The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00289

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
# Jewish Floridian
Off Tampa
Volume 8 Number 8
Tamp, Florida Friday, April 4, 1986
fm*l
Price 35 Cent*
f
Signature Does It
Waldheim Incriminates Himself
Dry land sailors preparing for the Auction (from left) Johanna
Barat, Ways and Means chairman, Jewish Community Center
Board of Directors, Laurie Hanan, Fantasia chairman, and
Ann Levi, donor.
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The World Jewish Congress
has provided what they
referred to as a "surprise
witness" in the Kurt
Waldheim affair
Waldheim, himself. The
WJC presented captured
Nazi documents obtained
from the National Archives
in Washington which
Waldheim himself had sign-
ed in the capacity of senior
intelligence officer repor-
ting directly to the General
Staff of Army C, Group E
("Heeresgruppe E"), the oc-
cupying force in Yugoslavia
during World War II.
It was headed by Gen. Alex-
ander Loehr who was extradited
to Yugoslavia after the war and
executed in 1947 for war crimes.
These disclosures appear to
refute Waldheim's claim he was
only an interpreter for the
Wehrmacht in Yugoslavia. The
evidence produced was discovered
and researched by Prof. Robert
Herzstein of the University of
South Carolina, who recently
served as an expert witness for
the U.S. Department of Justice.
THE PHOTOGRAPHIC
documents released show that
Waldheim was a senior in-
telligence officer. The tasks to
which he was assigned, according
to Herzstein, went beyond respon-
sibility for interrogating prisoners
of war and included capturing
civilians aged 14 and above from
whom information "was extracted
by the most brutal methods of
torture."
In the documents he signed,
Waldheim reports on what were
called "cleansing" (Sauberung)
operations in Bosnia, Yugoslavia,
in 1942, "cleansing" being the
Nazi term for mass murders. The
documents refer to the killing of
about 5,000 "partisans" with a
loss to the Germans of 71 dead.
Other captured secret Nazi
documents signed by Waldheim
refer to Vernehmung, a
euphemism for interrogation
under torture. They also indicate
Fantastic Fantasia ^dNamed Head w New Party
A relaxing sail on beautiful
Tampa Bay, a weekend in a lux-
urious condo overlooking the Gulf
uf Mexico, a babysitter, or a facial,
any or all of these may be yours at
Fantasia, June 7.
"Plans are underway for the Se-
cond Annual Auction, Fantasia,
sponsored by the Tampa Jewish
Community Center, which will be
held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel
in early June," said Mary Lathe,
Director of Special Events for the
JCC.
The Jewish Community Center
will be celebrating its 80th an-
niversary this year and this is the
first in a series of planned events.
At this time the Center serves 700
family members and will continue
to grow and serve the greater
Tampa Jewish community of over
15,000 people.
The proceeds from this auction
will go towards playground equip-
ment, a new van, and support for
the many cultural, athletic, and
educational programs sponsored
by this community center.
Lathe recently joined the staff
of the JCC after 15 years with the
Marriott Hotel chain where she
helped plan special events for cor-
porate clients, and even set up a
Kosher kitchen in the Cleveland
hotel. She has an eye for creative
planning and hopes to interest
many new people in the Jewish
Community Center with these
special programs. Besides the auc-
tion on June 7, plans are afoot for
a golf tournament, and a profes-
sional directory.
Lathe said, "Laurie Hanan will
be the 1986 Fantasia chairman
and Louis Morris has agreed to be
the acquisitions chairman. We will
have over 250 items for the auc-
tion and eight blitz days have been
set aside by the committee for ap-
proaching the community. We are
looking forward to having many
creative and unique ideas for your
pleasure that evening."
Other volunteers for the Auc-
tion committee are acquisitions,
Esther Carp and Bert Green;
brochure. Dale Solomon, chair-
man, Debbie Gitomer, and Louise
Eatroff; auction night committee,
Johanna Barat, chairman, Susan
Okun, Karen Berger, Carole
Ewen, and Ceida Houseman;
honorary table chairmen Jerilyn
Goldsmith, and Jane Spector with
Mr. and Mrs. Jay Markowitz, Mr.
and Mrs. Zennith Pasternak, Mr.
and Mrs. Les Barnett, Dr. and
Mrs. Steven Gitomer, Mr. and
Mrs. Roger Mock, Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Levine, Mr. and Mrs. Al
Mizrahi, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff David-
son, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Tobin,
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Greenberg,
Mr.and Mrs. Barry Karpay, Dr.
and Mrs. Steven Field, Mr. and
Mrs. Barry Meyerson, and Dr.
and Mrs. Stuart Goldsmith serv-
ing as table captains.
The cost for the evening with
hor d'ouevres and dinner will be
$30 per person. For more infor-
mation and to make donations
please call Mary Lathe, 872-4451.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Yosef Lapid, a senior editor of the
daily Maariv, was named Secretary General of the newly-formed.
Liberal Center Party last week. He was appointed by the party's
unofficial leadership Mayor Shlomo Lehat of Tel Aviv, Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the World Zionist Organization and Jewish
Agency Executives, and Yitzhak Berman, a former Speaker of
the Knesset.
The Liberal Center Party was founded several months ago by
disaffecting members of the Liberal Party wing of Likud. It will
hold internal elections soon.
Lapid retired last year after a five-year term as Director
General of the Israel Broadcasting Authority, which runs the
country's radio and television. He has long been a senior staffer
at Maariv, where he wrote food and travel columns.
Politically he is considered to the right of center. On the ques-
tion of the future of the administered territories, he said the
Liberal Center platform wants "what most Israelis want: a solu-
tion that avoids the twin dangers of a binational state and a
security risk."
ZOA Launches Campaign
Against Saudi Arms Sale
Waldheim participated in one of
the worst atrocities of the Nazis in
the Balkans, the Kozara
massacres of 1942 in which 1,626
partisans were killed, nearly 9,000
captured, and 431 persons shot to
death as reprisals. Waldheim's
name appears on a list of 30
honoring Nazi troops for the "an-
nihilation of the enemy," a
reference to the Kozara
massacres.
HERZSTEIN AND Eli Rosen-
baum, WJC legal counsel, com-
mented on the singularity of a
25-year-old lieutenant in charge of
such major operations.
The documents detail the
organizational structure for
Waldheim's command, including
his duties and responsibilities.
Waldheim was one of two, and
subsequently sole, chief of the in-
telligence division within unit
"03," whose responsibility was
the direct briefing to the General
Staff of the Army group. The
documents indicate that
Waldheim was solely in charge of
"prisoner interrogation" of
Greek, Armenian, British, French
and Bulgarian nationals.
"In all my experience as a
federal prosecutor," said Rosen-
baum, "rarely, if ever, have I seen
documents of such devastating
nature as those made available to-
day." Elan Steinberg, executive
director of the WJC, said that
"the Waldheim affair ... is now
ready to be turned over to official
agencies responsible for the in-
vestigation of Nazi war
criminals."
THE WJC sent a letter to U.S.
Attorney General Edwin Meese
III asking that Waldheim's name
be placed as soon as possible on
the watch-list of the U.S. Im-
migration and Naturalization Ser-
vice. "We stand ready to make
available to the Justice Depart-
ment all our documents,"
Steinberg said.
Rosenbaum, asked by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency why
the Jewish communities of Greece
and Yugoslavia did not recognize
Waldheim's name as a Nazi
responsible for atrocities, said
that it was not possible that an
operative of such high stature
would be known to the general
populace.
TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION/
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
CAMPAIGN UPDATE
1986 Goal........................$1,300,000
To Date..........................$ 985,000
Increase...............................20%
NEW YORK, N.Y. ZOA
President Alleck A. Resnick
has announced that the Zionist
Organization of America will
conduct a grass roots cam-
paign in opposition to new
Saudi Arms sales proposals by
the U.S. Administration.
Resnick stated bluntly that the
Saudis "don't need" and
"don't deserve" the proposed
U.S. weaponry, which includes
the hand-held "Stinger"
missile, described as an ideal
weapon for terrorists.
Said Resnick, "It is an in-
conceivable premise to believe
that any sales of sophisticated
weaponry scheduled for
delivery in 1989 and into the
1990's can secure Saudi
Arabia from the threat it
perceives in 1986. Such
however, will add to an
already dangerous Saudi war
arsenal and can further in-
crease Saudi hostility to peace
with Israel.
Referring to repeated Saudi
requests for more and more
sophisticated weaponry,
Resnick cautioned the U.S.
Administration against fueling
a spiraling and uncontrollable
arms buildup amongst
unstable and totalitarian
states in the Middle East.
"The Saudis already possess
200 combat aircraft to Iran's
70's and Arab armies now can
field more tanks than all of
America's NATO allies com-
bined. Said Resnick, "It is time
to stop feeding the Kingdom's
insatiable thirst for in-
struments of war until that
country can demonstrate that
it's willing to use its resources
for peace in all of the Middle
East."


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, April 4, 1986

I
8

Alice's Adventure. Off to the Outback, is Alice Cohen,
daughter of Dr. Lawrence and Betty Cohen. She'll be joining
one of the 16 phases of Operation Raleigh, an international ex-
pedition program initiated by Prince Charles. The four-year pro-
gram will eventually provide community service and scientific
research around the world, similar to the Peace Corps. Alice
leaves in early May for her assignment in Australia; her work will
range from establishing water systems to studying aborigine rock
art to preparing an environmental impact study of wild horses
and buffalo.
Alice, who is a junior at the University of the South in Swanee,
Tenn., is now working two jobs to raise funds for her expedition.
She is seeking sponsors to assist her with some of her expenses in
exchange for her time, research and service. If you're interested
in learning more about Operation Raleigh and helping Alice, you
may call her c/o EPC, 272-5960.
Curtain calls. Best wishes to Goldie and Ryan MacDonald,
children of Lynn and Mel MacDonald, who will soon be appear-
ing in the old favorite, Bye Bye Birdie. Goldie is 14 years old and
in the 8th grade at Coleman Junior High. Ryan is 11 and in the
6th grade at Roland Park Elementary. The play will be presented
by Class Act Productions, Inc., May 7-11 at the Falk Theater. For
ticket information, call Susan at 961-3347.
Author, Author. The Suncoast Young Author's Conference
was held March 7 at USF. To attend the daylong workshop that
included pupils from Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas counties,
the writers had to have written a book. At the conference, they
shared their work with their peers and got some tips to help make
their next books even better. We expect to read great things
from:
Rachel Specter, daughter of randi and Steve Specter,
kindergartner at Carrollwood Elementary and author of "A Bear
Book." Eric Kominsky, son of Jill and Jack Kominsky,
kindergartner at Claywell Elementary and author of "The Old
Tree." Matthew Levine. son of Eileen and Jack he vine, 1st
grader at Carrollwood Elementary and the author of "A Very
Nice Monster." Stephanie Katz. daughter of Wendy and Erwin
Katz, fifth-grader at Carrollwood Elementary and author of
"Magic Toys."
Science Fair winners were selected from over 1,000 entrants
from kindergarten through 12th grade. We are proud of all the
finalists, including:
Jay Michaelaon, son of Lorna and Stanley Michaelson, who
actually won two awards. A 1st place ribbon in the engineering
category senior division and a $100 bond from the Florida
Engineering Society for the Oustanding Engineering Award.
Jay's project is entitled "Effect of Light Filtering Techniques on
the Voltage Output of a Photovoltaic Cell." He now goes to Pen-
sacola to compete in the State Science Fair.
Ross Specter, son of Randi and Steve Specter, a 4th grader at
Carrollwood Elementary won Outstanding in the Physical
Science Matter category for his project on "Fermentation: C02
Production from Four Different Juices."
Hal Herzog, son of Herb and Rachelle Herzog, a 4th grader at
Claywell Elementary won First Place (superior) in the Physical
Science Matter category for his project called "How do you
Spell Relief?" Hal conducted 10 tests on four different antacid
tablets and determined TUMS to be most effective.
Daniel Lancz, son of Sharon and Jerry Lancz, 6th grader at
Lockhart Elementary won a first place trophy in the Microbiology
category for his project entitled: "When Should You Clean Your
Finger Machine?" Daniel tested 10 objects and discovered the
sink and hand dryer in the men's room contain the most bacteria.
Congratulations to all our scientists!
Masol tov to Jim Shimberg on receiving the Humanitarian
Award of the Judeo-Christian Clinic. Another great honor for a
great guy!
Welcome to Beth Schwartz. A year-and-a-half ago, Beth left
Lansing, Mich, for Tampa. (She grew up in Tallahassee and decid-
ed it was time to get back to Florida.) She is presently teaching
learning disabled and emotionally handicapped children at Lake
Myrtle Elementary in Pasco County. Beth, age 28, lives near USF
and loves to exercise, cook and garden. We're glad to have you
here.
Hey gang, send your news and nachas to "Our Gang," c/o The
Jewish Floridian, 2808 Horatio St., Tampa, FL 33609.
Ihyw
-WMMaawfM
*Wfl*NMfe.
MftfttttrtHtMi-
"COMMUNAL SEDAR SERVICE**
& DINNER
Peetimty:
Egg In Salt Water; Gef lite Fish; Matzo Ball
Soup; One-Half Baked Chicken with Tzimmas
and Green Beans; Matzo Pudding; Fruit Compote; Matzos,
Beverage & Kosher Wine.
a For Reservations Call:
^okcA*.<*>^ irf* .* (813)367-4536
*A*V**Vt* ****... Mrs. Brett Kublin
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Wedding
HASKINSKUBLIN
Cynthia Gayle Haskins,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Burt
Haskins, and Brett Lawrence
Kublin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin
Kublin, North Miami Beach, were
married March 22, at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom. Rabbi Ken-
neth Berger and Cantor William
Hauben officiated.
The reception was held at the
Tampa Airport Marriott.
Grandparents of the bride are
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Haskins,
Macon, Georgia. Grandparents of
the groom are Mr. and Mrs.
George Goer, North Miami Beach;
and Mrs. Pearl Lerman.
The bride's sister, Jodi Haskins,
was maid of honor; the
bridesmaids were Terri Haskins,
Macon, Georgia; Jennifer Huston,
Jacksonville; Lynn McGugan,
Jacksonville; Nancy Turkel, Tam-
pa; and Kerry Ward, Davie,
Florida.
The groom's father. Alvin
Kublin. was best man, and the
ushers were Richard Haskins,
Macon, Georgia; Michael Kublin,
Sunrise, Florida; Doug Fields,
Miami Springs; Luke Unglaub,
Tallahassee; and Scott Jones.
The Rehearsal Dinner was given
by the groom's parents at the
Tower Club. A Bridesmaid's lun-
cheon was given at The Claiborne
Restaurant by Jodi Haskins and
Nancy Turkel. A Saturday brunch
was given by friends at The Rusty
Pelican and a Sunday brunch was
given by family at the Guest
Quarters. Attending the wedding
were friends and relatives from
New York, Alabama, and Georgia.
Cynthia is a sales representative
for Cosmair, Inc. Brett is general
manager of Simco Recycling, Inc.
After a honeymoon trip to Can-
cun, Cozumel, and Acapulco, Mex-
ico, the couple will live in North
Miami Beach.
Engagement
GOTTFKIUDSLONIM
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob L. Gottfried
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Barrie Leslie, to Dr.
Charles Bard Slonim, Son of Mrs.
Kathe Slonim and Dr. Arnold
Slonim, Ohio.
A June 14, 1986 wedding is
planned at Congregation Schaarai
Zedek.
The Tampa Jewish Federation Women's Division recently hosted
a breakfast for the residents of the Jewish Towers and Mary
Walker Apartments. The breakfast was on behalf of the 1986 Tam-
pa Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal Campaign. Pic-
tured are: (left to right) Rhoda Davis, Director, Women's Divi-
sion; Jolene Shor, President, Women's Division; Bert Green,
Breakfast Chairwoman; Sid Bleendes, committee member; and
Jerome Gleekel, keynote speaker.
if
Irving Garber (pictured left), a resident of the Jewish Towers is
leading the residents in the salute to the Jlag; chairwoman Bert
Green was mistress of ceremonies during the Breakfast hosted by
the Tampa Jewish Federation Women' Division.

f
..iiiiii *
Meet the kitchen committee that served the elegant breakfast to the
residents of the Jewish Towers and Mary Walker Apartments at
the recent Federation/UJA sponsored event: (left to right): Helen
Males, Rosamond Uretsky, Ann Rosen, Gert Kern, Ruth Levine,
Syd Fridkin, Florence Gordon, Ann Spector. The Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division extends its deep appreciation to all
who helped make the day a success.
IN THE COOL 4 SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNT A INS
DELICIOUS JEWISH-AMERICAN CUISINE
SWIMMING POOL* WHIRLPOOL/ 29 *62
GOLF e TENNIS MATING / ",~J
e FISHING ENTERTAINMENT/ 0M. occ. including
PLANNER ACTIVITIES / Brt.kf.tt. Lunch end Dinner.
For Brochure & Rates Call Miami Office
(90S) 534-8356 or write
250 Palm Ave., Palm latand, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Resort Hotel on Beautiful Lake Osceola
HENDERSONVILLE, North Cnrollna 28739
Let The
Tampa Airport Marriott
CaterTb
'Your Every Need.
Our professional staff, attentive service and gracious
accommodations will make a success of your Wedding,
Bar Mitzvah, Banquet, Business Meeting or Reunion.
We also provide outside catering services. See our Catering
Department for information or please call 879-5151.
TAMPA
AIRPORT,
Marriott


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Sunday, March 28, Mr. Aronin addressed
over 60 people from the Young Adult Division
of the Tampa Jewish Federation at the Lin-
coln Hotel. He spoke about demographics and
relayed many Yiddish stories to illustrate
Jewish immigrant life in America. (From left)
Susan Swift, Mike Schwartz, Karen
Schulman, Iz Aronon, Ree Aronon, Gail
Titen, and Andy Titen.
Socializing before the Yad event were (from
left) Lori Brown, Fred Brown, Ellyne Nordl-
inger, Rick Myers,
Alper.
Cary Gould, and Jeff
Women's Division Reaches
$250,000 For 1986 Campaign
"LET'S TAKE A TOUR
OF TAMPA!"
A message from Jolene Shor,
President of the Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division
"I would like to take you on a
tour so that you may see what is
happening in our community. It's
easy to ride through downtown
Tampa and be proud of the pro-
gress being made. New buildings,
one more beautiful than the other
a few blocks across the bridge
to Harbour Island easy living,
shopping in the marketplace, lux-
urious lodging in the hotel, plea-
sant working conditions, and a
marina .all at your fingertips.
Turn around and head north and
approach the performing arts
center a facility which promises
to be one of the finest centers for
artistic performances of music,
theater and dance in the south.
Yes, Tampa is a city we can take
pride in. As the slogan says
"America's Next Great City." We
Are A Part Of This Growth, But
What Does It Mean?
Do we take the same amount of
pride in the growth and ac-
complishments of our Jewish com-
munity? For once let's not dwell
on what we haven't done or can't
do, but on what we are doing
let's start at home The
Federation!
Women's Division raised 28 per-
cent of the Federation campaign
last year $278,000 and has
set a goal of $300,000 this year. I
am happy to announce that to date
Women's Division has raised
$250,000 towards that goal!
Alice Rosenthal and Aida
Weissman, Co-Chairwomen of the
1986 Women's Campaign have
been working diligently with their
cabinet to make sure the goal is
reached. We are expanding our
horizons and will shortly unveil
our plans for an endowment pro-
gram to benefit the Women's
Division. Working together with
TOP this endeavor is an example
of one agency lending its exper-
tise to another to strengthen our
Federation. By planning now and
assessing our needs, we are show-
ing our foresight and our commit-
ment to the future of our
community.
YLD, Young Leadership
Development is a group of young
adults who are participating in an
intensive educational experience
which will increase their own
knowledge of the Jewish com-
munity and their desire to become
more involved in the advancement
and decision making process of
that community. From YLD will"
spring our future leaders.
The Jewish Community Center
serves over 700 members. They
operate on a budget of $812,000 to
which our Federation allocates
$122,000 or 17 percent. Granted
there have been and will be pro-
gram and staff cut backs, but we
have a vital and busy JCC. The
greatest need right now is to ser-
vice our teens. A full time teen
worker has been hired who will
turn her attention to the youth of
the center. If the President of the
JCC could have one wish granted,
it would be to build a facility on
the north end of town in addition
to maintaining a center to service
residents of the south side of Tam-
pa. A new addition to the JCC
staff is our community Schliach
who is working to increase Jewish
and Israeli programming within
the Center's activities.
Look at Tampa Jewish Family
Services. This agency offers not
only counseling for marital dif-
ficulties, family problems,
behavioral and school problems,
adults and adolescents under
stress, and persons with financial
and employment difficulties, but
also presents programs to
enhance and enrich the basic
structure of Jewish family life.
Over 100 students attend the
Hillel Day School whose campus is
on the grounds of the JCC. The
inter-relationship between our
agencies is highly evident in the
sharing of facilities between Hillel
and the Center and furthermore
by the counseling service provided
to Hillel Students by the Jewish
Family Services agency. This
spirit of cooperation is another
reason to be proud.
I could go on and on and show
you the positive things your
dollars are accomplishing. The
High School In Israel Program.
Tampa Bay Jewish Singles, Hillel
at USF, UT-HCC, The Jewish
Floridian. River Garden and
Menorah Manor, homes for the
aged, our own Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Network,
Young Adult Division of the
Federation, etc. you have
planted the roots please make
sure that the tree doesn't die!
Every year we must water it a lit-
tle more and see those branches
bloom.
Don't separate yourself from
the active community. To be part
of a community, to shape it and
strengthen it, is the most urgent,
the most vital obligation facing
the Jewish individual today.
I wanted you to see Tampa
now I want you to take a look at
the "C" in community. The "C"
stands for Commitment Caring
and for the fact that we are
always Colinted as Concerned
members of the Tampa Jewish
Community.
Your gift in your name, makes
the services possible. Your gift,
like your time and your energy, is
an expression of your personal
commitment to the survival of the
Jewish people.
If you have not made your com-
mitment to the 1986 Tampa
Jewish Federation/United Jewish
Appeal Campaign, please call the
Federation office, 876-1618 To-
day. If you had made the decision
not to make a gift this year
please won't you reconsider? We
desperately need your help to
remedy the problems which face
Jews here and around the world.
You Can Make A Difference!
(Remember you have until
December, 1986 to pay it and can
pay in monthly, semi-annually, or
annual installments)."
Tay-Sachs Testing
During the month of April, the
Tampa Section of the National
Council of Jewish Women and the
Pediatric Laboratories of the
University of south Florida
Medical School will offer free
blood tests for Tay-Sachs Disease
to Jewish women and men. Call
974-2356 for an appointment. No
physician referral is required.
For further information call Jan
Boas at 963-5293.
'"Jewish Floridian
Of Tampa
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Second Claaa PoeUge Paid at Miami. Kb. USPS 471-910 ISSN 8750-50.'.;)
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jn.i-1 su* h a suhH(-riptnn bnuH "** iMtlft In.- I.-wish KtnrtaVaa <>r I'hi- t-VaVr.il MM
24 2 ADAR 5746
Number 8-"
Friday, April 4,1986
Volume 8
Young Jewish Physician...
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I'm 26,5'11", 150 lbs., and enjoy tennis,
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, April 4, 1986
Yamit Settlers Still Recall Evacuation With Bitterness
By SIMON GRIVER
London Chronicle Syndicate
The 2,000 Israeli families
who were evacuated from
the Sinai in April, 1982 were
quickly forgotten. It was on-
ly six weeks later that the
Israel Defense Forces em-
barked upon Operation
Peace for Galilee, and conse-
quently all eyes shifted their
gaze from the south and
were focused firmly on the
north.
The national trauma caused by
the abandonment of Yamit and
the other Sinai settlements was
soon eclipsed by the bloody hor-
rors of Lebanon. However, for the
families who paid the price of evic-
tion for the sake of the Camp
David accords and peace with
Egypt, the memories of lives left
in tatters still looms large.
WITH DEGREES of success
and failure, the Sinai settlers have
built new lives elsewhere, but all
retain deep-rooted recollections oi
bitterness, frustration and
anguish, and all recall the sands of
the Sinai with romanticized tales
that smack of mourners speaking
of a fondly missed relative.
To be sure, the Sinai was en-
dowed with idyllic charms. But
the former residents of the land
returned to Egypt have elevated
their former homes, conjuring up
images of the Garden of Eden
amidst the gently shifting sands.
There were more than 1,000
families who lived in Ophira near
Sharm el-Sheikh and other
smaller settlements along the Red
Sea coast. Yet it was the 600
families who lived in Yamit, in the
Rafiah Salient on the Mediterra-
nean coast south of the Gaza
Strip, and the 400 families who in-
habited the surrounding 14 set-
tlements, who captured most of
the headlines and came to sym-
bolize the sacrifice that Israel had
made for peace.
IN PART, the relinquishing of
Yamit was left deeply engraved in
the Israeli psyche because the
rightwing "Stop the Withdrawal"
movement transported down
thousands of supporters and bar-
ricaded them in the town. But,
more significantly, the settlers in
the Yamit area embodied the
traditions of the Zionist pioneer-
ing spirit.
Most were Labor Party sup-
porters and had been promised by
the Labor-led government of the
early 1970s that their corner of
the Sinai would never be return-
ed, even if a peace treaty was one
day signed with Egypt. In the
event, the more hawkish
Menachem Begin was prepared to
return their land.
"The Yamit settlers felt as if
they had been stabbed in the back
by the Israeli government," ex-
plains David Nahmias, who until
1982 was director of the southern
region of the Jewish Agency's set-
tlement department. "I think
almost all of them have now got
over the trauma, but most remain
bitter and most are not satisfied
with their new lives."
Many become hostile when the
subject is merely mentioned and
several former Yamit settlers
stated in vehement language that
they do not grant interviews to
journalists. According to them,
journalists have helped to ruin
their lives through their probing
and prying and were currently
engaged in ruining the country.
'j "S PERSONAL hatred
t iids the media probably stems
from die fact that $350 million
w3 dished out in compensation to
the 2,000 families who left Sinai in
1982, and Israeli investigative
journalists went on the rampage
exposing supposed excesses and
abuses in the money awarded.
"Much of the media coverage jf
A
Resitting evacuation in Yamit, settler* use
wooden poles and tires in rooftop fighting sands of the Sinai with romanticized tales
against IDF soldiers ordered to remove them that smack of mourners speaking of a fondly
on April 1,198t. Today, all of them 'recall the missed relative.'
'people get angry, but if you watch them
you will see how optimistic they are .. .'
the compensation was unfair and
exaggerated," says Nahmias.
"The money replaced homes,
fields, businesses and stores, but
not the endeavor and dreams that
had gone into them.
"The compensation was fair,
but it should not have been given
in such large lump sums. People
suddenly felt they were rich and
wasted their money on expensive
holidays abroad and on videos and
Volvos. They started houses that
were bigger than they could af-
ford. Many ran out of money
before they could replace what
they had left behind, and others
invested unwisely, losing money
when the bank shares collapsed."
Nahmias estimates that 40 per-
cent of those who lived in the
Yamit region have stayed in the
area, moving to settlements in the
neighboring Besor and Katif
regions. A further 40 percent
have moved to settlements all
over Israel, while the remainder
have moved to cities around the
country, almost all of them having
lived in Yamit itself.
THERE IS virtually unanimous
scorn among the former Sinai
residents for the concept of peace
with Egypt. "You call this
peace?" asks Yahudit Sahflan,
formerly editor of the Yamit
newspaper, Yamiton, and now
one of 35 families from Yamit on
Moshav Dekel, some ten miles in-
land from their old homes, close to
the new border with Egypt. "Our
moshav is fenced in, border
patrols are always passing by, our
children are scared and we do not
trust the Egyptians."
Shaflan's husband, Yitzhak,
worked as an irrigation engineer
in Yamit. On Dekel, he has his
own land and greenhouses and
grows melons, eggplants and
vegetables for export during the
winter to Europe.
"With the exception of last
year," says Yehudit Shaflan, "we
earned a good living. We remain
idealists, despite the poor way we
have been treated. The govern-
ment has not come up with the
funds it promised to develop the
area. The parks and cultural
facilities, banks and supermarkets
have not been built. Everybody
wants to develop the Galilee now
and we are low down on the list of
priorities."
SHAFLAN, like all the former
Yamit settlers, is not prepared to
reveal how much money the fami-
ly received. She describes their
compensation as fair, though adds
that no amount of money can fully
make up for their shattered
dreams, and she complains that
she has not been able to find full-
time employment as a journalist.
If the Shaflans have adhered to
the pioneering spirit, others have
not had the same energy. David
Karni moved down to Yamit in
1978 from Jerusalem with his
wife, Bertha. "I was offered a job
down there," he recalls, "and at
that time the notion of being
pioneers was attractive. But in
1982 we decided we were too old
to start all over again and so we
came back to Jerusalem."
Kami found work at the
Ministry of Housing and claims
that his compensation was just
enough to buy a similar size flat in
an outer suburb of Jerusalem. He
patronizingly explains why the
Camp David accords are doomed
to failure.
"I came to the Middle East from
Poland 45 years ago," he says, "so
after all this time in the region, I
understand the Arabs. You cannot
trust the Arabs. Some individuals
are pleasant and moderate, but
collectively you cannot trust
them, and you cannot trust their
political leadership. If big men like
the philosopher Martin Buber
talked to the Arabs and failed,
what chance do the rest of us
have?"
AN ALMOST lone voice in this
wilderness of mistrust comes from
the Keidar family. Ovadia and
Roni Keidar moved to Netiv
Ha'asara in Sinai in 1973 and
moved again to the new Netiv
Ha'asara at the northern tip of the
Gaza Strip in 1982. Of 57 families
on the original moshav, only 36
families moved to the new
settlement.
Ovadia Keidar, who came to
Israel from Egypt in 1956, was
appointed, agricultural attach-
the Israeli Embassy in Egypt and
now lives in Cairo with his
London-born wife, Roni, and their
five children. "At first we were
bitterly opposed to Camp David,"
Roni recalls. "Like all the peo]
'Some people got
greedy and
over-extended
themselves. ..'
in the Yamit region, we thought
peace didn't stand a chance. But
now that we've met so many
Egyptians and seen how genuine
and sincere they are about peace,
we've changed our minds."
"I think that most of the people
here at Netiv Ha'asara get
misrepresented by the press," she
observes. "By asking about the
past, people get angry and mor-
bid, but if you watch those people
going about their everyday lives,
you will see how optimistic, en-
thusiastic and idealistic they re-
main, despite the painful events of
history."
THE KEIDARS were satisfied
with their compensation, though
Roni Keidar complains that the
money was distributed in an
unhealthy way. "All that money
was dumped in our laps," she
remarks, "but .we had had no
training in managing large
finances like that
"Some people got greedy and
over-extended themselves. The
whole region is dotted with the
shells of large homes that settlers
do not have the money to
complete."
While many settlers drifted into
financial difficulties, for others
employment has been the major
problem. Chaim and Sarah Feifel
owned the general store in Yamit.
They were part of a group of 25
families from America who
emigrated to Israel together in
1975 to become Yamit's founding
families. Of those 25 families, only
three families remain in Israel.
The Feifels now live in Zichron
Ya'akov, near Haifa. "We came to
live in Israel, not specifically in
Yamit," asserts Chaim Feifel. The
compensation we received was
enough to buy a good house, but
not enough to purchase a new
store.
"By training I am a rehabilita-
tion counselor. I have a Master's
degree in rehabilitation counsel-
ing, but because I am over 50 and
was out of my profession for so
long, I have no chance of getting a
fulfilling job. I get by with odd
teaching jobs."
DESPITE THE complaints, the
former Sinai settlers have had to
face up to new realities. It is to
their credit that, beneath the
anger, bitterness and frustration
they feel towards the Israeli
government and towards Egypt,
there remains the energy and
drive to build new lives.
They have achieved this with
varying degrees of success, and
the ultimate success is that all
have resisted the temptation to
curl up indifferently into a corner.
They are annoyed, but at least
they have not become apathetic.
Time will tell whether Camp
David was worth it.


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
JNF Restores Archaeological Sites In Israel
The Jewish National Fund,
responsible for afforestation and
land reclamation in Israel, has
recently launched an ambitious
program to restore many of the
countless archaeological sites in
the Jewish state.
Unlike many countries where
archaeology is a minority pursuit,
thousands of Israelis flock to ad-
mire their historical heritage at
every possible opportunity. Eli
Shenhav, JNF's chief ar-
chaeologist, attributes the Israeli
love for archaeology to the fact
that the Jewish people spent cen-
turies exiled form their ancestral
homeland. "We lived with the
stories of the Bible and the
historical sites in which they took
place. Now we are back in Israel
and we naturally seize every
chance to rediscover our roots.
Those years in exile have sharpen-
ed our archaeological appetites,"
Shenhav states.
Unfortunately, those appetites
cannot always be so easily
satisfied, since many of the
fascinating discoveries in Israel
are publicly inaccessible. To im-
prove the situation, JNF embark-
ed on a program that includes con-
structing access roads, parking
lots, picnic areas and public
bathrooms. The organization has
also helped to restore the ar-
chaeological sites themselves, to
encourage local inhabitants and
tourists to reach some of the
lesser-known remnants of the
Jewish heritage.
Shenhav left his research in Tel
Aviv University's Department of
Archaeology four years ago to join
JNF and start its archaeological
restoration program. Work is
soon to commence on one of his
pet projects at Hanot, southwest
of Jerusalem. In the first stage, a
former Roman inn and garrison
will be restored with a parking lot
and public amenities to be con-
structed nearby. Other relics in
the vicinity dating to the Roman
era include an oil press and a
mosaic floor belonging to a former
Byzantine church, which will also
be subsequently restored.
Shenhav hopes that these sites
will prove as popular with visitors
to Jerusalem as the Roman
aqueduct and the Bar Kochba for-
tress, restored in Park Canada.
Further south is the town of
Sussya, where JNF is in the pro-
cess of excavating a synagogue
from the Byzantine period, dated
about the sixth century. This area
is often referred to in the Bible as
Carmel and is consistently confus-
ed with Mount Carmel in the
North, overlooking Haifa. At
Sussya, Shenhav intends to
reconstruct an entire village from
the sixth century. Visitors to the
site will be able to dress in period
costumes so that they can sample
their ancestral lifestyles.
v
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The Regency Vi mile South of Mission Bell
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Listen to Radio WFLA and WPDS for Specials.
In the North, JNF is also engag-
ed in a number of projects involv-
ing archaeological sites. On the
northeast shore of the Sea of
Galilee, Shenhav reports that
several options are being
surveyed for restoring a Crusader
fortress, which will be intergrated
with camping, sailing and picnic
facilities. Another Crusader for-
tress in Safad will also be
renovated in the near future.
At Park Ashkelon, which forms
a forest belt encircling the
southern part of the city, a diverse
range of archaelogical treasures
have been unearthed. These in-
clude sites from the Byzantine,
Koman and Crusader periods. In
Ashdod, a port city 20 miles south
of Tel Aviv, a similar forest belt is
being planted and historical sites
are being considered for
development.
In the Judean Desert, JNF is
helping to make improvements at
Herodion, which several thousand
years ago served as King Herod's
winter palace. Work is currently
underway on the ramparts, and a
monorail will eventually be con-
structed to transport visitors
around the circular structure.
Eli Shenhav's only regret its
that he must contend with budget
considerations in the process of
restoring Israel's archaeological
treasures. "There are literally
hundreds of sites waiting to be
restored," he asserts. "The
possibilities are endless. I'm
tremendously exicited by the
potential, and I'm sure the visitors
to our sites will be just as excited
by what they see."
Music Published
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
"Anthology of Hasidic Music," in-
corporating 104 melodies some of
which have never appeared in
print, has been published by the
Jewish Music Research Center of
the Hebrew University. The an-
thology, which is based on the
musical legacy of the late Ehmjo
Vinaver and edited by Dr. Eliahu
Schleifer, is meant to be used by
both scholars and performers.
'Menorah Mavens' Go For The Gold
The Residents of Menorah
Manor are really going out of their
way to stay physically fit and ac-
tive these days, as five residents
participated in the Spectrum
O'Fun, 1986 Olympics.
The Spectrum O'Fun games
were held on Wednesday, March
19 and was sponsored by the
Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment of the City of Clearwater.
The Residents of Menorah Manor,
who named themselves the
"Menorah Mavens" practiced for
days to sharpen their skills for the
big event.
When the time arrived to go,
Herman Alper, Irene Fiedler,
David Kline, Win Lowther and
Joe Schwartz, led by their coaches
Renee Krosner, director of ac-
tivities and Ray Teasdale, activity
coordinator, all were dressed in
matching blue and white shirts
proudly displaying their team
name. As they were leaving, the
"Mavens" indications to everyone
was that of "thumbs up."
The events of the day included
ring tossing, bowling, Frisbee
throwing, baketball throwing,
olf, bean bag tosses, shuf-
eboard and a triathlon. Each
Maven participated in several
events and did extremely well.
Thumbs up as Residents depart for the Olympics. Front row are
Joe Schwartz, Irene Fiedler and David Kline. Back row are
Renee Krosner, Activity Director; Winifred Lowther, Herman
Alper, and Ray Teasdale, Activity Coordinator.
Over 21 area Homes were
represented at the Olympics, and
when all scores were totaled, the
"Menorah Mavens" took sixth
place.
It was a day filled with fun, corn-
back at the Home everyone was
awaiting their return to let them
know how proud and happy they
were to have such a fine team
represent Menorah Manor,
Although tired and achy, there
residents who participated, but next year s competition.
Trvthe
This Passover, experience a
delightful change of taste:
Dry Chablis and Dry Burgundy,
new from Manischewitz.
Made for wine drinkers
who prefer the popular
taste of dry wines, both are
Kosher for Passover and,
of course, the year round.
Celebrate Passover
with the wines that will
become as welcome a tra-
dition as Manischewitz
traditional wines: new
Manischewitz Dry Chablis
and Dry Burgundy.
Ask your wine merchant
to be sure to order them
in time for Passover.
Uft'fHAHJS
Wft'BlMMA
Manischevbitzj
%, y C19S4 Monarch Wine Co., Brooklyn, N


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, April 4, 1986
The Fourth Annual "Hit the Road for Hillel"
Bikeathon gets a big pushoff. The Annual
Hillel School of Tampa fund raiser cycling
around Davis Island will be held at 8 a.m. on
Sunday, April IS. "Sponsor a Kid and Be
Glad You Did." Getting ready for the event
are HUM students (standing left to right) Ted-
dy Gorman, Josh Brusin, Steve Gorman, Rab-
bi David Brusin, Gila Adler. Shana Levine,
and "Bikeathon Boss" Paul Gorman; (Kneel-
ing left to right) David Grossman, Jonathan
Kolodner, Seth Forman, Dawn Masher, and.
Peter Kaufmann. Photo: A udrey
Hauhenstocks.
A Potpourri of Thoughts From Tiffany Stein
At High School In Israel
Hello or should I say Shalom
from Eretz Yisrael. I had my first
encounter with the wall today.
Kissing the wall was the best feel-
ing a person could feel inside. I
can't wait to get there on Shab-
bat. I love the freedom here. Two
months is not enough. Masada.
Leave youth hostel at 4:15 a.m
Climb in 52 minutes up the run-
ners path. Watch the Sunrise!
Study for 5 hours and leave know-
ing more about yourself, Judaism,
and your roots than have been ab-
sorbed in my life so far. The feel-
ing is unexplainable.
As eight Roman camps sur-
round Masada, the Arabs sur-
round Israel. "Sheynit Afezadeh
Lo Tipol" Masada must never fall
again' I'm learning more than you
can imagine. Tears flowed freely at Tiffany (left) said good-bye at the airport
JOEL'S
gjkecim&y 3FcotA
Now Offers You
A Choice!!
Visit Our New
FRESH KOSHER
Meat and Poultry Department
2619 -23 Avenue North
Telephone: Butcher Dept:
13270849
UNDER SUPERVISION VAAD KASHRUTH
Proudly displaying the large screen TV are, from Uft to right:
Sarah Shapiro, Resident; Renee Krosner, Volunteer Director;
Elsie Estroff Ways and Means Chairman and Guild President,
Ida Michels.
Menorah Manor Guild
Planning For The Future
The Volunteer Guild at
Menorah Manor is constantly busy
planning their future goals and
objectives for the coming years.
A very special event that will be
taking place May 22, will be the
first Menorah Manor Volunteer
Guild awards luncheon. This pro-
mises to be a very special affair in
honor of all of the hard work and
dedication that they have given
over the past year. Nominations
are also being made for a new
slate of Guild Officers that wil be
installed during the luncheon.
Through the Volunteer Guild,
they hope to be able to raise
money on a steady basis to build a
fund that will enable them to pur-
chase a major gift each year for
Menorah Manor that will help
enrich the quality of life for the
Residents of the Home. This year
the Guild was able to purchase a
large screen television which is set
up in the Activities Room and is a
most welcome gift from both
Menorah Manor and the
Residents.
As stated by the President of
the Guild, Ida Michels, "We hope
to be able to recruit many new
members to our Guild over the
next year. It is a most fulfilling
feeling knowing that we are all
working together to help the
elderly of our communities by be-
ing able to give them the little ad-
ded extras that they desire daily
living."
If you are interested in becom-
ing a member of Menorah Manor's
Volunteer Guild, or would like fur-
ther information regarding the
Guild please contact Renee
Krosner, director of Fro
grams/Volunteers at 345-2775.
Summer Staff Jobs
In Pennsylvania's
Pocono Mountains
Specialists for oidor adult vaca-
tion camp in music and arts *
cratta. Early Juns August 29,
1966. Compatltlva salary plus
room and board.
For Info contact Eugona Ball,
YM-YWHA Camps, 21 Plymouth
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Jewish Culture Oittary Laws Observed
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AH land & water sports, cratts. music, pioneer-
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FOR INFORMATION CALL
305-651 0746
Oft WRITE
Til sM. YM-YWHA Cis.pi
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QAPER 4
Packaging
i
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[QROWARD
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Packaging
Sue Sutker's Creative Cookery
MAAS BROTHERS/WEST SHORE PLAZA
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-GefilteFlsh
MENU: Stuffed Cabbage
Brisket of Beef
Hazelnut Torte
PRICE: $15.00 per person
DATE: Thursday, April 10th, 1986
TIME: 10:30 AM
LOCATION: Maas Brothers, West Shore Plaza,
Cooking School, 2nd floor
For Reservations, call Jane Lea
229-7725
+


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7

INTRODUCING EL A3 OWN
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Now you can enjoy our new Milk and
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You'll get superior class or deluxe hotels,
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As always, El Al has the most non-stop
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flight. Packages are also available to Eilat,
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So when you go to Israel, go with the peo-
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El Al Israel Airlines. To us, Israel is more
than just another stop on our flight schedule.
Ifs home.
For more information call your travel agent or
El Al toll free at 1-800-ELAL-SUN
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For a free, detailed color brochure, write El Al
Israel Airlines, Milk and Honey Vacations,
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COME TO ISRAEL. COME SMY WITH FRIENDS.


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, April 4, 1986
Synagogue Secretary
Shorthand, accurate typing, good telephone
and public relations. Knowledge of Jewish
traditions and customs important.

837-1911
New Officers and Board Elected
At 106th Annual Meeting of HIAS
If
>
\
Bay to Bay
Passover
Goods
NOW OPEN
For Food
On Premises
Serving
Breakfast
and Lunch
/ V
4315 Bay to Bay Boulevard Tampa, Florida 33629
837-3354/831-0388
Saturday and Sunday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekdays 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Closed Mondays
Owner*
MARTY FELD MAN HANAN KARPUCH
Complata Catering Service* For All Occasions
Guest Speaker Morris B. Abram
Calls Upon All Americans To
Demand That Human Rights Is
A Major Agenda Item At Next
U..S./Soviet Summit
NEW YORK, NY At the
106th Annual Meeting of HIAS
(the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society), held on March 12 at the
Summit Hotel in New York City,
Robert L. Israeloff of Hewlett
Bay Park, N.Y., was re-elected as
President, and Karl D. Zukerman
of South Orange, N.J., as Ex-
ecutive Vice President. Both had
originally taken office in 1984.
The meeting also encompassed
Business Card Directory
A BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY for
Professionals and Executives continues
as a regular monthly feature of THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
Please send your business card, with
payment of $28.58 for the first edition. Future
placement will be invoiced by mail at the
same monthly rate.
Send To:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
2808 Horatio Street
Tampa, Florida 33809
Attn: Business Directory Dept.
> ??????
Business Card Directory
UMKLQBE
Distinctive Travel, Inc.
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Tampa. Florida 33607
(813) 875-9323
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PLEASE TELL OUR ADVERTISERS YOU SAW IT IN THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
the election of officers and
members of the Board.
Morris B. Abram, chairman of
the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, was guest speaker at the
Annual Meeting of the Board that
immediately followed a brief
meeting of HIAS' membership. A
well-known attorney and human
rights activist, Mr. Abram called
upon the American Jewish com-
munity to "galvanize the
American people and the Con-
gress" to demand that the four
major items on the table for
discussion during the next summit
meeting include arms control;
human rights, including the
emigration of Jews; regional dif-
ferences and bilateral ar-
rangements. Mr. Abram express-
ed skepticism over the flurry of
exits from the USSR that follow-
ed the recent talks between Presi-
dent Reagan and General
Secretary Gorbachev. They had,
he said, little meaning when one
viewed the dismaying figures for
current Soviet Jewish emigration,
which continue to be among the
lowest in recent history.
Other HIAS elections announc-
ed during the meeting included:
Newly elected officers: Leonard
S. Kesten of Hartsdale, N.Y., and
Neil Greenbaum of Chicago, 111.,
as Vice Presidents. Leonard
Kesten formerly served as
Associate Secretary. Re-elected
officers include Harold Friedman,
Carl Glick and Edwin Shapiro as
President Emeriti, all of New
York City.
The following were re-elected as
Vice Presidents: Bobbie Abrams,
New York City; Joseph Ain, Mon-
treal, Canada; Joyce Arnoff .
Cohen, New York City; Hon. Bet- >*
ty W. Ellerin, New York City; An- '
nette Eskind, Nashville, Tenn.;
Max M. Fisher, Detroit, Mich.;
Ben Zion Leuchter, Vineland,
N.J.; Alan H. Molorf, Philadelphia,
Penn.; William Rosenwald, New
York City; Dale Schwartz, Atlan-
ta, Ga.; and Edward Weinberg,
Mamaroneck, N.Y.
Lawrence J. Kalish of
Manalapan Township, N.J., was
re-elected as Treasurer; the Hon.
Lewis R. Friedman and Norman
J. Resnicow, both of New York Ci-
ty, were re-elected as Associate
Treasurers.
Donald M. Landis of White
Plains, N.Y., was re-elected
Secretary. Re-elected as
Associate Secretaries were: Dr.
Albert Hornblass, Englewood,
N.J., and Liliane Shalom of New
York City.
Irving Haber of New York City
was re-elected Vice President-
Finance and Assistant Secretary.
Gaynor I. Jacobson of Phoenix,
Ariz., and Harry M. Friedman of
New York City were re-elected
Honorary Executive Vice Presi-
dent and Honorary Vice
President-Finance, respectively.
HIAS National Council re-
elections included Edwin Shapiro,
chairman, and as Vice Chairmen:
Daniel G. Ross, David Teitelbaum,
both of New York City, and
Melvin S. Wortman of Woodmere,
N.Y.
In addition, some 31 leaders of
the Jewish community in the U.S.,
Latin America and Europe, were
newly elected to the HIAS Board
of Directors.
HIAS is the international
migration agency of the organized
Jewish community. HIAS is a
beneficiary of the UJA of Greater
New York and Jewish federations
across the country.
I

-^-


I
Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page
Starting April 27th Rut Am Will BeTakingOff Every Day For Tel Aviv.
Right now Ran Am can take
you to Tel Aviv four times a week
with convenient connections
through Paris. And we're happy
to announce that our schedule will
get even better. With daily service
starting April 27th. Making it even
easier for this year to be the year
you see Israel. For reservations
and information call your Travel
AgentorranAmatl-800-221-1111.
^e
Pan Am.\bu Cant BeatThe Experience

Schedule;, subject to change without notice.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, April 4, 1986
Congregations/Organizations Events


CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHALOM
I am my brother's keeper .
speak out for Soviet Jewry
On Sunday, April 13, a very
special program is planned at
Rodeph Sholom. "I am my
brother's keeper speak out for
Soviet Jewry" is an awareness
program for the entire Jewish
community of Tampa to attend.
Paticipation in this program in-
cludes Religious School students,
Kadima and USY. Community
leaders have also been invited to
attend. The morning begins with
Greetings followed by songs,
music by Orson Skorr, and an oral
presentation of "The Universal
Declaration of Human Rights," by
students of our Religious School.
The Rodeph Sholom USY chapter
has been diligently working on a
permanent statement for the
front lawn of the synagogue, to be
unveiled that morning.
Elie Wiesel concludes in his
book on Russian Jews, The Jews of
Silence: "What torments me most
is not the Jews of silence I met in
Russia, but the silence of the Jews
I live among today." Though the
plight of Soviet Jewry has been
known almost since the turn of the
century, few Jewish groups have
spoken up until recently due to ig-
norance, wide-spread apathy, and
lack of Jewish identity. Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom invites you to
attend this meaningful experience
on Sunday, April 13, at 10:30
a.m., as together we become no
longer The Jews of Silence.
ISRAELI INDEPENDENCE
Saturday night, May 17, and on
Sunday, May 18, the Jewish Com-
munity of Tampa will salute Israel
by marking her 38th In-
dependence year with two events.
Saturday night. May 17
A new tradition for celebrating
Israel's Independence, a big Bir-
thday Party for Israel including a
concert by Israeli entertainer
Ruthie Navon followed by
refreshments and dancing featur-
ing the Orson Skorr Band.
Sunday, May 18
Family celebration festival
the Tampa Jewish Community
Center will become, for the day,
the City of Jerusalem, with the
Wall of the old city and the old city
markets. Booths, educational
displays pertaining to Israel,
ethnic food, fun rides and the op-
portunity to experience Israel will
be on hand.
Radio station WMNF "The
Jewish Sound" will broadcast
their program from the JCC
festival grounds.
The weekend will allow the en-
tire community an opportunity to
celebrate Israel's Independence
as one.
OSHEROFF
To Speak At JCC
The public is invited to learn
more about opportunities and life
in Israel at the Jewish Community
Center April 9 at 7:30 p.m\ The
guest speaker will be Leo
Osheroff. American alivah since
1959.
A man of many talents and in-
terests. Mr. Osheroff is a sue
cessful Israeli businessman. He
has been active in the Israel
Sports Federation and has been
on the organization committee of
the Maccabian games. He has
worked extensively with the
Society for the Preservation of
Nature and was involved with the
Hai-Bar Project to restore to
Israel all of the animals mentioned
in the Bible.
JtttlSH WAR VETERANS
Albert Aronovitz Post, No. 373
And Its Auxiliary
A Joint Installation of Officers
of the Post and its Auxiliary will
take place on Sunday, April 13 at
the Admiral Benbow Inn on
Westshore Blvd., at 11:45 a.m. A
luncehon will be served as well as
professional entertainment.
Present for the purpose of in-
stalling our Auxiliary will be Ruth
Eiseman, President of the Gulf
Coast Counties Council, accom-
panied by her staff. Installing of-
ficer for the Post will be Cy Woolf,
Past National Executive Commit-
teeman. He will also emcee the
event.
The entertainment will be per-
formed by Class Act Productions,
Inc. Reservations are a MUST.
Please call Jo Woolf, Chairperson:
a.m. 877-2515 or p.m. 933-5410.
Officers-elect to be installed for
the ensuing term:
POST: Commander, Jerome.
Posner, PPC; Senior Vice-
Commander, Joe Ribnick; Junior
Vice-Commander, Mary Surasky,
PPC; Quartermaser, Cy Woolf,
PNEC; Adjutant, Max Frouman;
Chaplain, Hank Landsberg, PPC;
Historian, Ben Sogol; Judge Ad-
vocate, Judge Ralph Steinberg.
AUXILIARY: President. Selma
Cohen, PAP; Senior Vice-
President; Minnie Posner, PCP;
Junior Vice-President, Esther
Piper, PAP; Chaplain, Mollie
Rich; Patriotic Instructress, Janet
Lynn; Conductress, Estelle
Siegel, Anne Spector, PAP;
Treasurer, Helen Males; Recor-
ding Secretary, Catherine
Repenn; Corresponding
Secretary, Gerturde Kern.
HILLEL CHAVURAH
Holds First Service
Building on the success of the
study sessions already held,
Hillel's Reconstructionist Com-
munity Chavurah held its first
Shabbat service and dinner on
5700 Quit Boutevart, ft. Ntmburf a* sen. Florida S370S
(813)367-4536
-Within the Brsckanrtoo* RmotI Ho<-
Sunday Brunch 11-2:30-$9.*
Monday Seafood Buffet 5-10:00 p.m. $9."
Our English Style Specialty
Thursday "Garden Ave 7" Live Jazz Night
with Chef Ken's Meat Carvery
Eat & Dance All You Like for $14."
FRIDAY NITE IS "SABBATH"
Come To Our Special "Shabbat" Dinner
Matzoh Ball Soup, Salad, Vi Roast Chicken with Brisket
Tzimmas, Kugel & Chef's Dessert
All Prices Plus Tax & Gratuity ONLY $6.**
__^__________ From 4:J0 to 7 p.m.
Sunday Afternoon the Golden Ave. 7 Jazz Band from 1 p.m.-5 p.m.
Sunday Evening Is A Hawaiian Show from 7 p.m.-10 p.m.
Both FREE "On the Deck Of the Brack"
March 7. With approximately 25
people sharing and participating
in a warm Shabbat experience,
future monthly services are plann-
ed, as well as weekly Friday even-
ing programs. To enjoy the friend-
ship and camaraderie this group
offers, contact Rabbi Kaplan or
Mrs. Weinbergat the Hillel office,
988- 7076.
HILLEL
Continued Growth And Success
Leads To Expansion
A.- a result of the success it has
the past two years, the B'nai
H'rith Hillel Foundation at the
University of South Florida and
the University of Tampa can no
longer house the large numbers of
students it continues to serve. As
result,' a move to larger tem-
porary quarters was made April 1.
While waiting for the new, perma-
nent facility m be constructed on
I FSF'fl campus.
Hillel, the only pluralistic
Jewish Student Center serving
Jewish students from all
backgrounds and traditions, will
be able to add to the full calendar
of programs already available.
"Bagel brunches, weekend
gateways, credit and not-for-
credit courses, cult information
seminars, Shabbat and holiday
services, and personal, career,
and rabbinical counseling are the
norm," according to Hillel Direc-
tor Rabbi Steven Kaplan. "We
now offer Israel awareness pro-
graming, a special group for
Jewish medical students and
residents, graduate students, a
faculty/community chavurah, and
have other new projects waiting
to be implemented."
For those wishing to become in-
volved in Hillel's exciting growth,
contact Rabbi Kaplan at 988-7076.
CONGREGATION
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Northdale Open Chavurah
On Friday, April 4, the 50 plus
Single Chavurah, Hatikvah
Chavurah, will host the Oneg
Shabbat and will also be par-
ticipating in the service. This is
the new Northdale Open
Chavurah. Chairmen are Janice
and Richard Silver.
Being Successfully Single
If you are 35 or older and are
single, you are invited to the first
Temple sponsored event with our
guest speaker, Dr. Martin Cohen,
PhD, who will discuss "Being Suc-
cessfully Single." The date is
April 10, at 7:30, with a social
hour following. Wine and cheese
will be served. For reservations,
call the Temple at 876-2377. Non-
Temple members are welcome.
Semi-Annual Blood Drive
The Semi-Annual Blood Drive
will be held on Sunday, April 13
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Remember
thnt you can give any time, not
just on that Sunday. Please con-
tact Howard Raymond for a
scheduled time: 935-5706.
If you cannot give on that date,
you can donate at any Southwest
Florida Blood-Bank Hospital.
A Holocaust
Memorial Corner
The corner display case in the
front foyer will soon be the Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek
Holocaust Memorial. The stone
memorial to the 6,000,000 Jews
who were victims of the Holocaust
has all ready been placed in this
cabinet which was designed by
staff members of the Tampa
Museum of Art.
A Torah rescued from the
Holocaust and loaned to Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek by Lon-
don's Westminster Synagogue
will !* placed in the upper part of
the cabinet. The Torah Cover will
Ik- a Holocaust Memorial needle-
point canvas worked by congrega-
tion members. The canvas has
I wen roinmissioned for our con-
ation from .ludaica designer
Bonnie Yales of Massachusetts
All of this has been made possi
hie by the generosity of John and
Lisa Rosenberg, who donated the
Holocaust Memorial Stone. They
have now made it possible to ob-
tain the Holocaust Torah, to com-
mission the memorial Torah cover
and to construct the cabinet mak-
ing a complete Holocaust
Memorial.
HADASSAH
Tampa Chapter To Hold Donor
Luncheon
The Tampa Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its Donor Lun-
cheon on Tuesday, April 15, 11:80
a.m. at the Carrollwood Golf ami
Tennis Club. This luncheon is the
highlight of the fundraising year
where there is much joyous
celebration about the suport sent
ot the Hadassah medical facilities
in Israel. Through the hard work
and dedication of many members
the Hadassah hospitals continue
to be the best in the Middle East
with its pacesetting and up-to-
date treatments and research
departments. Treatment for .pa-
tients is equal, regardless of their
religious or national affiliation.
Recognition will be given in the
donor, silver and golden angel and
founder areas. Special tribute will
Ik? given to a long-time devoted
member of our chapter, and to
members who have helped make
this year very successful.
Marilyn LeVine, Area Expan-
sion chairman and a member of
the Advisory Council of the
Florida Central Region of
Hadassah will present a brief slide
presentation with music that she
compiled titled "Hadassah
Through the Years." The music
and special events of the last
seven decades are featured. Mrs.
LeVine is from St. Petersburg
and will be the Florida Co-
Coordinator of the Hadassah Na-
tional Convention to be held in
Miami in August.
Since this is the 100th Anniver-
sary for the Statue of Liberty, the
theme will be "I Lift My Lamp"
from the poem by Emma Lazarus
about the Statue of Liberty. Em-
ma Lazarus and Henrietta Szold
(founder of Hadassah) were
among the dedicated women who
helped educate and
"Americanize" Jewish im-
migrants to America in the late
1800's.
Assisting president, Nancy
Mizrahi, with this event are:
Donor Chairman Ruth
(Milkman, Ellie Fishman. Harriett
Glaser, Margery Stern, Bert
Green, Alice Israel, Freda Rosen-
baum. Sylvia Gertzman. Judy
Tawil, Dorothy Skop, Esther
Carp, Bernice Starr and Terry
Medgebow.
TAMAP BAY
JEWISH SINGLES
COUNCIL
Fun N' Fitness
Join the TBJS for Fun N"
Fitness Night at the American
Fitness Center, 4110 Henderson
Blvd.. Tampa at 7:30 p.m.
Whether you are on a fitness kick
or not, you'll have a blast at
American fitness Saturday night!
Take a dip in the whirlpool, dry
out in the sauna, work out on the
machines, get your heart pumping
in an aerobics class, or swim a few
laps in the pool and then munch
out! Healthy foods (and some not
so healthy) will be served. By the
way, American fitness will be clos
ed to the public' for the evening
and will be open exclusively for
the Tampa Bay Jewish Singles.
Admission is free For more infor-
mation please contact Cathy at
969-8441.
Planning Meeting
Would you like to help plan the
future events for the Tampa Bay
Jewish Singles? Jeff Donsky, our
new chairman of the program
committee, would like your input.
He will be meeting with his com-
mittee on Wednesday, April 2. o
p.m. at the China One Buffet.
1240 Kennedy Blvd. in Tampa.
(Dinner at 6 p.m., and planning
meeting at 7 p.m.). Please join us
for this important meeting. If you
have any questions contact Jeff at
585-1888, or Cathy at 969-3441.
Singles Go To Services
The TBJS will be attending
Shabbat Services at Congregation
Kol Ami. 3919 Moran Road in
Tampa on Friday evening, April
1. Services begin at 8 p.m. After
services you are invited to attend
i special oneg at the home of Rick
Myers. You will receive directions
o Rick's at the Temple. For more
information contact Cathy at
!>69-3441
Are you single and new in the
area? Would you like more infor-
mation about the Tampa Bay
Jewish Singles? Contact our
welcoming committee, in Pinellas
County call Gerri at 578-0201 in
Hillsborough call Carla at
mi ceo t
To place a Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah announcement in the
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
please have information,
(typed/double spaced), in
the office, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, Florida
33609, three weeks prior to
the event.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday, 8 p.m.;
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:30 a.m.; 5:45 p.m.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Conservative
3919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H. David Rose, Cantor Sam Isaak Services:
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Conservative
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, hazzan William
Hauben Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:16.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2877 Rabbi Herbert Droox. Rabbi Joan Glazer Farber.
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION BAI8 TEFFILAH Orthodox
3418 Handy Road No. 103 Rabbi Yossi Dubrowski 962-2376 Services Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
P.O. Box 271167. Rabbi Yossie Dubrowski, Executive Director. 963-2317.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
13801 N. 37th St. No. 1114. Rabbi Dovid Mockin. Program Coordinator. 971-6234.
Friday night Services one half hour after sunset. Tuesday night classes at 8 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at U.S.F./U.T./H.C.C. Cambridge Woods 14240
North 42nd Street 972-4433. Services and Oneg Shabbat Friday evening 7 p.m.
Sunday Bagel Brunches, 11:30 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
634-9162, United Community Church. 1601 U Jolla Street, Sun City Center, Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECONSTRUCTION 1ST COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
Reconstructionist Community Chavurah Reconstructionist Cambridge Woods*
972 4433 Rabbi Steven Kaplan Monthly study sessions, weekly "Shabbat Ex-
perience," monthly services with dinner.


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Community Calendar
SUNDAY
I Sunday* Tnae in "The
Jrwiih Sound" WMNr
88.5-FM 10:40 .-!
KOL AMI SCHOLAR IN
RESIDENCE
KOL AMI RELIGIOUS
SCHOOL RESUMES
9:30 TAMPA JEWISH
FAMILY SERVICES
MEMBERSHIP
BRUNCH
MONDAY
CandleliffhUHK timei
Friday. April 4 6:2
p.m.
Friday. April II t:33
p.m.
Friday. April 18 :37
p.m.
10:00 SCHAARAI '
ZEDEK SISTERHOOD
BOARD/GENERAL
MEETING
12:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK 8I8TERHOOD
PROGRAM AND
LUNCH
W
9:00 SCHAARAI I} \M
ZEDEK
BROTHERHOOD
BLOOD DRIVE
9:30 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK FORUM
11:00 SZ ISRAEL BOND
RW^4-TPA-1.8
Bat Mitzvah Announcement ALKER
with photo/nameline: ING
12:16 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK EXECUTIVE
BOARD MEETING
1:30 'JEWISH WAR
VETERANS
OARD
TUESDAY
".91
10:00 HADA8SAH
TAMPA CHAPTER
OPEN BOARD
MEETING
:00 'BUSINESS AND
PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN BOARD
MEETING
6:30 SCHAARI ZEDEK
BROTHERHOOD
GENERAL MEETING
8
WEDNESDA Y
C3?
10:00 ORT/BAY
horizons chapter
general meeting
11:10 had ass ah
tampa chapter
donor luncheon-
Tim SCHAARAI
ZEDEK ADULT
HEBREW EDUCATION
15
10:00 'JEWISH O
COMMUNITY FOOD
BANK
1040 TEMPLE DAVID
SISTERHOOD BOARD
MEETING
11:30 NATIONAL
COUNCIL JEWISH
WOMEN GENERAL
MEETING
'j'J
0:30 NATIONAL _
COUNCIL JEWISH 16
WOMEN VP MEETING
10:00 -JEWISH
COMMUNITY FOOD
BANK
12:00 KA SENIOR
SOCIALITES
7:45 KOL AMI
SISTERHOOD
MEETING
THURSDAY
m.i
:30 -TAMPA JEWISH
FEDERANTION lO
WOMEN'S DIVISION
EXECUTIVE BOARD
MEETING
12:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK LUNCH WITH
THE RABBI
ItM -TAMPA JEWISH
FEDERATION
EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE
MEETING
1:30 JEWISH CENTER
RESIDENT/MANAGE
MENT MEETING
1:30 MARY WALKER
RESIDENT
MANAGEMENT
MEETING
5:50 -JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
EXECUTIVE BOARD
MEETING
17
FRIDAY
M
11:0* TAMPA JEWISH
FEDERATION
WOMEN'S DIVISION
SPRING PARTY
*0SCHAARAI
ZEDEK SISTERHOOD
SHABBAT DINNER
8:00 RODEPH
8HOLOM HILLEL
SCHOOL SHABBAT
11
18
SATURDAY
KOL.AMI SLEEPOVER
8:00 KOL AMI
MYSTERY NTTE
12
7:30 JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
ADULT PRODUCTION
8:06 KOL AMI JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
SHABBAT
Interest-Free
Educational
Loans
The Jewish Children's Service,
based in Atlanta. Georgia is a
social service agency that pro-
vides interest free educational
loans to Jewish youth whose
families reside in the Southeast
region.
The need for private funding for
higher education is emphasized
with the anticipated cut backs in
the availability of federal financ-
ing. The Tampa Jewish Family
Service is proud to be affiliated
with this program.
If you are a young person in-
terested in securing funding for
the upcoming school year or you
have a child with financial need,
please contact Michele Goldstein
at Tampa Jewish Family Service
to determine eligibility. The
numbers are 932-6676 or
251-0083.
Obituaries
BLUM
Albert, 97. of Tampa, died Thuraday, March
13, 1986. A native of New York, he came to
Tampa in 1962 from Buffalo, N.Y. He wa a
member of Temple Beth Zion in Buffalo and
he attended Temple Beth El in St.
Petersburg. He is survived by his son, Ed-
ward of Tampa and two grandchildren
SAUL
Sam, 90, of Tampa, died Sunday. March 16,
1986. He had lived in the Bay area for 16
yean, and was the operator of a ladies' shoe
business in Griffin, Gs., for many years. He
was s veteran of World War I and in Griffin
he was s member of the American Legion.
He was s member of Congregation Rodeph
Congregation Sholom in Tamps. He is sur-
vived by a son, M. William of Tampa; a
daughter, Blanche Spivak of Tampa; a
sister, Rebecca Frankel of Miami; and four
grandchildren, Linda and Julie Saul and
Richard and Marilyn Ingram. Memorial con-
tributions may be made to the Menorah
Manor. 250 58th St. N.. St. Petersburg
GALL
Nathan, of North Bay Vilage died Saturday.
March 22, 1986. Survivors include his wife,
Rachel of North Bay Village; a daufhter,
Eva Gruman of Tampa; s brother. Philip
Gall of Worcester, Mass.; a sister, TWeaa
Ltnde of Miami; grandchildrw: Margot
Marcaois, Parry Gruman. Eric Gruman, all
of Tamps and Elite Gruman of N.Y. Chy.
ZION8
Howard Leonard. 62. of Lute, died Satur-
day. March 16,198*. He had been a resident
of the Bay area for nine years, coming from
Norwalk. Conn. He was the ownsr-oparatar
of Lorenso'i Italian Restaurant, was a
member of the Tampa Sertoma Club and
was actively involved with the Muscular
Dystrophy Association. He to survived by
his wife, Sunni; three sons. Barry. Aron and
Mathew, all of Tampa; two daughters,
Sharon Markowite and Jan Zkms, both of
Rockland Co.. N.Y.; parents, George and
Anna Zkms of Bronx. NY.; one sister. Bet
ty Msssei of Queans, NY.; and grandson.
P.J. Markowite. Those who wish may make
memorial contributions to the MDA
riseigastart far ALS reaaafch.
Shana Hilk
Kerri Aaron
Bat Mitzvah
SHANA HILK
Shana Beth Hilk, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Hilk, will be call-
ed to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah
Friday, April 4 at 8 p.m. and
Saturday, April 5 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and Can-
tor William Hauben will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
Rodeph Sholom Religious School
and the Religious vice president of
Kadima. Shana is a 7th grade
honor student at the Hillel School
of Tampa. She is a member of the
student government, the
Chanukah Speaker's Bureau, and
the Safety Patrol.
Mr. and Mrs. Hilk will host the
Friday evening Oneg Shabbat, the
Kiddush luncheon following the
services in honor of the occasion,
and a reception Saturday evening
at their home. Mr. and Mrs. Ed-
ward Leibowitz will host a brunch
on Sunday for family and out-of-
town guests at the Harbour Island
Hotel.
Special guests will include fami-
ly and friends from south Florida,
Orlando, Virginia, Pennsylvania,
Knoxville, Tennessee, Las Vegas,
Nevada, and Washington State.
KERRI AARON
Kerri Beth Aaron, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Alan R. Aaron, will
be called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah Saturday, Aprjl 12 at
9:30 a.m. at Congregation Kol
Ami. Rabbi David Rose and Can-
tor Sam Iaaak will officiate.
The celebrant is a member of
the Kol Ami Religious School Hey
Class and a member of Kadima
and Young Judea. Kerri attends
7th grade at Oak Grove Junior
High School where she is a high
honor roll student in the Gifted
Program. Kerri was selected to be
a participant in the Duke Univer-
sity Talent Search. She is a
member of the National Junior
Honor Society. She authored a
poem published in the 1985
Hillsborough County Poetry An-
thology. She has been a student of
dance for eight years and is also
interested in theater.
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron will host
the Oneg Shabbat Friday evening
and the Kiddush luncheon Satur-
day following services, and a
reception Saturday Evening at
the Tampa Hilton.
Special guests will include:
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. David
Davis, Miami Beach, and Mrs.
Gloria Aaron, Coconut Creek; Mr.
and Mrs. Martin Hammer and
family, Westport, Conn.; Dr. and
Mrs. Richard Steinberg and fami-
ly, Miami; Mr. and Mrs. Gideon
Davis and family, Brooklyn, N.Y.;
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham
Oberlender, Biacayne Point; Mrs.
Helen Horowitz, Baltimore, Md.;
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Konsker, Atlan-
ta, Ga.; Mrs. Frances Feigen,
Forest Hills, N.Y.
A Friday evening Shabbat din-
ner at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Ir-
win Browarsky and a Sunday
morning brunch at the Marriott
Hotel, will be hosted by Dr. and
Mrs. Irwin Browarsky, Dr. and
Mrs. Steven Field, Mr. and Mrs
William Kaliah, Dr. and Mrs
Richard Levine, Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Matter, Dr. and Mrs. Ar
thur Simon for the out-of
towners.
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Hirahorn
will provide all the welcome
baskets for the out-of-town
guests.
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