, in order to
make room for the JCC's summer
camp. Many thanks to Juliet
Rodriguez and the Jewish Towers
staff for their assistance.
ENDOWMENT FUND
CONTRIBUTIONS
Building Fund:
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eatroff in
memory of Norman Eatroff
Renee Miller in memory of Ben
Miller
Leah Davidson
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Goldsmith
in honor of Sam Geltman's 70th
birthday
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Eatroff in
honor of Marcella Geltman
Senior Fund:
Renee Miller in memory of
Mickey Kasriel
Charles Johnson
Anonymous
Syd Fridkin
Helen Males
Rosamond Uretsky
Jewish Culture Fund:
Anonymous
Cap Scholarship Fund:
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gerber
lsr The JCC'8 Israel Independence Day Planning Committee meeting
to plan activities for the upcoming Yom Haatzmaut Celebration.
SUMMER CAMP '86 IS JUST AROUND THE
CORNER
Don't miss out Register NOW!


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E2USBSYZ3_862WCJ INGEST_TIME 2013-06-19T21:14:44Z PACKAGE AA00014305_00292
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES