The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00288

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
fj&tfsh Meridian
Off Tampa
Volume 8 Number 7
Tampa, Florida Friday, March 21, 1986
Price 35 Cent*
National Leader to Address Sue Brav Program
The First Annual Susanne E. W.
Brav Family Life Education Pro-
gram will be at Sunday morning;
brunch, April 6, 9:45 a.m.-noon at
the Tampa Airport Marriott
Hotel. This special community
gathering will combine learning
and paying tribute to a unique in-
dividual who devoted herself to
the welfare of her community.
As an active board member of
Tampa Jewish Family Services,
Congregation Shaarai Zedek
Sisterhood and the National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women, Sue was in-
strumental in the development
and expansion of many creative
and innovative projects. Through
the inspiration and example she
set, and the funds she bequeathed
to Tampa Jewish Family Services,
her dream of offering oppor-
tunities to support enhanced fami-
ly functioning and togetherness
through a variety of Family Life
Education programs will be
realized.
This first program, entitled,
"Somewhere Over the Rainbow:
The Changing Role of the Jewish
Woman," will highlight one of the
most pressing issues of our time.
As women enter the work force
and forge a career in larger
numbers, the implications for the
Jewish family as a unit are
dramatic. The traditional role of
Jewish women in attending to
family needs and keeping the
in light of recehT development
Our guest speaker will be Bert
Goldberg, ACSW, Executive
Director of the Association of
Jewish Family and Children's Ser-
vices, the parent body of over 115
Jewish Family and Children's
Agencies throughout North
America. Mr. Goldberg has served
as Executive Director of Jewish
Family Services in Allentown.
Pennsylvania and Orange County,
California. He has also worked in
other capacities for Jewish com-
munities in Chicago and Seattle
and has been on the faculty of the
School of Jewish Communal Ser-
vice of Hebrew Union College in
Los Angeles. He was the 1984
Program Chair for the National
Association of Jewish Family,
Children and Health Professionals
(NACHES) Annual Conference
and is a member of the Executive
Board of that organization and
also of the Conference of Jewish
Communal Service.
Additional plans for the pro-
gram include the viewing of a
special tape of a memorial service
for Sue Brav at Gorrie Elemen-
tary School. The service was held
several months after Sue's death,
on her birthday. Students and
faculty at the school gathered
together and shared memories
and thoughts about Sue and her
tremendous contribution to their
lives and the school. In her capaci-
ty as guidance counselor, she
touched the lives of many
students and teachers at Gorrie.
We anticipate the participation
of members of the various
organizations with which Sue was
involved, including Gorrie
Elementary School, Congregation
Shaarai Zedek and the National
Council of Jewish Women.
The Susanne E.W. Brav Family
Life Education Endowment Fund
has been established as a fitting
tribute to Sue. Through communi-
ty support of this fund, Tampa
Jewish Family Services looks for-
ward to providing outstanding
Family Life Education programs.
Contributions to this fund may be
made to TJFS at any time. The
fee for the first Family Life
Education program on April 6 is
$7. For registration and more in-
formation, please call Tampa
Jewish Family Services at
251-0083.
XJap and Gown Per Izzy'
YAD Hosts Jewish Demographer
Bert Goldberg
The Young Adult Division of
the Tampa Jewish Federation will
host a brunch featuring Is Aronin,
Harris Poll
On Anti-Semitism in the Farm Belt
Since last year's ABC-TV 20/20
segment on anti-Semitism in the
farm belt, its scary message of
brewing anti-Semitism in the farm
belt has been the subject of con-
cerned press conferences and
meetings. Regsettebly the- ex-
ploitation of the subject exceeded
by far a studied assessment of it.
ADL early on criticized 20/20 for
its faulted reportage; we did so,
however, more out of our ex-
perience and our trained observa-
tions than because we had a full
scale profile of the financially
besieged American farmers' at-
titudes toward Jews.
PiUar of Fire
Exhibit At JCC
Standing solidly amidst a ravag-
ing fire of oppression and abuse is
a Pillar. A Pillar of life, of hope, of
identity and knowledge. The
Pillar is Jewish survival and it has
conquered the many flames which
engulfed it these past two thou-
sand years. Today the Pillar
stands in Israel.
The JCC will be displaying the
Pillar of Fire from March 2. This
exhibit is based in part on the
documentary television series
created by Yigal Lossin and pro-
duced by Israel TV with the
cooperation of the department of
information of the World Zionist
Organization and the youth and
Hechalutz Department
This is r. very unique exhibit
recording the history of modern
Zionism prior to the creating of
the state of Israel. Israel present
and future is also portrayed in a
very symbolic manner.
The display tracks step by step
development of the Zionist move-
ment from the time of Herzl, the
Zionist dreamer, who foresaw the
establishment of the Jewish state,
and was instrumental in the
establishment of the modern
Zionist movement.
The exhibit explains issues deal-
ing with life in the "Galut
Diaspora" and assimilation and
also follows the pioneering spirit
and their committment and ef-
forts to gain liberation. Finally
the display sums up Israel
achievement in agriculture rural
development as well as the
achievement in the field of
technology. The Jewish Communi-
ty Center welcomes members of
the community to come view the
display.
The exhibit will be on loan for
local organisations for their enjoy-
ment and enrichment.
TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION/
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
-CAMPAIGN UPDATE
1986 Goal........................$1,300,000
To Date..........................$ 875,000
Increase...............................20%
Because some were crying wolf,
because the extent of anti-
Semitism in the farm belt needed
dispassionate measuring and
weighing, ADL commissioned a
Louis Harris poll to probe at-
titudes in Iowa and Nebraska.
Polling was conducted on Jan. 23
and 24; Harris interviewers asked
in-depth questions of 600 people in
the farm belt.
The resuls confirm that charges
of growing anti-Semitism in our
farm lands were grossly exag-
gerated; that the organizations
which would foster anti-Semitism
by attempts to capitalize on the
farmers' economic plight have
failed in their mission; in short,
that the American farmer is
decidedly not as vulnerable to
bigotry as those who shrilly cried
"Anti-Semitism" would have us
believe.
Indeed, those polled placed the
Sjatest blame for their plight on
ngress, on local bankers and
loan agencies, on the Reagan Ad-
ministration, on the Farmers
Home Administration, on the
Federal Reserve Board, and in-
terestingly, on the farmers
themselves.
When asked to what extent
"certain religious groups, such as
Jews" were responsible for the
economic problems of the farmer,
four percent said "a great deal,"
nine percent said "somewhat,"
and the vast majority said "not
very much" or "not at all." The
pollsters concluded that "the
wrath of rural people and farmers
in particular is much more focused
on political types ... in terms of
blame, the political and economic
establishments receive much more
blame than religious minorities
such as the Jews. *
Another section of the poll was
designed to ascertain to what
degree rural Iowans and
Nebraskans were familiar with
and receptive to active extremist
and/or anti-Semitic groups. Of
these polled, hah* were aware of
the National Agricultural Press
Association (NAPA), 29 percent
had heard of the Populist F
and even fewer were acquainted
with the Posse Comitatus (24 per-
cent), the Covenant, the Sword
and the Arm of the Lord (15 per-
cent), and Liberty Lobby (14
percent).
Moreover, and especially signifi-
cant in view of the 20/20 program,
Harris and Associates reported
that "when asked if they had been
to any meetings or belonged to the
organization, 98 percent said they
had no such association with these
groups." By and large, according
to the poll, "direct involvement
has been minimal and minute."
In an attempt to gauge the ex-
tent of anti-Semitism in the two
states, our commissioned poll also
asked whether individuals agreed
or disagreed with a series of
statements about Jews and other
minorities. The responses to the
following statements were
revealing:
The radical right is much more
dangerous than Kahane, Sprinzak
argued, because its leaders are
"some of the most educated and
CoBtiaaed oa Page 7
Security
Tightened
JERUSALEM (JTA) Tight
security measures taken to pro-
tect the renovated Hadassah
building in Hebron, soon to be oc-
cupied by Jewish settlers, do not
constitute harassment of Arab
shopowners there, according to
Maj. Gen. Ehud Barak, com-
mander of the central region.
Barak submitted a written state-
ment to the Supreme Court in rep-
ly to complaints by Arab mer-
chants that they were being
harassed by.the army.
Ten Arab-owned shops occupy
space on the ground floor of the
building. The Israel Defense
Force in recent weeks erected
fences ground the shops and
soldiers check every customer.
The IDF says the precaution is
aimed against possible sabotage of
the building. The shopkeeper
maintained in a petition to the
court that their business suffered
because customer do not want to
undergo security checks. The high
court reserved a decision on this
matter.
on Sunday, March 23 at the Lin-
coln Hotel at 11:30 a.m. Andy
Titen, president of YAD, asserted
that "Mr. Aronin's presentation
should be one of the finest pro-
grams YAD has sponsored this
year for it will give us a better
understanding of the composition
of the young, professional Jewish
community, here in Tampa." Mr.
Aronin's discussion will focus on
Southern Jewish Demography.
Through humor and factual
description, Aronin will highlight
the reasons why Jews immigrated
to America in the early 1900's. He
will provide a vivid description of
the obstacles Jews encountered
when they first arrived to this
country and he will share the
evolution of the Jewish communi-
ty through the fourth generation.
Finally, he will compile whatever
data he receives from YAD and in-
clude it in his thesis, which is a
study of Jews living in the South.
Recently commissioned by the
Jewish Welfare Board to write a
book titled, "Shalom Y'all" in
celebration of the 100th anniver-
sary of the Statue of Liberty, Mr.
Aronin is a recognized authority
on this subject. YAD encourages
everyone to attend this program.
Please RSVP to the Tampa
Jewish Federation. The cost is
$12.50 per person.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, March 21,. 1986
to
H
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V
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i
2
Hillel Students
Experience Seacamp
By MARTHA GROSSMAN
Ever swim with a shark? Thir-
teen Hillel School students did last
month at Seacamp, a national
marine biology camp-school
. located on Big Pine Key. After
studying and looking at pictures,
samples and microscope slides of
marine plants and animals, they
were ready to touch and feel the
real thing. Accompanied by
Sidney Schuster, Hillel parent and
board member, and Meta Van
Sickle, Hillel science teacher, the
sixth and seventh grade students
traveled to the keys for first hand
experience. David Cyment, Ian
Davidson, Michael Feldman,
Rachel Greenhawt, Caron Jacob-
son, Josh Schulman, David
Schuster, Josh Brusin, Stephen
Gorman, Shana Hilk, and Gila
Nadler were tremendously en-
thusiastic about the trip.
The two day session began with
a study of plants, native and
transplanted species, and their
uses. The coconuts tasted great,
but the bananas weren't ripe yet.
They also learned that early
Spanish settlers sewed with spine
and thread found in the yucca
tree.
Snorkeling was a high point of
the trip. The students were fitted
with snorkeling gear and guided
through a shallow bay, where they
saw sea stars, velvety stars,
sponges, calcareous algae, fish,
anemones, and more. Algae was
collected and found to be home for
crabs, shrimp, sea stars, annelida
and various other creatures. Dur-
ing the close-up of a coral reef,
they saw brightly colored fish and
corals ranging from plain grey, to
clear, to bright yellow, to blue.
During the snorkeling expedi-
tions the students collected
samples, but after they were done
studying them, everything was
put back into the water. Seacamp
motto is "to observe, not
disturb."
Astronomy by the campfire was
another special activity, and no
one minded a few clouds. Hillel
students were honored by helping
to write a new script for the
astronomy show.
Oh yes, the shark. Well, they
don't eat people after all. It seems
we taste bad to them. There were
other animals, alligators,
dolphins, and sea cucumbers to
touch in a special tank. What did
the students like best? Snorkeling,
swimming with the shark, the
dolphins, touching the different
plants and animals, and, they
report, the food wasn't bad. All of
them are ready to go back any
time.
Tampa Jewish Federation
Provides Unique Opportunity
This summer, singles living in
the Tampa Bay area will have an
opportunity ta participate in an
enriching experience a singles
mission to Israel. More than 3,000
singles have visited Israel with a
UJA singles mission and this is an
excellent chance to discover a
country rich with culture and
tradition with other singles who
share common values and
lifestyles.
Two missions have been
scheduled this summer, since the
demand is so great. The dates are
Sunday, July 13-Wednesday, July
23 and August 17-August 27.
Because the singles mission is
by far the most popular, the
Federation encourages anyone
who is interested to call Lisa Bush
at 875-1618 today, to guarantee
your participation in this trip.
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when you use Autolog. lb get all the facts, call our
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Origin_____________Destination_____________ Jf J
(Back row, from left) Andy Titen, Mark Car-
ron, Lee Tobin, Jolene Shor, Dan Albert.
(Middle row, from left) Karen Schulman, Cin-
dy Spahn, Debbi Eisenstadt, Ronni Epstein,
Lisa Bush. (Front row, from left) Shan
Rashkin, Debra Linsky, Don Weinbren.
(From left) Harriet Pila, Jeff Brinen, Lyn Meyerson, Ralph Marcadis, Ellen Perlman,
Cathy Gardner.

. i i- u_j :-------
I
YLD Building Awareness
Leadership development is ar.
important component of every
federation and the Tampa Jewish
Federation is no exception. Under
the guidance of chairmen, Cindy
Spahn and Don Weinbren, Young
Leadership Development expects
to attract a core group of commit-
ted, young executives and profes-
sionals to attend monthly pro-
grams through January 1987.
Through small group participa-
tion, Young Leadership Develop-
ment gives individuals an oppor-
tunity to explore pertinent issues
affecting not only the Tampa
Jewish community, but Jews
throughout the world.
The first program, "Building
Jewish Awareness" was recently
held at the home of Debra and
Donald Linsky. Ronni Epstein,
Director of Leadership Develop-
ment for the West Palm Beach
Federation led a discussion on an
"ethical will" and prompted in-
dividuals to explore their own
system of Jewish values. This
well-attended program drew over
35 people and these people
represented a cross-section of the
community including those involv-
ed with Women's Business and
Professional Network, the Jewish
Community Center, Jewish Fami-
ly Services, our community
synagogues and the Young Adult
Division.
The Young Leadership Develop-
ment Council which includes,
Debra Linsky, Leslye Winkelman,
Diane Charme, Karen Schulman,
Andy Titen, Debbie Eisenstadt,
Shari Rashkin, Bruce Silverman,
Mark Carron, Dan Albert, Karen
Patron, and Lee Tobin plan these
monthly programs and the April
event will focus on Israel.
"Young Leadership Develop-
ment provides the opportunity for
education and networking and it
seeks individuals who are commit-
ted to directing the future of our
community," commented Spahn
and Weinbren. For those wishing
to obtain more information please
contact the Federation 875-1618.
Advertising Sales
Miami based publishing company has
opening for Tampa publication
advertising sales person with proven
track record of success.
Send letter and resume to Jewish
Floridian P.O. Box 012973 Miami, Fla.
33101.
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Friday, March 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Menorah Manor Residents Begin Community Project Menorah Manor Begins
The Residents of Menorah
Manor are so appreciative of all
that the communities have done
for them, that they in turn wanted
to do something worthwhile for
the communities.
With the cooperation of the
Pinellas County Emergency
Medical Squad, the Residents of
the Home have begun putting
together Vial of Life Kits for
distribution in the community.
They feel that this is a most wor-
thy cause and can be of great
Reaganites Press $354 Million
Missiles Sale to Saudi Arabia
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -(JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion will try to prevent Con-
gress from rejecting its pro-
posal to sell $354 million in
missiles to Saudi Arabia by
stressing the Saudis need
the weapons to defend
themselves and other Per-
sian Gulf states from Iran.
The missile package which
was sent to Congress last week,
does "not represent a threat to
Israel," a senior Administration
official asserted in briefing
reporters. "This sale will not
threaten Israel's qualitative
military edge nor change the
power equation in the Middle
East," he stressed.
THE PROPOSED sale includes
1,666 Sidewinder air-to-air
missiles, of which 995 are the
most advanced type of
Sidewinder; 200 Stinger shoulder-
fired ground-to-air missile
systems plus 600 replacement
missiles; and 100 Harpoon air-to-
sea missiles. The Saudis now have
2,500 Sidewinders, 200 Stinger
systems with 200 replacement
missiles and 178 Harpoon sea-to-
sea missiles.
The official said that the Ad-
ministration had planned to pro-
pose this package at the end of the
year but had advanced it b* 'e
of the threat caused by Ir. .*n
troops moving to the border of
Kuwait. "That not only threatens
our interests but deeply troubles
our friends in the area,' he said.
The official also pointed to the
current unstable situation in
South Yemen "exacerbated by
Soviet interference" which he
said "raises the potential of a
renewed threat on Saudi Arabia's
southern border."
AT THE same time, the official
conceded that deliveries of the
missiles would not start until 1989
and run through 1991. However,
he stressed, "the fact of American
support for Saudi Arabia will act
as a deterrent on Iran."
He added that "acting now will
send a clear signal to Iran. It will
also reduce the chances that we
would have to take emergency ac-
tion later on our own to protect
our own interests."
Perhaps the most important
reason was noted by the official
when he said that the Saudis have
been pressing the U.S. to move on
the sale. "Our bilateral relation-
ship with Saudi Arabia and of
equal importance, our credibility
with the rest of the moderate
I-1ROWARD
[JAPER
Packaging
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 MO 432 37M
|:]ROWARD
I JAPER 4
[JACKAGING
Arabs, will be advanced by this
sale," he said.
THE OFFICIAL would not
assess whether the Israel govern-
ment's decision not to publicly
campaign against the sale means a
lessening of Israeli opposition. He
noted that the Israel Cabinet said
that on principle it was opposed to
arms sales to Arab countries that
are still at war with Israel.
The official said that this would
be the last major sale to the
Saudis this year except for the
possible beginning of delivery in
June of AWACS sold in 1981.
benefit to anyone who would like
to participate.
As explained by Mrs. Renee
Krosner, Director of Pro-
grams/Volunteers, "the Vial of
Life is designed to provide perti-
nent medical information in the
case of an emergency situation.
The program is especially useful
for those individuals living alone,
the handicapped, senior citizens,
and those people with special
health problems. If an emergency
situation arises, the Emergency
Medical Workers are trained to
look for the signal that the person
has a Vial of Life, as it can be of
utmost importance to have this in-
formation readily accessible."
If you would like to participate
in the Vial of Life program, please
contact your Synagogue or Tem-
ple and leave your name, as the
kits will be distributed through
the Synagogue or Temple.
If you would like further infor-
mation regarding the Vial of Life
Kits, please contact Renee
Krosner, Director of Pro-
grams/Volunteers at Menorah
Manor at (813) 345-2775.
Family Support Group
Somethin new and exciting is
happening at Menorah Manor
every Wednesday afternoon at
12:30 p.m.
The Social Service Department
of Menorah Manor has begun con-
ducting weekly "Family Hour
Meetings." These meetings are
available to anyone in the Home's
service area that express an in-
terest in learning more about
what it is like to live in a nursing
home. The Family Hour is design-
ed to help family members and
friends cope with the emotional
effects that are acquired when the
major decision is made to place a
loved one in a nursing home
setting.
According to the Home's Direc-
tor of Social Services, Barbara
Friedman, "each meeting deals
with the problems and concerns of
family members as they go
through the transition of placing a
loved one into a nursing home.
There have also been indepth
discussions on the new Florida
Laws and how they affect
members of a family with a
relative in a nursing home, and
the concerns of family members
as they too grow old. The best
thing about this group is that each
family member feels that they are
able to open up to one another and
help each other cope with the
many fears and frustrations that
they must deal with."
If you would like further infor-
mation on the Family Hour
Meetings or information regar-
ding admission to Menorah Manor
please contact Barbara Friedman,
Director of Social Services at
(813) 345-2775.
Who makes the
moistest, tastiest
chicken ever?
*}: jm'^.

*H IM Sf^^ ***"*
-
HellmannVand you.
Now you can bake up an exciting,
new chicken dish that promises
a delicious surprise in every bite.
Chicken baked with Hellmann's.
Soooo moist, soooo tender, so
remarkably delicious. Hellmann's
keens it specially juicy.
Marvelously tender.
And Hellmann's is Kosher Parve.
So, bring out the Hellmann's
and bring out the best in all kinds
of food.
Moist and Crispy Chicken
1 cup fine dry bread
crumbs or matzo meal
2 tsp dried oarsley flakes
1 tsp dry mustard
'/.' tsp paprika
'/2 tsp onion salt
2'/? to 3 lb broiler-fryer
chicken parts
'/2 cup HELLMANN'S^
Real Mayonnaise
Place first 5 ingredients in large plastic food bag;
shake to blend. Brush chicken on all sides with
Hellmann's Real Mayonnaise Place 1 piece of
chicken at a time in bag, sr^ke to coat well. Place
chicken on rack in broiler pan, so that pieces do not
touch. Bake in 425F oven 40 to 45 minutes or unti
golden brown and tender. Makes 4 to 6 servings.
O 1985 Be* Fooflt CPC Intonation* Inc
- i i,i,-. ii r. .'. i,

W'


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, March 21, 1986
cJewisH Floridian
Of Tampa
The Importance of Purim
Huwn*mOffic* 2H0N Horatio Siren. Tampa. Kb. 33609
Talephon* H7'J-447II
Publication Offic* 120 NE 6 St.. Miami. Kb 33132
KRrCI) K SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHKT AUDREY HAUBENSTTKK
Editor and Publisher Krcutivr Editor Editor
Free) SJtocftef
TW Jroiah Klondian Doaa Not Gaaraata* Th* KaUrvth
Of Tkr Marrhaaaia* Advrrtbad la Ita C oluiaa.
Publiahad Bi Weakly Phial Additional Edition on January 31. 1986 by ThaJawi.h Klondian of Tampa
Second Claae Poeta** Paid at Miami. Kb USPS 471-910 ISSN 8750-5063
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
SUHSCRIKNON RATKS 11 .oral Arrai i Yrar Minimum SulWriptinn ? (Hil of Town Upon Hrquent
Trw Jewish Klondiar. maintain* no trw hit IVopIt- receiun*; the paper who have not MJOMTiheri
directly are Mbacribffl through arrangrmfnt with ihr Jewish rederalion ol Tampa whervhv %'l 2\>
per yir i* deducted from their contribution* for a tuhvriplion to the paper -\n\one wihinK I"
tarn, el such a Friday, March 21,1986
Volume 8
10 2 AD AR 5746
Number 7
Judith Resnik Remains
Will Be Cremated, Dad Declares
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
body of Judith Resnick, one of the
seven astronauts who died when
the space shuttle Challenger ex-
ploded on Jan. 28, will be
cremated, her father, Dr. Marvin
Resnick, told the Army Radio in
an interview from Akron, Ohio.
He spoke in Hebrew and English.
Tne interview followed
discovery of the shuttle's crew
compartment on the ocean floor
off the Florida coast last week
with the remains of the five men
and two women aboard. Although
the remains were said not to be in-
tact, Resnick, a medical doctor,
was quoted in the American media
as saying officials of the National
Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration (NASA) believe some
of the bodies could be identified.
Resnick told the Army Radio
that efforts to raise the crew com-
partment have been delayed by
bad weather. But some of it has
been brought to the surface, and
forensic experts are examining
the bodies, he said.
"She achieved something in her
life, but her life was too short,"
Resnick said of his daughter, who
at 35, held a PhD in electrical
engineering and had completed
one successful flight in the space
shuttle. She was the second
woman astronaut to go into space
and the first Jewish woman
astronaut.
Media reports in the U.S. said
the families of the astronauts
greeted news of the discovery of
their remains with mixed feelings.
Pre-natal Professional. We know where you can find Lorraine
Kuahner these days. A certified childbirth educator, she has been
teaching in various health-care settings, schools and colleges for
over 20 years. Now she has begun EASE Education And Sup-
port Enhancing The Childbearing Year at Carroll wood
Obstetrics and Gynecology offices of Drs. Levitt, Levine. Fer-
nandez and Matthews.
Lorraine will offer pre-natal care and post-partum follow-up ae
part of the doctor's routine obstetrical care. This will include in-
struction in such areas as nutrition, breastfeeding, pre-and post-
natal exercise, LaMaze childbirth preparation, stress
managements and relaxation techniques, and of course, emo-
tional support. Sounds like^a wonderful and important new
service.
Memorial Hospital Election. AMI Memorial Hospital of Tam-
pa held an election for officers of the hospital's Board of Direc-
tors. Michael Gerber, Executive Director of the hospital, was
elected President of the Board; and L. David Shear, was voted
secretary. Congratulations and good luck to you both.
First place and first seat. Bjorn better keep an eye on Peter
Kaufinann, son of Lili and Barry Kaufmann. who won first place
in Boys Age 14 Division of the Tampa Tennis Association Grand
Prix Tournament. Peter, an Honor Roll student at Hillel and a re-
cent Bar Mitzvah, also holds first seat in the violin sectiorvof the
Junior String Orchestra. Yitznak Perl man better watch out, too.
Brazilian Bar-B-Que is the theme of The Children's Home
Patron Party on April 4 at the home of Carole and Harold Ewen.
The menu will be completely South American and entertainment
will be provided by an authentic Salsa band. On Saturday, April 5,
at the Palma Ceia Country Club will be the Home's annual gala
fundraiser. This year's theme is "Carnival in Rio," according to
publicity chairman, Rhonda Frazier.
The Children's Home, located on Memorial Hwy. provides hous-
ing, facilities and services for children up to 17 years old who are
haned, neglected or abused. For tickets and information, call
jnda at 831-3126.
Babies, babies, babies. Congratulations and mazel tov to
Trudy and Ken Novak on the brith of Erica Rachel on November
2, 1985, weighing 8 lbs., 10 ozs. Her grandparents are Miriam
and Stanley Solomon of Delray Beach and Shirley and Tom
Novak of Annapolis, Md. Her lucky great-grandparents are
Phyllis and Matthew Dolan in Annapolis and Celia Mann in
By RABBI
STEVEN J. KAPLAN
Purim is steeped in controver-
sy. Scholars from all walks of life
have examined and analyzed the
authenticity of the Book of
Esther, who the characters were
and where they fit in historically,
who authored the Scroll itself,
was the holiday simply another
non-Jewish festival that we
Judaized, and on and on and on.
In addition to these academic
issues, theological concerns arise.
Why is G-d not mentioned in the
Scroll? Was there Divine guidance
in the events taking place, and if
so, does this no conflict with
Judaism's belief in free will?
Further, we have halachic
issues to contend with. How can
we expect to follow the Purim dic-
tum to become happy if we are in a
shiva period? Should Purim cancel
a shiva? Can a man masquerade as
a woman on Purim? Must one
fast? Are men and women re-
quired to give charity? This list,
too, can continue.
We are all familiar with the nar-
rative of Purim, and commonly
envision boys and girls dressed as
Haman and Esther, participating
in a joyous occasion of some sort.
A Jewish Halloween? Hardly.
What then is the significance of
observing a holiday who's origin is
questionable, authorship doubted,
was initially opposed by our sages,
and has characters that may never
have existed?! The answer is one
of spiritual importance. Does it
truly matter that Shakespeare
may not have written all of
Shakespeare? We must look at the
story and understand what the
message of Purim is.
When we veiw the pride
Mordechai exhibited in not bow-
ing to or worshipping another
human, the willingness of Esther
to no longer conceal her identity
because it was the selfish and safe
thing to do, we learn to be proud
of what we are. and to stand up
for those values we hold dear.
They were willing to die for their
ideals. We are asked to simply live
by ours.
The obligation of shalach manot
and the custom of tzedakkah
reminds us that as in the Megillah
narrative, we have an obligation
toward our fellow Jew. Helping
for the sake of helping allows us to
have good as its own reward.
Although it is no mitzvah to
become drunk, we are allowed to
partake of intoxicating beverages,
to a limit.
As in most things in Jewish life,
extremes are avoided, but enjoy-
ing life in a variety of ways is
encouraged.
These are major messages
Purim, a relatively minor holiday,
teaches us. Let us together, as a
community of Jews, continue to
show our pride, our convictions,
and as a result, our strength.
Then will Purim's importance
become a beacon.
Readers Write
Editor's Note: This letter is in
response to an article "Kahane:
Not just Israel's Problem" by
Harry Wall, which was printed in
the January 10 issue.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridan:
Harry Wall's letter attacking
Rabbi Meir Kahane bothered me.
Wall is the director of the Anti-
Defamation League office in
Jerusalem. His organization is
famous for fighting legal battles
for our children so that they could
go to the same hotels as gentiles
and eat non-kosher food with
them and violate the sabbath with
them and then marry them. The
ADL is an organization dedicated
to the destruction of Jewish iden-
Whiteville, N.C.
Hello to Brcnnan Richard Falkner who was born at home to
Linda and Gerald Falkner, and three year old sister Naomi, on
January 16 weighing 8 lbs., 1 oz. His grandparents are Rath and
Joseph Miller in Madison. Wise, and Edna Falkiewicz in
Milwaukee. He has three great-grandmothers in Milwaukee:
Celia Troy, Rae Miller and Martha Prais.
Mazel tov to Rae and Paul Wallach on the birth of their
daughter Sharon Elaaa on January 30, weighing llk lbs. Her
delighted grandparents are all in nearby Orlando: Rabbi and
Mrs. Rudolph Adler and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Wallach.
Welcome to Joel Clifford Moore, born February 2 to Kris and
Michael Moore, and big sister Melissa who is in first grade at
Hillel School. Weighing in at just 4 lbs., 7 ozs., little Joel's grand-
ma Irene Redner lives in Tampa and grandparents Katherine
and Herman Moore live in Mobile, Ala.
And we welcome Kari Heather Lipschutz, born February 10 to
Dr. Fred and Ellyn Lipschutz, weighing 6 lbs., 14 ozs. She was
eagerly greeted by big brother Evan, age six and sister Brooke,
age three. Grandma Ruth Weston, of Tampa, grandparents Mar-
cia and Carl Lipschutz are in Philadelphia and great-
grandparents Jenny and Daniel Starr live in Tamarac.
Mazel tov to Linda and Bobby Berger on the birth of Benjamin
Abraham, born February 12 weighing 7 lbs., 4 ozs. His grand-
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wintermyer of Findley, Ohio
and Charlotte Berger and the late Melvin Berger of Tampa. He
has three great-grandmothers: Mrs. Helen Porter in Findley,
Ohio; Mrs. Marguerite Spitz and Mrs. Lizzie Berger, Tampa.
Congratulations to Andrea and Gary Stupp who are thrilled to
announce the arrival of Katherine Marie (Katie) on February 18.
She weighed 5 lbs., 12 ozs. at birth. Her proud grandparents are
Elaine and Mort Stupp of Tampa. Andrea, Gary and Katie live in
Ft. Carson, Colo, where Gary is a Specialist 4 in the army.
Busy lady. Just try to keep track of Diana Winoker. She's just
been re-appointed by Mayor Martinez to a three-year term as one
of six trustees meeting monthly to oversee and invest the City of
Tampa General Employees Pension, over $130 million fund An
account executive at E. F. Hutton, Diana is also teaching finan-
cial planning for women in USF's continuing education program
And working toward her Certified Financial Planner deeree'
Believe it or not, she still manages to find time for scuba divine'
sailing, and her many organizations.
Corporate health. We send congratulations and a big Tamoa
greeting to Gary S Weinstein, recently appointed Corporate
Relations Director for Doctor's Walk-In Clinic, Inc Gary
relocated here from Gainesville about six weeks ago where he
was Director of the Gainesville Medical Center. A graduate of the
University of Flonda, he now resides in Temple Terrace and is
ooking forward to meeting anyone interested in hot
ballooning.
air
Newcomers. Welcome to Dr. Bruce and Claudia Kahan who
moved to Tampa last October from Virginia Beach. Bruce and
Claudia met in Worcester, Mass. when she was a patient in the
emergency room during his residency. Now Bruce is practicing
internal med.c.ne for Cigna Health Plan, and Claudia is concen
tracing all her energies on 20-rnonth-old Justin. (And believe me
that s takes a lot of energy.) The Kahan's are happy to be in Tarn'
pa and ran t wait to start going to the beach. Glad you're here!
tity not only in America, but also
in Israel.
Harry Wall, who is Jewishly il-
literate, compares the Torah to
the laws of Hitler's Reich. Yet
Wall claims that Rabbi Kahane
distorts Judaism. Harry Wall
wouldn't know what Judaism was
if it hit him on the head. Wall is
correct in saying that Judaism
respects law, but it is Jewish law,
halakha, which Judaism respects
not the U.S. Bill of Rights.
Wall is afraid of Kahane
because he enjoys widespread
grassroot support among the ma-
jority Oriental Jewish population
in Israel. They remember what it
was like to live among the Arabs
as a minority which, under a
democracy, could happen again.
As Kahane says, "If the Arabs
laid down their weapons and
retired to their bedrooms and kept
making babies then those Arabs,
With Israeli Citizenship, could
democratically dismantle the
Jewish state." The ADL does not
nor cannot offer any alternative,
any solution to the Israeli Arab
threat to the Jewish identity of
Israel.
Kahane was a viable alter-
native. He wants Israel to com-
plete the population exchange
which the Arabs began even
before 1948. This is the most
human and practical route in the
long run. Historical precedent
was set before WW I when the
ethnic communities of Turks,
Greeks and Bulgarians where
repatriated to their homelands
from which they had been absent
for generations. The same is true
of -the German minorities scat-
tered throughout Europe after
WWII. In 1948, when Israel had
the chance to rid herself of "the
thorn in her eyes," India and
Pakistan were not so stupid; the
same year they ridded themselves
of another civil war by their
population exchanges. Were these
acts of racism or pragmatic acts of
survival? No one can become a
Turk, Greek, German, etc. but
anyone can become a Jew in-
cluding an Israeli Arab.
RA'ANAN ELOZORY
NEW JERSEY YM-YWHA CAMPS
ROUND LAKE CAMP
lake Como. Pa
FMnnfiaiwnaiiia-i
LEAUIIS IIIMIimft
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rMFEUIMUl UPEMS1M llttCTll IT
Cf ITIFIEI SPECIAL EIWATIII SPECIALISTS
a Stress on individual Gran* m AN Act****
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FOR INFORMATION CALL:
305-151-07a
OR WRITE
Till I.j. TM-TNHA Caaas
21 Plymouth St.. FairheW. N J 07006
1


Friday, March 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
INTRODUCING EL AS OWN
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Now you can enjoy our new Milk and
Honey Vacation packages, for nine or thirteen
nights.
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As always, El Al has the most non-stop
and direct flights to the Holyland. And you'll
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flight. Packages are also available to Eilat,
Istanbul and Cairo.
So when you go to Israel, go with the peo-
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El Al Israel Airlines. To us, Israel is more
than just another stop on our flight schedule.
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For more information call your travel agent or
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For a free, detailed color brochure, write El Al
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COME TO ISRAEL. COME SMY WITH FRIENDS.
Land portion only. Prices subject to change. Effective May through October 1986.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, March 21, 198fi

"I gave at the office
and other grim fairy tales.

"Send me the card and I'll think about it."
"I have to talk to my accountant."
"I don't believe in parochial education."
"I don't want to give a new pledge until I've
paid off my old one."
"I have a problem with Israeli politics right now.
"I send my money directly to ."
"We've only been here a few years and don't
feel we're part of the community."
Fairy tales all.
When we call, we're not interested
in fairy tales.
Turning pumpkins into coaches takes
a lot of work and your financial
support.
Yes, you!
We gave up on fairy godmothers a long
time ago.
ti
h
t!
J
h
fi
n
rr
e
n
n
V.
a
W
tl
o
Is
tc
C
A
le

S

a
d
u
ir
oi
a
b
u
Support the 1986 Tampa Jewish Federation/
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
2808 Horatio Tampa, FL 875-1618
One People, One Destiny
-* -


-.
JNF Inaugurates Memorial Forest
For Young Sinai Victims
Friday, March 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
Bereaved parents and relatives
planted four Lebanese cedars in
the Ramot Forest, Jerusalem, to
remember four children who were
shot in Ras Burka in the northern
Sinai in October 1985. The
children, Amir Bauer (10), Tzilia
Shelach (12), Ofri Turiel (13) and
Dina Baeri (10), were among
seven Israelis lolled when an
Egyptian soldier opened fire upon
a group of Israeli vacationers
camping by the Red Sea.
The trees were the first to be
planted in a new Jewish National
Fund memorial forest, located
below the capital's Ramot suburb.
The forest, inaugurated in the
presence of Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of Educa-
tion and Culture Yitzhak Navon,
is being planted on the initiative of
teachers and pupils of Ramot's
neighborhood schools, attended
by three of the slain children.
"Planting a forest is the only
meaningful expression we have to
commemorate the victims of an
event which was tragic, painful,
horrendous and unnecessary,"
said Navon. "These families came
to Ras Burka because they were
drawn by Sinai's natural beauty
and because they believed in peace
with Egypt. Instead, they were
welcomed with bullets and then
denied elementary human
assistance." Navon stressed his
dedication to peace, but insisted
that Israel has the right to know
Harris Poll
Continued from Page 1
talented Israelis." For example, nia studies would
he noted that those arrested and
tried for participating in the
Jewish underground included
highly educated Israelis officers
from the army.
Sprinzak contended that the
radical right would have been
much less successful if more Arab
countries and the PLO had
recognized Israel. Continued Arab
rejection of the Jewish State
weakens the efforts of Peace Now
and other groups on the political
left which argue for a peaceful set-
tlement of the Arab-Israeli
conflict.
Such groups need the support of
American Jews, Sprinzak said.
"American Jews can contribute to
Israel the lessons of pluralism,
tolerance, and the rule of law."
In his remarks, San Francisco
CRC director Earl Raab implored
American Jewish communal
leaders to redouble their commit-
ment to pluralism in the United
States and to support those
groups in Israel working against
the siege mentality. Observing
that while American Jews have
until now avoided interfering in
internal Israeli affairs, Raab went
on to say, "We may have entered
a new stage in which we will
become more explicit about the in-
ternal character of Israel."
a. "Jews are irritating because
they are too aggressive"
24 percent agreed, however
61 percent disagreed.
b. "Jews feel superior to other
groups"
27 percent agreed, but 60 per-
cent disagreed.
c. "The Jewish lobby in the
United States is far too powerful
for the good of this country"
30 percent agreed, and 50 per-
cent disagreed.
When asked if Jews in this coun-
try have too much power, 27 per-
cent agreed, while 53 percent
believed Jews have "the right
amount" of power. In a follow-up
question, 14 percent believed
"steps should be taken to reduce
the power and influence that Jews
now have in this country," but 65
percent opposed such steps.
These figures are highly signifi-
cant, particularly in the context of
the current crisis in the farm belt.
In previous polls repeated over
many years, approximately one-
third of those polled have tradi-
tionally expressed aati-Semitic
sentiments, while another third
have been philo-Semitic and the
remaining third non-committal.
Indeed, the anti-Semitic quotient
for rural Midwestern whites in the
landmark University of California
study (1969) was 52 percent. The
fact that only 27 percent of those
questioned in the ADL/Harris poll
believed Jews have too much
power indicates that the decline in
farmers' fortunes has not been ac-
companied by a concomitant rise
in anti-Semitism; America's
fanners, by and large, are simply
not engaging in scapegoating.
A direct comparison of the Har-
ris and the University of Califor-
not be ap-
propriate because they were con-
ducted in different ways, but it is
noteworthy that despite the hard
times farmers face and the an-
ticipated scapegoating that ac-
companies difficulties, anti-
Semitism has not caught hold. A
substantial majority of those ques-
tioned in the Harris Poll are simp-
ly not anti-Semitic no matter
viewers with alarm.
the full truth about Ras Burka and
the many unanswered questions
surrounding the incident.
"These tender saplings sym-
bolize youthful lives which were
tragically and prematurely cut
down," said Ya'akov Barmore,
JNF's information director. "As
the trees grow, their roots will
deepen and in years to come they
will help to beautify the surroun-
ding hills."
Yossi Arid, chairman of
Ramot's Neighborhood Council,
hoped that Ramot Forest would
comfort the bereaved families.
"May Israel's sacrifice at Ras
Burka be the sole price we shall be
called on to pay for peace with
Egypt and, indeed, with other
Arab nations," he said, his voice
choking with emotion.
Displaying attentiveness and
restraint, classmates later read
poems, compositions and letters
written by their slain friends,
while several duets, a choir and
two choreographic troupes from
the Ramot Central Community
State School performed in
memorial solidarity for the
departed pupils.
JNF is the organization respon-
sible for afforestation and land
reclamation in Israel.
Yitzhak Navon (left), Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of
Education and Culture, plants a sapling at inauguration
ceremonies for a new JNF memorial foret in Ramot for four
children slain in the northern Sinai. They were among seven
Israelis killed when an Egyptian officer opened fire in October
1985.
Eat in Good Health
With Fleischmann's. Margarine
V^eetUTCALTED
Fleischmanns
oSss?^
<3>
Cfc*^
W*
r^lOO% corn oil
Margarine
'*XX)%comol
krgariue
*(S?~
?* -****
Now its easy to make delicio.us low cholesterol Challah
French Toast. Start with your own low cholesterol Challah
(see recipe below) and make sure Fleischmanns Margarine
and Fleischmann's I'm Beaters are part ot the recipe
Fleischmann s Margarine is made trom 100' corn oil has 0\.
cholesterol and is low in saturated lal
So il you want lo enioy good eating and good health one
things tor certain .er been a better time h,t the
great taste ot Flenctiniann s
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH m*?.
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH FRENCH TOAST
4 (V*Hnch thick) shoes Low
Cholesterol Chakah (recipe toKows)
1 tablespoon FLEISCHMANN'S
Sweet Dreaded Margarine
Syrup, iam or confectioner's sugar
6 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Dash powdered saffron, optional
1 package FLEISCHMANN'S'
FtapidRise' veast
1 cup hot water (125*10 130f)
V, cup FLEISCHMANN S Sweet
Dnsalted Margarine, softened
1 cup FLEISCHMANNS EGG
BEATERS Cholesterol Free 99%
Fteal Egg Product, at room
temperature
Sesame or poppy seed
Y, cup EGG BEATERS
Cholesterol Free 99% Real
Egg Product
W teaspoon vareHa extract
Yi teaspoon ground onnamon
m sharow dsh. ban FLEISCHMANN'S Egg Beaters, vania and cm
namon Dip chafoh into mixture, tumng to coat wet In sk*et. over
medwm heat, met FLEISCHMANN'S Sweet DnsaNed Margarine Add
Chalah, cook tor 3 to 5 minutes on each side or until gokton brown.
Serve witi syrup, jam or contoctoners sugar
* .. h
f It'iv hmanns tyves even meal d holid.i\ lldvor.
Set aside t cup Dour In large bowl, mx remaining flour, sugar, sat.
saffron and FLEISCHMANN S RapidRise Yeast, sor m hot water aid
FLEISCHMANN'S Sweet Dnsalted Margarine Mix in y, cup
FLEISCHMANN'S Egg Beaters and enough reserved ftour to make sort
dough Knead until smooth and elastic. 8 to 10 minutes Cover; let rest
10 minutes
Divide dough m halt Divide one halt into 2 pieces one about ^ot dough
and the other about fc of dough Divide larger piece into 3 equal pieces;
rol each into 12-mch rope Braid the ropes, seal ends Divide smafler
piece mto 3 equal pieces, roll each into 10-inchrope Braid ropes; place
on top of large brad Seal together at ends Place on greased baking
sheet Repeat with remaining dough Cover, let rise in warm draft-free
place until doubled In sae, about 1 hour
Brush loaves with remaining Egg Beaters; sprinkle with seeds Bake at
376*F for 20 to 25 minutes or until done Remove from sheets,
cool on wire racks
15c
MMMil wuwta.1

SAVE15C
When you buy any package of
Reischmannls Margarine
-> 63MDS0
nw Or* cawm m wiMh m nM
ntcjlil y am .* cwmMr, Lm
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MnnHI Ma t* offer ttrms CM) MU 1 (
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29000% 1015


Page 8 The Jewiah Floridian of Tampa/Friday, March 21, 1986
Pearl Division Stages Successful Luncheon

The 2nd Annual Pearl Division
teen) event on behalf of the 1986
Women's Division Campaign was
leld last week at the Marriott
Hotel.
Co-Chairwomen of the event,
Patty Kalish and Mimi Aaron
report that 130 people were in at-
tendance to the "most successful
event ever!" Jeff Fox and Neil
Shaw, assisted by Rabin Shaw,
gave a presentation on their trip
to Israel, including humorous an-
tidotes. The teens staged a
fashion show coordinated by Shel-
'y Appleblatt and Elaine Brover-
man, and moderated by Shelly.
Teens modeling in the show were:
Randi Broverman, Monica Rosen-
thai, Dana Appleblatt, Stacey
Levine, Julie Kalish, Jenifer
Kalish, Kerri Aaron, Arlene Her-
zog, Randi Rudolph, Loren Har-
ris, Pam Kleban, Jessica Older,
Ben Older, Matias Eichberg, J.J.
Zwern, Darren Applebiatt, Brett
Marks, and Michael Zaritsky.
The committee who planned the
memorable day included: Jerilyn
Goldsmith, Shelly Appleblatt,
Elaine Broverman, Janet Cotzen,
Doris Field, Trudy Harris, Susan
Zalkin, Phylis Browarsky and
Bonnie Solomon.
The fashion show included
clothes by Colony Shops and The
Men's Room. Door prizes were
furnished from Colony Shops, The
Men's Room, Maas Brothers Fine
Jewelry, People PaPER Plus, and
Puritan Men's Wear, and table
favors donated by Pride-Mark
Promotions, and the Name Game.
The 1986 Women's Division
Campaign Co-chairwomen, Alice
Rosenthal and Aida Weissman
stated, "Part of the educational
process of fundraising involves
transmitting an understanding of
the traditional obligations of#*
'tzedaka' which means justice, not
charity. The Teen Division was
formed to educate our youth to
movitate, strengthen leadership
qualities, and provide students an
opporutnity to advance their
understanding of the Jewish past,
present, and future. The process
involves learning the facts about
the needs of world Jewry. In addi-
tion, a financial commitment in
the form of a pledge, however
minimal, gives the least as well as
the most active teens the chance
to become personally involved in
the development of our Tampa
community. Teens who learn to
give in this way, by learning the
facts and rearranging their
priorities to face their obligations,
will be the intelligent and effec-
tive leaders of the Tampa Jewish
community in the future."
Let The
Tampa Airport Marriott
Cater To
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Our professional staff, attentive service and gracious
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For Brochure A Rates Cod Miami Otttea
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Friday, March 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
Starting April 27th Pan Am Will Be Taking Off Every Day For Tel Aviv.
Right nowrftin Am can take to announce that our schedule will you see Israel, For reservations
you to Tel Aviv four times a week get even better. With daily service and information call your Travel
with convenient connections starting April 27th. Makingiteven Agentor Pan Am at 1-800-221-1 111.
through Paris. And we're happy easier for this year to be the year

*
Pan ArnVbu Cant BeatThe Experience;
'scheduli-- suhiift to change withtnii notice
HP *^ *'?'-* *>*


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, March 21, 1986
Congregations/Organizations Events
-
CONGREGATION RODEPH
SHOLOM
PURIM
Purim begins on Monday night,
March 24. We are looking forward
to our members and guests joining
us for the reading of the Megillah
this evening at 7:30 p.m. Rabbi
Berger and Cantor Hauben cor-
dially invite you to join them in
COSTUME. We will have singing,
dancing, and hamentashen for all.
See you there!
USY AND KADIMA PURIM
CARNIVAL
Sunday, March 23 Religious
School, 9-10 a.m. Costume Parade
(prizes given) 10-10:30. Carnival
10:30-12:30. Bigger and better
booths. Food, music, dance,
prizes. Dunking booth, moon
walk, go fish, hamentashen,
lunch. Join your friends and
celebrate Purim at Rodeph
Sholom.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
JEWISH WOMEN
PROFESSOR HEIM TO
SPEAK
"Golems and Monsters in An-
cient Folklore" or "Frankenstein
Certainly Sounds Jewish" will be
the topic of discussion with Prof.
William Heim of the University of
South Florida on Wednesday,
March 26.
The Tampa Section, National
Council of Jewish Women
meeting will take place at 11:30 at
the Sunset Park Garden Club on
Browning at West Shore. There
will be a catered luncheon served.
The cost is $6 per person. For
reservations call: Lois Tannen at
837-2806 or Dorothy Greenberg at
963-1756.
There will be a Board Meeting
at 9:30, just before the meeting.
CORRECTION
HadasMh/Brandon Shalom
Chapter
The Brandon Shalom
Chapter/Hadassah Purim Picnic
will be held March 23. An incor-
rect date was listed in the last
JEWISH WAR VETERANS OF
TAMPA
The Albert Aronoviti Post No.
373 and Ladies Auxiliary invites
all veterans, auxiliary members
and their families to attend Friday
evening services on April 4 at 8
p.m. at Congregation Kol Ami to
honor the Jewish War veterans
and the fallen astronauts.
Members of both post and aux-
iliary will partake in the services
with Rabbi H. David Rose. There
will be an Oneg Shabbat following
the services. Come and join us. ^
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI
ZEDEK
Purim Carnival
On Sunday, March 23 at 11:30
a.m., immediately following
Religious School, SCHZFTY in-
vites the Congregation to the
Purim Carnival. There will be a
raffle, lunch, games, prizes, and
lots of fun for the whole family.
HADASSAH/AMEET
CHAPTER
Garage Sale
The Ameet Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its annual
Garage Sale on Friday, March 21
from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. The loca-
tion will be 3602 Prunus Place in
Carrollwood. Items range from
furniture, clothes, toys, ap-
pliances, kitchen wares, knick-
knacks. All proceeds go to
Hadassah projects. For more in-
formation call 996-4680.
"OVER 50"
Second Time Arounders
Are you interested in meeting
couples who are second time
arounders? Let's get together for
a new beginning! Call 977-4985.
CONGREGATION RODEPH
SHALOM
Mitzvah Luncheon
Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood is
pleased to announce our Twelfth
Mitzvah Luncheon will be held on
Wednesday, April 2, 11 a.m. at
the Rodeph Sholom Social Hall.
This year we will be hosting a
Spring Style Show put on by
Deborah Kent's.
The Miriam Circle will be pro-
viding the luncheon at a cost of
$15. Mitzvah donation and lunch
is $25. For reservations, please
contact Diana Siegel, 685-7433
before March 26.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI
Purim Carnival
You are invited to attend this
fun-filled event on Sunday, March
23 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Kol
Ami. We will be featuring arrival
of the mystery Purim Phantom, a
moonwalk. dunk tank, costume
contest, lunch and munchies as
well as booths and prizes for ALL
ages. BE THERE! If you are in-
terested in volunteering to help,
please call Cheryl Levy at
972-4282, Mindi Herman at
963-2588, or the synagogue at
962-6338.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI
ZEDEK
YOUNG SINGLE ADULTS
(18-35)
COME TO A KICK-OFF
MEETING
Wednesday, April 2
at 7:30 p.m.
at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
3303 Swann Avenue
For more information, please call
the Temple 876-2377
THE TAMPA BAY JEWISH
SINGLES COUNCIL
The Tampa Bay Jewish Singles
Council, an autonomous non-
profit Jewish singles group serv-
ing both Hillsborough and Pinellas
Counties, recently contracted
with the Tampa Jewish Communi-
ty Center to provide professional
staffing service. Susan Peled, pro-
gram director at the Jewish Com-
munity Center will be working
with the Singles Council.
"I feel she will be a strong asset
for the council in building future
leadership, assisting with pro-
gramming and maintaining the
continuity of the council. We look
forward to working with her,"
states Richard Myers, president
of the Tampa Bay Jewish Singles
Council.
The Tampa Bay Jewish Singles
Council was formed a year ago by
single Jewish leaders to help meet
the needs of the Jewish singles in
our community. The council offers
a variety of social, educational,
religious, recreational and
cultural activities. In addition to
involvement with various Jewish
community projects, the council
works very closely with many
synagogues, the Jewish Federa-
tions, the Jewish Community
Centers and Jewish Family Ser-
vices both in Hillsborough and
Pinellas Counties.
To be added to the council's
mailing list, please send your
name, address and phone number
to: Carla Goldman, the Tampa
Bay Jewish Singles Council, c/o
The Tampa JCC, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, FL 33609. For ad-
ditional information concerning
future events please call Cathy
Smith at 969-3441, Susan Peled at
872-4451 in Hillsborough, Jeff
Donsky at 585-1888, Debbie
Zimbler at 347-3236 in Pinellas.
Singles Go To Services
Worship this ShaBbat, March
21, with the TBJS's and Rabbi
Rose at Congregation Kol-Ami,
3919 Moran Road, Tampa.
Services begin at 8 p.m. and will
be followed by a special Oneg
Shabbat at Rick Myers' home.
You will receive directions to
Rick's home at the Temple. Shab-
bat Shalom.
Fun N' Fitness
Whether you're on a fitness
kick or not you'll have a blast at
American Fitness, Saturday,
March 29 starting at 7:30 p.m.
Take a dip in the whirlpool, dry
out in the sauna, work out on the
machines, get your heart pumping
in aerobics class or swim a few
laps in the pool then munch out!
Healthy foods (and some not so
healthy) will be served. By the
way, the American Fitness Center
which is located at 4110 Hender-
son Blvd., Tampa will be closed to
the public for the evening so it
is open exclusively for the Tampa
Bay Jewish Singles. Locker
facilities available. Bring your
own towel and lock. There is no
fee for this event. For more infor-
mation contact Cathy at 969-3441.
Planning Meeting
Join us for dinner, socializing
and planning the May/June
events, Wednesday, April 2 at the
China One Buffet located at 4240
West Kennedy Blvd., Tampa at 6
p.m. Now is the good tune to
become involved. If you have any
questions please contact Jeff Don-
sky, program chairman at
585-1888.
USP Dsarsscspas
Doe to USF schedule change
the USF Daneespaces program
tUnited by the Tampa Bay Jewish
ingles Council for Saturday,
April 12, has been cancelled.
CHABAD LUBAVITCH
PRESENTS PURIM
EXPERIENCE
Purim is the festival which com-
memorates the breathtaking vic-
tory over the murderous designs
of Haman. It is a day to be
celebrated by the entire family
beginning with the reading of the
Megillah (Book of Esther) which
contains and helps us re-live the
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miraculous events of Purim. One
should listen to the reading of the
Megillah on Purim night and
again during Purim day. Also em-
phasized is the importance of
Jewish unity and friendship by
sending mishloach manos, gifts of
food to friends; at least two kinds
of edibles (for example, a piece of
cake and fruit) to at least one
friend. We show concern for the
needy in giving Matanos
L'evyonim (charity), at least one
penny to two poor people,
however, the more one gives the
better. If one cannot find a poor
person, put it in a charity box. On
Purim day we gather around the
table to enjoy a festive Purim
meal.
To further enhance the celebra-
tion of Purim Chabad Lubavitch
will sponsor a grand carnival,
"The Purim Experience." Includ-
ed in the attractions at this event
will be Moon Walk, Dunk Tank,
Dart Hamen, Kosher Hot Dogs
from New York, cotton candy,
prizes and raffles galore.
The entire Jewish community is
invited to share in this joyous day.
Purim has always had a special
meaning to children, therefore a
free raffle ticket will be given to
each and every child that comes
dressed in a Purim costume. The
carnival will be held at Congrega-
tion Bais Teffilah, Sunday, March
23 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For fur-
ther information please call
962-2375.
CHABAD HOUSE
Chabad Jewish Student Center
At USF announces a gala Purim
party on Monday evening, March
24. A special Purim slide presen-
tation will be shown during the
reading of the Megillah; music and
refreshments will follow. All
students are encouraged to come
and bring their friends. Evening
services will begin at 7:30 p.m.
followed by the reading of the
Megillah. For further information
please call Rabbi Mockin at
971-6234.
CONGREGATION BAIS
TEFFILAH
Special Shachris services will be
held for Taanis Esther (the fast of
Esther) beginning at 7 a.m. Mon-
day, March 24. Minchah services
will begin at 5:30 p.m. followed by
the giving of a half of Shekel (half
a dollar) customary. Evening ser-
vice will begin at 7:30 p.m. follow-
ed by the Megillah reading and the
breaking of the fast. Tuesday mor-
ning Shachris services at 7 a.m.
followed by the Megillah reading.
The Women's Auxiliary
together with Chabad Lubavitch
is sponsoring a Purim Seudah
(Festive Meal). Purim is a time of
joy and celebration, and therefore
we gather together to feast in the
spirit of Purim. Seudah will begin
at 6 p.m., Tuesday, March 25, at
the Synagogue. For reservations
and information please call
968-1849 or 962-2375.
Summer Staff Jobs
In Pennsylvania's
Pocono Mountains
Specialists for older adult vacs-
tlon camp In music end srts *
crafts. Early Juna-Auguet 29,
1966. CompstHhrs aalary plus
room and board.
For Info contact Eugene Bell,
YM-YWHA Camps, 21 Plymouth
St., Falrfletd, N.J. 07008, or phone
201-575-3333
Randy M. Freedman
n
Lynch
One Tampa City Center
Tampa. FL 3360?
813-273-8586
TliIsSlIMMER,
ThADEThE Heat For CK r\&rmth
^ if^S Beftsclhc Florida heal wilt* vnu ilwtsummcr.
QJ^^^W nuke plans to head North lot ihe l-alK\ie\\ Hun- vmi'll
%^fl lintl cool sum minimus and warm reeepii' >ns e\er\ \\ here
^^k mmi nun
WV Ami ii mhi plan id nuke unit summer roerva
M% lions now. vow i .in plan to take ail\ .tillage ol out special
J Extended Shi) Rates Ai thai rare. ymi'llcnkn the
Fallsview activities even more
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and sw miming, a KoIh.ii Trent
Janus gull course, mcuuettxill, boating and so much more There seven
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weather The Fallsx tew
THE IAl I SVIKW EU ENVIUE, NY. <
CALL TOLL FREE HUM.'1-015.


Friday, March 21,1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Sundays: tmmt ia "Tha
Jewi.h Sowd" WMNF
gg.SFM 10:10 a.w.-l p.m.
Community Calendar
CANDLELIGHTING
TIMES
Friday, March 21 C:22
p.m.
Friday. March 28, C:2C
p.ai.
Friday. April 4 8:29 p.m.
KOL AMI PURIM
CARNIVAL
23
10:00 RODEPH
SHOLOM
SISTERHOOD PURIM
CARNIVAL
10:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK SISTERHOOD
CRADLE ROLL
1:00 KOL AMI -
BONEEM JU
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER SPRING
CAMP
KOL AMI-NO
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
7:00 KOL AMI PURIM
SERVICE
31
25
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER SPRING
CAMP
KOL AMI-NO
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
10:50 JEWISH
TOWERS BOARD
MEETING
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER SPRING ^X
CAMP A"
KOL AMI-NO
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
9:30 NATIONAL
COUNCIL JEWISH
WOMEN GENERAL
MEETING
10:00 'JEWISH
COMMUNITY FOOD
BANK
ALL DAY HADASSAH _
AMEET CHAPTER 21
GARAGE SALE
8:00 KOL AMI
HEBREW LEVEL I
SERVICE
8:00 RODEPH SHOLOM
B/M ADULT
CONVERSION CLASS
8:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK FAMILY
SERVICE ___
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER SPRING ? 7
CAMP ""'
KOL AMI-NO
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
7:30 KOL AMI
FELLOWSHIP
MEETING
7:50 KOL AMI
EXECUTIVE BOARD
MEETING
Good Friday
28
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER SPRING
CAMP
8:00 SCHAARAI
ZEDEK
BROTHERHOOD
SABBATH
22
KOL AMI KADUf A
AND USY SOCIAL
8:00 JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
ADULT PURIM PANIC
088
29
March
KOL AMI-NO
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
9:30 'JEWISH WAR
VETERANS GENERAL
MEETING
APRIL 1
KOL AMI NO
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
10:00 ORT/BAY
HORIZONS CHAPTER
BOARD MEETING
11:00 BRANDEIS
LUNCH AND LEARN
MEETING
740 HADASSAH/AME-
ET CHAPTER BOARD
MEETING
KOL AMI NO
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL % 10:00 'JEWISH KOL AMI NO 3 4
COMMUNITY FOOD RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
BANK 9:30 BRANDIES
10:00 RODEPH WOMEN BOARD
SHOLOM MEETING
SISTERHOOD 8:00 SCHAARAI
MEMBERSHIP ZEDEK ADULT
MEETING EDUCATION
12:00 KA SR.
SOCIALITES "i"1 -.14
Knesset Presents Quality of Life
Award To American Physician
Stacy Lieberman
Tracy Saff
Bat Mitzvah
STACY LIEBERMAN
Stacy Robin Lieberman,
daughter 4^H&fc##f^.
man will celebrate her Bat Mitz-
vah on Friday, March 28 at 8 p.m.,
and Saturday March 29 at 10 a.m.
at Congregation Rodeph Shoiom.
Rabbi Kenneth" Berger and Can-
tor William Hauben will officiate.
Stacy is a seventh Grade stu-
dent at Young Junior High school.
She attends Rodeph Shoiom
Hebrew School and is a member ol
Kadima. In her spare time Stacy
enjoys tennis and likes to writ*
stories.
June and Jeff Lieberman will
host the Oneg Shabbat on Friday
evening and a luncheon in Stacy's
honor after services at the Guest
Quarters. Saturday evening they
will have a dinner for out of town
guests at their home.
Special guests will include her
sister Dara, Grandparents: May
and Sam Silk, Tampa, Rose and
Saul Lieberman, New York, Anna
nd Paul Silk, cousins, April, Jill
and Penny, Albany, New York,
Gary and Mona Lieberman, New
Jersey, Fran and Max Gold,
Philadelphia, Adele Swick, White
Plains, N.Y., Ken Gold, Calif.,
Sylvia and Nat Weston, Fort
Lauderdale.
TRACY SAFF
Tracy Karen Saff, daughter of
Loretta and Edward Saff, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah Saturday, March 29 at 9:30
a.m. at Congregation Kol Ami.
Rabbi David Rose and Cantor
Samuel Isaak will officiate.
"The celebrant is a sowent in the
Hey Class at Kol Ami Religious
School and is active in Kadima.
She is in the seventh Grade gifted
classes, the high honor roll, and
the newspaper staff at Young
Junior High School. Stacy plays
the french horn and was chosen
for the All-County Band. She
plays softball with the North Tam-
pa Leaguerettes and enjoys
tennis. Pr?
Mr. and Mrs. William Wares,
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Hirshorn,
Dr. and Mrs. Saul Lipsman, Mr.
and Mrs. Stuart Kaminsky, and
Dr. and Mrs. Donald Saff will host
the Oneg Shabbat after Friday
evening services. There will be a
luncheon following services on
Saturday hosted by Loretta and
Ed Saff. Saturday evening a din-
ner and reception is planned at
the Tower Club. Sunday morning
a brunch will be held at the home
of Stuart and Lynda Kaminsky of
Palm Harbor. Allso hosting the
brunch are Donna and Bill Wares,
Steve and Enid Gildar, Penny and
Joel Breitstein, and Ann and
Jerry Sokol.
Special guests will include Rose
and Irving Saff, Hollywood, Fla.;
Harvey and Myra Saff and family,
Pompano Beach; Sylvia Newman,
Yonkers, N.Y.; Elliott and Joanne
Snger and family, Nashville,
Tenn.; Elliott and Sarah
Goldberg, and Harold and Shirley
Seigal, Atlanta.
TEL AVIV (MDA* Dr. David
Applebaum Chief Medical Officer
of the Magen David Adorn
Paramedic Emergency Medical
Service in Jerusalem, recently
received special recognition from
the State of Israel when he
became the recipient of the
"Quality of Life" award from the
speaker of the Knesset.
Dr. Applebaum, formerly of
Cleveland, Ohio, was cited by the
Knesset for his 24 hours a day
dedication and sacrifice to deal
with critical pre-hospital
emergencies and performing
emergency operations under ex-
tremely adverse conditions.
In addition, Dr. Applebaum has
helped to modernize and make
more systematic emergency room
and ambulance work. He initiated
a system of calling back patients
for followup after they have
been initially treated, which was
never done before. He also
organized patient records, looking
for ways to improve successful
treatment of cardiac arrest.
Dr. Applebaum pointed out that
many patients, who might have
been lost through cardiac arrest,
are now walking around because
of the MDA Mobile Intensive Care
Ambulance (MICU), and its
lifesaving instruments. He further
stated, "The MDA Paramedics
and Physicians are proficiently
trained and very knowledgeable
to act at a time when speed is of
the essence, and the sophisticated
lifesaving equipment in the
MICU's saves many lives.
The MDA Mobile Intensive Care
Ambulances and equipment, as
well as the MDA Parameidc
courses offered by Magen David
Adorn are made possible by
generous contributors to
American Red Magen David for
Israel (ARMDI).
Obituaries
Robert A. Uvln
Andy Lewis
Robert K. Bartjer
L. Mark Cerron
EF Hutton & Company Inc.
102 W. Whiting St.. 2nd Fir.
Tampa. FL 33802
Telephone (813) K3-4946
Florida Watt Line: 1->M8MW1
N.i 1 Wats Una: 1-800-237-8610
JAFFER
Robert P., a Tampa consulting engineer,
died Thursday. February 27, 1986. of a
heart attack. He was 59. Jaffer was the
founder and a past president of the Con-
sulting Engineers Council of Florida and
was a member of the National Board of Con-
sulting Engineers Council of the United
States. He was an officer of the American
Institute of Electrical and Electronic
Engineers and other professional engineer-
ing associations, A native of New York, Jaf-
fer had lived in Tampa for 30 years. He was
a past officer and current board member of
Congregation Rodeph Shoiom, was a past
board member of the Jewish Community
Center and served as a scoutmaster for
several years. Jaffer received a bachelor of
science degree in electrical engineering
frdm Rutgers University. He served with
the U.S. Army Air Force during World War
II and was a volunteer with the Israeli army
during their War of Independence. Sur-
vivors include Jaffer's wife, Naomi Stern; a
son, David of Tampa; a daughter. Laurel of
Tampa; his father and stepmother, Harold
and Adah Jaffer of Miami; and two
brothers, Aubrey of Boston and Joel of New
York.
SLOHN ,
Emanuel. 85. of Tampa, died Saturday,
March 1, 1986. He came to the Bary area in
1953 from New York. He was a member of
Congregation Rodeph Shoiom and its Men's
Club, and was a mason. He is survived by a
daughter, Rhoda Albert of Tampa; a son,
Herbert Sloane of Tampa; a brother, Irving
Sloane of New York City; a sister. Ruth Ot-
tenstein of Baltimore; and 8 grandchildren.
BRANDES
Samuel Edward, 1 month, of Tampa, died
Saturday. March 8. He is survived by his
parents, Alan and Elisabeth; a brother, Mat-
thaw; grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. H.R
Northcutt of Tiptonvilie, Tenn.; and great
grandmothers, Blanche Peacock of Uaior.
City, Twin* and Adele Roaenkrant of
Tampa.
R06ENBAUM
Alice. 72, died Monday, March 10.1986. She
waa a resident of Tampa for over 40 years.
She was a member of CongregaUon
Schaarai Zedek. Temple Sisterhood and
Council of Jewish Women. 8he was current-
ly Regional Vice President of The Jewish
Children's Services, a founding member of
the Tampa Museum of Art and formerly a
board member of the Child Guidance Clinic.
. She is survived by her husband, Daniel, of
Tampa; two sons. David and Marcus, both of
Washington. D.C.; and four grandchidlren,
Dorothy. Daniel. Emily and Robert. Con-
tributions may be made to the Apte-
Roaenbaum Scholarship Fund, Jewish
Children's Service. 1605 Peachtree Road.
N.E., Atlanta. GA SOSM
Responsible Caring Woman
.. needed ... starting April 1,20 hours
weekly, to care for young infant in my home
or yours. Non-smoker. USF area. Call before
6 p.m. with references.
971-2541
i
[Experienced Babysitter
Needed
Weekdays References
932-9752
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, March 21, 1986
The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece
PRESCHOOL
JCC PRESCHOOL NEWS
The JCC Pre-School staff and
parents are now planning: a fan-
tastic Open House, Sunday, April
IS, 1-3 p.m. This event will be held
at the JCC Main Branch. All
teachers and aids will be available
to answer questions concerning
our Pre-School. This fun-filledI
afternoon will include swimming,
sports, arts and crafts, hot dog
cookout and other special events.1
Also, an arts and crafts display by
our pre-schoolers.
More information concerning
this event will follow soon!
YOUTH
CAMP JCC
NEWS UPDATE
More Information on Three*
Quarters Day Program This
season we are offering a three-
quarters day option for grades
K-3, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
It is a new program this sum-
mer The program offers a total
camp experience in an ab-
breviated day designed for the
younger camper. Individual camp
units will be created if numbers*
allow. A super enriched camper'
day will be experienced by our
young campers. ,
More on Travel Troop The
Kent JCC (Clear-water) tweens
and teens will be joining us on
some of our trips including one of
our week long expeditions! |
SAVE THIS .DATE: June 15,
Camp Open House and Family
Day. Come meet your counselor,
review camp day in advance dry
run.
BIRTHDAY BONANZA!
Be a guest at your own child's
party! Have your child's party at
the Center and have a ball! You
choose the theme, and the rest is
up to us. The party package in-
cludes: a party leader to lead the
activities; invitations filled-in and
mailed out; set-up, serve, and
clean-up; cake, ice cream, juke,
and party favors; and a terrific
two hour party all for only $4
per child! There is a minimum of
10 children, and reservations for
parties must be made at least two
weeks in advance of desired date.
Now our birthday parties are
reflecting the creativity of our
talented Youth Director! How
about an evening party, you might
consider. We welcome
suggestions!
For the best party you'll ever
have, call Tami at the Center.
Reservations accepted on a first
come, first served basis and are
held on Sundays only.
SUNDAY FUNDAY8
Sunday Fundays are open to all
children in Kindergarten through
sixth grade. Please call the Center
in order to sign up for these fun
activities. Advance registration is
a must'
April 13, 1-4 p.m. Car-
rouwood Skate Center. Pickup at
South at 12:80 p.m. Pickup at
North at 12:50 p.m. Coast
members, $2, non-members $8 in-
cludes skating, rental of skates,
and snack. Return to North for
snack. Return to South at 4:16
p.m.
If yon haven't already
received oar spring pro-
gram brochure, please call
the JCC to get your copy!
872-4461
"SPRING ABOUND THE
WORLD" PBOGBAM FOR
, SPRING VACATION
For the very best spring vaca-
tion ever, join us at the JCC's Spr-
ing Camp on March 28 and March
31-April 4. There will be a new
adventure every day! Field trips,
sports, arts and crafts, and drama
something for everyone. You
won't want to miss this!
Transporation from Kol Ami
will be provided, and we en-
courage all CarroUwood area
children to attend this special pro-
gram. The camp day runs from
8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., and day care is
available at the Main JCC at 7:30
a.m. Hillel children are welcome
to join the camp from 3-6 p.m. and
can also register for the kick-off.
day, March 28, when we will be!
going to Al Lopes Field to watch
the Reds vs. Astros spring train-
ing baseball game.
Cost is $10 members, $15 non-
members per day. Are you in
grades K-6 or do you have a
child in any of those grades? Then
sign-up now for this fabulous pro-
gram!! Call Tami Eisner at the
Center, 872-4451.
PASSOVER CAMP
"Pesach in other Countries."
Designed for children in grades
K-6 who are not in school for the
Passover holidays. The program
will run April 28-April 29 and May
2. We will explore and simulate
Passover in Ethiopia, Russia,
Puerto Rico, and Israel. We will
learn special songs and of course t
make our own matzah. Our doors
will he open from 7:80 a.m.-6 p.m. |
Children should bring their own
lunches. The coat is $10 par day-
members/$15 non-members. For
more information and to make
your reservations, please call the
Center.
TWEEN/TEEN
JOIN OUR NAME BANK
Interested in doing some
babysitting, plant-sitting,
lawnmowing, pet-sitting or per-1
forming some other service? Need i
a little extra spending money?
We're starting a Name Bank of
babysitters, yard cleaners and
other talents and services.
Anyone in need of special services
just calls the Center, and we give
out your name and number! Just
call Tami to list your name with
us!
TEEN COUNCIL
MEETING
Teen Council is open to all
youth group advisors, rabbis,
parents, and especially teenagers
both affiliated with youth groups
in the city and unaffiliated.
The JCC Teen Council is set-up
to help the youth groups and unaf-
filiated teens in Tampa come
together for social and commdnity
activities. We will meet at least
once a month to plan events for
teens which will not conflict with
any other youth group functions.
We encourage you to become in-
volved! we can be terrific
together! Tuesday evening, 7:00,
April 8, at the JCC Main. Be
there!
SKI TRIP REPORT
"WE SKIIED SUGAR!"
"Wow!" "Exhilerating!"
"Ankle-busting!" "Of course,
we'd do it again!" These were
some of the reactions we got when
we asked about the JCC Teen Ski
Weekend trip to Sugar Mountain,
NC, in February.
Eight Tampa teens (Michele
Friefeld, Francie Linsky, Jeff
Leitman, Courtney Malowney,
Ian Pear, Jonathan Pear, Bobby
Schwartz, and Deana Zabaldo) all
enjoyed a fantastic weekend of
skiing and fun. It was said that
"the slopes were land of in bet-
ween a snow cone and a shirpee
but didn't taste quite as good!"
No major injuries were
reported, and we're hoping to
make the trip an annual event, as
well as to add other teen travel
weekends. How does Key West
sound to you? Sure wish you'd
been on the slopes with us. It was
ablest!
PHYS. ED
VOLLEYBALL IS BACK!
Every Thursday evening,
6:30-9, Adult Volleyball meets at
the JCC. Come join in on all the
fun, and bring a friend!
BODY SHOP
(WEIGHT ROOM)
Members Only (14 years or
older) No Charge.
Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-l
p.m.; 4-9 p.m.
Friday, 11 a.m.-l p.m.
Sunday, 4-6 p.m.
JCC YOUTH
SOFTBALL TEAM
The JCC is forming a Youth
Softball Team for children in
grades 4-6. We will practice on
Wednesdays, 4:15-6 p.m., and will
compete with other teams. Con-
tact Bill for additional
information.
ADULT SOFTBALL
LEAGUE
The JCC's Adult Softball
League is ready to swing into ac-
tion on April 6. Registration must
be completed by March 28. Games
will be played on Sunday morn-
ings at Steve Garvey Field.
Register either as a team or as an
individual, and we will place you
on a team. For further informa-
tion, call Bill or Liaea at the
Center.
JCC BASKETBALL TEAMS
FINISH SEASON
The JCC basketball season
came to an end with the following
results:
The Tween and Teen teams
journeyed to Miami where the
Tweens lost both games, and the
Teens lost the first but won the se-
cond game.
The JCC's 5th and 6th grade
team was victorious in its game
against the YMCA. Congratula-
tions to all participants on a
season well played!
JUNIOR TENNIS
TOURNAMENT
Attention, Tennis Players in
grades 4-6! The JCC will be
holding a Junior Tennis Tourna-
ment starting March 23. Register
at the P. E. Office for this terrific
tournament. Prises will be
awarded.
COUPON
1 FREE ADULT
AEROBICS CLASS
APRIL ONLY
EXPIRES
APRIL 30. 1986
ADULT AEROBICS
Not sure whether or not to
join our Adult Aerobics classes?
Try us out for free with this
coupon during the month of April.
North Branch: Monday and
Wednesday, 9-10 a.m. Main
Branch: Tuesday and Thursday,
9-10 a.m. Monthly charge is $20
members, $30 non-members.
SINGLES
COMING ATTRACTIONS
March 29 Fun 'N Fitness
April 4 Singles go to Services
April 12 USF Dancescapes -
This program has been cance 1 led
due to schedule change by USF.
April 16 Happy Hour
April 20 Putt Putt and Pizza
SAVE THIS DATE: June 14
and 15 Jewish Singles Con-
ference at Sheraton Sand Key in
Clearwater
FAMILY
SEND A MISHLOACH
MANOT GIFT BASKET TO
YOUR FRIENDS AND
FAMILY
The custom of Miahloach Manot
gives us the opportunity to send
good wishes and Purim greetings
to our friends in the Tampa
Jewish Community.
To have a Kosher Purim basket
filled with sweet treats delivered
to the home of a friend on March
23, contact the JCC. Donation: $3
per delivery. Proceeds will be us-
ed in support of the Community
Israel Independence Day event.
Volunteers are still needed to
help distribute Mishloach Manot
on March 23. Please call the JCC
if you can help out.
^FANTASIA
Please note: the JCC will
close at 5 p.m. on Erev
Purim, March 24 but will be
opea all day regular
hoars on Purim, March
25.
..1
ADULTS
CLUB VARIETY UPDATE
March 29 "GodspeU" at Falk
Theatre
April 1 Regular Meeting
April 13 Game Night at the
JCC (cost of admission: either $1
or a dessert to share)
SENIORS
PERSONAL HISTORY
DRAMA
Wednesdays, 1:30-8 p.m. A
chance to express the experiences
of your life creatively. Fun, ex-
citing and challenging. A free
program.
A DAY AT JAI ALAI
The JCC's Senior Travel Club is
at it again! We're planing a full
day outing to Tampa Jai Ami on
Wednesday, March 26 for fun,
food, and first-rate seating. Cost
includes full course luncheon,
preferred seating, admission, pro-
gram and services charge. $11.50
members, $15 non-members. Call
Judy London to sign-up.
FREE INCOME TAX
ASSISTANCE
Wednesdays and Fridays, 9
a.m.-noon. Bring last year's
forms. Through April 11.
March 21 Jewish Culture Club
March 23 Miahloach Manot
Drive; Jr. Tennis Tournament
March 24 JCC dotes 5 p.m.
March 25 Stress Support
Group
March 26 Travel Club to Jai
Alai; Youth Softball; Personal
History Drama; Senior Sewing
Class; Income Tax
March 27 Coping with Life
Changes; Adult Volleyball; Older
Adult Program
March 28 Income Tax
March 28 and March 31-April 4
Spring Camp
March 29 Club Variety to
"GodspeU"; Singlet Fun 'n Fitness
April 1 Club Variety Meeting;
Stress Support Group
April 2 Youth Softball; Per-
sonal History Drama; Senior Sew-
ing Class; Income Tax
April 3 Adult Volleyball; Older
Adult Program
April 4 Singles go to Services;
Income Tax
April 6 Adult Softball begins
April 8 Teen Council Meeting;
Stress Support Group
April 9 Senior Sewing Class;
Income Tax
April 10 Older Adult Program
April 11 Income Tax
JEWISH CULTURE
CLUB
If you'd like to learn more about
Jewish culture, then plan to at-
tend our monthly Jewish Culture
Club! We'll be discussing Jewish
customs, values, holiday celebra-
tions, folklore and mysticism, as
well as Jewish theatre, humor, ar-
tists and intellectuals, history,
biblical tales, and current events.
Our next meeting is Friday,
March 21, 12-2 p.m., and we'll be
featuring an hour of Yiddish,
along with Jewish folktales. Bring
a dairy lunch dish to share, and
join in on the fun! Free to
members, $1 non-members.
SACS
INVENTORY SALE
The JCC's Senior Arts and
Crafts Shop is holding its yearly
inventory sale. Special prices on
all items in the store. Especially
large selection of infant wear.
Visit both our shops: JCC:
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-l p.m.;
Downtown: 316 Madison St,
Monday, Thursday, and Friday,
11 a.m.-3 p.m.
BLAZING NEW TRAILS:
COPING WITH LIFE
CHANGES AND ISOLATION
Facilitator and Lecturer:
Natalie Merker Rose, MSW, Tam-
K Jewish Family Service, Tampa
wish Family Services.
MAINTAINING QUALITY
LONG-DISTANCE
RELATIONSHIPS
Week III March 27, 1:30-3
>.m. Coat* $2 per workshop or
16 for the series. Pre-register by
March 6. We will make every at-
tempt to assist in transportation
to this program.
SEWING CLASSES
la there a future Betsy Ross
among us? Join our senior Sewing
Class every Wednesday, 1-4 p.m.
Claire Wichman, instructor.
Minimal Adult Education fee ($1)
may be waived. Contact Senior
Program Director, Judy London,
for further information.
K


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