The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00278

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
uemsti Floridia r?
Of Tampa
7 Number 22
Tampa, Florida Friday, November 1, 1986
CftMSftocftrt
I Price 35 Cents
Senate Blocks Arms Sale, 97-1
IDAVID FRIEDMAN
JHINGTON (JTA)
Senate, by a 97-1
passed a resolution
[nting President
's proposed $1.9
rms sale to Jordan
uing through before
|inless direct negotia-
;tween Israel and
iave begun.
hard Lugar (R., Ind.),
Dl' the Senate Foreign
[Committee, said the
[worked out with op-
I supporters of the sale
^nt an unfortunate
on the arms package
kg a "signal" designed
(the peace process. He
resident Reagan and
' State George Shultz,
k1 the resolution, and
nt was expected to
bn adopted by both
. in the House, a
introduced by Ma-
James Wright (D.,
Dante Fascell(D.,
Broomfield (R.,
iwrence Smith (D.,
[d by about 275 Con
feject the sale.
Bon for Smith said
could now amend
to include the
frtion, or adopt a
separate resolution, as the Senate
did.
The Senate resolution said that
"prior to March 1, 1986, no letter
of offer shall be valid with respect
to any of the proposed sales to
Jordan of advanced weapons
systems, including advanced air-
craft and advanced air defense
systems, that are described in the
notification submitted to the
Congress on Oct. 21, unless direct
and meaningful peace negotia-
tions between Israel and Jordan
are underway."
SEN. EDWARD Kennedy (D.,
Mass.), who with Sen. John Heinz
(R., Pa.) sponsored the Senate
resolution signed by 74 Senators
introduced last week opposing the
sale to Jordan, said that the
resolution, by "delaying and de-
nying the sale for now, we offer
a clear, continuing and ap-
propriate incentive to Jordan to
make peace with Israel. The last
thing we need is to provide a
disincentive to the peace process
by giving the King an opportunity
to take our weapons and run."
Kennedy stressed that if
negotiations do not begin by Mar.
1, "we stand ready in the Senate
to renew our opposition to any
policy and any sale that would
escalate the arms Face, not
facilitate the peace process, in the
Middle East."
Both Lugar and Senate Majori-
ty leader Robert Dole (R., Kan.)
stressed that anytime before Mar.
ganizations Host
>nberg November 6
End-Decade Con-
^men: Fighting Anti-
ot for Women Only"
opic of a Nov. 6
to the Hillsborough
Jewish communities
reenberg, Eastern
[Rights Coordinator
[Defamation League
Jth. Ms. Greenberg
[delegate to the con-
was held recently
fcnya.
I of anti-Semitism at
nen's Conferences
^t decade. In 1975,
Dmen's Decade was
fie UN, three major
[were scheduled to
ress. The first was
1 City, the second in
the final gathering
fhe first two events
by anti-Semitic and
Dutbursts and little
<>n women's issues.
nd numerous other
determined that the
[Nairobi Conference
the advancement
elated to women's
Uher than the
| of Jews and Israelis
oblems.
erg will speak about
that of the ADL and
Jewish agencies, in
Iccessful conference.
Don will be free to
\y and will take place
>n Nov. 6 at the
tel-Tampa Airport
Kennedy Blvd., three
)f Westshore Blvd.)
iponaoring this
the West Florida
1, if Senators saw a lack of pro-
gress in the peace process, they
could reintroduce the resolution
rejecting the sale. But Sen.
Christopher Dodd (D. Conn.), the
lone Senator to vote against the
resolution, said that he wanted an
additional paragraph that would
"guarantee" the right of the
Senate to reject the sale.
Sen. Rudy Boschwitz(R., Minn.)
said the resolution enhanced the
power of the Senate, since it in-
creased the time for rejectig the
sale from Nov. 20 to Mar. 1.
"THIS FORMULATION has
been carefully constructed to
meet the needs of all parties in the
debate over this issue," Dole
pointed out. He said the agree-
ment on all sides was that the
resolution would not be amended.
Dole said he regretted
statements reportedly made by
King Hussein that the resolution
was a form of blackmail. "We are
not trying to take responsible ac-
tions to encourage negotiations
for a true peace in the Middle
East, which will be of more
benefit to Jordan's security than
anything else we can do."
Sen. Howard Metzenbaum (D.,
Ohio), who was one of several op-
ponents of the sale, who praised
the resolution, warned that the
, Senate woukLnot be satisfied with
* a meeting between Israel and Jor-
dan that did not result in peace
negotiations. "We don't want a
meeting just for the purpose of a
meeting," he said.
WHEN REAGAN officially
notified Congress of the proposed
sale, he said it was "essential" for
the peace process. There was an
indication he was trying to keep a
promise he made to Hussein when
the King met with him in the
White House last May.

Standing in a prison cage erected by the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry, Anatoly Sharansky's wife, Avital, leads a 'General
Assembly of Truth' opposite the United Nations as the Kremlin's
Foreign Minister Edward Shevardnadze addresses the world
body. New stainless steel Prisoner of Conscience bracelets bearing
the name of Sharansky and others in the Gulag are available from
the SSSJ at 210 West 91st St., New York 1002U
Minister Says
No Separate Jordan Talks With Israel
Sally Greenberg
Regional Board of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith include: B'nai B"rith
Women, Brandeis St. Petersburg,
Brandeis Tampa, Business and
Professional Women's Network of
the Tampa Jewish Federation,
Congregation B'nai Israel
Sisterhood. Congregation Rodeph
Sholom Sisterhood. Congregation
Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood,
Hadassah, JWV Ladies Auxiliary
Tampa Chapter, NCJW Pinellas
Suncoast Chapter, NCJW St.
Petersburg Section, NCJW Tam-
pa Section, ORT St. Petersburg
Evening Chapter, ORT Tampa
Bay Region, Pinellas Co. Jewish
Federation Women's Division,
Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division. Temple B'nai
Israel Sisterhood. Temple Beth-El
Sisterhood and Temple David
Sisterhood.
Individuals desiring more infor-
mation can contact the ADL in
Tampa at 876-0750 or Susan
Goldberg in Pinellas County at
381 l
AMMAN, Jordan A
government spokesman,
said that Jordan will not
press for a separate peace
with Israel even though
King Hussein is
"frustrated" with Palestine
Liberation Organization
Chief Yasir Arafat, who ar-
rived here for talks with the
King
The meeting would mark the
first time that the two have met
since Sept. 25, Yom Kippur, when
three Israelis were killed in
Cyprus by PLO extremists. The
Israelis met their deaths on their
yacht tied up at Larnaca.
THEREAFTER came the
Achille Lauro cruise ship affair,
which involved the boarding of the
ship by Force 17 terrorists and the
slaving of an American passenger,
Leon Klinghoffer.
Only last Thursday, following
his statement in London that the
PLO was itself to blame for the
withdrawal of an invitation to two
PLO representatives to meet with
Continued on Page 7
Jewish Community Centerstage
Presents 'My Fair Sadie'
Nov. 2 and 3 are the production
dates of this year's original
musical presented by the Jewish
Community Centerstagers. "My
Fair Sadie," a take-off on a Love-
Boat theme is once again full of
special parodies, deemed to make
you giggle. Seven-thirty will be
hors d'oeuvres, show time is 8, to
be followed by dessert and wine
punch. On Sunday, a lunch will be
served at 12:30; show time is 1
p.m. Cost is $20 for patrons
(medal seating), $10 for adults,
$5 for children and $7.5<>for
Senior Citizens OB Sunday only.
Fur further information or
tickets, please call the JCC
872-4461.
Alice Rosenthal


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday. November 1. 1985
g
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a
V
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5 S
II
There is definitely a baby boom in Tampa. We are delighted
to welcome six new members of our stork club and the mak-
ings of a great Playgroup. Congratulations and mazol tov to all of
you and your families. We wish you all warm, snuggly hugs, at
least two naps a day and very soon, sleep-filled nights.
Shane Alexander Ward was born Sept. 11 to Barbara and al
Ward. This charmer weighed 9 pounds, 8Vj ounces and measured
21 fc inches. He was named for Barbara's beloved grandmother.
Sadie Sparber. Welcoming him are older sister Nicole. 6 and
brother Justin. 2. Also grandparents Ethel and Solomon
Feldman of Tampa and Dot and Marshall Ward of LaGrange.
Ga. Rabbi Frank Sundheim officiated at Shane's bris.
Olivia Ann Garafola arrived on Aug. 2 to Sheryl and Philip
Garafola. and big sister Alexis Caroline. She weighed 7 pounds.
11 Vi ounces and was 19Vi inches. Her delighted grandparents are
Sandra Haney and the late Haney of Rahway. N.J. and Anthony
and Marie Garafola of Tampa.
Emily Rifkin made her appearance on Sept. 24. checking in at
8 pounds, 9 ounces and 21 inches. She was happily greeted by her
parents, Roberta and David S. Rifkin and her three-year-old
sister, Laura. Her grandparents are Dr. and Mrs. Aaron Hertz
of New Haven, Conn, and Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Rifkin of Fort
Lauderdale. Fla.
27,
I
::
Jonathon Mitchel Pinaky decided to arrive on Sept. .,
weighing 6 pounds, 11 ounces and measuring 19 inches. His proud :
parents are Charyne Pinaky and Henry Cordeiro; and all his
grandparents live in Massachusetts. ::
Robert William Sharp was born Oct. 1 to Linda and Ted
Sharp, weighing 8 pounds and 8 ounces. His super proud grand-
parents are Helen Schnlman of Palm Harbor; Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Sharp of Palm Harbor, and great-grandmother Sara Lip-
ton of Cleveland. His delighted aunts and uncles are Susan
Schnlman of Palm Harbor; Steve Sharp; Pam and Harold Sharp
of Tampa; and Sooxie Sharp of Clearwater. Baby Sharp was
named after his dearly beloved grandfather. Robert William
Sehalmaa.
Ross Louis Rnffkess choose Oct. 1 to join the family of Erma
and Skip Rnffkess and big brother Brad, 6V. He weighed 6
pounds. 13 ounces at birth and made big news in West Hartford,
Conn, where he was awaited by grandparents Florence and
Gilbert Greenspon; Sylvia Rnffkess and great-grandmothers
Eva Greenspon and Belle Neivert. Uncle Martin Rnffkess. his
godfather, was also here for the bris.
Congratulations to the new Hillel School stadent officers
for '85-'86. Recently installed was President Jonnie Kolodner.
son of Dr. Harry and Ellen Kolodner, Vice President Seth For-
man, son of Dr. Arthur and Susan Forman; Secretary Robin
Pegler, daughter of Errol and Sandy Pegier and Treasurer Deb-
bie Perahes, daughter of Paul and Gail Pershes. Serving as the
shamash is Danny Kolodner, son of Dr. and Mrs. Kolodner. The
Chief Justice is Alison Lewis, daughter of Mark and Ricky
Lewis. There are two judges: Avi Berger, daughter of Rabbi
Kenneth and A viva Berger and Caron Jacobson. daughter of
Richard and Sharyn Jacobson. Key Representative for the
younger grades is Jocelyn Lewis, daughter of Mark and Ricky
Lewis. Have a good year everybody.
Honor student. We were happy to learn that Linda Davis-
Zolinaky was invited to attend a ceremony at L'SF at which time
she received a certificate naming her an Outstanding Academic
Honor Student by the President of USF. Linda is completing her
studies towards her bachelors in education, emphasizing learning
disabilities. She is the mother of Sarah and Benjamin, both Hillel
students, and the daughter of Mildred and Paul Zolinsky. Keep
up the good work!
Welcome to former Pittsburghers, Chellee and Phil Siegel.
They moved to Tampa about six months ago. on the recommenda-
tion of a friend. Phil is in sales at the Electric Supply Company of
Tampa and Chellee has joined the staff at the Boulevard Shop.
None of their kids are in town: one son is an architect in New
York; there's a daughter in St. Louis and a son in prep school in
Pittsburgh. That leaves lots of time for golf and the beach and
discovering Tampa. Nice to meet you; glad you're here.
Hey Gang, keep sending me your news and nachas. Tell me
about your awards, promotions and booby prizes. Write Our
Gang, c/o The Jewish Floridian, 2808 Horatio St.. Tampa, FL
33609.

::-X-;*>:-:*:-:-xx*>^
*
CORRECTION
In the article about Lisa Bush, it should have read the Hillel
Foundation of B'nai B'rith and the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
The Centre For Women 'In Pursuit
Of Personal Excellence' Series Begins Nov. 4
in Pursuit Of Personal Ex-
cellence." the four-week series of
daytime classes at The Centre For
Women, includes courses in con
fidence building, dealing with
anger and depression, assertive
communication and stress
management, as well as time
spent exploring personal options
during times of transition. "
Tran-
sitions and New Directions" in-
cludes self-assessment, values
clarification and goal-setting
techniques.
The next series of classes "In
Pursuit Of Personal Excellence,"
which are held mornings and
afternoons, Monday through
Thursday, begins NOv. 4. Some of
the classes are held in the evening
as well. The Centre asks a >
donation monthly. This aiL|
SSL* adJust"/,,r *3t
those women in financial nZ [
The Centre f
located at 805 S
need.
Women ,
Avenue. Tampa. Fr additr^il
formation, call the Cmm
251-8437. entre
Reminisce With Gift
Of Gold Hillel School
Remembers Golden Oldies
Remember bobby socks, saddle
shoes and circular felt skirts with
poodles? Rolled-up jeans, inside-
out sweatshirts and crew cuts?
Dreaming with the Everly
Brothers and rocking with Elvis?
How about the Mickey Mouse
Club, hula hoops and Fizzies?
Sure, you do. So do Leah David-
son and Carole Ewen, co-
chairmen of Hillel School's annual
Gift of Gold extravaganza, and
they are looking for people to
reminisce with them at the Gift of
Gold. The golden oldies will start
playing on Saturday, Nov. 23, at
7:30 p.m. at Bon Appetit
restaurant, overlooking the Gulf
of Mexico in Dunedin.
"The Gift of Gold has been
Hillel's most important fundrais-
ing project for many years," said
Laura Kreitzer, president of the
school. "The support it received
from our friends in the community
contributes significantly to the
operation of the school and is
greatly appreciated. We look for-
ward to its success to realize many
of our hopes and expectations for
the coming year."
Proceeds will go directly into
the general operating fund to be
spent on books, supplies and other
basic necessities for the school.
According to Leah Davidson,
"The Gift of Gold will help Hillel
continue to offer a top quality
Jewish and secular education.
Gold is invaluable and our
children's education is in-
valuable." A gift of gold to Hillel
School will protect and nurture
one of the treasures of this
community.
It is hoped that the project will
be more successful than ever in
reaching its goal of making up a
large portion of the school budget.
"We are hoping to make the Gift
of Gold our one and only fun-
draiser of the year," said Carole
Ewen.
This year's party will be a fifties
bash. Guests are encouraged to
"re-mem-mem, re-mem-mem-
mem-ber" and come dressed in
the styles of 30 years ago. The
decorations, the music and the
dinner (fifties-style junk food
hamburgers, hot dogs and fried
chicken) will reflect the theme.
The cost of the dinner will be
$12.50.
A $100 donation will make a
guest eligible for receiving a
$5,000 grand prize. Second prize
of $1,000 and third prize of $500
will also be awarded, in addition to
varied and exciting door prizes,
contributed by local merchants.
Past winners have included Hillel
parents, community members and
Hillel students, who purchased
group tickets. Partial tickets are
available.
For further information or
tickets, call Leah Davidson,
837-4788, or Carole Ewen,
875-9579.
Gigantic Garage Sale
and Auction Saturday
November 2
hU16. rentre c",r Women al
hold a Garage Sale and Auctil
Saturday. Nov. 2. from 9am to!I
p.m. Proceeds will go toward
funds raised to renovate the CI
tre. which was built in 1890 id
building is listed in the Natiatdl
Registry of Historic Places as J
of the finest examples of Claail
Revival architecture.
The Garage Sale. featuring n
boutique, plants and bake safe
will also offer the items q
tributed by the Junior Lea
after their one-day event
women's and children's apparei
and toys. The Garage Sale begin
at 9 a.m.; after 2 p.m. thoseattea-1
ding may bring a grocery bag and
fill it up for $1.
The Auction will be held at 111
a.m. and feature the talents cf |
professional auctioneer Da y
Angiin. Brand new items donated I
by Tampa stores and businesses I
will go to the highest bidder.1
Refreshments will be available
throughout the day.
The Centre For Women *
located at 305 S. Hyde Part
Avenue, Tampa. For additional in-
formation, call the Centre a
251-8437 or Man- Carola at
685-1399.
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We also provide outside catering services. See our Catering
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TAMPA
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Marriott


Record Attendence Expected At CJF Assembly
Friday, November 1, 1985/The Jewish FloridUn ol Tampa Page 3
Over 3.000 Jewish community
jers from throughout North
kmerica will be in attendance at
Jie 54th General Assembly of the
houncil of Jewish Federations, to
held Nov. 13-17 at the
fashing"" Hilton Hotel in
yashintfton, D.C. Because of its
atjon the assembly is expected
attract a record number of
fgislators and influential
olicymakers from both the U.S.
nd Israel in addition to its usual
contingent of Jewish com-
unity leaders and
Dkespersons.
The Assembly will have as its
kjeme: "The Coming of Age of
Forth American Jewry:
Strengthening Our Jewish
firmation."
For the first time, the opening
lessen will be held in a location
Utside the convention hotel: the
kmed Kennedy Center. The
keynote address will be delivered
by CJF President Shoshana S.
Cardin. The opening session will
include a dramatic presentation,
"The Golden Land," an acclaimed
musical that will help set the mood
for the theme of the assembly by
portraying the past 100 years of
changing Jewish immigration to
North America.
The GA will also feature two
mini-symposiums on topics of ma-
jor current concern "Jewish
Education" and "New Life Styles
and Jewish Populations at Risk"
to be followed by workshops
designed to permit participants to
discuss the issues raised in
greater depth and from several
different perspectives.
Other events being planned in-
clude a vast variety of workshops,
forums, a Thursday evening ses-
sion featuring a leading Israeli
spokesman and a Saturday even-
ing ddress by a major U.S.
Government figure.
More information on the GA is
available at the Tampa Jewish
Federation, 875-1618.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions is the national association of
200 Jewish Federations, the cen-
tral community organizations
which serve nearly 800 localities
embracing a Jewish population of
more than 5.7 million in the U.S.
and Canada.
Established in 1932, CJF helps
strengthen the work and the im-
pact of Jewish Federations by
developing programs to meet
changing needs, providing an ex-
change of successful community
experiences, establishing
guidelines for fund raising and
operations and engaging in joint
planning and action on common
purposes dealing with local,
regional and international needs.
Maurice Sendak, Designs JWB Children's
Poster Heralding 1985 Jewish Book Month
Maurice Sendak, world-
enowned illustrator of children's
.oks, has designed a full-color
jiildren's poster for the 1985
North American celebration of
Jewish Book Month.
The event, sponsored by the
tVB Jewish Book Council, will be
narked from Nov. 7 to Dec. 7, ac-
ording to Blu Greenberg, Council
resident
Fur the children's poster Sen-
bak drew i >ne <>f the friendly "wild
tnimals" fur which he is famous
hading stories by Sholem
Meirhem to two happy children in
i field.
Interviewed by JWB, Sendak
ns asked how he developed his
foncept for the poster.
The author-artist said, "I chose
pe iiuoi.it ion of HaiGaon, an 11th
rentury scholar: 'To three posses-
lions thou shouldst look Ac-
quire a field, a friend, a book.'
"This is a good solemn quote,"
endak continued. "But I wanted
ny enactment of it to be spon-
ineoua and comical without
(indermiiiing it.
"Reading hooks is not a prim,
pious activity. It is joyful. It is one
pf the great pleasures of life. I us-
id the wild creature to express
this uninhibited pleasure which
he children literally attack, in the
att Bense of the term."
i wrote and illustrated
Wen Th* Wild Tk&mgt An
[Harper and How), which won him
in 1964 Caldecott Medal for the
rV<>-t Distinguished Picture Book
pf the year.
He traces his drawing of huge
kn pother calling him and her other
pildren, "vildeh chayes" Yid-
dish for "wild animals."
fyjFti
.

V 4f
J^^
ToduveuowMinwthuu rinikbl V*k Anjuiiva Ikfcia fHmdsabook.
I || \*,m
November 7th to December 7th. iSBfS
JfewMh Bm>k Momitflii
jiiia IrwtahHnuklinunril
IS East MHi Street Nrw v..rk. \.Y VOOTD 1579 (212)532-1848
While most of the books he has ing of the stories of Chelm.
illustrated are not Jewish, he did Sends* is currently illustrating
illustrate A Good Shabbos. /;J (;rnn(lpa-s House (Harper and
Everybody. Happy Hanukkah. R()W) a snort fairy toie by his
Everybody, and Isaac Bashevis father, Philip Sendak.
Singer's Zlateh the Goat and Other
Stories, a children's classic retell-
A model of his monument, "Brotherhood of Man," is presented by
the world-famous sculptor, Nathan Rapoport (left), to Joseph
Handleman, National Chairman of American Red Magen David
for Israel. The finished sculpture will be located in the Joseph and
Sally Handleman Plaza, in front of the new MDA National Blood
Service Center in Ramat Gan, Israel. American Red Magen
David Adorn for Israel will raise most of the $12 million for con-
struction of the new MDA Blood Service Center.
Curtain Opens on '86 Campaign
The curtain goes up at 7:30 p.m.
on Jan. 8 as the Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division
presents "opening night" of the
1986 General Campaign. A
dramatic and moving evening
awaits contributors at the gala
premier of The Playmakers pro-
duction of "The Diary of Anne
Frank."
"We have reserved the entire
theatre for this unique community
event," announced Co-Campaign
Chairwomen Alice Rosenthal and
Aida Weissman. "We applaude
our generous donors throughout
the entire Tampa Jewish Federa-
tion community, as they will ap-
plaude this outstanding
performance."
Recommended as an experience
to be shared by the entire family,
tickets and further information
will be forthcoming.
*JI|l|lllllllll|llttlll|l|lllll|l|l|l|l|l|lll|lll|l|l|l|llll I INTERVIEWERS |
| Consumer research, full and part-time posi-
| tions. Flexibility and stamina a must. People- :
: oriented. Jobs vary with outside and inside |
| assignments. Ideal for energetic singles :
I and seniors. Z
I CALL: 223-5806 1
I 2:00-6:00 P.M. |
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(2131 273-72*6-(213) 531 2449
Name:______________________
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Address:
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unopened regular stae tor a full refund ol trie purchase price (Shmng & Handing
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SANDELL COSMETICS. MEMBER AMERICAN-ISRAEL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE






>--
Floridian of Tampa/Friday. November 1. 1985
Peres Presses Flesh
Of World Leaders
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres expressed satisfac-
tion last week with King
Hussein's initial reaction to
his peace proposals pro-
mulgated Monday at the
United Nations General
Assembly. Appearing on
ABC TV's "Good Morning
America" program. Peres
termed the Jordanian
King's response, as
reported in The New York
Times, "constructive" and
"encouraging."
In ar. interview with the Times.
--'in said :n Amman: 'I
believe his (Peresl speech
represents the bejlBning of move-
ment in the rigfnwrr:ion. and
.ersonai concern for the
fate re gener:. ^.d a
TWt'ion to contribute
-ds the achievement of peace
in oar
"I HOPK -e beginning
.ment of a just and
ibie peace. w ">rds.
rapid movement towards the
g of an international con-
ference with the participation of
all of the parties of the c
the issues before us
bef'. <> late
He called the convening of such
an international conference "the
solution." Hussein indicated
that the immediate termination of
the state of war between Israel
and Jordan, which Peres had
declared in his speech, was pro-
blematic because of Israel's con-
tinued occupation of the 1
Bank "and other te*~
The termination of the state of
n continued, would be
the "crowning achievement of a
peace effort under the right
auspices an international con-
ference, dealing with all aspects of
the problem, in particular, the
Palestinian dimension and Palesti-
nian rights." to "implement
Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338." He repeated his in-
sistence that the two superpowers
as well as the Palestinians" and
their legitimate representatives"
would have to participate in such a
conference.
THE KING also said that he re-
mained committed to his Feb. 11
accord with the PLO to seek peace
jointly, but added that he was
reviewing his relationship with
that organization.
Meanwhile. Peres continued his
high-level diplomatic activ.:
meetings *nth heads of states
from around the world who are in
New York for the 40th anniver-
sary celebration of the UN
ha unscheduled meeting
held between Peres and Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze during a reception
for world leaders hosted by Presi-
dent Reagan at the Waldorf
>ria Hotel.
According to Peres' adviser, the
two spoke for about 25 min-
They were introduced by an
unidentified American official.
Peres brought up the issue of
Soviet Jewry and the desire of
many Jews to leave the Soviet
Union for Israel.
AT THIS POINT, the Israeli
adviser reported, the Soviet Am-
bassador to Washington. Anatoly
Dobrynin. who took part in the
conversation, interjected and said
that the problem is not emigration
to Israel but the fact that many of
those Jews who leave the Soviet
Union do not go to Israel but
rather to the United States.
Shevardnadze reportedly told
Peres that a meeting beweer.
-elf and the Israeli Premier
should be considered for some
time after the summit meeting
eer, Reagan and Soviet
leader II Gorbache-.
evaNo*
Peres also met at the recep I
Rajiv Gandhi
da. Peres was introduc-
the India leader
- George and the
Premiers -eported "a
friendly conversation" for
BUM
"They agreed that the relat:
between the two countries should
be deepened." Peres' adviser said.
THE ISRAELI Premier met
for 45 minutes this morning with
Canada's Premier Brian Mulroney
at the UN Plaza Hotel. Peres in-
vited him to visit Israel, and the
Canadian Premier accepted. He
will v.s:t Israel sometime at the
beginning of next year
I congratulate you for your
peace initiative, and I am happy
that Hussein reacted the way he
did." Mulroney reportedly told
Peres In addition, the two
Premiers discussed the establish-
ment of a mutual research and
development fund between
Canada and Israel.
A total black out was imposed
on Peres' meeting with British
Premier Margaret Thatcher at the
request of the British leader It
was learned, however, that the
discussions were centered on the
prospects for peace in the Mideast
and Peres' new peace proposals to
Jordan.
Conversions Barred
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Rumania's Chief Rabbi. Moshe
Rosen, has rejected applications
by many Rumanian villagers to be
erted to Judaisrr. Israel
Radio reported Thursday Rosen
reported to feel that the
villagers, from isolated villages in
Transylvania, had never had any
connections with Jews or
Jewish Floridian
Of Tampa
FV.DK SH.HET
Ofkr V Hratie Sum Twaaa Fta MM
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Postmaster Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101
OMafTaaaSfcaal
menorah
--------FJSFER
(Xf hem & Jew& IWQ
UPD4TE
STRAUSS NAMED
COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
Menorah Manor Board Chair-
man. Ted Winner, and President
Irwin Miller, recently announced
the appointment of Sigi Strauss,
as the General Chairman of the
Campaign Completion and
Founders Dedication Wall Com-
mittee for Menorah Manor.
The Committee has been charg-
ed with a two-fold responsibility:
confirming those gifts and dedica-
tion opportunities already made to
the Home and securing those addi-
tional pledges to the Home's
Capital Building Fund, to com-
plete the campaign goal of $6
the end of this year.
Stranai will be aided by Co-
Chairmen. Saul Schecter of Clear-
water and Marshall Lil
Tampa.
In announcing the appoint-
ments. Chairman Winner noted
that the Menora: Building
Campaign has been the lar.
and -cessful fund-raising
effort in the his-
Coast of Florida.
It has been a tremendous ef-
fort of community support." he
noted, "and we only have a small
amount left to complete the
campaign."
W-.ttner recently introduced the
Founders Dedication Wall, at the
Formal Dedication Ceremonies
for the Home. The wall, located in
the entrance lobby of the Home,
has been designed to recognize
those, whose generosity has made
the Home possible.
Strauss noted that the Capital
Building Fund campaign has been
scheduled to be completed by Dec.
1. He urges each community
member, who has not yet par-
ticipated in the campaign to con-
firm their gift by Dec. 1 to ensure
that they aie included on the
listing of the original Founders of
the Home.
More information is available by-
contacting Strauss at 367-3003 or
the Home's Executive Director.
Edward W. Vinocur at 345-2775.
Edward Vinocur
VINOCUR APPOINTED
TO STATE COMMITTEE
Edward W. Vinocur. executive
director of Menorah Manor, was
recently appointed to the Nursing
Home Committee of the Florida
Association of Homes for the
Aging.
The Committee, chaired by
Elliot Palevsky. director of toe
Jacksonville Jewish Home
(Rivergarden). is extremely active
in working with the state of
Florida to improve the quality of
care in Homes throughout the
State of Florida. The Association
representi over 153 Retirement
and Health Care communities.
which serve more mat 451
older adults.
Vinocur joined Menorah Maid
as the Executive Director du
the development and
of the Home. While working^
Ohio, he was an active member of
the Ohio Association of Homes for!
the Aging, where he had servedi
Vice-President and Treasurer 1
that state's association.
In commenting on the appoint,!
ment. Manor President
Miller stated that, he was ple_
to learn that Vinocur wouldl*!
serving on this statewide commit,!
tee. It is an indication, thai
although Menorah Manor is veijl
new. it is already being recogniadl
as one of the finest Homes in the|
State.
MANOR GUILD PLANS
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
Communicating with the Elder-1
iy. will be the topic of the Fall
Educational sponsored 1
by the Menorah Mai r Volunteer!
Guild. President Ida MicheM
stated that the educational]
meeting will take place on Mon-
day evening. N 18 al 7:30 paJ
at Menorah Man Featured
speaker will be Elaine Dermody,
executive director 1 if the Morton I
Plant Gerontology Center.
The evening program, which is I
open to the public, was especially
chosen to aid the working |
volunteer, both men and women.
This is the first of an annual (
educational program, to be spon-'
sored by the Guild.
Through the Guild, volunteers
add many of the extras which tru-
ly make Menorah Manor, a special
place for the residents of the
home.
Prospective volunteers, or those
interested in becoming sustaining
members of the Guild are urged to
contact Program Volunteer
Director. Renee Krosner it
345-2775.
Friday. Noreaber 1.1965
Volume 7
TW)<*nua
17HESHVAN
Number 22
Crossword Puzzle
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Suzanne W. Brav Lives On
Friday, November 1, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
Suzanne W. Brav a very uni-
i..p loving, caring human being
Son September 12. 1983. She
Itemize.! t"e true essence of
Jdaism the need for doing
I mitzvot and the basic importance
gftzedakah.
Following in the spirit of her
life she bequeathed funds to Tam-
,-, Jewish Family Service to be us-
j to help others as she had done
while she lived. As a result, the
aeencv is happy to announce the
establishment of the Suzanne W.
Brav Memorial Fund. This endow-
ment fun.l will be used, primarily,
to promote family life education -
to enable family members to cope
with the many hurdles which pre-
sent themselves in day-to-day life.
In this way Sue Brav continues
| helping others.
Sue lived a short but very fulfill-
ing life. She was born in 1937 in
Dallas. Texas, one of three
daughters and a son born to Rabbi
and Mrs. Stanley Brav. She grew
up in Vicksburg, Mississippi, and
Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating from
Walnut Hills High School,
Peabody College in Nashville,
Tennessee, and earned her Master
of Arts degree in counseling from
the University of South Florida.
She was the mother of three
sons, Garret, Adam and Joel
Waltzer.
Throughout these years these
years of growth, education, mar-
riage, child bearing and rearing,
she exhibited unique qualities
qualities which made her stand
[out in the community. She was
blessed with a joy of living. She
was a practicing Jew. Her Jewish
soul gave her the impetus to ac-
complish wonders. The word "im-
possible" did not exist in her
vocabulary. Her warmth and
charisma enabled her to rally peo-
ple around her. No project was
ever too big or too difficult, nor
| was any project too small.
In innumerable respects, Tampa
[benefited from the innovative
| ideas of this special individual.
'Music of
Williamsburg'
Planned For Nov. 7
U the Tampa Museum
Imagine enjoying your lunch to
[the strains of Vivaldi played on an
[antique harpsichord. You can
[and its free! The Tampa Museum
[is offering a film "The Music of
IJilliamsburg" as the first Thurs-
|oay s, Art for Lunch program at
|noon on Nov. 7.
This film portrays popular, for-
JJ* and traditional music enjoyed
Pv the colonists in the third
farter of the 18th century. Pro-
PJ*d in Williamsburg in period
[""ngs, the scene conveys the
paw and cultural customs of col-
f1 which surrounded the
music.
visitors are encouraged to bring
"own bag lunches to the Museum
a enjoy the lemonade and
es provided by Friends Of
* Arts, the Museum's volunteer
FPPort group. After the film,
pswrs may tour the exhibit
E^8 f American Style:
[J>m Tampa Bay Collections and
vignettes of homes from 1720
1!M0 including furniture and
wrative objects. This exhibition
r1" w on display through Dec. 1.
Jhe Tampa Museum is located
fwntown by the River behind
rs Hixon Hall at 601 Doyle
*nton Drive. For more informa-
on call 223-8130.
Suzanne W. Brav
She helped to create the Chai-
Dial-Bus Transportation program
for seniors through the National
Council of Jewish Women. She
developed the Russian Resettle-
ment Program under the auspices
of Tampa Jewish Social Service.
At Congregation Schaarai Zedek,
she was the first chairman of the
Chavurah.
In her professional career as a
school euidance counselor, she
endeared herself to the many
students who benefited from her
sensitive, compassionate ap-
proach to her responsibilities. She
formed support groups dealing
with many deeply troublesome
problems such as death and dying,
and the broken family due to
divorce. In addition, she practiced
developmental guidance, always
believing that preventing a pro-
blem is better than curing it.
In 1981, she discovered that she
had cancer and began working
with the American Cancer Society
in their one day at a time pro-
gram. Once again, at a time of
such personal anguish, she ex-
hibited all the wonderful qualities
which made her so different and
important to the community.
Bringing her dying wishes to
fruition, Goldie Shear and Rhoda
Franklin, appointed by Sue as co-
personal representatives of her
estate, have joined Tampa Jewish
Family Service in the formation of
the Suzanne W. Brav Memorial
Fund.
To help memorialize Sue to
promote the continuity of her no-
ble and idealistic aims, contribu-
tions to her fund would be ap-
preciated. For more information,
contact Tampa Jewish Family
Service at 251-0083.
Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry national coordinator Glenn
Richter, wearing a. taU.it, is searched by police before he and eight
others arrested for protesting at the USSR Embassy in
Washington are put in a paddy wagon. The 80 persons so far de-
tained in five actions at the Embassy, including U0 rabbis, all face
trial, as contrasted to over 2,000 anti-apartheid demonstrators
released immediately after similar arrests at the South African
Embassy. The Soviet protests have been coordinated by the
Washington Board of Rabbis.
NOVEMBER IS ZOA MONTH BY PROCLAMATION OF GOVERNOR BOB GRAHAM.
The Zionist Organization of America
For 87 Years Its Members Have Been
LEADERS: For the Reestablishment of the State of Israel
LEADERS: For The Support of Israel
LEADERS: For The Future Of Israel
The ZOA has provided the leadership that has made the Zionist grass roots movement of the
Jewish people in the United States the strongest Zionist community in the world outside
of Israel.
Membership in the ZOA is the expression of 150,000 Americans to their commitment to survive
as a Jewish people based on the foundation of the centrality of Israel.
The Zionist Organization of America a militant Zionist grass roots movement looks to you
for continued leadership.
Leadership in Florida:
RABBI SAMUEL SILVER, Delray Beach, Southeast Regional President
RABBI IRVING LEHRMAN, Miami Beach, National Vice President
MILTON GOLD, Royal Palm Beach
LOUIS HOBERMAN, Surfside
BENJAMIN KAPLAN, Hollywood
EVE LEIKEN, Miami Beach
JUDITH LEINWAND, Boca Raton
MOSHE LEVINSON, Deerfield Beach
DR SAMUEL MENICKS, Hatlandale
DAVID MEYER, North Miami Beach
SOLOMON MOSKOWITZ, West Boca Raton
ANNE ROSENTHAL, Hollywood
RABBI CHAIM ROZWASKI, Orlando
ALAN TAFFET, Jacksonville
LESTER WEINBERG, Delray Beach
HERMAN WEISMAN, Palm Beach
YES | WANT TO JOIN THE LEADERSHIP OF ZOA
Enclosed is my Membership Dues in the Amount of:
($300) Life Member
Onetime Payment
Nam#(Mr..Mrt.orllr.4Mra.)
Addreaa:--------------------------
City/State: _
SEND TO:
ZOA 800 West Oakland Park Boulevard, Suite 308
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311
WORLD UNION OF GENERAL ZIONISTS AND ZOA CONVENTION
DECEMBER 15,16,17, DIPLOMAT HOTEL, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
For Information Call: (305) 9441248 566-0402



Sounds of Silence
By STUART LEWENGRUB
Director
Southeast Regional Office
Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith
During the past few days my
mind wandered back to October,
1973, to be specific, two days after
the start of the Yom Kippur War.
Jews the world over felt threaten-
ed. The initial military victories,
as a result of the surprise attack,
seemed to belong to the Arabs.
Israel had not yet turned the tide.
In Washington, there were time-
consuming debates over arms
shipments to Israel.
That morning, into my office
walked a friend, Lonnie King,
then president of the Atlanta
NAACP and a longtime active
civil rights leader. As a
Morehouse College student, Lon-
nie was one of the architects of
the early sit-ins and had more
than once been threatened and at-
tacked by white racists. In 1973,
Lonnie, while active in community
affairs, was also struggling to
establish his own business.
Minister Says
Continued from Page 1
Britain's Foreign Minister
because they refused under any
circumstances to recognize the
right of Israel to exist. King Hus-
sein declared in Amman that he
was "reassessing the entire
situation."
This meant that he was con-
sidering seeking other suitable
Palestinian representatives for
possible talks with Israel.
But Information Minister
Mohammed Khatib said that there
was no change in Jordan's con-
tinued refusal to meet Israel
either without Palestinian
representation or outside of the
context of an international con-
ference that would include the five
permanent members of the
United Nations Security Council,
including the Soviet Union and
China. The latter two have no for-
mal diplomatic relations with
Israel.
BUT HANNA SINIORA, a
Palestinian newspaper editor in
Jerusalem, said that "Monday and
Tuesday are crucial" in the at-
tempt to resume the peace
process.
Siniora has been mentioned as
one of the possible participants in
a Palestinian delegation to peace
talks between Israel and Jordan.
He sat down at my desk and
pulled out his personal checkbook.
He wrote out a check for $100 (not
a small amount for him then) and
said "I want to send this to the
Israelis, can you do it for me?" I
told him to fill in "UJA-Israel
Emergency Fund" and I would
see that the check got there. Then
I said "thanks," and asked, "how
come?"
I've never forgotten Lonnie's
response. He said: "I don't know
much about Arabs or Israelis, but
I do know that when I was mar-
ching for our rights and I looked
around, most of the whites that 1
saw helping us were Jews and I
figure I owe you this. When we
needed you, you helped. Now it's
my turn." I hugged Lonnie. In-
terestingly, several months later,
Lonnie King and I led a mission of
12 Atlanta black leaders to Israel
in what remains for me one of the
highlights of my own career.
It has been several years since I
last saw Lonnie. I'm not sure
whether he is still in Atlanta or
not. The reason I recall his visit
that October day, 12 years ago,
relates to the current issue con-
cerning the anti-Semitism of
Black Muslim leader Louis Far-
rakhan and the reluctance of some
black political and community
leaders to issue unqualified, firm
and clear condemnations of this
peddler of bigotry.
In recent months, Farrakhan's
anti-Semitism has reached a fever
pitch. His audiences have grown
in number and enthusiasm. His
public expressions of bigotry are
not directed toward Jews alone;
white Americans, in general, also
share his oratorical ire. But his
pet scapegoats are "the Jews."
Actually, he refers to us frequent-
ly as "the so-called Jews."
In the most insulting and
detestable of terms, Farrakhan
mocks the Holocaust, attacks the
legitimacy of the democratic State
of Israel and degrades Judaism,
itself. He ascribes the cause of
every affliction suffered by blacks
to the Jews. "Jewish control,"
"Jewish money," "Jewish
wickedness" are among his oft-
used phrases.
There are those who have ex-
plained that Farrakhan speaks to
issues of black pride, black
economic initiative and black
freedom. But why with his foot
firmly on the neck of the Jews?
Fan-khan does not simply say to
black audiences, get ride of your
shackles and find your freedom.
He says get rid of the shackles
placed on you by the Jews and find
your freedom from the Jews.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
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TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
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18 East 48th Street
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Securities (212)7591310
itiOfl Toll Free (800) 221 48381
Why then is criticism from some
of our nation's most respected and
visible black leaders such as
Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young
and Los Angeles Mayor Tom
Bradley belated and then so
carefully phrased and muted?
Are they unaware that Far-
rakhan is appealing to the basest
instincts of his audiences? Do they
doubt the anti-Semitic thrust of
his message? Do they believe that
the $5 million Farrakhan received
from Libya's Muammar Khaddafi
is solely for the purpose of
manufacturing and selling
toothpaste and cosmetics and has
nothing to do with his past
assaults on Jews and Israel and as
incentive for future ones? Are
they simply afraid of retaliation
by Farrakhan or his followers
should they be too critical?
There have been several black
political and civil rights leaders, as
well as journalists, who have firm-
ly denounced Farrakhan and his
bigotry. But too many others have
couched even their mild criticisms
in sociological explanations,
apologies, assurances of his
harmlessness and suggestions he
is being "misread" and
"misunderstood." Farrakhan has
been termed "articulate," "per-
suasive," "a legitimate force for
positive change," etc. Hitler was
articulate and persuasive. The Ku
Klux Klan speaks of "white
pride." Mussolini made the trains
run on time. Does that excuse
their evil?
It is both fair and accurate to
suggest that were it not for the
early and continuous support of
many Jews, political leaders such
as Young and Bradley would like-
ly not have achieved their suc-
cesses. It was not Jews alone who
provided support and obviously
each man has been successful
because of his individual abilities
and efforts, but the fact remains
that Jewish support was vital to
each.
So then, what, if anything, do
they owe Jews? Is that a cynical
question? Not at all. Reciprocity is
not cynical. Nor is it immoral.
Reciprocity is the essence of
political life and perhaps of most
human behavior. It does not sug-
gest a compromise of principle.
Black political and civil rights
leaders do not repeat do not
owe the Jewish community
automatic agreement, assent, or
support on any political issue.
There is the mutual responsibility
to listen to one another's concerns
and views and, indeed, there are
times we will agree and times we
.will differ on given issues.
Sometimes our agendas are
shared; sometimes they are not.
But I believe there is one thing
black leaders and spokesman do
owe the Jewish community.
Whenever and wherever racism
has surfaced, Jews have been, and
still are, among the first to public-
ly condemn it and assure the black
community that we stand side by
side in opposing that racism.
Strategies may differ, but the
history of the Jewish people and
the teachings of Judaism demand
that we oppose racism. We have
learned the painful lesson that
bigotry is contagious and once
unleashed knows no limitations.
I believe it is not too much to ex-
pect that those who hold positions
of leadership in the black com-
munity will likewise denounce
anti-Semitism without
qualification, without apologies,
without equivocation whenever
and wherever it surfaces.
Is it reasonable to expect a black
leader, whose primary constituen-
cy is in the black community to
openly criticize another black? I
think it is. If leadership includes a
degree of boldness, a sense of
right and a sense of justice, then
bigotry must be condemned no
matter the source. Any respect
for facts will confirm that Louis
Farrakhan preaches religious and
racial hatred. Andrew Young,
Tom Bradley and others are not
responsible for Farrakhan or
anything he says, but they are
responsible for their own reac-
tions and responses, and the
messages they send to millions of
blacks set a tone. Each has of-
fered some criticism of Far-
rakhan. That is better than
nothing, but hardly strong enough
to make a ripple.
Bigotry is a monster whether it
sports a swastika, a burning crail
or a suit and tie and menS
looking bodyguards. WhetS
those who utter hatred are whit*.
or black matters not. The venom
they spread can infect us all And
as history has clearly ghoW
those who are silent today Ji
likely be victimized tomorrow
& ^
jfi J> JT
&
fl?
,
^
* KW
Family Tour To Israel
From the Tampa Bay area. Two weeks in
Israel, August 9-August 23, 1986. Trip includes
a Bar Mitzvah celebration at the Western Wall.
App. $1900.00 per person incl. air from Tampa.
Deluxe accommodations. For more informa-
tion call:
M. Pa ley (813) 962-6348
J.Levitt (813) 962-6021
Congregation Kol Ami
Sisterhood
GALA ART EXHIBITION
and AUCTION
SATURDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 9,1985
PREVIEW AT 7:30 P.M.
AUCTION AT 8:30 P.M.
to be held at
CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE COUNTRY CLUB
13903 CLUBHOUSE DRIVE
TAMPA, FLORIDA
Admission $6.50 per person
R.S.V.P. by NOVEMBER 1
mmmmm
962-6338
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
6 DAYS ONU! Tues.. Net. 12 *re Sm, Nov. 17
r corrai NJomMNN
'MTIK

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1 nday, November
le Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
FLYTOISR4EL
IWNELA.
No, El Al isn't suggesting you take another airline
5 to Israel. But now its possible to take advantage of our
' knowledge of our homeland and our great service for
telavw a lot less money. Because we've just lowered our fares.
mberis:i985. Now you can fly round trip from Chicago, Miami,
mston, or Dallas to Tel Aviv for only $699.
We've even lowered the fares on our vacation packages. For a
joe $729 we'll give you round trip airfare from Chicago. Plus six
days/five nights in either Jerusalem or Tel Aviv at a
choice of luxury hotels. Or, if you'd rather stay with
friends, we'll give you a rental car for five days.
Of course, we'll still give you that great service
you've come to
IDES HOTEL
MDARMRE.
'EMBER 11,1985-
EMBER 15,1985.
beet from El Al. And we still
}ve the most non-stop flights
ly, with free movies and
ks on all flights.
After all, although we low-
id our fares, we would never
our standards.
For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at
1-800-ELAL-SUN (1-800-352-5786).
For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al Israel
Airlines, Tour WE 850 Third Avenue, New York, New York 10022.
Name.
Address.
JF 1025
WMW^^WK^M III// i
The airline of Israel.
COME TO ISRAEL. COME SMY WITH FRIENDS.
.,,-,, 1..I Aviv ptdMK prices indudinga.riare are subject to change without notice Airfare is sublet to
Mmtu,nx Contact vour travel agent or El Al tor details ind l.ms trom r
\
1


^Bj^^^TWWFTrionflfafti oi'iarnpa.rnaay. November 1. liWo
Business Card Directory
^
^?
-
.-: 3"E Ag--
<** A-txx tio" Ot
r-c* =co J362S
Tartu 36-400C
:-*- 3 '94T-9
*A> -90Mt26
ft l/reast
/ J'9nostK
* f* enter 4700 N Habana Avenue
I Suite 104
Tamp* Florida 33614
Hours Moo Fn. (813) 875-3787
8 AM to 5 PM (813) 875-6871
Randy M. Freedman
ManiD Lynch
One Tampa City Center
Tampa. FL 33602
813-273-8588
MarkD. Ql*rz
IN-
The Pnidtntaj
insurance Company
of
On
Ca
MM
120
219 Manner Square
Tampa Rontfi 33609
Oflct (813) 877-5725
(813) 831-5299
Prudential
Distinctive Travel, Inc.
1211 North Westshore Blvd Ste 316
Tampa Flonda 33607
(813) 875-9323
Sal AJhaoetf
g^ldg)
I1t4 "*i gnc>t Hortu Ant'iCI
Roo#vt A. Levin
Andy Lewie
Robert K. Berger
L. Mart Cerron
EF Hutton & Company Inc
102 W Whiting St.. 2nd Fir
Tampa. FL 33602
Telephone (813) 223-4946
Florida Wats Line 1-600-282 5871
Nat'I Wats Line 1-800-237-861C
TAxelrod Publishing
of Tampa Bay
B
TAmbaY
REALTY IKC- REALTORS
0O1 SWANN AVINUI
TAMPA. FLORIDA 99604
ARTHUR U. SK0P
bmokcj* lwmaw
Business
(8131 251-80C2
Arrt* Houa*
(B13) 639-0107
(SI 3) 839-46454
weoveu
ihegesioit
ond hjxnonrstc
1420 W.BUBCH BLVD.
TAMPA. FLORIOA 33612
(813)933-5144
DEBORAH GAIL ALBERT, M. A.
CfHWd In neaaty Therapy
=
REALTY. *C.
JOLENE SHOR
MAI.T0W ASSOCIATE
THi CASCADES
13024 N. Dais Matey
Taws*, nerttfa 33S1I
S
(618)
2300
Cypress Travel Center^
A full service, fully computerized travel agency
$50 per couple discount on any
one week cruise through December 31,1985
We give special attention to you
and your travel needs.
875-0252 Our service is FREE 963-5566
3502 Henderson Blvd 10006 N. Dale Mabry.
Quality Style Safety
B)
Ih ond a|
MikeGersholowitz Tampa Hondaland PH. 935-8585
Ask Your]
Congress.
Baby Boomers Will _
Senior Boomeri
Deur Congrettman Gi
I have heard mare ml
laUly about the pnbkmT
turn vnli face u-hen the (*&
the baby boom years reach
ment age. What arethete,
and what can uedoabimi
DearCSB:
The aging of the
Boomers" is indeed a
that our nation must
the near future. By
children born today reach!
of 65. one person in five \,M
or older, and of those oveTl
increasing percentage
female, alone and poor.
Some of the trends th|
developing are outlined I
In 1960. 16.5 million i
in 10) were over 65. By the
of the next century, 67.
peopled in 5) will be 65 oro
a 400 percent increase.
Costs for program!
benefit the elderly are
rapidly and have been"
years.
Men and women art 1
longer, but retiring earlier.
The elderly dependent p
tion is growing faster
working population that i
it.
If we did nothing to pr
this "Senior Boom," the i
programs designed to aid |
elderly could become
manageable. Fortunately,
are many things that we i
doing to prevent
manageable situation. Wei
make the social security:
less vulnerable to
economic pressures by
it from the unified budget; i
work harder to insure that t
row's workers receive the |
education and training i
perhaps most importantly, i
work to reduce the federal d
There is, of course, much I
than this that needs to bei
but we must begin son
The Ways and Means Su
tee on Social Security, of i
am a member, has intj
legislation that would
the social security trust
from the unified budget I
Not only would this help i
system more secure for
future, it would also protect j
Cost-of-Living Adjniti
(COLA) due recipients of i
security benefits each
Through reforms of the
like this, we can insure f
"Senior Boom" does not t
"Senior Bust.
Saa<
Cong
U.S.H*
Repr
D.CI
[QROWARD
[JAPER *
PACKAGING
RUTH Gl
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LES, INC.
Show moumi
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FREE DELIVERY FLfl
PLEASE TELL OUR ADVERTISERS YOU SAW IT IN THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
hlROWARD
[JAPER *
[JACK AGING


Friday, November 1, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
Pan Am's
No Strings
To New^brk

One Way,
Monday
Through
Thursday



No ininimum/maximum stay.
No advance purchase requirement.
No restrictions at all!
Now you can fly Pan Am to New York for just
$99 one way Monday through Thursday. Or add $10
and fly Friday through Sunday. No strings, no
restrictions. Just buy and fly!
These fares are available for purchase on any
coach seat, on any of our nonstops-including
our bie, beautiful new widebodies -anytime
between now and December 16,1985, when travel
must be completed. .^a,.
So don't let other airlines stnng you along to the
Big Apple. Fly Pan Am, and cut the cord
For reservations and information, call your travel
agent or Pan Am at 1-800-221-1111. -------------
Rui Am.You Can't BeatThe Expei
K,a.s,n>iMh.ln1l,ssuhl..olh..ngew1.h.Hlln..tK,
1 cm- Miami Arrive Nev ><>rk
DAILY NONSTOPS
7:30am 10:09am (K)
8:45am 11:30am (L)
11:30am* S:14pm (L)
1:30pm 4:09pm (K)
2:00pm 4:45pm (L)
4:00pm 6:39pm (K)
5:15pm 8:00pm (L)
7:45pm* 10:29pm (L)
9:45pm 12:29am (L)
10:15pm 12:55am (K)
L-UK.iurdu K kmrwdv
U Sal
k


TOi*ifu rrrr\ rTN'n\ finiK'i i. r.'oo
1985 NOVEMBER COMMUNITY CALENDAR
SATURDAY. NOV. 2
7:30 'Jewish Community Center Play Production
SUNDAY, NOV. 3
9:00 Schaarai Zedek Brotherhood Blood Drive
11:30 Schaarai Zedek SchZfty
1:00 Kol Ami Boneem Function
1:30 'Jewish Community Center Play Production
7:00 Kol Ami Kadi ma Function
MONDAY. NOV. 4
10:00 Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Board/General
Meeting
7:00 Kol Ami Hebrew High School
7:30 Jewish Towers General Meeting;
7:30 ORT/Tampa Chapter Board Meeting
TUESDAY. NOV. 5
ELECTION DAY
10:00 ORT/Bay Horizons Chapter Board Meeting
7:30 Kol Ami Adult Ed
7:30 Hadasaah/Ameet Board Meeting
7:30 Schaarai Zedek Adult Hebrew Education
8:00 Schaarai Zedek Brotherhood Board Meeting
WEDNESDAY. NOV. 6
10:00 'Jewish Community Food Bank
10:30 Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Membership
Meeting
12:30 Kol Ami Senior Socialites
7:30 Anti-Defamation League "Sallv Greenberg
Visit"
7:45 Kol Ami Sisterhood Board Meeting
8:00 Rodeph Sholom Board Meeting
THURSDAY. NOV. 7
9:30 Brandeis Women Board Meeting
12:00 'Tampa Jewish Federation Executive Commit-
tee Meeting
12:45 Senior Citizen Advisory Council Board Meeting
FRIDAY. NOV. 8
12:30 Schaarai Zedek School Committee Meeting
SATURDAY. NOV. 9
7:30 Kol Ami Art Auction
7:30 Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Fall Fundraiser
SUNDAY, NOV. 10
'All day Hadasaah Tampa Chapter Rummage Sale
'Jewish Community Center Book Fair Nov. 10-Nov.
12
Kol Ami No Religious School Nov. 10-Nov. 11
Kol Ami Kadima Hayride and BBQ
MONDAY. NOV. 11
VETERAN'S DAY
12:15 Schaarai Zedek Executive Board Meeting
1:30'Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary Board
Meeting
6:30 Schaarai Zedek Brotherhood Gen.r..u
7:30 H.I lei School Board Meeting "**"
ling
7:30 Kol Ami Youth Community
7:30 Schaarai Zedek Adult Hebrew Ph I
7:30 Kol Ami Adult Ed B*ekf
Meetiaj I
nen
TUESDAY. NOV. 12
9:45 Hadassah/Tampa Board Meeting
6:00 'Business and Professional Women
Meeting
Board
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
General Assembly Meeting in Washing
11/13 through 11/17 -""nftoa
10:00 'Jewiah Community Food Bank
10:00 Temple David Sisterhood Board
11:00 National Council Jewish Worn
Membership "Rosita"
12:00 Tampa Jewish Family Service, v
Committee '
12:30 Kol Ami Senior Socilites
1:00 'Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary M
7:30 Jewish Women for Jewish Survival M
7:30 Schaarai Zedek Youth Committee
8:00 Jewiah National Fund Council Board
THURSDAY, NOV. 14
9:30 'Tampa Jewish Federation Women'.
Board Meeting
12:00 Schaarai Zedek Lunch With The Rabbi
7:50 Kol Ami Board Meeting
Tune in "The Jewish Sound" WMNF 88 5 FM
Sunday's 10:30 a.m.-l p.m.
Candlelighting time
November 1 5:26 p.m.
November 8 5:21 p.m.
November 15 5:18 p.m.
Congregations/Organizations Events
CONGREGATION
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Blood Drive
Sunday, Nov. 3. from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. there will be a blood drive at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
sponsored by the Brotherhood.
Please call Howard Raymond at
935-5716 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
for an appointment.
Brotherhood
The November meeting of Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek
Brotherhood will be held on Tues-
day. Nov. 5 at 6:30 pm. at the
Temple.
The guest speaker will be R. An-
drew Maass. director of the Tarn
pa Museum. The topic of his
speech is "What the Museum
means to Tampa and its future."
The dinner will be catered by
Marias Restaurant.
Sisterhood Fundraiser
Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood is
having its exciting fall fundraiser
of fun. games and special prizes
on Saturday. Nov. 9 at 7:30-11 at
the Guest Quarters. For more in-
formation contact the Temple at
876-2377.
Lunch With The Rabbi
Have lunch with the Rabbi on
Thursday. Nov. 14. noon to 1 p.m.
The study of Pirke Avot (The Say-
ings of the Fathers) will continue.
Bring your own brown bag lunch.
Coffee and cake will be served.
CONGREGATON
KOL AMI
Youth Groups
The Youth Groups of Congrega-
tion Kol Ami are in full swing this
month. Boneem (grades 5 and 6)
will be having a no-talk-a-thon
Nov. 3 to raise money for their
group. Also in November they will
THE TOAST
OF THE
TOWN"
(30S) 8*14154
laRO-PROTCTIV COflPORfiTION
Underwriters Laboralor.es Incorporated (UL)
approved
Bu'gU' Alarm System* Cameia Surveillance System*
Vault and Sale Alarms Card Access Sy terns
Holdup Alarms Automatic *r*1 Manual
_ ..- Fire Alarm Systems
. Closed Circuit TV Systems
Tr>e need lo ao.anced w cur.iy system., has ne*r been g.eater
more critical or m more .mmed.alr .).-.na-d than it is today
lCTftO PflOTCTIV COftPOftHTKDN
1102 North "B" Street Tampa, Florida 33606
(813)251-0578
LOUIS ZIPKIN
QUrXlTV SC0fllTV SflVKS fOfl VOUR 8USINSS AND HOM
be going rollerskating and par-
ticipating in a Shabbat youth
service.
Kadima (7 and 8 graders) will be
having an education program, and
on Nov. 10 they will have a
hayride and BBQ."
I'SY (grades 9-12) has just
returned from a fun-filled
weekend in Jacksonville where
they met with other USYers from
all over central and northern
Florida. In addition to many other
exciting activities, they are
preparing for their next conven-
tion in St. Pete Nov. 8-10.
All three groups will participate
in Mitzvah Corps the end of
November. They will be visiting
the nursing homes in the Tampa
Bay area to sing songs and bring
cheer to the elderly.
Art Auction
The Sisterhood of Congregation
Kol Ami is sponsoring a very
special event on Saturday even-
ing. Nov. 9. An Art Auction,
featuring outstanding artists, will
be held at the Carrollwood Village
Country Club 13903 Clubhouse
Drive. European-American Art. a
national organization, will be fur-
nishing works by such famous ar-
tists as Agam. Chagall. Miro. Dali.
Krte. ('alder. Roulanger. Fri-
rJer, Katx, Leroy NVirr.anand
Delacroix
A preview will be held at 7:30
p.m.. followd by the auction at
8:30 p.m. To round out the even-
ing, guests will be offered wine
and cheese as well as tempting
desserts. In addition, there will be
many door prizes and raffles.
Admission will be $6.50 per per-
son. The public is invited to attend
this enriching and entertaining
evening.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Presents Rosita Perez
To Paid-Up Members
On Wednesday. Nov. 13 at
11:30 a.m.. the Tampa Section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women will present an extraor-
dinary musical experience to
honor its paid-up membership by
presenting Rosita Perez.
Rosita Perez is an authority on
the use of music for other than
entertainment. She blends a
degree in social work and mental
health administrative experience
with humor and sensitivity in pro-
grams that motivate, inspire and
challenge thousands of people
each year in the top corporations
and associations of the world.
A member of the National
Speakers Association, she has
shared the platform with Dr.
Joyce Brothers, Art Buchwald.
Art Linkletter and many others.
Her musical messages make the
heart rejoice and the spirit soar.
Dr. Leo Buscaglia has said of her:
"Your wisdom and unique percep-
tion of life have added to mine. I
am more for it."
The accompanying Champagne
Fete will be held at the Bayshore
Diplomat located at 2611
Bayshore. There will be no charge
to paid-up members for this func-
tion, and dues may be paid at the
door on that day.
For reservations and further in-
formation call: Rae Lewis
886-0416 or Sylvia Krone
232-2091.
TEMPLE BETH-EL
Art Festival
The dates for Temple Beth-El's
Annual Art Festival have been set
for Jan. 25. 26 and 27.
Mark your calendars and watch
for further information.
BBG
Come and meet us. It's a brand
new year 5746 and we're starting
the year with a bang!! What are
we talking al>out'.' Why its BBG of
course. We have two new advisors
Irene Tache and Debbie,
We also have a new
Anne Mass. We are ready l
programming and or
the year. We have i
by inviting you. All girls f
8th to the 12th grade to jotj
We have our meetings
Wednesday evening at 71
the JCC. If you have any i
tions, please call the Tamp]
at 872-4451.
"WHY BBYO
IN 1985 (5746)?".
Parents check your
teens remind your
Nov. 11 at 7:30 in the II
the JCC, you are cordially ij
to hear "Why BBYO in
Our guest speakers will beJ
0. Rosenkranz. Presidento"
pa Jewish Federation and Drj
chel O. Weiss PhD Ex
Director of Tampa Jewish]
Services. Hear about
place in the Jewish Co
and our responsibility J
Jewish Youth and their |
in these tinni
Come and meet Tampa's
get to know the advisors,
formed about what we hope
complish and let us knot
you expect from BBYO. r
cheese, coffee and cake
served.
\\n
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Malhnger Services: FnfcJ.
Saturday. 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan. 7:30 am.. 5:45p
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Cttnative ,
3919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H. David Rose. Cantor Sam Uai*'
Friday. 8 p.m.. Saturday. 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM CeaservatiTt
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837 1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger, haa
Hauben Service*: Friday. 8 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan. 7:
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Refer- H
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim Rabbi Joan ua**
Services: Friday. 8 p.m., Saturday. 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION BAIS TEFFILAH OrtWei _.
3418 Handy Road No 103 Rabbi Yoaai Dubrowaki 962-2375 Sen**'
evening 7 p.m.; Saturday morning 9:30 a-m.
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STUDENT CENTER
10222 Pawnee Avenue Student Representative Jay Pepoe* ."^L.T
eeutive Director Rabbi Yoaai Dubrowaki 962-2375 Friday eveninf w
pm
B'NAI B'R'TH HILLKL FOUNDATION .. .
Bnai B'nth HiUel Foundation. Jewish Student Center, University of**" ^
CTR 2382 Steven J Kaplan. PhD. Dirsetor 5014 Patricia Ct, NJ* ,j
Florida 33617 (Village Square Apta.) 988-7076 Shabbat SemceJ 7*r
day Bagel Brunches. 12 noon.
JEWISH CONGREGATION Of 8UN CITY CENTER (m0.1
634 9162, United Community Church. 1501 La JoUa Street, Sun tny t"~
vice* Friday. 8 pm


Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Friday, November 1, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
^
han Kolodner
NATHAN KOLODNER
ithan Samuel Kolodner, son
and Mrs Arry Kolcdner,
[called t" the Torah as a Bar
.1 Friday, November 1 at 8
nd Saturday, Nov. 2 at 10
Congregation Rodeph
.. Rabbi Kenneth Berger
antor William Hauben will
I celebrant is an 8th Grade
L in the Hillel School of
\, where he is president of
tudent government.
an was the 1985 recipient
Maurice Levine Scholarship
academic achievement.
nd Mrs. Kolodner will host
_.iy evening Oneg Shabbat
Kiddush luncheon following
fcrvices in honor of the
r
iial guests will include
tarents: Dr. and Mrs.
im Codish, Worcester,
lusetts, and Mrs. Riva
Iner, Brookline,
ihusetts; Anna Kolodner,
lolodner Gold, Boston; Mr.
Irs. Milton Blank, Delray
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
Silver Spring, Maryland.
H'REN BERKOVITS
ANDREW BERKOVITS
en Suzanne and Andrew
Berkovits, children of
Berkovits and Michael
hts, will be called to the
Lauren Berkovits
Torah as B'nai Mitzvot on Satur-
day, Nov. 2, at 9:30 a.m. at Con-
gregation Kol Ami. Rabbi David
Rose and Cantor Sam Isaak will
officiate.
Lauren is a student in the High
School of Jewish Studies and a
member of USY. She is an honor
student at Chamberlain High
School, where she is a member of
the Drama Club and Future
Business Leaders of America.
Andy attends the eighth grade
at Adams Junior High School,
where he is a member of the Stu-
dent Council. Andy is active in
soccer and participated in the
Temple Terrace/East Leigh Soc-
cer Exchange Program in
England over the summer.
Margie Berkovits will host the
Oneg Shabbat on Friday evening,
a Kiddush luncheon following the
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception Saturday evening
at the Lincoln Hotel.
Special guests include Pauline
Fox, grandmother, Mr. and Mrs.
Sheldon Fox, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Fox, Alvin and Barbara
Zacharias, Randy Fox, Nancy
Valdez, all from New York,
Donald and Lynda Klapow of
Atlanta.
MICHELLE BRENT
Michelle Eileen Brent, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Brent will
be called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah Saturday, Nov. 9 at 9:30
Harvey, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Peirson, Nicole, and Brad, New
Jersey; and many other special
friends.
Andrew Berkovits
Business Card Directory
Business card directory for
afessionals and Executives is being
produced as a regular monthly feature of
IE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. If it is successful,
I will continue indefinitely.
me send your business card, with
fcment of $25.76 for the first edition. Future
(cement will be Invoiced by mail at the
ie monthly rate.
id To:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
2808 Horatio Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Attn: Business Directory Dept.
The PARENTS ASSOCIATION of
The Hillel School of Tampa
presents
Gift of Gold
ST PRIZE.....................$5,000.00
>ND PRIZE...................$1,000.00
PRDPRIZE.....................$ 50000
Saturday, November 23,1985
7:30 p.m. Bon Appetit Restaurant
Donation $100.00
FOR INFORMATION: 837-4788 or 875-9579
Karl Greenbaum
KARL GREENBAUM
Karl Greenbaum, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Elliot Greenbaum will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, Nov. 9 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Kabbi Kenneth Berger and Can-
tor William Hauben will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
Rodeph Sholom Religious School
and a member of Kadima. He is an
8th Grade student at Wilson
Junior High School where he
plays trumpet in the marching
band. Karl swims competitively
with the Greater Tampa Swimm-
ing Association and participated
in the recent Sunshine State
Games. His favorite spare-time
activity is fishing.
The Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
luncheon following the services
and a reception and dinner at the
Tower Club of Tampa Saturday
evening will be hosted by his
parents and his grandfather, Ben
Greenbaum.
Out-of-town guests will include
Mrs. Marion Coleman, Mr. and
Mrs. Ronald Coleman, Jason Col-
eman, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Green-
baum, Mr. and Mrs. Kune Green-
baum, Mrs. Minna Kresch, Mr.
and Mrs. Martin Mitler, and Mr.
and Mrs. Dan Davidson.
Michelle Brent
a.m. at Congregation Kol Ami.
Rabbi David Rose and Cantor
Sam Isaak will officiate. There
will be a twinning ceremony with
Adina Muleris of Lithuania,
USSR, during the service.
The celebrant is a graduate of
the Hey Class of the Kol Ami
Religious School and a member of
Kadima. Michelle is an 8th Grade
High Honor Roll student at
Buchanan Junior High School.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Brent will
host a Shabbat dinner in their
home for family and out-of-town
guests; the Oneg Shabbat Friday
evening and Kiddush luncheon
following services in honor of the
occasion at Congregation Kol
Ami; a Saturday evening recep-
tion at Congregation Kol Ami;
and a Sunday brunch in their
home for family and out-of-town
guests.
Special guests will include
Michelle's brother, Joey; grand-
parents, Leon and Shirley
Pothfeld, Tampa, Harry and Ceil
Brent, Boca Raton; Ms. Julie
Rothfeld, Dr. and Mrs. Murray
Roseman, Mr. and Mrs. Monty
Lieberman, Mr. and Mrs. Murray
Bossowitch, Mr. and Mrs.
Seymour Rosenblatt, Dr. and Mrs.
Mark Reiss, David Marshall, and
Jonathan, Ms. Marilyn Horowitz,
New York; Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Klutch, Boca Raton; Mr. and Mrs.
David Gamble, Indiana; Mrs. Sara
Butler, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Lois
Obituaries
CHAIN
Zina, 96. of St. Petersburg, died Saturday
October 12. 1985. She was a former Tampa
resident, coming to the Bay area in 1976
from Brooklyn, NY. She was a member of
Rodeph Sholom Synagogue. Hadaaaan and
Talmud Torah Ash Cola. She is survived by
two sons. Jack of Clearwater and Harold of
St. Petersburg; and two grandchildren.
FRAIBERG
Donald C, 67. of Tampa, died Tuesday. Oc-
tober 15 1935. A Bay area resident for du
years from Harrisburg. Pa., he retired in
1980 as an insurance agent for Allstate In
surance Co. He was a member of tile
Masons, Hillsborough Lodge No. 25
f and AM. Scottish Rite. Egypt Temple
Shrine, Brandon Shrine Club. Buckhorn
Spring and Country Club and the Buckhorn
Spring Men's Association He was a U 8.
Navy veteran of World War II. He is surviv
ed by his wife, Murielle. his daughters. Mary
Ellen Bass, Laurie Susan Eads; five grand
children; his parent*. Mr. ami Mrs. Samuel
Fraiberg. Boca Raton; and his brother,
Lawrence P. Fraiberg. New York. Those
who wish may make contributions to the
Shnners Crippled Children's Hospital.
BRILL .
Ceorge. 70, of Tampa, died Sunday. October
20 1985. He was a 19 year Tampa resident
coming from Racine. Wisconsin. He was a
Real Estate Investor/Broker He is survived
by his wife. Irene; daughter, Karen
Sideman; two sisters. Ruth Shovers, Allan
U and Helen Kaplan, Racine. Wisconsin;
and three grandchildren.
JNF to Hold 4th Annual
Judicial Mission in Israel Dec. 25-Jan. 3
The Fourth Annual Judicial
Mission and Symposium of the
Jewish National Fund of America
will be held in Israel from Dec. 25
to Jan. 3. Attorneys and other
members of the legal profession
from across the United States will
participate, and will take advan-
tage .of the opportunity to meet
top Israeli jurists, lawyers,
academic and rabbinical
authorities, and government of-
ficials. The mission's theme will be
the impact of Halacha, Jewish
law, on contemporary social
issues.
The symposium will be chaired
by Menachem Berger, president
of the Israel Bar Association, an-
nounced Charlotte Jacobson,
president of the JNF of America.
Discussions are scheduled with
Meir Shamgar, presiding
Supreme Court Judge; Moshe
Nissim, Minister of Justice; Pro-
fessor Yitzhak Zamir, Attorney
General; and Moshe Rivlin, World
Chairman, Jewish National Fund,
Jerusalem. Mrs. Jacobson noted
that the Judicial Mission will in-
clude visits to an absorption
center, Israeli courts, and penal
reform facilities. The field trips,
she said, will demonstrate the im-
pact of Halachic law upon such
current issues as the absorption of
Ethiopian Jews and the practices
of the military establishment.
The mission's theme will also be
explored through a dialogue with
Rabbinic leaders, an address on
the "Impact of the Rambam on
our Legal System" by one of
Israel's outstanding academi-
cians, and a discussion entitled,
"Implementation of Social and
I,and Policies," led by an expert
from JNF, the organization
responsible for land reclamation
and afforestation in the Jewish
state.
Dates for the 1986 Judicial Mis-
sion and Symposium were chosen
to coincide with a time of year
when court calendars in the
United States are customarily less
demanding, enabling more
members of the legal profession
and their families to take an
unusual and exciting vacation in
Israel. The deluxe travel program
provides accommodations in first-
class hotels, including two meals a
day, with lunches en route during
the touring. The cost is $1550 per
person, double occupancy, and in-
cludes round trip fare from New
York. Extensions are available to
Eilat and other areas in Israel, as
well as to Cairo and major Euro-
pean capitals.
For further information, please
contact Larry Wasser, Jewish Na-
tional Fund, 8405 North Himes
Ave., Suite 209, Tampa, Florida
33614. Telephone numbers are
933-TREE or Toll Free
1-800-282-4198 (tone) 8733.
Awards Announced
in Annual CJF
PR Competition
Jewish Federations from
throughout the United States and
Canada are recipients of gold,
silver, and bronze awards in the
annual Public Relations Competi-
tion of the Council of Jewish
Federations, it was announced by
Harry A. (Hap) Levy of Miami,
chairman of the CJF Awards
Committee. Tampa received a
bronze award for original
invitations.
The Family of
Robert E. Barnum
wishes to extend their grateful appreciation
of your messages of Sympathy.
(SignL>Rhoda, Bob, Debra, Scott
j4 -V-i.T.r,.
Chapel services available in Tampa.
Jonathan A. Fum Dedicated to serving
Owner Qur Jewish Community
Funeral Director
4100- 16th Street N.
81 Ptonburf. PL 33703
247-1772


? ; -..
Pae_i2__The Jewish FIoridianofTampa/Fridav. November 1, 1985
YOUTH
TO: AD Jewish Students,
Grades 1 through 6
PROM: The Jewish Com-
munity Book Fair Committee
RE: 2nd Annual Story
Writing Contest
Hi!
Last year we had our first
annual story writing contest
in conjunction with the first
annual book fair. We were so
pleased with the stories we
received that we have decided
to do the same project again,
and we hope you will par-
ticipate. Here are the rules:
1. The theme is: "Let Me
Tell You About My Favorite
Jewish Story ..." You can
tell us what the story is about,
what you liked about it, how
you came to read, or anything
else you would like to say.
2. Your story may be any
length.
3. Send your story to the
Jewish Community Center,
Attention, Terry Abrahams,
2808 Horatio, Tampa, FL
33609.
SUNDAY
FUNDAY FIELD DAY
AT KOL AMI
Our November Sunday Funday
will be a Track and Field Day at
Kol Ami on Nov. 17, from 1-4 p.m.
This special day promises to be
lots of fun for all children in
grades K-6. Our activities will in-
clude a 60 yd. dash. 100 yd. dash,
1 mi. run, high jump, long jump,
and hurdles.
All participants will receive rib-
bons, and awards will be
presented to winners. Charge for
members is only $3 and for non-
members a mere $4.50, so plan to
be there! Register with Bill or
Leigh no later than Nov. 8!
BIRTHDAY BONANZAS
GOING STRONG!
We have already hosted five bir-
thday parties at the JCC, with
themes ranging from He-Man and
Transformers to Cabbage Patch
and Care Bears. Make your reser-
vations early for your child's bir-
thday party. Our calendar is
filling-up fast!
Call Leigh at the Center if you
have any questions or want to
reserve a date.
TALENTED STAFF
ENRICHES YOUTH
PROGRAM
We really have a dedicated and
enthusiastic staff working in the
Youth Department this fall, and
we'd like you to meet them.
Linda Katz, a student at USF, is
leading our Berkeley Prep. Kinder
Club as well as our Second Home
Programs. Linda has a degree in
Psychology and is currently work-
ing on another in Communicology.
Adriana Bouchester is also
working with our Second Home
Program. Adriana recently moved
to Tampa from Orlando where she
worked with the JCC. She is
presently a student at ITT.
We were very fortunate to
enlist Michael Schwaid to teach
our computer class. Michael runs
his own business called (what
else?) The computer Tutor!
Our drama class is working on
its Chanukah play, "The Littlest
Maccabee." Mary Goldman, a
teacher at Roosevelt, has an ex-
tensive background in children's
theatre and is doing a wonderful
job with the group.
"The Mad Scientist," a very
popular class, is being led by Meta
The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece
4. Deadline is Nov. 4.
5. There will be prizes
awarded for each grade.
6. All stories will be
displayed at the JCC.
7. The winning entries will
be printed in the Tampa
Jewish Floridian and read at
the Book Fair.
8. Winners will be announc-
ed at the second Annual Book
Fair on Nov. 17.
Van Sickle. Meta is the Science
teacher at Hillel and is teaching
lots of enjoyable and educational
experiments to the children.
Keep your eyes open for more
exciting classes coming this
winter to the JCC!
TWEEN/TEENS
NOVEMBER PROGRAMS
FOR TEENS
Nov. 12: It's Tough Being
Jewish! 7 p.m. at Kol Ami (grades
7-12) Leslye Winkelman will
help you with handling incidents
at school that might be anti-
Semitic; what to say, what to do,
and how to do it. This is a one-
time event!
Nov. 18: Stress Management
for Families, 6-9 p.m. (adults and
teens) Teens, bring your
parents! Parents, bring your
teens! Let's discuss with Dr. Rick
Weinberg (USF professor at the
Florida Mental Health Institute)
what causes stress in our families
and how to handle it. Cost: $6 per
family. At North End (Kol Ami)
only.
Nov. 30: Basketball Tourna-
ment, Tween/Teen The focal
point of a fabulous weekend for
teens! Followed by a victory
banquet.
JCC CHEERLEADING
SQUAD
The JCC Cheerleading Squad
consists of girls in grades 7-9 and
practices every Tuesday, 6:30-8
p.m. There is also cheering on
nights and weekends whenever
there is a game. The squad is free
to Center members and members
of the Youth Council.
Cheerleaders must supply own
uniforms, and additional charges
will be assessed for away trips.
BACK-IN-TIME BARBECUE
BIG SUCCESS
The JCC Teens hosted a
barbecue and swim party on Oct.
26 and celebrated our return to
Eastern Standard Time at mid-
night. Teens from the Kent JCC in
Clearwater joined us for the even-
ing's festivities, and everyone had
a good time.
Plans are currently in the works
for a Teen Ski Weekend this
winter. Call Leigh at the Center
for more information about this
exciting trip.
FAMILY
"MY FAIR SADIE"
COMES TO THE JCC
The JCC's blockbuster musical
hit, "My Fair Sadie," written in
part and directed by Terry
Abrahams, is headed your way!
Join us for a delightful evening
(Saturday, Nov. 2) or afternoon
(Sunday, Nov. 3) of hilarious
satire, and at the same time helD
to support YOUR JCC.
The cast, in alphabetical order,
includes: Debbie Abrahams, Dan
Alpert, Gary Alter, Johanna
Barat, Gordon Brunhild, Leah
Davidson, Jules Deutsch, Nadine
Feldman, Jerilyn Goldsmith,
Florence Gordon, David
Houseman, Lynn Hyman,
Dorothy Kanter, Barry Karpay,
Ruth Kirschener. Eileen Koteles,
Alia Libman, Svetlana Libman.
Debra Linsky. Donald Linsky.
Janet Lynn, Mark Mandel, Ralph
Marcadis, Minnie Marcus, Barry
Meyerson. Kris Moore. Lois
Older. Alice Rosenthal, Patty
Scott, Lee Tobin, Aida Weissman,
and pure joy of his motion.
Small captivates his audience
with a magic that transcends
the stage."
Please don't miss out on^
this wonderful opportunity to
see such a unique performer.
Mr. Small's residency in Tam-
pa is being sponsored by the
Aetna Life and Casualty
Foundation, and is the result
of the efforts of the Arts
Council of Tampa-
HiUsborough County and the
Affiliate Artists program.
There is NO CHARGE for
this performance.
ISRAELI CHASSIDIC
FESTIVAL '86
The JCC is proud to annunce
the forthcoming visit of the 1965
Israeli Chassidic Festival. This
spectacular musical production of
song, dance and music, performed
by top Israeli stars, is coming to
Tampa on Monday, Dec. 2, for one
performance only!
On previous American tours,
the Festival was described by the
Neu- York Post as "something of a
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
"CENTERSTAGE" PLAYERS
PRESENT
AN ORIGINAL MUSICAL COMEDY
SATURDAY, N3VETCER 2 SUMAY, rfl/ETCER 3
7:30 Mors D'oeuvras
8:00 Show Time
Dessert following show
$20.00 Patron (special seating)
$10.00 Adult
$ 5.00 Children
12:30 Lunch
1:00 Show
Sr. Citizen Discount
on Sunday $7.50
2808 Horatio Ave. 872-4451
Jan Wuliger, Bev Yeshion, and
Leigh Zaleon. Come and see your
friends perform!
Ads will be sold (2 inches) to
help support our "theatre" at the
JCC. If you are interested in pur-
chasing advertising space for $25,
just mail us your business card (or
drop it off at the Center) with a
check made payable to the JCC.
Patrons will be listed in our pro-
gram for $20 and will have special
seating (other tickets are $10
adults, $5 children, $7.50 seniors
on Sunday only).
DANCER
ROBERT SMALL
TO APPEAR A THE JCC
Robert Small,
dancer/choreographer and ar-
tistic director of The Small
Dance Company. Inc.. in New
York, will be appearing at the
JCC Auditorium on Wednes-
day. Nov. 13. at 8 p.m. Mr.
Small has received numerous
honors for his skill and
creativity and is a master at
communicating his art
through a strong kinetic
sense of wit and theatricality.
The New York Ttmes
reviewed his work by saying.
"As creator of method and
movement he is unequaled.
and the audience caught the
rial of ingenuity, humor
miracle." The New York Times
wrote that "these Israeli ballads
have an infectiously open spirit as
well as the foot-tapping rhythmic
lilt so characteristic of the coun-
try's many dances." Michael
Lachetta of the New York Daily
News wrote about the "sight and
sound of Israel's top
entertainers."
So, when the curtain goes up
and the stars come out dancing,
when songs fill the air with an-
cient verse, make certain to be
there. Don't miss this delightful
evening!
Come experience Israel without
leaving town! Call the JCC for ad-
ditional information.
ADULTS
CHANGE IN ADULT
VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE
Beginning Nov. 3, our Adult
Volleyball group will no longer be
meeting on Thursdays, 6:30-9
p.m., but will be meeting instead
every Sunday. 6-9 p.m. There is
no charge to n.embers for this ac-
tivity and a charge of $2 to non-
members.
CLUB VARIETY
PLANS DANCE
On Saturday. Nov. 23, Club
Variety will hold a fall dance at
the Centro Astunano Ballroom.
BYOBandBYOSnacbfc
per person. TeiTi&lLJ
Dfnngfun,goodey
allows an opportunity^
fellowship. Paid tZ
necessary by Nov ik
JCC at 872-4451' *'
SPECIAL P.E. m
FOR MEN
Over "30" *Wi ,
Basketball!*^
The JCC Over "3o
Basketball League will sM
24. Games will be pbySi
Sunday. Registration fo, '
be picked up at the P.E. (
m
COMING UP
Nov. 1 New
recycling
Nov. 2 and 3 "Ih
Sadie"
Nov. 8 Mixed .
Tennis Tournament'
Volleyball
Nov. 4 Deadline
story contest entries; ,
Your Community Series
Nov. 5 (kmeral
Club Variety
Nov. 5 and 12 Your!
of the Century, Part II
Nov. 8 Last day I
register for Track and i
Day
Nov. 12- It's Tough I
Jewish!; Drugs and
tion Seminar
Nov. 13 Robert
Performance
Nov. 17 Sunday I
Field Day
Nov. 17. 18 and 19
Jewish Community Bookl
Nov. 18 Stress 1
ment for Families
Nov. 19 Pa
Disease Seminar
Nov. 23 Club Vi
Dance at Centro As
Ballroom
Nov. 24 Over 301
Basketball League begins
Nov. 30 Teen
Tournament
SENIORS
GOOD HEALTH SEI
Drugs and M<
1:30 p.m., Tuesday,Ne?.I
Free. JCC Main--
associated with oi
medication and mo
drugs. Sponsored
Memorial Hospital
presented by a
pharmacist.
Parkinson's Diiei
1:30-3 p.m.. Tuesday.
It, Fee, JCC Mail-r
son's Disease: thepstiantj
care giver, and state of I
art treatment. Includes
discussion of technie
aspects of the disease by<
qualified neurologist aw"
formation on local suppaj
group activities.
YOUR VIEW
OF THE CENTURY. PA
II
An eight-week ere
writing and discussion |
for Seniors to share
ideas and experiences
the course of their lives i
the events of this centj
Discover how other men*"
of our generation have D*I
Learn how to prepare fjj
own life history for jT
children and JfrandchikW
read and cherish. WeDJJ
meeting on Tuesday. U f
and we'll continue me
through Dec. :v ContrfJ
London for further inf**
tion or to


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