The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00286

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text

fcJemst) FloridIan
Of Tampa
Volume 8 Number 5
Tampa, Florida Friday, February 21, 1986
Price 35 Cents
Federation Gala This Weekend
Yoram Dinstein
On Saturday evening, Feb. 22,
the Hyatt Regency Ballroom will
be transformed into the early
1900's representative of the
famous Hester Street in order to
greet over 260 guests expected to
attend the annual Tampa Jewish
Federation/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign dinner.
According to Dr. Irwin and
Phyllis Browarsky, co-chairmen
for the event, "thus year's dinner
dance will be quite different from
Women's Division Plans
Teen Happening
Mimi Aaron and Patty Kaliah,
co-chairwomen of the Tampa
Jewish Federation Women's Divi-
sion 1986 Pearl (teen) Division
have announced an event for 7-12
grade teens (boys and girls) and
their mothers. An entertaining
afternoon is being planned for
Sunday afternoon, March 9, at the
Marriott Hotel, Westshore and
Cypress.
"The afternoon will begin with
lunch at 1 p.m., in the Grand
Ballroom," stated Aaron and
Kaliah. "We are very excited
about the program a slide show
and presentation by Jeff Fox and
Neil Shaw who recently returned
from Israel, a co-ed fashion show
by Colony Shops, and The Men's
Room, modeled by our very own
teens, door prizes, and much-
more."
The planning committee is com-
prised of Muni Aaron, Patty
Kalish, Jerilyn Goldsmith, Shelly
Appleblatt, Elaine Broverman,
Trudy Harris, Susan Zalkin, Doris
Field, Bonnie Solomon, Phyllis
Browarsky, and Janet Cotzen.
The luncheon is open to all 7-12
graders and their mothers on
behalf of the 1986 Campaign; in-
vitations have been mailed to the
community if any names have
been inadvertently omitted, or for
farther information, call the
Federation office, 875-1618.
what we have had in the past. By
using the theme 'Celebration on
Hester Street' we plan to present
a nostalgic review of life on the
lower east side of New York
where many of our parents and
grandparents began their new life
in America. With the revitaliza-
tion of the Statue of Liberty and
Ellis Island taking place, we think
this is a very appropriate theme."
The Browarsky's also announc-
ed that "through the generosity of
a local community member, we
have been able to reduce the cost
of the evening to $30 per person.
When you consider all that is be-
ing planned for the evening, the
cost is very reasonable and we
hope that many individuals will
reach the $760 minimum contribu-
tion level ($375 for singles) so that
they will be eligible to attend,"
they concluded.
A major highlight of the evening
will be a special message from
Professor Yoram Dinstein who is
currently a Visiting Professor of
Law at New York University
School of Law. He is on sabbatical
leave from Tel Aviv University
where he is a Pro-Rector as well
as Professor International of Law
and Yanowicz Professor of
Human Rights. Professor Dins-
tein was Rector of Tel Aviv
University from 1980 to 1986 and
Dean of its Faculty of Law from
1978 to 1980. He is also the Editor
of the Israel Yearbook on Human
Rights. He is a former Consul of
Israel in New York and former
member of the Israel Permanent
Mission to the United Nations.
Professor Dinstein was born in
Israel and received his legal
education in Jerusalem and New
York. He is the author of more
than 60 articles on international
legal subjects as well as eight
books and is an internationally
recognised authority on Soviet
Jewry.
In keeping with the Hester
Street theme, the evening will
also feature Syd Lieberman, a
master storyteller who has ap-
peared extensively in the Chicago
area, on radio and television. He
tells Hassklic and Jewish folk
tales, stories of the immigrant ex-
perience, and vignettes of Jewish
life in America and Israel.
Bill and Patty Kalish are
heading a committee of Table
Captains that include: Linda and
Sam Blum. Maureen and Doug
Cohn, Yvette and Rodolfo
Ekhberg, Susan and Arthur For-
man, Patricia and Mickey Frank,
Betty and Bernie Germain,
Michelle and Burt Goldstein,
Lucille and Lawrence Falk, Kay
and Maril Jacobs, Bobbe and
George Karpay, Janet and Mike
Kass, Lili and Barry Kaufmann,
Laura and Steve Kreitzer,
Blossom and Ed Leibowitz, Debra
and Donald Linsky, Carol and
Sandy Mahr, Sharon and Roger
Mock, Lois and Jay Older, Judy
and Stanley Rosenkranz, Franci
and Richard Rudolph, Betty and
Sheldon Shalett, Jolene Shor.
Vikki and Bruce Silverman, Jane
and Neil Spector, Joyce and Herb
Swarzman, Lee Tobin and Don
Weinbren.
For additional information and
reservations, please call the Tam-
pa Jewish Federation at 876-1618.
In Washington
Young Leadership Conference March 2-4
Three hundred young Jewish
leaders from more than a hundred
17th Annual Jewish Music Festival
Spotlights Marilyn Michaels and Ron Eliran
The spotlight for the 17th An-
nual Jewish Musk Festival is on
Marilyn Michaels and Ron Eliran.
Of Miss Michaels, the critics
say, "there is only one illustrious
comedienne/singer/impres-
sionist/actress." Rodeph Sholom
Synagogue is pleased to be able to
bring this multi-faceted talent to
the Tampa area.
Marilyn Michaels has been is
the entertainment world since she
was seven years old. She was
literally born in a trunk. She
comes from a musical family.
Marilyn sang Yiddish with her
mother Fraydele Oysher in
vaudeville shows, and her uncle is
the renowned actor/cantor, Moise
Oysher.
She graduated from high school
and immediately had a contract
with RCA Records. She has
headlined every TV variety show,
appeared regularly on the
communities throughout the
United States will attend the
United Jewish Appeal's Fifth Na
tkmal Young Leadership Con-
ference in Washington, D.C.,
March 2-4. Jolene Shor and Don
Weinbren, regional chairmen of
the Conference, proudly asserted
that Tampa will be sending 13
delegates, the largest amount of
delegates in the history of Tampa
"Tonight" show and has guested and the third largest delegation in
with Andy Gibb, John Davidson the state of Florida to D.C.
JCC Hosts Afternoon
Of Family Entertainment
JCC hosts an afternoon of
Family Entertainment Sunday,
Feb. 23 at 1 p.m. at the Jewish
Community Center, 2808 Horatio
Street. In celebration of Jewish
Culture and Music Season, an
afternoon of Jewish Musical per
formances will be highlighted by a
performance by Syd Lieberman
reknowned Chicago Jewish
Storyteller.
Syd's repertoire contains pro-
grams for both adults and
children. He tells Hasskfae tales,
stories of the immigrant ex-
perience, holiday tales, Jewish
folk and fairy tales, stories about
Israel, and vignettes of life in
present-day America.
According to Syd, "I love to tell
stories. There is an excitement in
freeing a story from the page and
presenting it to an audience. Peo-
ple's eyes literally light up with
pleasure as the story unfolds. Be-
ing told a story puts us in touch
with the child in all of us. It also
provides a connection between the.
generations. Sometimes when I'm
telling a story I feel like a conduit
as I watch the old-timers shake)
their heads knowingly and the
younger generation stare in
wonder. People of all ages have a
thirst for stories."
Refreshments for intermission
will be baked and furnished by the
JCC pre-school as a fundraiser for
classroom equipment Admission
free for members. Nonmembers
$1. Bring the entire family for an
afternoon of enjoyment.

TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION/
UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
CAMPAIGN UPDATE
1986 Goal........................$1,300,000
To Date......................... $ 600,000
Increase...............................25%
and Victoria Principal in a celebri-
ty special for CBS.
Miss Michaels has played Fanny
Brice in the national company of
"Funny Girl," and she has been
the sole female performer on
ABC-TVs "The Kopykata." She
is also an accomplished artist, and
many of her works have been
shown in the Norval Gallery, in
New York City and the Mai
Camins Gallery of Fine Arts in
Palm Beach.
Marilyn Michaels is married to
Doctor Peter Wilk and they have a
one-year-old son, Mark Edward
Wilk.
Ron Eliran was born in Haifa,
Israel, and has come to-be known
as "Israel's Ambassador of
Song." During the 1967 Yom Kip-
pur war he entertained the troops.
Mr. Eliran has toured extensive-
ly throughout the world. His con-
certs have taken him to every ma-
jor city in Europe, Africa,
Australia, South America and
Canada. Being multilingual, he is
always able to express his deepest
feelings to his audiences.
Not only is he talented per-
former, but he is also a gifted com-,
poser. He is responsible for many
songs at the Israeli Song Festival
as well as the creation of the Off-
Broadway show, "Night Song."
Ron Eliran is one of the only
entertainers who, while retaining
his ever rising popularity both in
Israel and the U.S., is a one man
show combining the best of the
Israeli-traditional with the
Coatiaaed on Page 9
Dan Albert, Lisa Bush, Mark
Carron, Diane Charme, Lois
Greenhaum, Steffie Hoff, Bill
Kaliah, Lee Tobin, Keith Schilit,
Jolene Shor. Cindy Spahn, Susan
Swift, and Don Weinbren will be
among the many participants to
enjoy workshops and plenary ses-
sions led by highly acclaimed
speakers such as Senators Gary
Hart, Howard Metsenbaum and
Congressman Jack Kemp. Ben-
jamin Netanyahu, Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Nations,
will also lead a discussion on
"Terrorism."
The Tampa delegation will also
have an opportunity to meet with
Congressmen Michael Bihrakis
and Sam Gibbons to discuss such
important issues as Soviet Jewry
and the Jordan arms sales.
Through a series of high level
briefings, seminars, workshops
and study sessions, participants
will take part in discussions and
dialogues with Cabinet members,
high ranking State Department
diplomats and strategic planners
from the Defense Department and
the National Security Council.
Morris Abram, chairman of the
National Council for Soviet
Jewry, will brief the participants
s they conduct a candlelight
inarch past the Soviet Embassy,
demonstrating support for their
orethren who are unable to lead a
free Jewish life behind the Iron
Curtain.
Workshops will cover a wide
range of activities and topics in-
cluding "Israel." "Soviet Jewry,"
"Terrorism." "The Media and the
Holocaust," "Intermarriage,"
"The Federal Budget." "The
Third World," and "Prospects for
Peace."
There will also be a gala buffet
and dance including a Mary
Travers concert which will be
broadcast to the Soviet Union by
the Voice of America.
Conference co-chairmen are
Nancy Beren, Andy Eisenberg
and Robert Shulman. Michael
Adler is chairman of the Young
Leadership Cabinet and Ann-
Louise Le vine is chairman of the
Young Woman's Leadership
Cabinet.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, February 21, 1986
Cathy L. Gardner
Welcome home to Cathy L. Gardner, recently returned from
Chicago ... Currently the Catering Sales Manager at the Tampa
Hyatt Regency ... her previous Hyatt responsibilities have' in-
cluded those of Concierge, Hotel Assistant Manager and Front
Office Assistant Manager. She is the daughter of Frimit and
Henry Gardner. As you can imagine, they and sister Ellen
Johnson, are aboslutely thrilled to have Cathy back in Tampa.
Whew, it sure is hard to keep track of all the comings and go-
ings in the Echelman Kantor Clan. I say "Clan" because Anne
and Bernie Kantor have seven children, so between all the
engagements, weddings, graduations, even birthdays, their many
celebrations have them traveling literally all over the world!
Grandmothers Lillian Einbinder and Cele Kantor (Hollywood,
Fla.), look forward to these travels too.
Todd Echelman has announed his engagement to Lori
Lemberg of Denver. So this August the family will travel to Col-
orado. Last August it was Brooklyn, N.Y. where David
Echelman married Francine Smith. And just before that, it was
Boston where Susan Kantor married Douglas Horning.
And there's almost as many graduations: This May they'll be
off to Baltimore where David Echelman will get an MD from
Johns Hopkins University Medical School. (David's BS was at
Amherst.) Last year David's wife, Fran, earned her PhD from
Hopkins. David and Fran will then move to Chapel Hill, N.C.,
where David will do residency in opthalmology at the University
of North Carolina. Biophysicist Fran has a grant to do her post-
doctoral work in N.C.
Last May it was Gainsville when Michael Echelman graduated
from the University of Florida with an MBA (BA from Emory).
Michael moved back to Tampa and went immediately to work as
an account executive for E.F. Hutton.
Another Michael Michael Kantor has also moved to Tam-
pa. Previously practicing dentistry in Knoxville he'll now be living
and practicing in the Tampa-Clearwater area. By the way, both
Michaels are very eligible! Shiddachs, anyone? Anne is very
interested!
And how did Anne just celebrate a very special birthday? Eight
wonderful days in Vienna, courtesy of Janet Echelman, age 19.
She insisted on sending Anne a ticket for their Mother-Daughter
Week. Janet is now living with a family in India, then next an
Australian family for five weeks. Then Indonesia, and finally ends
her year abroad in Japan in May. All this to study film and social
anthropology for a full year of credit at Harvard. Sounds mighty
good to us. Maxol tov to a wonderful family; thanks for sharing
your nachas with us!
Kid style. Save the date, March 3, in Schaarai Zedek's annual
Sisterhood Fashion Show. Enjoy food, fashions and fun ... and
expert modeling by Amanda and Rebecca Sergay, Audrey
Garber, Lauren Argintar, Michael Wnliger, Michael Hymaa.
Jenny Novick, Leslie Rudolph, Amanda Tarkow, Adam and
Stephanie Goldstein, Nicole Ward, Melissa Hymaa, Erin
Barat, Jennifer Balis, Lauren Tarkow, Cheryl Rothberg,
Lauren Osterweil, Naomi Zell, Debra Browaraky, Amy Spec-
tor, Jamie Goldsmith, Alexis Sunders, Caroline Kass, Justin
Ward, Randi and Jamie Hirsch, Nell Rudolph, Debbie Pershes
and Allison Segal. Bring your cameras!
Babyline. Congratulations to Martha Curtis and David Boggs
on the brith of their daughter, Jennifer Erin Curtis-Boggs, on
Jan. 8. Jennifer weighed 7 lbs., 15 ozs. at birth. Her proud grand-
parents are Genevieve Curtis of St. Petersburg Beach;
Wakemaa Curtis of Tampa, and Patricia Boggs of Cincinnati,
Ohio.
Maxol tov to Nancy and John Shearer on the birth of Marjorie
Frances on Dec. 20. Weighing in at 5 lbs., 8 ozs., she was greeted
by five-year-old brother Philip, and grandparents Dr. and Mrs.
Lester Gordon, Ft. Lauderdale; Grandma Beatrice Shearer in
North Miami and Great-grandfather Aaron Gordon in Miami.
And say hello to Eric Joseph Garber, born to Dr. Allen and
Debbie Garber on Dec. 28 weighing 8 lbs., 3 ozs. His thrilled sibl-
ings are 5 year-old Audrey, 11 year-old Lauren and 14-year-old
Adam. Eric's grandparents are Rhea and Harry Garber in Long
Island; Grandma Helen Strerapel in Rosenberg, Tx.; Grandpa
Louis Molnar in Land O'Lakes and Great-grandmother Helen
Lavko in Ruskin.
Have fun ... and try to get some sleep!
New Officers. We know the folks at the Jewish Towers are in.;
...... '
Women's Division Jewels
A woman of valor
who can find?
She is more precious
than rubies.
She extends her hand
to the poor,
She reaches out her hands
to the needy?"
What could more appropriately
describe the women of the 1986
Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division than these
beautiful lines from Proverbs 31?
The women who have responded
to the vital needs of fellow Jews in
Tampa and Israel and worldwide
are truly gems, precious jewels to
be prized for their sense of respon-
sibility and generosity.
Recognizing this, the Women's
Division Campaign Divisions are
named for gems, the names and
giving categories are:
LION OF JUDAH $6,000 and
above
Diamonds $l,000-$4,999
Rubies $250-$999
Sapphires $100-$249
Topaz (Telethon) Under $100
Pearls Teens
Business and Professional
Women's Network
Young Adult Division (women)
Towers Division (seniors
Engagements
KIMPELLENHOFF
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kimpel,
Warren, Ohio, announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Kathryn Renee, to Martin David
Lenhoff, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max-
well Lenhoff, Tampa.
The bride-elect is a graduate of
Ohio University and is a credit
representative with Xerox
Corporation.
The groom-elect is a graduate of
the University of South Florida
and is a representative of the
Prudential Insurance Company of
America.
A May wedding is planned at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek.
STILLMAN-HURWITZ
Mr. and Mrs. James Stillman
announce the engagement of their
daughter, Wendy Beth, to Ken-
neth Michael Hurwitz, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Martin Hurwitz.
Wendy is the granddaughter of
Mrs. Fannie Glasser, Tampa, and
Mr. Henry Stillman, Amherst,
Mass. Kenneth is the grandson of
Mr. and Mrs. Jay Markowitz and
Mrs. Sylvia Hurwitz.
Both the bride-elect and the
groom elect are pre-medical
students at Tulane University in
New Orleans.
Jewish Towers and Mary Walker
Apts.)
It is said that a diamond is just a
piece of coal that stuck to the job.
By sticking to the job and respon-
ding to the very real and very
desperate needs of our fellow
Jews everywhere, each woman in
the Tampa community has an op-
portunity to become a precious
gem right now!
"Franci Rudolph, past Women's
Division president and campaign
chairman, previously wrote the
above choice "Gems," stated
Alice Rosenthal and Aida
Weissman 1986 Campaign co-
chairwomen. Our community has
continued to grow every year
our gems are hard-working and
committed in 1986 we need
your time and your commitment
now more than ever!"
Speaker's Bureau Offers Training
As reported in a previous news
article, trained speakers for the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith Speaker's Bureau have fill-
ed over 60 engagements since the
bureau's inception just seven
months ago. Due to the heavy in-
flux of requests, the ADL is begin-
ning a new training series, which
is a three-part program to begin in
mid-March. According to Stefani
Margolis, Bureau Chairperson,
"We are reaching out to the com-
munity for volunteer speakers in
order to meet the needs of our
ever-increasing demand."
The Speaker's Bureau training
sessions will consist of three 2%
hour segments held approximate-
ly a month apart. Prior experience
with ADL or public speaking is
not required; an interest and a
desire to learn are all you need.
The purpose of the first session is
to give participants an introduc-
tion to the agency and its history,
as well as tips on public speaking.
The second session will aim to
help participants focus on how
they represent themselves and the
agency to a speaker's audience.
Finally, the last of the workshop
series will be directed at develop-
ing the fine points of public speak-
ing for ADL: i.e., answering dif-
ficult questions and showing
audio-visual materials to their
best advantage.
The ADL Speaker's Bureau of-
fers the Tampa Bay community
highly qualified speakers,
authoritative publications and
audio-visual materials on human
rights, prejudice and intergroup
relations from the nation's largest
resource for human relations
materials.
Community members are in-
vited to join the ADL's Speaker's
Bureau. Interested individuals
should call the Anti-Defamation
League Office 876-0750 to
sign up as a volunteer for the
training workshops. Additionally,
members who wish to secure an
ADL speaker for their organiza-
tions are encouraged to call.
f
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Forth* AuthBntic
UtfOt
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REAL MANDARIN &
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985-8961
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Continued on Pate' '
Let The
Tampa Airport Marriott
Cater To
Y>ur Every Need.
Our professional staff, attentive service and gracious
accommodations will make a success of your Wedding,
Bar Mitzvah, Banquet, Business Meeting or Reunion.
\te also provide outside catering services. See our Catering
Department for information or please call 879-5151.


Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Regional Inter-Agency Co-Op
of Jewish Family and
Children's Services
Participants in the first meeting of the North
and Central Florida regional Jewish Family
and Children'8 Services inter-agency
organization. (Standing left, to right) Alvin
Gamson, Orlando; Anschel Weiss, Tampa;
Michael Bernstein, Pinellas; Iris Young,
Jacksonville; Naomi Korn, Tampa; Caryn
Moss, Jacksonville; Iris Lee, Pinellas. (Seated
left to right) Lee Berkowitz, Sarasota; Jerry
Stone, Sarasota; Michelle Goldstein, Tampa;
and Dale Johnson, Tampa.
A new region of the association
of Jewish Family and Children's
Services, to be known as the
North and Central Florida
Region, held its initial meeting in
Tampa last month under the
auspices of the Tampa Jewish
Family Services. Twenty-one peo-
ple representing the professional
staffs of the Jewish Family Ser-
vice agencies from Jacksonville,
Gulf Coast, Sarasota, Orlando and
Tampa met to discuss professional
issues and share ideas designed to
enhance the quality of services of-
fered by the agencies.
This new regional group will
enable its member agencies to in-
form, assist and support each
other as they face the challenges
of meeting the needs of an in-
creasing population coming to live
in Florida. Meetings have been
scheduled to take place three
times a year so that inter agency
co-operation will be able to keep
pace with the increasing demands
for service.
Sam Reiber, president and
Audrey Haubenstock, vice presi-
dent of Tampa Jewish Family Ser-
vices noted that future plans call
for the board members of the
respective agencies to also par-
ticipate in these regional meetings
as well.
Michael Bernstein, Executive
Director of the Gulf Coast Jewish
Family Service was selected as
the first regional chairman and
the next meeting of the regional
group has been scheduled for
Monday, May 5 in Sarasota.
))
Shalom Reunion Correction
The Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division is planning a
Shalom-Tampa welcoming party
in the spring. A May date was in-
advertently reported in the last
issue. The correct date is SATUR-
DAY EVENING, JUNE 28! Betty
Shalett, Vice President of Special
Projects announced that a special
party is being planned to welcome
newcomers to the Tampa area. 'A
reunion of people that attended
annual parties hosted by the Tam-
pa Jewish Federation Women's
Division for the past five years is
being planned for June 28 to help
welcome the 1986 newcomers. If
you missed out on attending one
of the famous Shalom-Tampa par-
ties, we cordially invite you to join
us. An exciting evening is being
planned for you."
If you are new or know of so-
meone new please call the Tampa
Jewish Federation office,
875-1618 to add their name to our
invitation list.
'New Directions' Workshop
Sharing ideas and issues were (from left
seated) Natalie Merkur Rose, Tampa; Shirley
Serbell and Phyllis Abrams, Pinellas. (Stan-
ding from left) Bernice Bressler, Meryl Borns-
tein, Tampa; Robin King, Tampa; Juli Sol-
inger, SarasotaJManatee; Selma Smulyan,
Orlando; Barbie Heller, Orlando; Robin
Pollack, SarasotaJManatee.
TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION
WOMEN'S DIVISION
1986 Pearl Campaign Division
IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE
"A MOM-TEEN HAPPENING"
Sunday, March 9,1986
1:00 p.m.
MARRIOTT HOTEL
WESTSHORE & CYPRESS
(GRAND BALLROOM)
Lunch: $11:00 per person
7th-l2th grade Teens
(boys and girls)
Join Us For An Exciting
Sunday Afternoon
1'A Summer Experience''
with Jeff Fox A Nell Shaw
Co-Ed Fashion Show
by Colony Shops A The Men's Room
Modeled by our own teens
. DOOR PRIZES
FUN, ENTERTAINMENT, SURPRISES
For further information, call the Federation office, 875-1618
It is difficult to recognize
divorce as an opportunity for per-
sonal growth. If you are recently
divorced or separated, Northside
Community Mental Health Center
offers an eight-week workshop
that can help you recover from a
marital break-up.
The "New Directions"
workshop will begin Tuesday,
March 4, at 7 p.m. at the Apostles
Lutheran Church, 200 Nertn
Kings way, Brandon. Workanop
topics include dealing with loss
and loneliness, communications
with the ex, and starting over
again.
The fee for the workshop is $40
(sliding fee scale available).
For more information or to
register, call 977-8700 or
971-0338.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/FWday, February 21,1986
Nazi Network in Brazil
Rabbi Kosenthal is director of
the Latin American Affairs
Department of ADL's Interna-
tional Affairs Division.
By MORTON M. ROSENTHAL
Hotel Tyll, in the Brazilian
resort town of Itatiaia, was the
site of an international gathering
in April, 1978. The occasion
Hitler's 89th birthday brought
together many Nazis living openly
or in secret in Brazil, plus more
than a score from overseas, in-
cluding Manfred Roeder, the
leader of Germany's neo-Nazi
movement, and Hans Werner
Shutte, a leader of the German
Reich Liberation Movement. It is
possible that Dr. Josef Mengele
was one of the guests.
The news of Mengele's death
and the fact that he had lived for
many years near Sao Paulo,
Brazil, was greeted with shock
and disbelief by many who think
of Paraguay and Argentina as the
primary havens for Nazis in Latin
America. Ironically, the media, in
reporting the Mengele discovery,
generally failed to inform the
public that Brazil has long been
the nerve center for the Nazi net-
work in South America.
Several Nazis known to have liv-
ed in Brazil were responsible for
the death of more than one million
Jews during the Hitler era. The
roster is impressive: Franz
Stangl, Gustav Franz Wagner,
Herbert Cukurs, and now Josef
Mengele.
Franz Stangl's curriculum vitae
is that of a master Nazi criminal.
He served as police superinten-
dent of the Euthanasia Institute,
Schlou Hartheim, November
1940-February, 1942; komman- ,
dant of Sobibor concentration I
camp, March 1942-September, '
1942; kommandant of Treblinka
concentration camp, September,
1942-August, 1943.
After the war, Stangl and his
deputy at Treblinka, Gustav
Franz Wagner, made their way to
Rome to connect with the
"Vatican route" to South
America. In Rome they learned
that Syria was recruiting German
officers to train its army, so both
men went first to Damascus and
later to Beirut.
Stangl and his family moved to
Brazil in 1951, after getting a visa
readily from the Brazilian consul
in Beirut. Using his own name, he
worked for several textile firms in
Brazil and later got a job with
Volkswagen where he was
employed at the time of his arrest
in February, 1967. Returned to
Germany, he was sentenced on
December 22, 1970 in Dusseldorf
to life imprisonment for co-
responsibility in the murder of
900,000 people at Treblinka.
Gustav Franz Wagner served as
kommandant of Sobibor concen-
tration camp where inmates called
him "the human beast." Sobibor
was different from other concen-
tration camps because it had no
work facilities. It has been
described as "a killing machine"
where men, women and children
were gassed within hours after be-
ing herded off arriving trains. A
monument, ten feet tall, now at
Sobibor, commemorates "the
250.000 Russian. Polish. Jewish
and Gypsy prisoners murdered in
this place from May 1942, until
October, 1943."
Survivors of Sobibor have
testified that Wagner personally
joined in the slaughter, on one oc-
casion splitting a man's head with
a shovel.
"When he killed, he smiled,"
said one former inmate.
Wagner lived inconspicuously
and did not think a pseudonym
necessary when he entered Brazil
in 1952. Although Franz Stangl
disclosed, during his 1970 trial,
that Wagner was living in Brazil,
Brazilian authorities made no ef-
fort to apprehend him.
Wagner was arrested belatedly
in 1978, in the wake of publicity
surrounding the Nazi meeting at
the Hotel Tyll. Justice, however,
was denied by the Brazilian
Supreme Court which blocked ex-
tradition requests by four coun-
tries. The court based its ruling on
a technical error in translation of
a court document, even though
Wagner had confessed his guilt.
Wagner committed suicide at
his farm in October, 1980.
Herbert Cukurs was responsible
for the massacre of 32,000 Lat-
vian Jews in 1941. Columnist Jack
Anderson reported that
eyewitnesses described Cukurs as
"strutting about in a black leather
coat, brandishing a pistol" as
Jews were brutalized and
murdered. He also barricaded
some Jews in their synagogue
where they were burned alive.
Cukurs arrived in Rio de Janeiro
in 1946. After he was identified in
1949 as the man responsible for
the mass killing of Jews in Riga,
the Jewish Federation of Rio de
Janeiro presented Brazilian
authorities with sworn statements
by survivors about Cukurs' war
crimes and demanded that he be
expelled. The government refused
because he had fathered a child
born in Brazil.
The most that Jewish leaders
were able to accomplish was to
block Cukurs' three attempts to
become a naturalized Brazilian
citizen.
Cukurs' body was found stuffed
in a trunk in a beach house in
Montevideo, Uruguay in 1965
where he reportedly had been
lured on a business deal. His
killers left a note pinned to his
leather jacket which said, "The
Committee That Never Forgets."
The Nazis' main base is in
southern Brazil, in the states of
Rio Grande do Sul, Santa
Catarina and Parana which
border on Paraguay, Argentina
and Uruguay. German immigra-
tion to this part of Brazil began
about 1825 and continued in in-
creasingly large numbers; by
1940, it totaled more than one
million. So dominant is the Ger-
man influence in the region that
even today that language is the
vernacular in many cities.
Nazi bund groups sprang up in
Brazil in the 1930s. In the early
'40s, a large number of pro-
sperous German businessmen
moved to Brazil from other coun-
tries in Latin America. The
reason? The size of the country
eJewish Floridian
Of Tampa
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Friday, February 21 &*'/. 12 1 ADAR M*#
Volume 8 Number 5
made it more difficult for
authorites to keep an effective
check on them.
The United States Charge d'Af-
faires in Brazil, William C.
Burdett, in a memo to the State
Department in January, 1941,
reported that the Brazilian state
of Santa Catarina was "the head-
quarters of the Nazi organization
in South America." The memo
told of an extremely effective Nazi
network throughout Brazil,
noting that the Nazi party
"perfects its plans to the smallest
detail. Every block where Ger-
mans live has a leader ..."
The majority of the Germans in
Brazil were enthusiastic sup-
porters of Hitler and his aspira-
tions to convert the Southern
Cone of South America into
another German state.
Mr. Burdett reported in 1940, in
a secret message to the Secretary
of State, that the Brazilian am-
bassador in Germany had told his
government that he had reason to
believe that "the Germans envi-
sioned taking over sections of
Brazil in the event of their victory,
and that they are already prepar-
ing 'Fifth Column' activities."
There is ample evidence that the
passage of more than 40 years has
not diminished Nazi sentiment in
Brazil. When police interrupted
the Hotel Tyll meeting, they found
the participants wearing lapel
pins which said,
"Freiheitsbewegung Deutsches
Reich" (Freedom Movement: The
German Reich). In the hotel, own-
ed by Alfred Winkelmann, they
found large quantities of anti-
Semitic literature with swastikas
and photos of Hitler.
Winkelmann, a member of a
German spy network in the '40s
was convicted by a Brazilian court
and sentenced to two years in jail.
After the Itatiaia meeting,
Winkelmann told reporters for
the newspaper 0 Estado de Sao
Paulo (April 26, 1978) that "The
IV Reich is our dream and our ma-
* ir objective. They killed Hitler,
ut they will never kill his
philosophy, which is ours."
The massive outburst of anti-
Semitic demonstrations in the
wake of Gustav Franz Wagner's
arrest in 1978 is even more
dramatic proof that Nazism is still
a vital and popular force in the
heartland of German-Brazil.
Given the large German popula-
tion and the popularity of Nazism
among them, the attitude of
Brazilian authorities toward this
anti-democratic menace is crucial.
During World War II, the govern-
ment investigated the Nazi net-
work, which included many Ger-
man cultural and social institu-
tions. One measure to control pro-
Nazi activities imposed restric-
tions on German schools. German
propaganda activity, well financ-
ed and very extensive, was
carefully monitored and several
German spy rings were broken up.
However, the government was
reluctant to take more severe
measures because of the vital role
which Germans, particularly those
living in the South, played in the
nation's economy.
Since the war, the Brazilian
government has shown little in-
terest in curbing or investigating
Nazi activities. The official reac-
tion to the Itatiaia meeting and
the outburst of anti-Semitism that'
followed Wagner's arrest was
particularly troubling to Brazil's
Jewish community of approx-
imately 150,000.
Municipal and state officials in
Rio Grande do Sul largely dis-
counted the seriousness of the
situation and federal officials
were also reluctant to attach im-
portance to the renascent Nazi
activity.
0 Estado de Sao Paulo reported
on April 25, 1978 that in Brasilia,
the capital, the Nazi meeting was
viewed "without surprise"
because right wing governments
have such c"read of Communism
that "they fall into the arms' of
the opposite ideology Nazism
and fascism.
Colonel Rubi Ludwig,
spokesman for President Ernesto
Geisel, told reporters that the
Itatiaia meeting would not be
brought to the President's atten-
tion unless the matter became
serious, dismissing it as "nothing
more than a get-together of
nostalgic old men."
Mayor Antonio Carlos Borges of
Santa Rosa audaciously suggested
that Jews may be responsible for
the manifestations of Nazism "to
strengthen the defense of the
Jewish people."
After the war, thousands of SS
officers, Gestapo members and
other Nazis fled to Brazil. Stangl
Wagner, Cukurs and Mengele are
but four brought to the surface
Other Nazis have found shelter in
the vastness of Brazil and the
fraternal intimacy of large Ger-
man communities.
The restoration of democratic
government, after 21 years of
military rule, coupled with the
publicity surrounding the Mengele
case, create an opportune moment
for authorities to rout the Nazis
from Brazil. The United States ex-
perience may serve as a useful
model. After decades of similar in-
difference, the Justice Depart-
ment established the Office of
Special Investigations (OSI) which
has been instrumental in locating,
bringing to trial and deporting
Nazi war criminals.
USF Announces New
Endowed Chair
University of South Florida
President John Lott Brown an-
nounced the establishment of a $1
million endowed chair in car-
diovascular surgery in the Univer-
sity's College of Medicine and the
complete endowment of the Ed C.
Wright Chair in cardiovascular
research.
The new chair will be funded by
the Suncoast Chapter of the
American Heart Association and
will be known officially as the
"American Heart Association,
Suncoast Chapter, Inc. Chair of
Cardiovascular Surgical
Research." The Suncoast Chapter
has also funded the Ed C. Wright
chair, established in 1973, with
totally private funds, and has now
increased its contribution to
qualify the chair under the Emi-
nent Scholars Act.
President Brown said that this
brings the total of endowed chairs
at USF to eight in the medical
center and 14 overall. Under the
Eminent Scholars Act, the state
provides $400,000 in matching
funds when a university raises
$600,000 from private sources,
thus generating a $1 million en-
dowment to attract outstanding
researchers and scholars.
The Suncoast Chapter will also
meet its commitment to fund for
five years the Charles K. Donegan
Career Development Award in
Basic Cardiovascular Research.
The award will then be funded in
perpetuity by the University of
South Florida. It provides the op-
portunity for doctors who have
completed their residency to train
for a career in research.
The announcement was made in
conjunction with the American
Heart Association's designation
of February as "National Heart
Month." Treatment of heart and
circulatory disease, the country's
main cause of death, will cost an
estimated $76.8 billion this year,
according to Heart Association
figures. The mission of the
American Heart Association is the
prevention of premature death
and disability due to car-
diovascular disease and stroke.
"The establishment of these two
chairs in cardiovascular research
and surgery," said Dr. Charles L.
Rast, Jr., Executive Board
Member of the Suncoast Chapter,
"and the perpetuation of the
Charles K. Donegan Career
Development Award at USF
reflect the deep continuing com-
mitment of the Suncoast Chapter
of the American Heart Associa-
tion and of the people of the west
coast area in the search of a solu-
tion to the major problem of il-
lness affecting so many of our
population. We are proud to be a
part of this effort and to be able to
provide such support to outstan-
ding investigators in this field at
USF."
Dr. Ray Olsson, Professor of
Medicine and Biochemistry at the
USF College of Medicine, current-
ly occupies the Ed C. Wright
Chair of Cardiovascular Research.
Olsson will continue his present
research program in the cause and
treatment of heart disease, and
has a national and international
reputation for his excellence in
cardiovascular research. He has
been the chairholder since 1976.
"We established the first
research chair at the University of
South Florida," said Dr. Charles
K. Donegan of the Suncoast
Chapater, "and we believe the
money spent has accomplished so
much that we thought it wor-
thwhile to establish a chair in car-
diovascular surgical research."
vvrTH KPOUMjiesio O-'CRfiCO


Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish floridian of Tampa Page 5
,
Community Rallies to Help Keep
Sexual Abuse Treatment Center Open
Ruth Popkin, national president ofHadassah,
visits a wounded soldier in the Hadassah
University Hospital in Jerusalem. She is seen
talking to Victor Bergrin, 22, who has
undergone surgery for superficial wounds in
Scientist
Expected
TEL AVTV (JTA) A Chinese
scientist from the People's
Republic of China is due in Israel
to present a paper at the annual
Israel conference on aviation and
astronautics, to be held in Tel
Aviv and Haifa.
He is Z.C. Shi, of China's
Aerodynamic Research Institute
in Sichuan province, who will
deliver a paper on an aspect of
supersonic flow, jointly with J.J.
Gottlieb, of Toronto University's
Institute for Aerospace Studies.
Other senior Chinese officials of
cooperative associations are also
expected in Israel later this year
to attend the Agritech '86 interna-
tional agricultural exhibition to
open in Tel Aviv in September.
Israeli officials are unwilling to
say much about the expected ap-
pearances at the conference of
Chinese delegates.
Free Fare
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Eg-
ged bus cooperative has agreed to
a Ministry of Transport request
that it carry women soldiers free
of charge on its inter-urban
services.
the Plastic Surgery Department. Bergrin
came to Israel at the age of 6 when he was
brought by his parents, Norman and Betty
Bergrin, of Miami.
Community support is keeping
the Sexual Abuse Treatment
Center (SATC) of Hillsborough
County open while it worked out
its long-term financial problems,
the executive director said.
"Foundations, businesses, civic
organizations and individuals
have rallied to the Center's cause
coming up with needed emergen-
cy funds to keep the Center
operating," Lerea Goldthwaite
said.
"The Center serves too impor-
tant a need in Tampa," the callers
say and then offer money or
assistance in raising it.
Several civic groups and frater-
nities are planning special event
fundraisers. The Conn Founda-
tion awarded a grant which
alleviated the immediate strain,
but long-range funding is still a
problem, she explained.
The board of directors is explor-
ing additional foundation grant
possibilities as well as looking into
mounting a major campaign to
raise funds.
In addition to operating funds
the Center needs larger quarters
and will have to raise money for
land and a building, unless so-
meone donates it.
"The response has been heart-
warming. All the staff and clients
can say at this point is 'Thank you
Hillsborough residents,' said
Elbe LeBoss, president.
The Center has grown more
than 500 percent since opening 11
years ago. Funding has not kept
up. It also has expanded its ser-
vices from a counseling program
for rape victims only to therapy
for all sexually abused persons in-
cluding those who have endured
incest and child molestation.
The Center offers individual and
group therapy. It has group ses-
sions for all ages and problems
from small children to adults.
Some of the adult groups are com-
prised of people who were abused
as children and never received
psychological help till now. In ad-
dition, the Center runs programs
for sex offenders sent by the
courts for rehabilitation.
As great as the immediate help
has been, it is just a start to solv-
ing the financial woes of the
Center and the community will be
hearing later how it can help us re-
main open as long as the services
offered are needed, LeBoss said.
Eat in Good Health
With Fleischmann's. Margarine
"^SweetUNSALTED
Fleischmanns
i?&*}00%cctr\G*
OMM
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Margarine
^OO*com oil
argarine
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I i '"*"*'v
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation.
Passover
Wed. April 23-Thurs May 1
Cantor
Lawrence Tuchinsky
and the Nadel Choir
Services Sedarim
Dr.Chaim
Israel Etrog
win offer a program of
lectures and conduct
seminars during the holiday.
mm
EDenvllle, New York 12428
Hotel 914-647-6000
800647-6000
See fcur Travel Agent
Now its easy to make delicious, low cholesterol Challah
French Toast. Start with your own low cholesterol Challah
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Fleischmann s Margarine is made Irom 100.. corn oil has 0%
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So. it you want to enioy good eating and good health one
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great taste of Fleischmanns.
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH mmsjm.
6 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Dash powdered saffron optional
1 package FLEISCHMANNS'
RapidRise" >teast
1 tap hrt water (125* to 130/T)
'.'; cup FLEISCHMANN S Sweet
Unsalted Marganne. softened
1 cup FLEISCHMANN S EGG
BEATERS Cholesterol Free 99%
Real Egg Product, at room
temperature
Sesame or poppy seed
Set aside 1 cup flour. In large bowl, rrax remaining flour, sugar, salt,
saffron and FLEISCHMANN S RapidRise >reast; sttr m hot water and
FLEISCHMANN'S Sweet Unsalted Margarine Mix in Y, cup
FLEISCHMANN'S Egg Beaters and enough reserved flour to make soft
dough Knead until smooth and elastic. 8 to 10 minutes Cover: let rest
10 minutes.
Divide dough in half Divide one half into 2 pieces, one about 'A of dough
and the other about % of dough Divide larger piece into 3 egual pieces,
rol each into 12-mch rope Braid the ropes; seal ends Divide smaller
piece into 3 equal pieces, roll each into 10-mch rope Braid ropes, place
on top of targe brad Sea1 together at ends Place on greased baking
sheet Repeat with remaining dough Cover; let nse m warm draft-free
place unU doubled in size, about 1 hour
Brush loaves with remaining Egg Beaters, spnnkle with seeds Bake at
37**F for 20 to 25 minutes or until done Remove from sheets,
cool on wire racks.
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH FRENCH TOAST
MMHamp
y> cup EGG BEATERS
Cholesterol Free 99% Real
Egg Product
Vi teaspoon vanrta extract
'/> teaspoon ground cinnamon
4 (Wmch thek) slices Low
Cholesterol Chateh (recipe follows)
I tablespoon FLEISCHMANN'S
Sweet Unsalted Margarine
Syrup. iam or confectioners sugar
In shallow dish, beat FLEISCHMANN S Egg Beaters, vanilla and cin-
namon Dip challah into mixture, turning to coat well In skillet, over
medium heat, melt FLEISCHMANN S Sweet Unsalted Marganne Add
Chatah. cook for 3 to 5 minutes on each side or until golden brown
Serve with syrup iam or confectioners sugar
"e nwisru tame iac
Fleischmanns jives ever) meal a holiday flavor.
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iwmmammiri SAVE 15C
When you buy any package of
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29666"41015'


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, February 21, 1986
U.S. Leaders Hail Freedom of Sharansky
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American Jewish leaders
hail the release of Soviet
Jewish aliya activist Anato-
ly Sharansky, but they also
stress that the fight on
behalf of Soviet Jewry is not
over yet and that thousands
of Jews are still waiting in
the USSR to receive permis-
sion to emigrate.
Kenneth Bialkin, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organiza-
tions, expressed "joy" at Sharan-
sky's freedom and praised Presi-
dent Reagan and Secretary of
State George Shultz "for their
unremitting and ultimately suc-
cessful efforts to win his release.
Their commitment to the cause of
Soviet Jewry merits our deepest
appreciation."
NOTING THAT such
refuseniks as Yoaef Begun and
Idal Nude! have been waiting for
many years for an exit visa,
Bialkin said, "We will continue
our efforts to call to world atten-
tion the consistent violations by
the Soviet Union of the solemn
commitments which it made in
signing the Helsinki accords more
than 10 years ago," on the issue of
human rights.
Gerald Kraft, president of B'nai
B'rith International, declared,
"We can only rejoice that Sharan-
sky's bitter ordeal has finally
come to an end and that he can re-
join his remarkably courageous
and steadfast wife, A vital."
He said, however, that Jews in
the USSR are still denied bask
freedom as Jews," and that the
Jewish community in the United
States "will continue its efforts to
help those Soviet Jews who wish
to leave to do so."
IN A joint statement. Howard
Friedman, president, and David
Gordis, executive vice president,
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee, said, "At the same time that
we rejoice in Sharansky's
freedom, we are ever mindful of
the tens of thousands of other
Soviet Jews who remain behind,
denied the opportunity for an exit
visa. We reaffirm our pledge to
continue our efforts until they,
too, are able to establish new lives
in Israel and be reunited with
their families."
Abraham Fox man, associate na-
tional director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, said he welcomed Sharan-
sky's release but added that there
cannot be full rejoicing "while
hundreds of thousands of other
Soviet Jews continue to suffer
unable to live as Jews in the
Soviet Union, unable to leave."
Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
stated, "The release of Sharansky
confirms once again that the
Soviet Union cannot forever resist
the force of world opinion. It
reminds us too that, blessed as we
are with freedom to think and
speak and act, American Jews
must never forget or abandon
their brothers and sisters, who,
because they wish to live as Jews
and join their families in Israel,
have been persecuted and im-
prisoned by Soviet authorities."
NATIONAL Conference on
Soviet Jewry said, "We are ex-
tremely grateful to this Ad-
ministration for the continuing
Festival
Continued from Page 1
contemporary-International.
Don t miss these wonderful
talents at the 17th Annual Jewish
Music Festival Sunday, March 9,
at 8 nm. at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom. 2713 Bayshore
Boulevard.
public and private enorts in help-
ing secure Sharansky's freedom
and having him repatriated to
Israel to join his wife, A vital."
It added, "We trust that the
release of Anatoly Sharansky in-
dicates a change in Soviet
behavior, as it seeks to build a new
relationship with this country. In
so doing, we look forward to the
relaae of hundreds of thousands of
other Jews awaiting to leave,
some for more than 15 years."
Bernice Tannenbaum, chairman
of the American Section of the
World Zionist Organization, said,
"Soviet propaganda attempted
unsuccessfully to camouflage
Sharansky's imprisonment for
Zionist and humanist activities, as
a defender of human rights, and
the Helsinki accords, with the
canard of espionage. It is so fit-
ting, so right, so inspiring that he
has already arrived in the State
that welcomes him while it con-
tinues to burn a lamp of hope for
his fellow Soviet Jews."
CHAD! ARON, head of the
department of immigration and
absorption of the Jewish Agency,
said, "While we celebrate the
release of Sharansky let us not fall
into the trap of forgetting the
other Prisoners of Zion and the
400,000 Jews who have applied to
leave the Soviet Union. We must
continue the struggle to free
Soviet Jewry and we must be
careful not to view Sharansky's
release as s change in Soviet
policy, a change which unfor-
tunately has not yet been
accomplished."
Alan Pesky, chairman of the
Coalition to Free Soviet Jews,
said that the "momentous event"
of Sharansky's release "does not
mean the end of our struggle to
ease the plight of two-and-a-half-
million Soviet Jews." He said his
organization welcomed the
release, "especially in view of the
Soviets' unwillingness for many
years to even consider the notion
of his departure."
Pesky added, "The Soviet
Union must understand, however,
that the freeing of Sharansky, or
for that matter a handful of other
prominent Jewish activists, while
appreciated among those who
cherish liberty, will only have a
lasting impact if it is followed by a
large-scale emigration of Soviet
Jews."
AMERICAN Jewish Congress
president Theodore Mann said
Sharansky's release is "an en-
couraging and significant event,"
but the degree to which it
"reflects a real change in Soviet
policy" remains uncertain. To the
extent that the Sharansky action
does signal a new openness on the
part of the Soviet Union, Mann
said, "it holds the promise of a
new phase in American-Soviet
relations."
Rabbi Louis Bernstein, presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Council of
America, said that Sharansky's
release was a tribute to the
greatness of the American people
and its President. "It is a victory
of the indomitable spirit of a
human being created in the image
of G-d over the forces of evil and
darkness," he stated. Bernstein
expressed the hope that die
release will signal hope for the
release of other Prisoners of Con-
science who wish to leave the
Soviet Union and that the USSR
will open up its doors to all Jews
who wish to emigrate.
Ruth Popkin, president of
Hadaasah, welcomed the release
of Sharansky, stating that he "has
been a symbol of courage and
determination for the cause of
Soviet Jewry and to all who
cherish freedom. We hope that his
release will herald the opening of
the doors of emigration to the
many Prisoners of Conscience and
the thousands of other Soviet
Jews whose only crime is the wish
to rejoin their families and live as
r
Bay Area Jewish National Fund
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May 5-19
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free Jews in the Jewish State,
Israel."
OTHER JEWISH leaders who
welcomed Sharansky's release
and stressed that the struggle
must continue on behalf of other
Soviet Jews who wish to emigrate
were: Rabbi William Berkowite,
president, American Jewish
Heritage Foundation; Herbert
Magidson, president, Jewish
Labor Committee; Ernest Zelig,
president, B'nai Zion; Dr. Barnett
Zumoff, president, Workmen's
Circle; and Hart Hasten, presi-
dent, Herat Zionists of America.
Some 300 members of the Stu-
dent Struggle for Soviet Jewry
sang and danced in a "victory
celebration" at Stern College in
Manhattan around a wooden
prison cage which Avital Sharan-
sky often stood in during SSSJ
demonstrations for her husband.
Rabbi Allan Meyerowitz of Spr-
ing Valley, N.Y., who met Anatoly
Sharansky in 1974, recalled that
Sharansky had encouraged him to
sing the Israel anthem, Hatikvah,
with him in Red Square. Israei
Fridman of Manhattan, who had
been at the courthouse in Moscow
during Sharansky's trial, em-
phasised that "many Soviet Jews
are still left in hell as Sharansky
reaches his seventh heaven."
Israel, Ivory Coast to Resume
Severed Diplomatic Relations
JERUSALEM (J*TA) Israel and Ivory Coast an-
nounced the resumption of full diplomatic relations last
week in joint statements released simultaneously here and
in Abidjan, the Ivorian capital. Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir said an Israel Ambassador will take up his post in
the West African nation shortly.
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Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
Hillel School Participates In
Citywide Interfaith Memorial Service
Business Card Directory
A BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY for
Professionals and Executives continues
as a regular monthly feature of THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
Please send your business card, with
payment of $28.56 for the first edition. Future
placement will be invoiced by mail at the
same monthly rate.
Send To:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
2808 Horatio Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Attn: Business Directory Dept.
For Gregory Jarvis, Francis R.
Scobee, Judith Remik, Christa
McAuliffe, Mike Smith, Ellison S.
Onizuka, Ronald E. McNair, and
their families, we, ike family of the
HUlel School of Tampa, extend our
sympathy. To the family, friends,
and relatives of the Challenger's
crew, we, the human family, share
in the sorrow of your loss our
loss.
These words were spoken by
Jonny Kolodner, President of the
Student Government at The HUlel
School of Tampa on Sunday, Feb.
2 at a special citywide memorial
service for the seven astronauts
who died in the space shuttle on
Jan. 28.
The memorial service was held
at the First United Methodist
Church and was arranged by
Pastor Richard Bingham. Other
clergy who participated were Rab-
bi Kenneth Berger and Cantor
William Hauben from Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom, Father Ken-
nely, and Reverend Jim Hannas.
In addition to Jonny Kolodner
representing the Hillel School,
there was a 12th grade student
from Plant High School, Carmen
Fowler, and George Pennington,
a representative from the City of
Tampa.
When the request came for the
children from Hillel to participate,
the eighth grade class under the
guidance of Mrs. Reiber, prepared
many of their feelings regarding
the tragic event. These were con-
densed and combined to form the
text which was read by Jonny at
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the service.
Although only eighth graders,
these young teenagers have elo-
quently expressed s very adult
concept that despite this tragic
setback we must find the courage
to move on:
With sadness we gather the debris
from the explosion. With heavy
hearts NASA officials gather page
after page of data. Piece by piece,
bit by bit we gather information
searching for answers. As we do
so, we must gather our courage.
We must gather our undaunted
hope towards a better future in
space.
Children's Museum
Of Tampa
The Children's Museum of Tam-
pa originated in January, 1985
with the formation of a committee
to research the feasibility of a
"Hands-On" children's museum
for Tampa.
Surveys were distributed to pre-
schools in the Tampa area and at
the USF Children's Festival. The
response was unanimously in
favor of such a museum.
The Children's Museum wfll
provide a place for children ages
two to twelve to explore and in-
teract with exhibits that are
designed to stimulate thought
about the world around them.
. Some of the exhibits that are
proposed are a grocery store, post
office, printmaking room (making
paper, rubber stamps), a
playspace and a giant bubble
maker. Also proposed is a chang-
ing exhibit room La. medical, den-
tal, ethnic.
Currently we are seeking Vih/"'
dividusls with time and Interest to
work with us in the areas of
museum development, fund-
raising and public relations.
For further information call
985-9100 and 988-2755.
Effects of Aging
"The Effects of Aging On
Memory Processes" will be the
subject of a University of South
Florida speech at 3 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 21 in Classroom Building A
(CBA 103) on the Tampa campus.
Dr. Fergus I.M. Craik, a
psychologist from the Unviersity
of Toronto, will discuss the com-
mon memory problems that hap-
pen day-to-day as well as more
technical aspects of memory loss.
Internationally known for his
human memory research, Craik
has edited journals and received
numerous research grants. He
also has published many papers,
such as "When Memory Fades,"
"Learning in the Aged," "The
Nature of the Mind," and 'Age
Differences in Remembering."
His speech is sponsored by the
University Lecture Series and the
psychology organizations of
Sigma Xi and Psi Chi and will be
free and open to the public.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, February 21, 1986
Radioativity Research May Affect
Florida's Phosphate Industry
A team of researchers at the
University of South Florida have
isolated polonium as the major
radioactive chemical in ground
water that drains phosphate-rich
Central Florida into the Florida
aquifer, the main source of drink-
ing water in the state.
Dr. Sam Upchurch, one of the
USF scientists involved in the
study, said that he didn't think
there was enough total radioac-
tivity being transmitted to the
aquifer by polonium, a natural by-
product of phosphate, to present a
health risk.
But Upchurch said the findings
of the study performed by himself,
Dr. H. Ralph Brooker of the USF
Physics Department and Craig
Oural, also of USF, indicated that
the total amount of radioactivity
present in the water, known as
gross alpha, sometimes surpassed
national standards. The geologist
said that while researchers were
studying the relationship between
ground water and the radioactive
chemical radium, the scientists
found that most of the radioactivi-
ty was being caused by polonium,
a decayed form of radium.
Upchurch said the state Depart-
ment of Environmental Regula-
tion (DER) hasn't set any stan-
dards on the amount of polonium
allowed in erroundwater. He said
Prof. Named
Winner
JERUSALEM (JTA>jttE|ojE._
Haim Beinart, Bernard Cherridk
Professor of Jewish History at the
Hebrew University, has been
named the first winner of the in-
ternational "Three-Culture"
Prize (el Premio de "Las Tres
Cultures") awarded by the City of
Cordoba, Spain. The prize was
created by Cordoba to call atten-
tion to its past role as a center for
Judaism. Christianity and Islam.
Beinart is a world-renowned
figure in the history of the Jews of
Spain and the Marranos.
one group that may be affected is
the phosphate industry, which
now drains mine sites by sinking a
deep well, known as a recharge
well, and allowing the water to
seep into the hole. The water from
recharge wells eventually drains
into the aquifer.
But if the DER sets polonium
standards that mines aren't able
to meet, Upchurch said, the
phosphate firms will have to go to
the more costly method of pump-
ing water out of the mine sites.
The geologist said an ongoing
study is being performed on the
situation and should provide more
answers.
"When the research is com-
pleted," Upchurch said, "we will
be able to say, 'We have a major
problem and they (the recharge
wells) should be shut down,' or,
'it's just a tempest in a teapot.' "
Gordon Nifong, research direc-
tor for the Florida Institute for
Phosphate Research, said it is too
early to tell what impact the USF
study will have on the industry.
Upchurch claimed that there
has been one major result of the
USF investigation: The develop-
ment of consistent guidelines for
further testing.
"There was a tremendous
amount of variability in how
phosphate companies and
research labs test their samples,"
he claimed. Upchurch said the
sample-testing standards devised
by the researchers should help
eliminate errors in future
polonium tests.
The USF study is being con-
tinued, the geologist said, thanks
to a grant from the Florida In-
stitute for Phosphate Research.
a Upshjarcb said that although more
evidence is needed, initial findings
indicate that the impact of
polonium is reduced because the
radioactive chemical is partially
absorbed by soil and clay found at
the bottom of the aauifer.
The results of the first study
performed by the USF team was
presented Feb. 4 to the American
Society for Testing Minerals dur-
ing the organization's conference
in Cocoa Beach.
Ask Your
Congressman
The Budget Crisis
Your Chance to
Honor The Astronauts
The JEWISH NATIONAL FUND is a private non-profit
charitable organization, which, since 1901, has planted
millions of trees in Israel.
The JEWISH NATIONAL FUND within hours of the recent
tragedy that befell the Challenger and the seven brave
Astronauts, set aside land in the American Independence
Park outside of Jerusalem to create the
CHALLENGER MEMORIAL FOREST
Your generous donation is urgently needed so that this
forest can immediately be created. You will be rewarded with
the knowledge that you have directly helped in keeping the
memory of our Astronauts alive.
Your Tax Deductible contribution of $35 will plant 7
treesone for each Astronaut. Any number of trees may
be planted at $5 per treethe number will come from your
heart. Please fill out this coupon today and mail to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
8405 N. Himes Ave. Tampa, Fl. 33614
Enclosed plMM Hnd S_____lor th planting
of___trees ($8 hc h) In tht
CHALLENGER FOREST outsMo Jerusalem.
Planted by above-ptMM
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lEWISH
runorw
RAID
Dear Congressman Gibbons:
Is Gramm-Rudman the answer
to deficit reduction?
-H.J.
Dear H.J.:
The first step to a healthy
economy is the reduction of the
federal deficit. Your government
has run up a greater deficit than it
has in the last 200 years of its ex-
istence. This exorbitant deficit is
having an impact upon the
domestic economy as well as the
world economy. It is going to have
an impact on our future com-
petitiveness in the world economy
and, in turn, will affect our stan-
dard of living.
On December 11, 1985 Con-
gress approved legislation that is
designed to bring our serious
deficit crisis under control. The
balanced budget measure, known
as the Gramm-Rudman proposal,
signed into law by the President,
establishes maximum allowable
deficits declining by $36 billion
each year to reach zero by 1991. If
the President and the Congress
fail to enact a budget that meets
the annual deficit targets, the bill
requires automatic across-the-
board spending cuts to reach the
deficit goal.
This deficit reduction package
requires that one-half of any
automatic cuts come from defense
programs. It exempts the follow-
ing low-income domestic pro-
grams from future automatic
cuts: Social Security cost-of-
loving adjustments; Medicaid; Aid
to Families with Dependent
Children; Child Nutrition; Food
Stamps; Supplemental Security
Income; Veterans' Pensions;
Veteran's Compensation; and the
special supplemental food pro-
gram for poor women, infants and
children. These programs were
exempted from future cuts
because many of the nations'
elderly and less fortunate have
virtually no other assistance
available to them to meet their
basic necessities.
The Gramm-Rudman proposal is
not a radical proposal. The same
principles are used by many states
in the Union to balance their
budgets. In fact, the state of
Florida is one of them. We first
determine how much revenue
there will be, then the additional
taxes we are willing to raise. If for
some reason more money is being
spent than is being raised, the
state of Florida gives the Gover-
nor the power to cut back on
spending.
This is essentially what the
Gramm-Rudman proposal will do.
It will force the federal govern-
ment to balance expenditures
with revenues. While the vast ma-
jority of people do not wish to see
their taxes raised or programs
that benefit them cut back, the
Gramm-Rudman plan is a more
equitable approach that puts us on
a track to control the federal
deficit.
The growing federal deficit is
one of the most serious economic
issues facing our nation. Failing to
address the deficit crisis could
result in an economic catastrophe
that would cost millions of
American jobs and impact each
and every federal program.
Gramm-Rudman is not a perfect
law and may not be the final solu-
tion, but I believe that the threat
of automatic budget cuts will
force the Administration and the
Congress to take the necessary ac-
tion to reduce the federal deficit.
SAM GIBBONS
Congressman, House of
Representatives,
Washington, D.C. 20615
High School Students Invited
To Summer Science Program
At Israel's Weizmann Institute
Seventy senior high school
students from throughout the
world are being invited to the
Weizmann Institute of Science to
participate in the 18th annual
Bessie F. Lawrence International
Summer Science Institute at
Rehovot, Israel, from July 7 to
Aug. 7.
During the four-and-a-half week
program, qualified students will
work alongside top scientists in
personalized laboratory en-
vironments and in lecture and
mini-courses at the Weizmann In-
stitute, one of the top five scien-
tific research centers of the world
today.
The Weizmann Institute of
Science, now in its 51st year, is
located 15 miles southeast of Tel
Aviv and 35 miles west of
Jerusalem. Currently the In-
stitute is engaged in more than
700 scientific projects ranging
from cancer and multiple sclerosis
to solar energy and aging of the
brain.
Research areas in which the
students will participate include
Biology, Chemistry, Physics,
Mathematics and Computer
Sciences. The students will also
spend a week on field trips in-
vestigating the ecology of the
Negev, Israel's southern desert.
Tours of Jerusalem and the
Galilee are also included in the
summer project.
The Summer program is open to
science-oriented students who will
have graduated from high school
by June 1986. A limited number of
outstanding high school students
who will graduate in June 1987
may be considered. Application
deadline is March 1.
The participation fee is $1,300,
which does not include transporta-
tion costs to and from Israel.
There is an additional charge of
$50 for health insurance while in
Israel. Scholarships, based on
academic qualifications and finan-
cial need, are available.
For applications and additional
information on the summer
science project, write to Lee
Millman. executive director.
Florida Region of the American
Committee for the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science, 1550 N.E.
Miami Gardens Drive, Suite 405,
N. Miami Beach, FL 33179 or
telephone 940-7377 in Dade Coun-
ty or 462-3722 toll-free in
Broward County.
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Israel Drazin
Simeon Kobrinetz
Three Jewish Military Chaplains Have
Top Rank Simultaneously For First Time
Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
Our Gang
Continued from Page 2
for a great year because the new officers of the Jewish Towers
Resident Association are very excited about the coming year.
Good luck to President Sid Bleendes; Vice President Leon
Lavine; Second Vice President Marcia Simon; Treasurer Bert
Green; Recording Secretary Miriam Sansweet and Correspon-
ding Secretary Evelyn Lopez, They are responsible for planning
and preparations for all activities at the Towers.
Directress. Combining a love of the arts with a diverse
background in banking and public relations, Sharon L.
Goldsmith is the new Director of Development of The Tampa
Museum of Art. Formerly with Sarasota's Ringling Museum and
then Clearwater's PACT, she is excited about the expansive
development effort underway in Tampa.
Sharon, her husband Dr. Nolan I. Goldsmith and daughter
Dana, live in Dunedin and are members of Temple Ahavit
Sholom.
NEW YORK, N.Y. For the
irst time in the history of the
iiitcd States Jewish military
chaplaincy, three Jewish
haplains now have top rank in
heir perspective branches of the
J.S. Armed Forces
imultaneously.
Rabbi Aaron Landes, of Elkins
'ark, Pa., chairman of the ex-
ecutive committee of JWB's Com-
nission on Jewish Chaplaincy, has
Bust been promoted to the rank of
tear Admiral, Navy Reserve, it
vas announced this month by
s'avy Chief of Chaplains Rear Ad-
miral John McNamara.
The promotion of Rabbi Landes
follows the appointment to
brigadier General of both Dr.
Israel Drazin, who was named
\ssitant Chief of Chaplains of the
Assertiveness
Workshop
"Life shrinks or expands accor-
ding to one's own courage."
If you've ever been uncomfor-
table or frustrated with the
average difficult situation or
frustrating person, attend a
course called "How to be Asser-
tive" being offered by Northside
Community Mental Health
Center.
This five-week class can help
you become a more effective in-
fluence and confident com-
municator. The class will meet
Tuesdays beginning Feb. 26 at 7
p.m., at The Commons, 14039 N.
DaleMabry.
The fee is $20 per person or $30
per couple.
For more information call
Elaine Kellogg at 977-8700.
U.S. Army in charge of mobiliza-
tion, and Rabbi Simeon Kobrinetz,
director of the VA Chaplaincy
Service who also serves as a
chaplain in the Office of the Chief
of Chaplains in the U.S. Air Force
with the Brigadier General rank.
"We of JWB's Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy can be truly
proud of this new appointment,"
Rabbi Barry Hewitt Greene, of
Short Hills, N.J., chairman of the
JWB Chaplaincy Commission,
said. "The selection places three
Jewish chaplains in the forefront
of the military services."
Rabbi Landes, spiritual leader
of Beth Sholom Congregation in
Elkins Park, Pa., is national
chaplain of the Naval Reserve
Association. A captain in the
Chaplain Corps. USNR, he is in
his 28th year of service as a naval
chaplain. Last summer the JWB
Chaplaincy Commission asked
him to serve as scholar-in-
residence at the annual retreat in
Sobernheim, West Germany, of
the Jewish chaplains in the
Western European and Mediter-
ranean theatres.
Dr. Drazin and Rabbi Kobrinetz
were the two Jewish chaplains
among the clergy on the national-
ly televised "Unknown Soldier
from the Vietnam War" program.
Dr. Drazin is the first Jewish
Reservist to be named Deputy
Chief of Chaplains of the U.S.
Army.
An attorney as well as a rabbi,
Dr. Drazin was asked by the Army
to return to active duty to handle
special constitutional issues, and
he prepared the defense in the suit
challenging the constitutionality
of the Army Chaplaincy. The
Government won the suit.
Dr. Drazin served as rabbi of
Passover
at the Concord
Wed. April 23-Thurs. Moy 1
The observance of rra- Outstanding leoders
dirion, the magnificence from Government, Press,
of the Sedorim, the beauty the Arts and Literature,
of the Services, the bril- Great films. Music day and
liance of the Holiday Pro- night on weekdays,
grommina. Special programs for tots.
Cantor Herman tweeners and teens.
Malomood. assisted by Rabbi Simon Cohen
and resident Rabbi Eli
Mozur oversee constant
Koshruth supervision and
Sedorim.
the Concord 45-voice
Symphoic Chorale, di-
rected by Marhew Lozor
and Don Vogel, to officiate Dietary Low observance,
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tut
Shaarei Tfiloh Congregation in
Baltimore and other pulpits in
Maryland and is a scholar and
author.
Rabbi Kobrinetz, a native of
New York, who served as national
chaplain of AMVETS and the
Jewish War Veterans, was na-
tional president of the Military
Chaplains Association. He cur-
rently serves as commissioner on
the B'nai B'rith Commission on
Armed Forces and Veterans Af-
fairs and as volunteer chaplain of
the Washington, D.C., Police and
Fire Departments.
Chaplain Kobrinetz has been
with the Veterans Administration
since 1965. He is the 10th chaplain
to become director of the VA
Chaplain Service and the second
rabbi since the service was
established in 1946.
JWB cares for the Jewish well-
being of those in both the military
and civilian communities. It is the
U.S. government-accredited
agency for serving the religious,
Jewish educational and recrea-
tional needs of American Jewish
military personnel, their families
and hospitalized VA patients.
It enriches Jewish educational
experiences as the leadership net-
work and central service agency
for 275 JCCs, YM-YWHAs and
camps in the U.S. and Canada,
serving more than one million
Jews.
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son of Rabbi Samuel Sliver
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(813)955-9193


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, February 21, 1986
Congregations/Organizations Events
CONGREGATION'
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Scholar-in-Residence
Rabbi Samuel K. Joseph,
Associate Professor of Religious
Education, Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, Cincinnati, will be at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek for
the Nathan I. Gordon Scholar-in-
Residence, Feb. 21-23.
Friday evening's topic will be
The Holocaust and Moral Educa-
tion. Saturday's all day session
will be on Faith Development. As
lunch will be served (free), please
call in your reservation.
Sunday's lecture will be
Humanism: Secular and
Religious. Juice, Danish and cof-
fee will be served.
CONGREGATION
KOL AMI
Rally Hunt
On Saturday, March 8 the great
Second Annual Kol Ami Rally
Hum will take place. It will be a
night filled with excitement,
adventure, and a great deal of fun.
The event will have to be limited
to the first 50 cars that enter.
There will be a maximum of six
people per car. The price is $45
per couple. The closing date is
Feb. 24. A late night bite and door
prizes will top off this wonderful
event. For those who wish to
order your very own rally hunt T-
shirt to wear to "the hunt," they
are available at $5.95 each.
The entire community is invited
to attend this event. For further
information call Karen at the
Synagogue office 962-6338.
Shabbat Family
Services and Dinner
Congregation Kol Ami will hold
its semi-annual Shabbat Family
Services and Dinner on Friday
Volunteers for Israel
Volunteers for Israel announces
a special program for
matriculated students from ages
17 to 26.
Students may go to Israel dur-
ing their spring break for a two or
three week period to perform
maintenance work in the Israel
Defense Forces.
The students will be housed
with the Israeli soldiers. They will
learn the trials and tribulations of
life in Israel from conversations
with their new Israeli working
friends and people in the streets
of Israel.
The volunteers short stay will
be an indoctrination that he will
carry home to tell his friends. He
will learn that the time spent ac-
tually helped the economy and
bolstered the confidence of the
Israeli; that his brethren in the
"Galut" want Israel to survive.
Cost to the student is $399 for
two seeks and $430 for three
weeks round trip (via Tower Air
from JFK) plus a $30 registration
fee. Departure dates will be
March 2nd, 16th and 30th.
Men and women up to the age of
65 may apply. They can fly from
JFK either on Tower Air during
the same departure dates at a cost
of $480 or on El Al March 10-25
(Cost $599 students $525)
Call the volunteers at
305-792-6700 Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday between
the hours of 1 to 4 p.m. The office
is located at 6501 W. Sunrise
Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL
33313.
DISCOVER
ISRAEL
ON Y(HR OW\ TERMS
Soys & Gtfls 13 ?1
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SpOfts Swimming Ctmping
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Special events including, fantastic
plant ride ovef Isiaei
Round trip El Al Ibgkts
BETAR
SUMMER PROGRAMS
for m> 50 rttts
furtflirtl In III mint*
C*f #.,**? r*ff,,>r
i4 tttm ifcial rrtfrtmi
Meet int I Jewish youth
Scheduled tree time
Itemed Ameman & Israeli siall
lowest puces
financing available
'at Oct.!
Call or write lor a Iree brodhure
Jewish Community Center.
2808 Horatio St Tampa. FL 33609
(813) 872-4451
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To make your party a rousing success, we offer a variety of
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Choose from our fine selection of hors d'oeuvres.
With this Ad receive a 10% discount on your catering order
10043 N. DALE MANY
(Original Carrollwood QaCfi *>77*l
. Shipping Center)_______________JDO'A// j
evening, March 7. Evening ser-
vices will begin at 6:15 p.m. and
will be followed by full chicken
dinner prepared by members of
the congregation. This evening of-
fers members of the congregation
the opportunity to participate in
an especially warm occasion of
Shabbat prayer and dinner and to
celebrate the Jewish family ex-
perience together.
HADASSAH
TAMPA CHAPTER
Book Report,
Lunch, and Gamen
The February meeting of the
Tampa Chapter of Hadassah will
be held on Tuesday, Feb. 25,10:30
a.m. (Please note change of date
and time), in the library of the
JCC, 2808 Horatio.
Sue Forman, a past president of
our chapter and president of the
Parent's Association of Hillel
School, will inform and entertain
us with a book report on "Our
Crowd" and "The Rest of Us,"
companion books by Stephen Bir-
mingham. These books are about
the European Jewish immigrants,
a topic so appropriate during this
100th birthday year of the Statue
of Liberty.
Have we got a deal for members
and guests Make a $5 donation
to help Youth Activities and
Youth Aliyah and we'll treat you
to a gourmet lunch prepared by
some of our best cooks. PLUS
we'll provide tables for you to play
your favorite game (mah-jong,
bridge, canasta, Rummy-Cue,
Etc.) and prizes for the winners.
Please call Dorothy Skop at
839-0167 or Freda Rosenbaum at
879-3244 to make a reservations
for lunch and type of game to be
played.
For members who wish to make
an extra investment in "our"
youth we will honor $18 (Chai)
givers with a Helping Hand pin.
In the United States, Hadassah
sponsors activities for youth
through Hashachar (The Dawn)
which offers summer camps, year
round clubs, leadership training
seminars and Israel programs. It
has over 8,000 members, is in its
75th year and is available for boys
and girls age nine through high
school age.
Hadassah remains one of the
largest organizational con-
tributors in the world to Youth
Aliyah. This child rescue move-
ment is without parallel. For over
50 years we have seen this pro-
gram change with the need
from the pre-war group of Ger-
man youngsters in 1934 to the
homeless, destitute waifs of the
Holocaust to those now seeking
rescue from oppression and disad-
vantage. There are currently over
18,000 children ages 12 to 18 in
315 Youth Aliyah install ions, kib-
butzim, youth villages and
centers.
Candy Latter and Blanche
Spivak, our Youth Activities and
Youth Aliyah chairmen, are being
assisted by Evelyn Mayer, Syd
Fridkin, Nancy Mizrahi, Lil
Bregman, Dorothy Skop, and
Freda Rosenbaum.
TAMPA BAY
JEWISH SINGLES
COUNCIL
An evening of meeting new
friends and reacquainting with old
is planned for Friday, Feb. 28 at 9
p.m. Attend services at the Tem-
ple of your choice, then join the
Singles at Carol Rubin's house
and celebrate the Sabbath TBJS
fashion.
If you missed our last Oneg,
here's your chance to see what
everyone's talking about! Good
food and good company
guaranteed. Directions: 1461
Ridgeland Circle North, Clear-
water (North on Highland, left on
Ridgeland Road, right on
Ridgeland Circles North to 1461).
For more information or direc-
tions contact Carol at 442-5000 or
Cathy 969-3441. Shabbat Shalom.
Challenger Astronauts to Have
Living Memorial With
JNF Forest In Israel
The Challenger space shuttle
astronauts will be memorialized
by the establishment of a forest at
the American Independence Park
in Israel, initiated by a spon-
taneous outpouring of sympathy
from across the United States, the
Jewish National Fund of America
announced.
"These seven courageous men
and women have touched us all
more profoundly than we could
have imagined, and their tragic
death and sacrifice fills us with
the need to reach out," said Dr.
Joseph P. Sternstein, JNF presi-
dent. MJNF has received a great
many phone calls from adults and
children alike, all of whom are ex-
pressing their sympathy by asking
that trees be planted as a living
memorial in the astronauts'
honor. The Challenger Forest is
JNF's way of commemorating
their indelible contributions to the
highest ideals of this nation and,
indeed, of the human spirit."
Children from schools which had
celebrated the festival of Tu
B'Shevat, the Jewish New Year
for Trees, have requested that
their recent Tu B'Shevat con-
tributions to JNF be donated
towards this forest. The presence
of teacher Christa McAuliffe on
the ill-fated shuttle has deeply af-
fected the children who had look-
ed forward to witching her "class
in space." Commenting on the
traumatic effect of the event on
youngsters, Sternstein expressed
hopes that the forest wUl sym-
bolize in their minds a meaningful,
lasting response to an event that
many schoolchildren find especial-
ly difficult coming to terms with.
The American Independence
Park was established just outside
Jerusalem on the occasion of the
nation's Bicentennial celebration
in 1976. It was dedicated as a liv-
ing testimonial to the friendship
and vision shared between the
United States and Israel. Among
the great Americans honored in
the park are founding fathers
George Washington and Thomas
Jefferson, as well as such promi-
nent leaders as Hubert Hum-
phrey, Henry Jackson, Gerald
Ford, and Nelson Rockefeller. The
park is located near JNF's John F.
Kennedy Memorial and Peace
Forest.
In addition to small groups of
trees which may be planted, in-
dividuals may also place larger
projects of Gardens (100 trees),
Orchards (300 trees), Groves
(1,000 trees), and Woodlands
(2,000 trees) in the "Challenger"
Forest. For more information
please contact the Regional JNF
Office at 8405 N. Himes Avenue,
Tampa, Florida 33614 or call
813-933-TREE. Toll Free calls
from outside the Tampa area
1-800-282-4198 (tone) 8733.
Intrest Free Educational
Loans For Jewish Youth
The Jewish Children's Service,
based in Atlanta, Georgia is a
social service agency that pro-
vides interest free educational
loans to Jewish youth whose
families reside in the Southeast
region.
The need for private funding for
higher education is emphasized
with the anticipated cut backs in
the availability of federal financ-
ing. The Tampa Jewish Family
Service is proud to be affiliated
with this program.
If you are a young person in-
terested in securing funding for
the upcoming school year or you
have a child with financial need,
please contact Michele Goldstein
at Tampa Jewish Family Service
to determine eligibility. The
numbers are 932-6676 or
251-0083.
To place a Bar/Bat Mitz-
vah announcement in the
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
please have information,
(typed/double spaced), in
the office, 2808 Horatio
Street, Tampa, Florida
33609, three weeks prior to
the event.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 261-4216 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday, 8
p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan, 7:80 a.m., 6:46 p.m
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Csrvstrre
3919 Moran Road 9024888 Rabbi H. David Rose, Cantor Sam Iaaak
Service*: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Coaeerrative
2718 Bayshore Boulevard 887-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, hatsan William
Hauben Service*: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:16.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Herbert Drooa. Rabbi Joan Gkaar
Farter. Service*: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION BAI8 TEFFILAH Ortaodoi
3418 Handy Road No. 108 Rabbi Yossi Dubrowaki 982-2376 Service* Friday
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:90 a.m.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
10222 Pawnee Avenue Student Representative Jay Pepoee 986-6391
Executive Director Rabbi Yoeai Dubrowaki 982-2876 Friday evening lervicea
7:80 p.m.
B'NAI BBITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Jewish Student Center, University of South
Florida CTR 2882 Rabbi Steven J. Kaplan, Director 6014 Patrick Ct. No.
172, Tampa, Florida 88617 (Village Square Apt*.) 988-7076 Services and Oneg
Shabbat Friday it swag 7 p.m. Sunday Bagel Brunches, 11:80 a.m.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OP SUN CITY CENTER
684-9162, United Community Church, 1601 La Jobs Street, Sun City Center.
Service*: Friday, 8 p.m.
RECONSTRUCTIONI8T COMMUNITY CHAVURAH
Rseonstruetionist, 6014 Patrick Court, Tampa, 88617. Rabbi Steven Kaplan
Study Session* on select Sundays. Monthly Friday evening services and dinner
9IS-7076.


Friday, February 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
Community Calendar
SUNDAY | MONDAY
SCHAAKAI ZEDEK __
SCHOLAR IN 23
RESIDENCE
1:00 JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
JEWISH MUSIC
SEASON PROGRAM
1:00 EOL AMI
BONEEM
1M EOL AMI KADIMA
ANDU8T
24
JEWISH WAR
VETERANS
VM EOL AMI ADULT
ED
iTH ANNUAL YOUNG
LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE -
WASHINGTON, DC
r.M JEWISH WAR
VETERANS
AUXILIARY AT JCC
061
CTH ANNUAL YOUNG
LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE -
WASHINGTON. DC
lfcMSCHAARAI
ZEDEK SISTERHOOD
BOARD/GENERAL
MEETING
ILK FASHION SHOW
FUNDRAISER
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
25
IM0 'HADA88AH/TA-
MPA CHAPTER
REGULAR MEETING
LK JEWISH
TOWERS BOARD
MEETING
t:K NATIONAL >
COUNCIL JEWISH AO
WOMEN BOARD
MEETING
IMC 'JEWISH
COMMUNITY FOOD
BANK
lMtRODEPH
SHOLOM
SISTERHOOD BOARD
MEETING________________
10:00 ORT/BAY ^
HORIZONS CHAPTER
BOARD MEETING
7:K HADASSAH/AME
ET CHAPTER BOARD
MEETING
7:KSCHAARAI
ZEDEK ADULT
HEBREW EDUCATION
1M0 JEWISH
COMMUNITY FOOD
BANK
M-.K RODEPH
SHOLOM
SISTERHOOD ANNE
ZACKINTBRFAJTH
LUNCHEON
7:41 KOL AMI
SISTERHOOD BOARD
MEETING
7:K KOL AMI
FELLOWSHIP 27
MEETING
7:K KOL AMI
EXECUTIVE BOARD
MEETING
S.-M TAMPA JEWISH
FEDERATION
COMMITTEE
MEETINGS
t:KBRANDEIS
WOMEN BOARD
MEETING
M0 HADASSAH/AME
ET CHAPTER STUDY
GROUP
8*0SCHAAKAI
ZEDEK ADULT
EDUCATION
J-^Jbt^v rt r\
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21
SCHAARAIZEDEK
SCHOLAR UN
RESIDENCE
28
SCHAARAIZEDEK
SEFTY KALLAH
KOL AMI SH ABB AT
DINNER AND YOUTH
SERVICE
*M RODEPH SHOLOM
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER SHABBAT
066
22
Washington'*
Birthday
SCHAARAIZEDEK-
SCHOLAR IN
RESIDENCE
C:M TAMPA JEWI8H
FEDERATION
CAMPAIGN DINNER
n^Atch
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
SEFTY KALLAH
7:30 JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
ART AUCTION
Sejsdars Tut ia The
Jewiaa Sood-WMNF
M.JFM 10:JO s.s.-l
pm.
rHalltaliat tiase
Frioay. Feermarr SI tM
Friday. Fakrnaiy <:10
Friday. Mare* 7 :14
MB.
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
AVIGAIL BERGER
Avigaii Ruth Berger, daughter
of Rabbi and Mrs. Kenneth
Berger will be called to the Torah
as a Bat Mitzvah Friday, Feb. 21
at 8 p.m. and Saturday, Feb. 22 at
10 a.m. at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom. Officiating will be Rabbi
Berger and Cantor William
Hauben.
The celebrant is a student in the
Rodeph Sholom Religious School
and an officer in Kadima. Avigaii
attends the Hillel School of Tampa
where she is in the Seventh
Grade, and a member of the
Hanukkah Speaker's Bureau.
Rabbi and Mrs. Berger will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Jules Berger, grand-
parents of the Bat Mitzvah from
Philadelphia; Mr. and Mrs. Barry
Berger, Philadelphia; Mr. Samuel
Berger, Washington, D.C.; Mr.
Daniel Ben Ayoun, Tel Aviv; and
Mrs. Madeline Korman, New
York; Stacey, Lisa and Tammy
Berger; Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Berger, Miami; Mr. and Mrs. Hy
Blum, Conn.; Ms. Annette Blum,
New York; Rabbi Mel Glazer,
Princeton, N.J., and Rabbi and
Mrs. Frederick Kazan,
Philadelphia, special friends of the
family.
MONICA ROSENTHAL
Monica Helene Rosenthal,
daughter of Alice and Stanley
Rosenthal will be called to the
Torah as Bat Mitzvah Friday,
Feb. 28 at 8 p.m. and Saturday,
March 1 at 10 a.m. at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom. Rabbi Ken-
neth Berger and Cantor William
Hauben will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
Obituaries
ELLER
Ethel L., 86, of Tampa, died Friday.
January 31. She had lived in the Bay area IS
yean, cominj from New York. She wm
employed aa a secretary, and wm a
volunteer with the St. Joeeph's HoapiUl
Auxiliary in the Community Relations Dept.
She is survived by a son William B. of
Eiurene. Ore.; a daughter. Mareia B. Adoff
of Tampa, a sister. Libby Brody of Tampa;
three grandchildren, and one great-
grandchild.
MOLAY
Ue Brenner, 46, of Temple Terrace, died
Tuesday, February 4 of natural causes. A
native of New York, she moved to the Bay
five years ago from Portola Valley.
Calif., where she was a schoolteacher. She
was an assistant vice president at NCNB in
Tampa. She was a member of ORT. Ska hi
survived by her husband. Richard L-; two
oas, Kenneth L. of Sunnyvale. Calif., and
Thomas of SarasoU; and a daughter. Heidi
of Temple Ta
FRANK
Macy. 64. of Ta
11- Formerly i
retired at an auditor for the Internal
"venue Service and had lived in Tampa
unce 1979. He was affiliated with Sehaarsi
2edek Congregation and was a veteran of
WorW War fwa. Sarvrvers include two
brothers, Myer and Assert Frank of Taaapa
and nieces and nephews, Allison Frank.
Joseph Frank. Nina Gerson and Barry
FwmA r-----^||t|-M ^ M|
"north Manor, 2S6 69th St. N.. 8t.
Petersburg, SS710.
Rodeph Sholom Religious School.
She is a member of Kadima, and
the Pearl Division of the Women's
Division of Tampa Jewish Federa-
tion. Monica is a student at
Berkeley Preparatory Schools
where she is in the Seventh Grade
and on the honor roll. Her hobby is
playing the piano.
Special guests from out of town
include great grandparents Moe
and Sophie Goldberg, Miami;
grandparents, Dr. and Mrs.
Seymour Grupp, Forest Hills,
N.Y.; Mr. and Mrs.' Norman
Rosenthal, Cranbury, N.J., and
Ruth Rosenthal, Miami. Other
special guests include Marshall
Grupp and Paula Senft Schnyler,
New York City; Michael Grupp
and Jodi Glass, Providence, R.I.;
Dr. and Mrs. Mel Rosenthal and
family, Wilmington, Del.; Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Abrams and Andrew,
Philadelphia; Beth Abrams and
David Discount, Princeton, N.J.;
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Rosenthal, San-
ta Barbara, Calif.; Mr. and Mrs.
Lou Rosenthal, Fort Lauderdale;
Ethel Katz, Miami; Martin Grupp
and Mary Santo, New York City;
Elise Rosenthal, Los Angeles; Dr.
and Mrs. Mark Berland and fami-
ly, Denver; Helen Reid, Esther
Lieberman, Forest Hills, N.Y.;
Avigaii Berger
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lewin, Palm
Beach; Arlene Samuels of Dallas;
Jerry and David Antis, Albany,
Ga.; and Mr. and Mrs. Max Rosen-
thal, Delrea Beach
Hosting the Friday evening
Oneg Shabbat will be Sandra and
David Bruck, Mareia and Jack
Cohen, and Bonnie and David
Solomon.
Hosting the Shabbat Dinner for
out of town guests at the home of
Nancy and Rick Lewis will be
Louise and Richard Eatroff,
Marilyn and Robert Farber,
Jerilyn and Stuart Goldsmith, and
Lois and Jay Older.
Dr. Joseph Sternstein Elected
President of JNF of America
Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein,
former president of the Zionist
Organization of America and Rab-
bi of Temple Beth Sholom, Roslyn
Heights, Long Island, has been
elected president of the Jewish
National Fund of America. He
succeeds Charlotte Jacobson, who
served two two-year terms as
president of JNF, the organiza-
tion responsible for afforestation
and land reclamation in Israel.
In accepting his new position,
Sternstein stated that "JNF is the
concrete manifestation of the
rebuilding of a people on a former-
ly arid, sterile land. The history of
JNF is a saga which must never be
forgotten. The interconnection
between the Jewish people and
the land of Israel is the catalyst
which continues to revolutionize
Jewish life." He emphasized,
"unless we are rooted in the land
we have nothing. Redeeming the
land of our forefathers provides a
never-ending source of Jewish!
small way in promoting this
development." She also noted
that JNF"s creation of Timna
Park in the Negev as a major
recreational facility represents
"history in the making and will be
a tremendous asset to the
Southern region's economy." In
view of the strict economic deci-
sions taken by the Israeli govern-
ment, Jacobson urged the
Diaspora, particularly the
American Jewish community, to
increase its support of JNF ac-
tivities vital to Israel's future.
Monica Rosenthal
Hosting the Kiddush Luncheon
following services will be Mr. and
Mrs. Moe Goldberg, Dr. and Mrs.
Seymour Grupp, Mr. and Mrs.
Norman Rosenthal, and Mrs.
Ruth Rosenthal.
Dr. and Mrs. Rosenthal will host
a reception Saturday evening in
Monica's honor at the Airport
Marriott Hotel, and a brunch Sun-
day at their home for their out-of
town guests.
BRIAN KANE
Brian Stuart Kane, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Bruce E. Kane will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah March 1 at 9:80 a.m. at Con-
gregation Kol Ami. Rabbi David
Rose and Cantor Sam Isaak will
officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
Kol Ami Religious School Hey
Class. He attends Seventh Grade
at Young Junior High School.
Brian was an outstanding athlete
in the Sixth Grade at Lockhart
Elementary School, and was se-
cond place winner in all of
Hillsborough County in competi-
tion sponsored by the Museum of
Science and Industry.
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Kane will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception for out-of-town
guests and family at a local
restaurant.
Special guests will include great
grandmother, Jean Abrams.
tmtmmmimmmmmmMmmmmmman'mi. ^A
\tCAHPfA\R\
CHOOSE THE RIGHT SUMMER CAMP FOR YOUR CHILD
FREE ADMISSION DOOR PRIZES
i amps died Tuesday. February
of Irvington, N.J., Mr-Frank
I rWkaa. Nartt to Nat-Am or
I taatrbe*. South to PtfnAm
strength and dignity."
elected tieasurer of JNr,s|)oke of p te .TO RIs^ ***
some of the organization s major __
activities during the past few ... it Hyatt *i|iiq HoW ai ifa*
years "One of toe most excitafig *"" r* ** 400SE Saco-JtoMUT
achievements." she said, "has a FREE 1R0CHURC DCSCMMNG ALL AJ.C. ACCREDITED CAMPS
been JNF's land reclamation work Staff Applications Invited Call or Write.-
in the barren. hiUy Galilee," ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT CAMPS
Israel's new northern frontier for e^ 10l2^f 60 Madison Avenue, N.Y.. N.Y. 10010(212) 679-3230
industry and mmiiwinince rm
elad to have participated in a
CUT U OUT a SMrt m
I
I
I
I
I
Brian Kane
Calif.; grandparents, Jack and
Shirley Kane, Miami, and Leo and
Estelle Hoffman, Georgia; Vickie
and Monty Kane and children,
Miami; Donna and Larry Kane
and children, Pennsylvania; Sheila
Jones and children, Georgia.
There will be other relatives and
friends from around the United
States.
COLON-RECTAL
CANCER
PREMAUGNANT
DISORDERS
DETECTED
EASILY
ONE out of every TWO readers
of this notice will have or develop
colon rectal CANCER or premalia
nant disorders (polyps) which can
EASILY EC DETECTED by a simple
annual STOOL examination, as re-
cently Shown on CBS-TV
SEND for this stool kit. follow the
easy instructions and return the
specimens in return envelope sup-
plied. Our laboratory will immedi-
ately notify you of the results. This
is a licensed medically supervised
laboratory.
DO YGuRSElF A FAVOR
THAT MAY SAVE YOUR I
AND PARTICIPATE IN A
NAT LTH SURVEY
s -
r
i
j NAME_
I AOE_____
I
| ADOflESS
MaVrro
CORPORATE MEDICAL
"EXAMINATIONS, INC.'
1872 Commerce St.,
Yorktown, NY 10596

ITY

STATE
.-
PHONE
Number o< Kits.
. H.T6 each
Tata)
I.
.FJ


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, February 21,1986

;

.

The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece
YOUTH
DISCOVER
ISRAEL
ON YOUR OWN TERMS
Beyi 4 Grt 0-21
6
Sfocti. SwwMmf. Cmtm Mm mf\ Jmk yuxh
Guttural actwite Schnulii" Urn \mt
SfKwl rants. *** fantastic Trim* Amancan A taml staff
lowtst nneas
BETAR
SUMMER PROGRAMS ^
C*M or axiM tor a km kraclmr*
Mar Sumrrnr fragrant*
Am Dora*
JanMt Commumty CaaMr
2*01 HoraM StreM
(111) !7J-44i1
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
Be a guest at your own child's
birthday party! Have it at the
Center with your choice of theme,
games, arts and crafts, etc. The
party package includes: a party
leader to supervise activities,
mailing of invitations', set-up,
serve and clean-up; cake, ice
cream and drinks; party favors;
and a terrific 2-hour parly all
for only $4 per child! Minimum 10
children. Parties are held on Sun-
days only and dates are available
on a first come, first served basis.
Hurry and make your reserva-
tions now (at least 2 weeks prior
to desired date). Call Tami Eisner
at the Center.
SPBINGCAMP/
PESACHCAMP
The JCC is offering a spring
vsfttzztsz
and Monday-Friday, March
31-April 4, for all children in
grades K-6 who do not have school
that weak.
Regular Second Home program
win stul be running. In addition,
thia year we will have a special
Passover Camp "Pesach in.
Other Countries," which will be1
held on April 28, 29 and May 2.
Plan to spend your vacation with
us!
WE NEED
YOUR OLD TOYS
After receiving lots of new toys
for Chanukah, are you thinking of
throwing-out some of the old,
ones? Please don't!! Our Second
Home program is in desperate
need of some new games and
pussies, and we would really ap-
preciate your thinking of us. The
Pre-School is always in need of
more toys and games as well, so
passes remember us when yon
clean-out those toy chests.
Thanks!
TWEEN/TEEN
TWEEN8GETIT
TOGETHER
We are in the process of plann-
ing some terrific programs for our
Tweens (6th, 7th and 8th graders)
- dances, skating parties, trips,
etc. PUom, if you are a fun-loving
tween who would tike to become
part of the JCC Tweens, call the
Youth Department at the Center
for further information, about the
programs we're planning.
TWEEN8
HAYKIDE AND COOKOUT
Back by popular demand the
new and unproved, bigger and
better Tween Hayride, Saturday,
Feb. 22. The evening includes the
hayride, cookout, campfire,
snacks and loads of fun! Call your
friends! Time: 6-10 p.m. Charge:
$6 members, $7.50 non-members.
Transportation provided from Kol
Ami (North End JCC). Advanced
registration required.
JOIN OUR
NAME BANK
Interested in doing some
babysitting, plant-sitting,
lawnmowing, pet-sitting or per-
forming some other service? Need
a little extra spending money?
We're starting a Name Bank of
babysitters, yard cleaners and
other talents and services.
Anyone in need of special services
just calls the Center, and we give
out your name and number! Just
call Tami to list your name with
us!
TEEN COUNCIL
MEETING
The Teen Council is composed
of representatives of each of the
community's youth groups as well
aa unafflhstod but interested
teens. The purpose of the Council
i? to hnng our community closer
together in order to program teen
activities of widespread interest
The Council will meet at least*
once a month on a Tuesday even-
ing at 7:00, with the next meeting
on March 4 at the JCC. Mark this
date on your calendar now! This is
the year the Teens of the Tampa
Jewish Community are going to
shine!!
TEENS
TEEN CONFERENCE:
IRRECONCILABLE
DIFFERENCES
On Jan. 19, the JCC, in conjunc-
tion with Tampa Jewish Family
Services, hosted the Teen Con-
ference Day entitled "Irrecon-
cilable Differences."
The day began with the teens
doing some role-playing as
members of a family involved in a.
divorce. After meeting the family,
a mock trial was held, and perti-
nent issues were discussed
(custody agreements, step-
parents, division of property, etc.)
in workshops. The day concluded
with the judge's decision and an
open question and answer period.
This special day was a unique
and highly successful one which
afforded teens an opportunity to
not only listen to but also par-
ticipate in the discussions, the
JCC extends its sincere apprecia-
tion to all those who worked so
hard to make the conference a
quality experience.
Special thanks to Judge Ralph
Steinberg, attorneys Ann Kerr,
ATTENTION.
COLLEGE STUDENTS!
CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Looking for a fun summer?
We are now accepting ap-
plications for summer camp
counselors and specialists in
music, drama, arts, sports,
and Judaic studies. Please
contact Cece at 872-4461.
Charles Scruggs and Sam Reiber,
and to Mental Health Profes-
sionals Naomi Korn, LCSW, Kay
Lilly, LCSW, Greg Firestone,
PhD. Thanks also to Alan Sterl-
ing, MD, and Rabbi Brod, and to
all the teens who participated in
the day.
PHYS. ED
RESULTS OF
SAVANNAH
BASKETBALL
TOURNAMENT
The Tampa JCC hosted a
Junior/Senior High basketball
tournament the weekend of Feb.
1-2, and the Savannah JCC was
our guest!. In addition to making
lots of new friends, our teams
played some fine basketball. Here
are the results:
Saturday night: Tampa 7 and 8
grades-30; Savannah 7 and 8
grades-29 (in overtime); Tampa 7,
8 and 9 grades-38; Savannah 7, 8
and 9 grades-30; Savannah 10,11
and 12 grades-62; Tampa 10, 11
and 12grades-41
Sunday morning: Tampa 7, 8
and 9 grades-25; Savannah 7, 8
and 9 grades-14; Tampa 10, 11
and 12 grades-44; Savannah 10,
11 and 12 grades-84
So successful was this tourna-
ment that another one has been
scheduled in South Florida bet-
ween the Tampa JCC and the
North Miami Beach JCC the
weekend of Feb. 22-28.
So successful was this tourna-
ment that another one has been
scheduled in South Florida bet-
ween tiM Tamps JCC and the
North Miami Beach JCC the
weekend of Feb. 22-23.
TENNISTEAMS
HARD AT WORK
The JCC's Tennis Team has
been practicing long and hard for,
JCC HOSTS FRIDAY
NIGHT SERVICES
On Friday evening, March 7,
the JCC will host both the Shab-
bat service and Oneg Shabbat
following the service at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Shalom. On Friday
evening, March 14, the JCC will
host both the Shabbat Service and
Oneg Shabbat at Congregation
Shahare Zedek. Your attendance
at this special service will be a
gesture of support for your JCC!
Singles
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
Feb. 22 Game Night
Feb. 28 Oneg Shabbat
ADULTS
ADULT AEROBICS
Join this enjoyable class either
at the North End (Kol Ami), Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday, or at
the Main Branch, Tuesday and
Thursday, 9-10 a.m. Instructor:
Lisea Leonard.
CLUB VARIETY
UPDATE
Feb. 26 Book Review -
Goldie Shear will discuss the
history of the Jews in Ybor City.
7:30 p.m. at the JCC.
March 4 7 p.m., planning
meeting
March 15 Jai Alai
March 29 "Godspell" at Falk
Theatre
Crab Variety extends hearty
congratulations to Lil Singer on
the marriage of her daughter
Sherrie Goldstein to David Sigler.
feafteeiaa
Hava Naglla fief's as Joyous;
COME CELEBRATE
JEWISH MUSIC SEASON
aftha
Jewish Community Confer
SHONE 872-4451 2SOS HORATIO TAMPA, FLORIDA 33000
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23rd
Admission: **"
Mambars No chanp; ______
\f \
Non-mambars $1 | ); [S
seeeaS aet variety skew
its first match. Our practices are
every Tuesday, 3-6 p.m., if you'd
like to come out and cheer us on,
and we're getting ready to play
area tennis dubs in competitive
matches.
FAMILY
JCC OPEN HOUSE
On March 2, the JCC is having
an Open House to introduce our
spring program offerings for
grades K-6. Our Drama, Ballet,
and Gymnastics classes will all
perform to illustrate how much
they've been learning! At the
same time, you may also register
your child for spring programs
and day care. So be sure to be at
the JCC from 1-8 p.m. on Sunday,
March 2, and discover for yourself
all the wonderful programs we
have to offer. There's a lot going
on at YOUR JCC that yon won't
want to miss!
ADULTS/
SENIORS
OLDER ADULT PROGRAM
(RETIREMENT AND
PRERETIREMENT)
The JCC North Tampa Older
AduK Program is holding a plann-
ing meeting to arrange scheduling
of special programs, including:
Welcoming committee for
newcomers
Speakers on topics of concern to
middle-age adults and seniors
Speakers and special programs
on Jewish culture and values, in-
cluding the Jewish experience
over the life span
Join us for tins informative
meeting on Thursday March 6, at
10
Coming Up
Feb. 21 Jewish Culture
Club program, "Jewish
Burial"
Feb. 22 Singles Game
Night; Tween Hayride and
Cookout
Feb. 22-23 Tween/Teen
Basketball Teams play in
south Florida
Feb. 28 Jewish Music
Season Program
Feb. 24 "Intergenera-
tional" Ceramics
Feb. 26 Chib Variety
Book Review
Feb. 26 Seniors Sewing
Class
Feb. 28 Singles Oneg
Shabbat
March 2 JCC Open
House
March 3 Travel Club
Meeting; "Intergenera-
tional" Ceramics
March 4 Jewish Culture
Club Planning Meeting; Club
Variety Planning Meeting;
Teen Council Meeting
March 5 Footcare
Screening; Senor Sewing
Chun
March 6 JCC North Tam-
pa Older Adult Program
(Rrtirement/Pre-Retirement)
March 7 JCC Services
and Oneg Shabbat at Rodeph
i Shalom
Tampa J.C.C.
Sponsors A Community
Mishloach Manot *Driva
Wa will Prapara, Packaga a) Deliver Purim Gift
Packagas tor your fhands In tha Tampa Ana.
Mora Information to follow.
the giving of gifts of hamantashen, and other sweets to friends
sod neighbors Is e lovely Purim Custom.
SENIORS
SENIORS
FREE FOOT CARE
SCREENING
Marty Port, local DPM, will be
on hand to answer your questions
snd examine your feet, on
Wednesday, March 5,1-2 p-m.
TRAVEL CLUB
QUARTERLY MEETING
Help us plan some exciting trips
for the summer months. Come to
the quarterly Travel Crab meeting
on Monday, March 3, at 10:30
a.m., at the Center.
"INTERGBNERATIONAL"
CERAMICS
Seniors tins is s wonderful
opportunity to work with young
people on s special creative pro-
ject Our After-School Children
will be joining our Ceramics Class
for a unique shared experience.
Mondays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. No
charge for seniors. Carol Skelton,
instructor.
TRAVEL CLUB TO VIEW
"THE ADVENTURES
OF RABBI JACOB"
On Sunday, March 16, the
JCC's Senior Travel Crab will
make a trip to the Safety Harbor
Spa for a allowing of the Yiddish
film. "The Adventures of Rabbi
Jacob." We'll be leaving the JCC
at 1 p.m and returning at 4:46
p.m. Cost: $6 members, $&25
non-members. Includes film,
trsnsportstion snd light
refreshments.
JEWISH CULTURE
CLUB
The Jewish Culture Crab is
holding a planning meeting on
Tuesday, March 4, at 10 a.m. We
invite you to become involved in
this important cultural program,
and we are seeking the ex-
perience, ideas and talents of the
entire Jewish community.


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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, February 7,1986
The Jewish Community Center
PRESCHOOL
SOUTH-END
TWO YEAR OLD CLASS
Our new South-End two year
old class is off to a fantastic start.
Enrollment has already reached
eight young 2's, and we are expec-
ting more new friends to join us1
soon.
Activities have included special
playground and gym time, em-
phasizing gross motor skill
development, and manipulative
activities such as finger painting
with chocolate pudding, table
painting with shaving cream, and
other activities stressing the
motor skill development.
To join this exciting new pro-
gram, please contact Cece Hur-
witz at the South End.
COMPUTER NEWS
In the JCC Pre-School's four
year old classes, we have recently
begun our Computergarten Pro-
gram. Everyone is now becoming
familiar with the Apple II
keyboard, utilizing our new com-
puterboard mat. This activity
allows our four years olds to.
physically participate in letter and
keyboard recognition activities.
We are now working a Weekly
Reader Software Program called
The Stickybear Series. This pro-
grammed software concentrates
on shape identification, letter
recognition, color recognition,
and opposites. The children are
having a ball and learning at the
same time!
YOUTH
/
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
Be a guest at your own child's
birthday party! Have it at the
Center with your choice of theme,
games, arts and crafts, etc. The
party package includes: a party
leader to supervise activities;
mailing of invitations; set-up,
serve and clean-up; cake, ice
cream and drinks; party favors;
and a terrific two-hour party all)
for only $4 per child! Minimum 10*
children. Parties are held on Sun-
days only and dates are available
on a first come, first served basis.
Hurry and make your reserva-
tions now (at least two weeks
prior to desired date). Call Tami
Eisner at the Center.
SPRING CAMP-
PESACH CAMP
The JCC is offering a spring
camp "Spring Throughout the
World" on Friday, March 28
and Monday, March 31-April 4,
for all children in grades K-6 who
do not have school that week.
Regular Second Home program
will still be running. In addition,
this year we will have a special
Passover Camp "Pesach in
Other Countries," which will be
held on April 28, 29 and May 2.
Plan to spend your vacation with
us!
TJCC
5TH AND 6TH GRADE
BASKETBALL TEAM
IS VICTORIOUS!
Our fifth and sixth grade
basketball team battled it out with
Boys Academy on Jan. 20, and
when the dust settled, the
scoreboard read "JCC 16,
Academy 14." It was our second
game of the season and our first
victory! Outstanding players
were: Scott Grossman, Rachael
Pear, Mike Kennedy, Ian David-
son, and Teddy Gorman.
FITNESS DAY
A special day for children in
grades K-6! Push-ups, chin-ups,
hand-eye coordination, agility,
speed, and just fun-for-fitness are
wb"t this day is all about. Ribbons
a r,w >n down to
Center Piece
show-off! Sunday, Feb. 16, 1-3
p.m. Members $3, non-members'
$4.50. Advanced registration is a
must. |
NEW YOUTH DIRECTOR
The JCC is delighted to|
welcome Tami Eisner as our new,
Director of Youth-Tween-Teen'
Activities. Tami comes to the
Center not only with expertise but
also with considerable en-
thusiasm. All Youth-Tween-Teen
inquiries should be directed toi
Tami's attention. But she'd also
love to meet everyone, so when
you're in the neighborhood, drop
by her office just to say hello and
offer any suggestions you might
have. Tami, we all warmly
welcome you to our JCC family.
TWEEN/TEEN
LET'S GET IT
TOGETHER
We are in the process of plann-
ing some terrific programs for our
Tweens (6th, 7th and 8th graders)
dances, skating parties, trips,
etc. Please, if you are a fun-loving
tween who would like to become
Cof the JCC Tweens, call the
th Department at the Center
for further information, about the
programs we're planning.
JCC HIGH SCHOOL
BASKETBALL TEAM
RETURNS
FROM SAVANNAH
The JCC High School basketball
team picked-up its first win by
TEEN SKI TRIP
DISCOVER
ISRAEL
ON YOUR OWN 1
Boys I M 13-21
8 WNk pr aa/am
Comatatwwa towj
Sports. Summing. Camomfl
Cultural activities
Saacial rams, mduatng fantastic
plant ridt ott toast
Koshtrfoof
forty ftrj Bf/itimtnU
Matt *t'l Jtwtsn raoth
SchoawM trtt tmt
lr avwd Amarican a Isr at* staff
Lowest prictJ
Fnaaona. raiaMt
NEXT OFEN HOUSE:
) P.M. at the JCC. 2808 Horatio St.. Tampa
Cat or mm lor that brochure
BHv Summer Program
Am Ooran
jtmfth commuMty Center
SUMMER PROGRAMS Sk^Sk
111J) I7I-44S1
Fob
BETAR
BLUE STAR CAMP
HOLDS GETTOGETHER
Blue Star Camp is holding a get-
together on Sunday, Feb. 9, 7-9
&m., at the Albert Aronovitz
x>m of the Jewish Community
Center. Join us for this infor-
mative meeting to introduce the
camp, and bring a friend!
NEEDED:
PART-TIME
YOUTH WORKER
14 p.m.
PRESCHOOL
DAY CARE
CALL CECE
AT THE CENTER
SCHOOL HOLIDAY
PROGRAM
All day (day care 7:30-9 am.
and 2-6 p.m.) school holiday pro-
gramming is being planned for
Feb. 7. There will be a field trip
from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and day care
before and after.
Also, watch this page for infor-
mation concerning the JCC's
special Spring Break program!
FEBRUARY SUNDAY
FUNDAY HAYRIDE
The JCC's special Sunday Fun-
day program for February will be
Feb. 9, 2-4 p.m. and promises to
be lots of fun for everyone! It's an
old-fashioned hayride at the
Lucky C Stables, and ice cream
will be served, too. All children in
grades K-6 are welcome to join us,
but we have room for only 25!
Sign-up early! Transportation will
be provided to (1:30) and from
(4:30) Kol Ami. Fee: $6 members,
$7.50 non-members.
WE NEED
YOUR OLD TOYS
After receiving lots at new toys
for Chanukah, are you thinking of
throwing-out some of the old
ones? Please don't!! Our Second
Home program is in desperate
need of some new games and
puzzles, and we would really ap-
preciate your thinking of us. The
Pre-School is always in need of
more toys and games as well, so
please remember us when you
clean-out those toy chests.
Thanks!
An exciting ski trip to Sugar
Mountain is on tap this weekend
for 10 very excited teenagers.
Watch for our report on this sen-
sational weekend in the next issue
of The Floridian. You might also
want to check the local sports
pages for news of some record-
breaking slolom times!!
Remember, if you need informa-
tion about Teen programs and
would like to be involved, just call
Tami at the Center.
av* afar 0m tat aaia **
ATTENTION,
COLLEGE STUDENTS!
CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Looking for a fun summer?
We are now accepting ap-
plications for summer camp
counselors and specialists in
music, drama, arts, sports,
.and Judaic studies. Please
contact Cece at 872-4451.
00 mm 0*0* 00 0* **'
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Feb.9 Dance
Feb. 22 Game Night
Feb. 28 Oneg Shabbat
beating the Savannah JCA in the
Consulation Round of the Holiday
Hoopla Tournament in Savannah,
Ga. Team members include: Mike
Black, Kurt Foster, Jonathan
Pear, David Froeht, Keith Rorer,
Charles Callins, Nilesh Patel and
Robert Misner. Keith Rorer made
the all-tournament team. Con-
gratulations to all the boys who
participated!
BASKETBALL
SCHEDULES
On Feb. 22 and 23, the Tampa
JCC heads south to play the North
Miami JCC in basketball. Our
teams will be playing and meeting
other Center teams from the
south Florida area.
BASKETBALL
SCHEDULES
JUNIOR HIGH
Feb. 11 vs. Tampa Christian
6:30 (H)
Tournaments
Feb. 22 and 23 vs. N. Miami
Beach JCC (AWAY)
SENIOR HIGH
Feb. 11 vs. Oldsmar Christian
(JV) 7:30 (H)
Tournaments
Feb. 22-23 N. Miami Beach JCC
(A)
HAYRIDE
' ANDCOOKOUT
Back by popular demand the
new and improved, bigger and
better Tween Hayride, Saturday,
Feb. 22. The evening includes the
hayride, cookout, campfire,
snacks and loads of fun! Call your
friends! Time: 6-10 p.m. Charge:
$5 members, $7.50 non-members.
Transportation provided from Kol
Ami (North End JCC). Advanced
registration required.
JOIN OUR NAME BANK
Interested in doing some
babysitting, lawnmowing, or per-
forming some other service? Need
a little extra spending money?
We're starting a Name Bank of
babysitters, yard cleaners and
other talents and services.
Anyone in need of special services
just calls the Center, and we give
out your name and number! Just
call Tami to list your name with
us!
FAMILY
Feb. 7 School Holiday Program
Feb. 8 Israel Reunion
Feb. 9 Blue Star Camp Get-
Together; Sunday Funday Hayride;
Singles Dance; Club Variety
Gasparilla Costume Party.
Feb. 9-11 Travel Club to Orlando
Feb. 13 Thrillers Basketball
Feb. 16 Fitness Day
Feb. 17 Club Variety Fishing Trip
Feb. 22 Singles Game Night;
Tween Hayride
Feb. 22-23 Tween/Teen Basket-
ball Teams go to South Florida
Feb. 23 Jewish Music Season
Program
Feb. 25 Book Review Club
Feb. 28- Singles Oneg Shabbat
March 2 JCC Open House
March 7 JCC Services and Oneg
Shabbat at Rodeph Shalom
March 15 New York-New Jersey
Reunion

Hava Nagila (Lat'sB* Joyous)
COME CELEBRATE
JEWISH MUSIC SEASON
attha
Jewish Community Center
PHONE 872-4451 2tM HORATIO TAMPA. FLORIDA
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 23rd
Admission:
Members Nochargfi^
Non-members $1
x p..
'UJt*
>*
ADULTS
ADULT AEROBICS
Join this enjoyable class either
at the North End (Kol Ami), Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday, or at
the Main Branch, Tuesday and
Thursday, 9-10 am. Instructor:
Lisea Leonard.
CLUB VARIETY
UPDATE
Feb. 4 Regular Meeting at
JCC 7 p.m.
Feb. 9 Gasparilla Party, 7:80
p.m. at the JCC. Reservations
please: Dinner, Dancing, Games.
$8.50 per person. Costumes if you
like BYOB Transportation
arranged.
Feb. 17 Fishing Trip Call
Lil 881-5648.
Feb. 25 Goldie Shear will
speak on the history of Ybor City:
Bring a dessert to share: $1 per
person: 7:30 at the JCC.
March 15 Jai Alai: have din-
ner with us at Jai Alai then enjoy
the games; Reservations a must
by March 7. Call JCC 872-4451.
March 29 GodspeU: Falk
Theatre. Reservations a must.
872-4451 March 14. Price to be
announced.
ADULTS/
SENIORS
SECOND
ISRAEL REUNION
Saturday, Feb. 8, 8 p.m. Just
bring yourself and all your Israeli
friends. Singing, dancing, good
food, and enjoyable Hebrew con-
versation will be provided! Our
earlier reunions Ohio and Israel
were highly successful, so join
us for our Israel reunion, where
you will make new friends and
renew old acquaintances. RSVP
872-4451.
If you are interested in having a
reunion for your own state or
country, please contact Susan Pel-
ed. Program Director, at the JCC.
GO WITH A WINNER:
THRILLERS
BASKETBALL
Join us for cocktails and hors
d'oeuvrea at J J. Winberie's. Then
on to the Thrillers basketball
game at the University of
Tampa's Spartan Gym. Thursday,
Feb. 13. Cost per person $10. Con-
tact the Center for reservations.
Get a group together!
SENIORS
JEWISH CULTURE
CLUB
Special Program oa Jewish
Burial Learn what is ap-
propriate under Jewish law.
Discover your rights and the op-
tions available to you in this area.
Authentic information with Steve
Rieley, of Roel and Curry Funeral
Home and Rodeph Shalom Ritual
Committee, and Jonathan Fuss,
Jewish Funeral Director in St
Petersburg The Feb. 21, Friday
program begins at noon, with a
dairy pot lunch buffet. Speakers
at 1 p.m. Call Judy London at the
Center to sign-up so that we have
enough food.