The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00277

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
* Jewish Flcridliairi
[olume 7 Number 21
Off Tampa
Tampa, Florida Friday, October 18, 1985
Fnd Shochtl
Price 35 Cents
Catholics and Jews: Talking, Working Together
By LESLYE WINKELMAN
And JEANINE JACOB
Marking the 20th anniversary
f a milestone pronouncement on
iter-religious affairs, three
fiorida religious newspapers and
be Anti Defamation League of
I'nai BVitli have cooperated in a
mque venture: a jointly published
Umenmration of Vatican Coun-
II declaration, "Nostra
etate."
I Tn pages of commentary on
kwish-fatholic relations are
king published simultaneously
is weekend in The Florida
I The Jewish Floridian of
tmpa. and The Jewish Floridian
\Piwllas County. The Florida
Dject is an example of a growing
|int of cooperation between the
faith communities in Florida
I elsewhere.
Following the posting last spr-
? of unsigned anti-Catholic
sters in downtown Tampa, for
-iiple, Catholic priest Father
Frederick Buckely, producer of
"Religion Today" cable television
program, and Leslye Winkelman,
West Florida Regional director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, appeared together
on a local radio talk show condem-
ning the hate-filled material. Jews
and Catholics responded similarly
in other parts of the country, in-
cluding New York and Miami.
Local cooperative efforts have
taken many forms. Grassroots in-
terfaith sharing sessions were
sponsored in synagogues and in
Catholic and Lutheran churches
last year by the Tampa Bay
chapter of the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews.
Rabbi David Susskind of St.
Petersburg was a visiting pro-
fessor of Jewish Studies for three
years at Saint Leo College in cen-
tral Florida in a project under-
written by the Jewish Chataugua
Society. The Society further in-
vited Saint Leo chairman of
religion and philosophy, Dr. Tyson
Anderson, to make a special
Presentation on the Jewish roots
of Christianity at an Orlando tem-
ple. Dr. Anderson is currently
working on adding Jewish Studies
permanently to the religion and
philosophy curriculum at Saint
Leo.
Forty Catholic dioceses in 29
states will have official com-
memorative programs for the
20th anniversary of "Nostra
Aetate." "Understanding the
Jewish Experience: The
Challenge of Nostra Aetate" is a
one-day educators' conference in
Miami Nov. 4 to explore the im-
pact of the declaration as it relates
to teaching about Jews and
Judaism. The program, open to
Catholic school teachers and
priests, is co-sponsored by the
United States Catholic Con-
ference Department of Education,
the Archdiocese of Miami and the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. Other commemorative
dialogues are planned in Venice
and Tampa.
Jewish-Catholic
Relations: A Dialogue
,
See Pages 6&7
Besides the Florida
newspapers' joint publication, na-
tional Jewish and Catholic
periodicals are taking up the inter-
faith dialogue at this time. The en-
tire October issue of "New
Catholic World" is devoted to the
topic as is the Fall edition of
"Face To Face," an interfaith
spiritual bulletin. Several Jewish
journals featured articles on the
topic this month.
International highlights of the
inter-religious dialogue will be the
official Vatican observance of the
"Nostra Aetate" anniversary Oct.
28-30 in Rome at which represen-
tatives of IJCIC (International
Jewish Committee on Inter-
Religious Consultations) will meet
with Pope John Paul II, and the
first Pan-American Conference on
Catholic-Jewish Relations, Nov.
3-5 in Sao Paolo, Brazil.
Lisa Bush Assistant Director of The Tampa Jewish Federation
AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
Dudith 0. Rosenkranz, presi-
pt, and Gary Alter, executive
president, take pleasure in
bouncing that Lisa Bush is the
director of the Tain-
Jewish Federation. Lisa, a
| v' I 'etersburg, comes to
Dps from Houston, Texas,
ere Bhe was the assistant direc-
of Anti-Defamation
igue.
Ksn ''<' tha role of the
1 Federation as a
I uicating the Jewish
bmuiii: : .sides being the urn-
[ ization of the Tampa
I'ish agencies."
lush-- major involvement with
I Tampa Jewish Federation will
oping a vital Young
'oershif, Group. She will be
geting those who have shown
pship qualities in different
p and already have a commit-
ment to Judaism, both social and
financial. She said, "Tampa seems
to be a progressive community,
something like the Houston of
Florida with the influx of so many
young professionals."
Bush said, "To me the true
meaning of tzedakah is accepting
your responsibility of understan-
ding the historical past and
educating toward the future. The
80> are years of change, with
a's similation. shifting
demographics, intermarriages,
later marriages, and fewer
children. We must look at where
we have been and where we are
going. The traditional covenant
has been redefined in the 1980's.
We must reinstill the basic tradi-
tional value system for people to
understand their role as a Jew in
the Jewish community."
Jewish communal work seems a
natural for Bush, even going back
to her years at the Jewish Corn-
Lisa Bush
munity Center summer camp. She
spent her senior college year away
from the Gainesville campus of
the University of Florida, at Tel
Aviv University. Her Jewish
studies in Israel seemed to syn-
thesize and reaffirm her Jewish
identity and her decision to work
for Jewish causes.
Lisa continued her studies and
received a master's degree in
Jewish Communal service from
Brandeis University.
During her internship at the
Tufts University Hillel Founda-
tion, she received the Haber
Award, a national honor given by
the Hillel Foundation in
Washington, D.C., for the in-
novative program she created
called "Intergenerational Oral
History Project."
In addition to the Young
Leadership Groups Bush will be
working with the Young Adult
th Annual 'Women's Wednesday' Education Day-
Feature Amalie Rothschild
Division in defining the basic
goals of Federation, and creating
magnet groups for networking,
luncheon forums, and social
activities.
The CRC (Community Relations
Committee) holds her special in-
terest as the coordinating vehicle
for educating the Jewish com-
munity on pertinent issues such as
anti-Semitism, cultural pluralism,
prejudice and Lisa sees herself
working with other organizations,
especially the synagogues, in the
area of community involvement,
and would like to pool the
resources of the neighboring com-
munities Pineflas, Sarasota, and
Orlando in broadening the Jewish
network.
Bush said, "The Tampa Jewish
Federation is the glue which
keeps the Jewish community
together," with that in mind Lisa
Bush will be cementing these
relationships.
he Tampa Jewish Federation
pen's Division and the
"ness and Professional
"en's Network proudly an-
jce the 6th Annual "Women's
Jnesday" Education Day
flnesday, Oct. 30, at the Mar-
Hotel, Westshore and
pen.
Jjs year the Education Day
Pfferent from any other in its
I years of programming. This
~ the program features an
^winning film, and the
*roic, young woman who
Produced. filmed and por-
m herself in it.
ana, Mom and Me" is a film
l of three generations of
fen by Amalie R. Rothschild.
^Kothschild. who resides in
rrk, is a director, lecturer,
"p-apher who has received
Pnw acclaim for her films.
Mime participants will join
lothschild and three guest
J"wtors to explore and discuss
Lffljj^ntissues as identity.
Amalie Rothschild
heritage, achievement, expecta-
tions, role models, and
relationships.
Guest Facilitators scheduled
:: Dale Johnson, Aging Services
are
Coordinator, Tampa Jewish fami-
ly Services; Jane Rosen-Grandon,
licensed marriage and family
therapist. Discovery Institute;
and Cindy Levinson Novick, PhD,
licensed marriage-family
therapist, in private practice since
1975.
The evening program, spon-
sored by the Business and Profes-
Continued on Page 11








Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, October 18, 1985
I

S
r
9
By Amy Scherzer
Adrianne Sundheim
Caryn Perkins
A votre sante. Congratulations to Adrianne Sundheim, chair-
man of the Health Council of West Central Florida, on her recent
election to President of the Statewide Health Council of Florida.
She'll head up this group composed of the chairmen of the 11 local
health-councils, plus six government-appointees. Together the
Council will govern all health policy matters in the state, and very
importantly, will promote public education and awareness of
health resources. Adrianne is past president of Florida Gulf
Health Systems Agency and is presently serving on the HRS
Task Force on Certificate of Need. She is married to Rabbi Frank
Sundheim. ____
Across the Bay. Caryn Perkins has been named the first Pro-
gram Coordinator of the Kent Jewish Community Center in
Clearwater. Previously, she worked as Youth Director at Con-
gregation Kol Ami and served as advisor to Tampa B'nai B'rith
Girls. Caryn has a BA degree in Criminal Justice and a Master's
in Guidance and Counseling from USF. Her primary goal at Kent
is to develop children, youth and family programs.
Yale Fellowship underway. Dr. Jana Snlzer, daughter of
David and Rita Snlzer is doing fellowship in Nuclear Medicine at
Yale-New Haven Hospital where she has been appointed Chief
Resident. A graduate of Vanderbilt University School of
Medicine, Jana is a board-certified radiologist.
ORTista convene. Next week, more than 1,200 delegates from
every part of the U.S. will reaffirm their support for ORT's global
network of vocational and technical education at the 128th Bien-
nial National Convention of Women's American ORT. Arlene
Lane, president of the Tampa Bay Region, will head a local
delegation of eight women, including Gail Reiss (Mrs. Robert)
and Ruth Klein (Mrs. Morton). The convention agenda includes
a roster of experts from around the world to discuss issues which
affect the viability of Jewish life everywere.
Speaking of ORT, the Tampa Evening Chapter of ORT held a
fun and delicious Progressive Dinner on Oct. 5. "Some Hawaiian
Evening" was the theme, starting with hors d'ouevres hosted by
Mitch and Karen Bentley. Then it was aloha to dinner at Gail
and Andy Titen's, Jan and Jeff Bloom's, Sandy and Jay
Krasne's or Edie and Gary Radloffs. Everyone regrouped for
dessert at Debbie and Steve Gitomer's beautiful new home.
Pineapples, cool breezes, good company everyone agreed it
was a wonderful evening.
Holiday visitors. Frieda Scott had daughter Sgt. Lisa
Bolland, her husband M/Sgt. Paul Bolland and grandchildren
Samantha Ann and Tammi visit during the holidays last month.
Grandmother (and great-grandmother) Rebecca Haimovitz join-
ed in the family festivities, too. The Hollands live in Maguire Air
Force Base in Wrightstown, New Jersey.
Weber Family addition and relocation. The newest Weber is
Matthew Jason Weber, born Sept. 20 to Fran and Lewis Weber
in Sarasota. He weighed in at 8 pounds, 6 ounces, measuring 22
inches, according to his proud grandparents, Paula and Dick
Weber. Matthew's other grandparents are Beverly and Ray
Broth of Sarasota; his great-grandmothers are Fat Nadell of
North Miami Beach and Dorothy Broth in Coral Springs.
His Aunt Mona, daughter of Paula and D\ck, and her husband
Barry Kaplan, son of Leda and Roy Kaplan, have moved to Fort
Lauderdale where Barry will be Admissions Counselor and head
soccer coach at Nova University. Mazol tov to the whole family.
We welcome Dena Gruman ... or maybe we should say
welcome back, as she was a Tampan some 20 years ago. Dena has
four degrees, including a PhD from the University of Georgia in
education with an emphasis on deaf-blind multiple handicapped
children. Her company, Gruman and Associates, puts on
workshops and in-service programs for institutionalized and de-
institutionalized retardates all over the country. Three months
ago, Dena started the Bay Winds Learning Center to offer 80
short courses for busy people in a wide variety of subjects, such as
business and careers, family and personal growth, sports and^
recreation, computers, cuisine, language and creative arts.
Among her favorite topics are Team Trivial Pursuit for singles
and deep-sea fishing for women. Dena has two daughters, Debra
Adeeb of Tampa and Beth in Kansas. Welcome and good luck in
your new ventures.
jr
Women's Division and Maas Brothers, of
course! Last week, the Ruby Division of the
Tampa Jewish Federation Women '$ Division
held a fashion show, hosted by Mass Brothers
at its Westshore Plaza location. Over 50
women attended the 1986 Campaign Ruby
Division event. Pictured are: Jolene Shor,
president; Anita Hershem, guest speaker;
Ricki Freeman, president and designer of
Tern Jon Designer Clothes; Nndine Feldna
co-chairwoman of the Ruby Division- AU
Weissman, 1986 co-chairwoman of the m
campaign; Debra Linsky, c<>-chn>rwnm
the Ruby Division; and Rhoda Davit dima,
of the Women's Division. The eventraS,
total of $16,000for the 1986 Women's Div
Campaign.
Let The
Tampa Airport Marriott
Cater To
Y)ur Every Need.
Our professional staff, attentive service and gracious
accommodations will make a success of your Wedding,
Bar Mitzvah, Banquet, Business Meeting or Reunion.
We also provide outside catering services. See our Catering
Department for information or please call 879-5151.
TAMPA
AIRPORT
Harriott
JEWELERS
invites you to a
"gala fashion preview"
featuring contemporary
gold and diamond jewelry
by top designers,
and a special presentation
of gold chains by "Aurafin"
40-50% off entire inventory
one day only!
Saturday October nineteenth
ten a.m. to five pm.
village square west
. 11606 n. dale mabry
wine and cheesecake
our anniversary sale will continue
on a limited basis for the following two weeks


Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 3
Jolene Shor
President
Alice Rosenthal
Vice President
Campaign
Aida Weissman
Vice President
Campaign
Ann Rudolph
Vice President
Community Education
Betty Shalett
Vice President
Special Projects
Deborah Eisenstadt
Vice President
usiness and Professional
Women's Network
Ellen Stern
Secretary


Meet Your Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division Officers
Jolene Shor heads up an im-
fcessive group jn the Jewish com-
munity of Tampa! The Women's
pvision, a year 'round viable arm
the Tampa Jewish Federation
romotes the philanthropic and
lumanitarian efforts of the
federation through programs of
duration and volunteer activity.
'he satisfaction experienced by
i members of Women's Division
in be evidenced by family par-
cipation in campaign and the
immunity. Women's Division is a
rogram with regularly scheduled
^ents, lx>th social and educa-
nal, with staff and volunteers
follow-up. The following are
reas that are on-going: the Board
Directors, representing the
ewish immunity, totals 60
Ners; the Executive Board
Ms 22 women; the Campaign
^ eight different giving levels,
a Campaign Cabinet of
ders. along with hundreds and
undreds of volunteers. On-going
rojects sponsored are the Com-
munity Calendar, Annual Plea for
Wiet Jewry, Shalom-Tampa,
women's Wednesday" Educa-
|on Day, Mini Missions,
Maker's Bureau, Jewish
FjKnesa programs and coffees,
Oership programs, Endowment
"grams, and during the cam-
ugn period, many campaign
PKation programs and fundrais-
'!tS.
l,,nn[i nominated for key
p positions by their peers
ive proven themselves to the
pnmunity and to Women's Divi-
resident Jolene Shor
Ifwted as her theme this year,
on, the place to be
"s year's officers of the
|<"nen s Division are outstan-
W wadera of the community.
|lei* Shor, as president of
f"'^ Division, has the
position humor, willingness,
** fairness, and love for her
community to lead her officers
and Board of Directors to do the
best job possible for the women in
our community.
Alice Rosenthal and Aida
Weissman have been involved in
campaign for several years, both
having served as chairmen of
various divisions they bring
knowledge and dedication to the
community in their fundraising
efforts.
Ann Rudolph and Betty Shalett
have previously served the Board
of Directors and campaign;
Rudolph this year is in charge of
Community Education, which in-
cludes the annual "Women's
Wednesday," scheduled for Oct.
30 and a spring education day is
planned. Shalett as vice president
of Special Projects brings ex-
perience and organizational
abilities to the board. These pro-
jects are the Annual Plea for
Soviet Jewry community obser-
vance, scheduled for Dec. 12; the
recent Shalom-Tampa Newcomer
party, and the Community Calen-
dar project.
Deborah Eisenstadt, CPA and
tax accountant with Laventhol
and Horwath, is a vice president
of the Business and Professional
Women's Network and is presi-
dent of that organization which
meets monthly.
Ellen Stern, secretary to the
Board of Directors, has been ac-
tively involved in Campaign, as
well as other projects and has
served on the Board of Directors
in past years.
The Officers and Board of
Directors personally invite every
woman in the Tampa Jewish com-
munity to be an active member,
participate in community events,
attend socials and educational ses-
sions and projects, all it takes is a
phone call and attendance, we
need and want YOU.
(Left to right) Bert Green, Bernice Hanick, Jack Feiles, Peggy
Feiles, Lois Stone and Milton Stone.
Women's Division Hosts
Shalom-Newcomer Party
The recent Shalom-Newcomer
get-together, hosted by the Tam-
pa Jewish Federation Women's
Division, and chaired by Trudy
Harris and Harriet Seelig was an
overwhelming success both in
attendance, and enthusiasm. Bet-
ty Shalett, Vice President of
Special Projects and a large com-
mittee which included represen-
tatives from the various Jewish
organizations, and Women's Divi-
sion Board members invited as
many newcomers to Tampa as
they could find names for to the
fall gathering. This semi-annual
event has grown from a small get-
together in various homes to large
recreation centers of various con-
dominiums. The story is still the
same, we are here to welcome you
and help you find your way in your
new city.
USY members from Congregation Kol Ami began the evening
with a Havdalah service. (Left to right) Naomi Sobel, Jeff Fox,
Neil Shaw and Lisa Stevens.
Playing Jewish geography
were (left to right) Harriet
Seelig, Jack Heller and Judy
Heller.
Rachel Alhadeff, Hilda Saragossi,
Feldman and Sal Alhadeff.
Marty Feldman, Dorit


.-.-.v-
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, October 18, 1985
Cramer and Qr^ Richard Hodes.
Young Adult Division
Brunch Huge Success
Deborah Albert, Mike Charme, Diane Charme, Herb Swarzman and Lee Tobin.
The Young Adult Division of
the Tampa Jewish Federation
recently hosted a successful
brunch at the Guest Quarters
Hotel. Over 80 people attended
and they had an opportunity to
mingle and learn about the Jewish
perspectives of American politics
from the featured speakers, Herb
Swarzman and Dr. Richard
Hodes. Andy Titen, President of
the Young Adult Division, com-
mented that both individuals, who
are activists on behalf of Jewish
concerns, stimulated the audience
to explore their own attitudes
towards the political process.
Mark Carron, Co-chairman of the
brunch, also said that the presen-
tation was certainly a catalyst to
motivate Jews to take more
responsibility as a political PAC.
The Young Adult Division,
recently created under the rubrick
of the Tampa Jewish Federation,
will continue to provide on-going
educational forums. YAD sn-
courages all individuals between
25-40 to attend these functions
since Andy Titen said so eloquent-
ly, "the future of Jewish leader-
ship in Tampa lies in our hands
and we must accept that
challenge."
Isolated Jewish Community
Barrie Gottfried, Shari Stupp, Steve
Zweiback, Lori Ann Haubenstock, Dick
Myers, Nancy Jacobs, Marianne Fisher and
Mark Carron.
Bounces Back From Holocaust With Foundation Aid
NEW YORK The dramatic
story of how an isolated European
Jewish community, without a rab-
bi for more than 20 years, bounc-
ed back from the Holocaust with
the aid of the Memorial Founda-
tion for Jewish Culture and the
local community, came to light
recently.
From 1958 to 1980, Oslo, Nor-
way, functioned without a rabbi.
It fell upon Michael Melchior, the
eldest son of a Danish family coun-
ting six generations of rabbis, to
rekindle Jewish life in one of
world Jewry's loneliest outposts.
Trained in Israel with the help
of the Fondation and the Oslo
community, Rabbi Melchior open-
ed the first kindergarten in Oslo
since the Holocaust and revitaliz-
ed the afternoon schools, which
teach children from seven through
18. In 1979, there were 39
children receiving religious in-
struction at the Jewish Communi-
ty Center in Oslo. The number for
1985 is 68.
Rabbi Melchior has reactivated
the youth groups. Teenagers
study Jewish history, Zionism and
religious texts. More than 80 per-
cent of all Jewish youth are now
being reached.
Herman Kahan, Vice President
of the Oslo Jewish Community,
describes one way in which Rabbi
Melchior works with children:
"Expectant faces wait every
Friday for the weekly appearance
of 'Michael,' as they call him. One
week, he appears as a pirate; the
next, an expectant mother. His
imaginative disguises inspire the
children to listen to his words and
appreciate Shabbat as something
very special. And special it is for
the children who bake challah, say
kiddush and light the Shabbat
candles every week. Basic
elements of Hebrew are taught in
the Jewish kindergarten; and
every 17th of May, the Norwegian
national holiday, the children
march under their own banner in
a children's parade."
Through the children's choir that
Rabbi Melchior initiated, he has
also brought new life and increas-
ed attendance at the synagogue,
bringing into the synagogue's or-
bit much of the community's
youth and many young couples as
well.
Adult education has also been a
focus of Rabbi Melchior. A large
number of workshops have been
organized under his leadership
with study groups in Pirkey Avot,
Jewish thought, and Jewish
holidays. Rabbi Melchior's wife,
Hannah, has taught classes for
potential converts.
Rabbi Melchior was instrumen-
tal in establishing the "Kosher
Food Center": a grocery which at
eJewish Floridian
Of Tampa
Buain
FRKOK SHOCHET
i Office mm Horatio Hint. Tanya. Fla 3MO*
Tiliphum 1172-4470
Pubueauon Offica 120 nF. 6 St Miami Fla 33132
SUZANNi; SHOCHET AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
Kaaculive Editor Ediim
frta1 Ifl.CfHf
TW Jewtea Ftoriaaaa Oaaa Nat Gaaraatae The kaeanta
Of TW Mirra.al.i A.erl-a la It. ( .
I Bi Weekly by Tha Jewiah Floridian of Tampa
Saraad Claaa Poetage Paid at Miami. Fla U8P8 471-910
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The Jewiah Floridian maintain- no free lurt People receiving the paper ho ha\r not *rrihr directly are wbacnber* through arrangement with the Jewiah Federation of Tampa ahwelll
per year i* deducted from their tontrihution* for a turncription to the paper Anyone wi-hing in
. jm el uch a wharriptmn should M notilv TheJewmh Floridian or The Federation
Friday, October 18, 1985
Volume 7
3 HESHVAN 5746
Number 21
the time of its opening in
November 1981 had the largest
selection of kosher foods in
Europe.
Since 1982, the Kosher Food
Center has provided food amoun-
ting to $30,000 each year to the
Jews in Poland. This enterprise
has come about thanks to an
agreement with Norway's Church
Relief Society (Kirkensnodhjelp).
In addressing the larger con-
cerns of the Jewish community,
Rabbi Melchior interprets
Judaism and the Jewish communi-
ty to the Christian community
through regular contacts with
churches, universities, schools and
service groups.
One of Rabbi Melchior's
greatest achievements is the crea-
tion of the Norwegian Council of
Soviet Jewry, in which he serves
as Co-Chairman with Christopher
Gjotterud, Professor of Physics at
the University of Oslo. The Coun-
cil has been very successful in
raising the issue of Soviet Jewry
at the highest level of government
in Norway.
At the end of this year, Rabbi
Melchior will make Aliyah. The
Oslo Jewish leaders have come up
with a plan which will be put into
action next year.
Rabbi Melchior will commit
himself to reside in Oslo for four
months of every year including
the High Holy Days and will
receive a salary which covers his
year's expenses. This solution will
enable him to continue his studies
in Israel the rest of the year.
The help that the Memorial
Foundation for Jewish Culture
has provided Rabbi Melchior is in
line with the emphasis the Foun-
dation is placing on service to
dispersed Jewish communities
communities that are isolated
both from Jewish life and from
other Jewish community
Rabbi Michael Melchior, trained in Israel with the kelp /*
Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture and the Oslo Jw
Community, helps little girls in lighting Shabbat candles and*J
ing the blessings. Rabbi Melchoir has revitalized Jewish ty|
08to, which had been without a rabbi for more than 10 j/wrt
Readers Write
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I write this letter on behalf of
the recipients of the Jewish Com-
munity Food Bank.
The Food Bank's funds were
completely depleted in recent
months. There were over 50
families receiving weekly
deliveries who were in jeopardy of
being cut off from this vital week-
ly food supplement. However due
to the efforts of the entire com-
munity the Rabbis, who spoke
eloquently from their pulpits
the individuals who graciously
wrote generous checks, and all
who brought cans of food the
Food Bank is once again solvent
and able to continue.
The volunteers who weekly give
of their time, their gas, their
hearts and strong backs
without whom this project would
not be possible, deserve a special
recognition for their devotion:
Elaine Baach, Aviva Berger,
Trudy Brinen, Freda Brod, San
dra Gander, Rita Garyn, Greg
Goldman, Joe Gordon, Helen Har
rison, Rhoda Jenkins, Sy Kessler,
Lillian Kolsky. Toby Krawitz.
Laura Lu, Nancy Mizrachi, Bsj
Mulhan, Vera Young Munj
Esther Neibauer, Lou 0W*
Mike Pedrinan. Jerry and Mm*
Posner. Elizabeth RappP
Louis Rappaport CUre tog
Judy Rothburd, Dr. WJ|
Schwartz, Leo Sider, Jan SJ*
man, Linda Stirling, Loa
Witner. Dr. Walter Woof *
Hanna and David Zohar.
Anyone in the communi^
is in need of food shouldljjj
Tampa Jewish Family ServTCj*
261-0083 for information W**
the program.
People interested in worjrijj ,
the Food Bank on W*gJ|
mornings should call 259-1125"
more information.
It has been a privilege to W,
served the community
Chairperson of the '*"* <5
munitV Food Bank AjJJj
three years. I am P^fci]
gratified to see the support
has been forthcoming i*ri
ill again. -
BARBARA ALA;


Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5
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VWre Celebrating 5746 With Our First Flights
Starting October 30.
<^
pan Am is proud to introduce new service to
1 Aviv. And it's really something to celebrate,
cause we're offering incredibly low
poductory fares. Plus the convenience of
n8 five days a week from JFK. We're even
^'ng kosher meals for those who wish them.
^nK; not all.
Two Exciting Tours Are More Reason to
f'ebrate.
See the spectacular beauty and rich history of
"Jsalem, Haifa, Massada and more. Pan Am's
Tel Aviv
34950
Based on Roundtrip Purchase.
two 9-day tours from $432-$525 make it all so
easy. For more information on Pan Am Holiday
No. 448, call your Travel Agent or Pan Am in
Miami at (305) 874-5000, in Ft. Lauderdale/
Hollywood at (305) 462-6600, and in other areas
calll-800-221-lHl.
Fare requires a 7 day advance purchase, with a minimum stay of 7 days
and a maximum stay of 21 days Introductory airfare is effective 10730/85
thru 12/15/85, is suh|ect to government approval, and does not include a
$3 departure tax. Fare Code: BRINT. Schedule subject to change without
notice* IVr person, based on double occupancy, excluding airfare.
i Rin Am. You Cant Beat The Experience.*


Page~6 ^he Jewish FlondianW Ta^a/Friday, October 18, 1985
Closer Look
%tu* ~:i--
Jewish-Catholic relations
I
A dialogue
In commemoration of the 20th anniversary, Oct. 28, of
Vatican Council II's document on interreligious relations,
"Nostra Aetate," The Florida Catholic, The Jewish Flori-
dian of Pinellas County, The Jewish Floridlan of Tampa
and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith have
worked with leaders of the Catholic and Jewish com-
munities to prepare these two pages of Catholic-Jewish
dialogue.
We are grateful to the Jewish and Catholic writers who
have so generously shared their expertise on the topics
asked of them in this project.
These articles are not meant to answer all questions in
continuing relations between the two faith communities
but rather to raise points of dialogue. It must be
understood that in the beginning stages of discussion, each
side's perception of reality is very different. It is in ar-
ticulating these perceptions and in listening to the other's
perceptions that progress toward understanding is achiev-
ed. It is the purpose of this forum to present divergent
views with the hope that an increased knowledge of one
another will be a step toward the ideals of "mutual har-
mony and esteem" set forth in the "Nostra Aetate"
declaration.
Why no Vaticai
with State of I
By Father Jerome Vereb, CP
Special Writer
VENICE A recent statement by
American ambassador to the Vatican,
William Wilson, highlighted the dialogue
between religion and diplomacy:
"Religion is a constant in the world of in-
ternational affairs because it is a constant
in the lives of men and women."
Mr. Wilson cited the examples of
religious motives as factors of diplomatic
exchange in the countries of Central and
South America, Northern Ireland, and
Iran. He did not mention what is perhaps
the most vivid of all 20th century in-
stances, that of Israel, the Middle
Eastern,nation which has stood for the
vitality of Jewish tradition in history. No
other country dramatizes more the need
to examine the place of religion in the
dialogue between nations in the post-
nuclear age.
Since the time of Vatican Council II, the
Roman Catholic Church has dealt with in-
ternational Jewish organizations and af-
fairs primarily througl its Commission
for Religious Relations with the Jews.
Headed by Cardinal Willebrands of the
Vatican Secretariat for Promoting Chris-
tian Unity, the daily business is conducted
by Argentinian Msgr. Jorge Mejia.
Msgr. Mejia stated that the Jewish af-
fairs are not limited to the State of Israel,
but that they might involve cases of anti-
Semitism in both Eastern Europe or the
United States. However, in general
Israel, despite claims to a secular style m
government, is viewed as the focal point
Father Jerome Vereb. CP
vicar general, chancellor
and ecumenical officer for
the Diocese of Venice in
Florida, is adjunct professor
of ecumenical theology at
St John Vianney College
Seminary. Miami and chair-
man. Florida Dialogue Bet-
ween Roman Catholics and
Baptists
of internatit.
If this is thee
no Catholic i
Since the i
1917. the Vatu
in the religion]
region then i
cent instance^
VI, haveexpt,
nationalizati
Jerusalem.
state of Israel]
fact enjoyed L
leadership oil
tions have i
usual cou
fered to V_
visiting in thej
The Vaticatil
Israeli primei
the approach t
See has chotatj
entire Middle I
tempt to resp
ty to the vi
Hence therein
bassadors
Jerusalem. It I
Catholic official
tion. whilenotq
present time i
exchange
region.
Israeli official
press an
Vatican policjJ
recognize the |
religious relati
document,
"our age'of'
the spiritual |
tians and Jewii
Synod wishes I
that mutual
which is the f
theological
dialogues."
When inter
that this pr
Catholic reL
changes with I
always the poi*<
Catholic theology must deal with reality of Israel
By Rabbi Ira S. Youdovin
Special writer
Twenty years after the publication of
"Nostra Aetate," the Vatican's policies
toward Israel remain a thorn in Jewish-
Catholic relations.
Jews are both puzzled and somewhat
angered by the Church's refusal to
establish full diplomatic relations with
the Jewish State, its ambiguous position
on Jewish rights in a united Jerusalem,
and its apparent softness of PLO ter-
rorism against Jewish civilians.
At a time of celebration, it might be
tempting to sweep this tension under the
rug. But evasion rarely accomplishes
anything good.
In 1967, as Jews and Catholics were still
basking in the warm afterglow of Vatican
II, dialogue almost died a-borning when
the Church remained silent in the face of
Arab genocidal threats against Israel,
reminding both Jews and Catholics that
the consequences of Vatican passivity
during the Holocaust could not be over-
come by the mere publication of a docu-
ment, no matter how helpful that docu-
ment might be and that it was
dangerously naive to think so.
But because Israel is a living reality, as
contrasted with the theological abstrac-
tions that are the substance of much
ecumenical dialogue, it has compelled
both parties to this dialogue to take a
closer, more realistic ..look at one
another. The results have been
gratifying.
Jews, for their part, have come to ap-
preciate the awesome political respon-
sibilty the pope faces as leader of a multi-
national polity which includes millions of
men, women and children living under
rj
it
Rabbi Ira Youdovin has
been a leader of the Reform
Movement as the executive
director of Association of
Reform Zionists of America
Currently ne serves Temple
Beth-i m St Petersburg
the potential threat of radical Arab ter-
rorism. While this cannot justify a papal
meeting with Yasir Arafat, it does help
soften Jewish disappointment over
aspects of the Vatican's Middle East
policy.
The Church has also responded
creatively. The 1975 "Guidelines and Sug-
gestions for Implementing Nostra
Aetate" urged Catholics to "strive to
learn by what essential traits Jews define
themselves in the light of their own
religious experience." In other words, to
understand the Jewish People's historic,
religious and emotional ties to Israel, and
to include these as a religious category in
the dialogue.
What lies ahead? Ironically (but
significantly), the Jewish perspective is
best articulated by a Catholic, the Rev.
Edward H. Flannery, who described
Israel as the "litmus test" in Jewish-
Catholic relations, challenging Catholics
to deal with the reality of a revitalized
Jewish People returning in strength to its
Homeland. Needless to say, this has enor-
mous implications for classic Christian
theology.
For M
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Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
1
| concern.
f is there
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Wrested
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rines in
of the
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100
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okesper-
of the
Ideals with
pi, 1985
120 Years
Relations ."
"sm, and
I toe West
tarnation
Bt. Suite
II 50 per
it
All peoples
comprise a single
community, and have
a single origin, since
God had the whole
race of men dwell
over the entire face
of the earth. One
also is their final
goal: God."
"Nostra Aetate." 1.
mm
Centuries of antagonism
What are implications
of 20 years of dialogue?
By Rabbi Jacob Luskl
Special Writer
Twenty years ago, in October of 1965,
Vatican Council II spent three years of
deliberations discussing the momentous
issues facing humankind and their
Church. To guide the Church toward the
future, they framed inspired documents,
committing Catholics to work for freedom
of belief, human rights, and universal
peace and justice. Emphasizing the
potential for a positive engagement with a
troubled world, the Church opened herself
to dialogue with all human communities.
Vatican Council II stirred the hopes not
only of Catholics but of persons of good
will the world over, for this was a unique
movement of spiritual and moral
renewal.
Among those to whom the Church ex-
, tended a hand of friendship were the
Jews. After nearly 20 centuries of tragic
antagonism, the bishops forcefully
repudiated the false teachings of anti-
Semitism and expressed appreciation for
the spiritual riches of the Jewish tradi-
tion. On Oct. 28, 1965, in the declaration,
"Nostra Aetate" ("In Our Age..."), the
Church proclaimed:
"Since the spiritual patrimony common
to Christians and Jews is then so rich, the
Council wishes to foster and commend
mutual harmony and esteem. This will be
the fruit above all, of biblical and
theological studies and of brotherly
dialogues."
The declaration set the Church on a new
course. Tested by these succeeding 20
years, the declaration has inspired more
progress in Jewish-Catholic relations,
more "mutual harmony and esteem"
than was possible in the preceding 20
centuries.
What "Nostra Aetate" brought about 20
years ago continues to transmit messages
of openness and of understanding and of
community. The signals grow stronger,
year by year, stronger and clearer,
despite lingering prejudice, terrorism
and our troubled memories.
It seems that 2,000 years of alienation,
the Holocaust, the birth of the State of
Israel, and 20 years of reflection were
needed to turn Catholic-Jewish relations
in the right direction. In 1975, the
"Guidelines and Suggestions for Im-
plementing the Conciliar Declaration
Nostra Aetate" were adopted. Another 10
years have passed and with great interest
we read of the forthcoming synod of the
Church, called on the 20th anniversary of
Vatican II. Who knows? Perhaps
Catholic-Jewish relations will also find
their place in the larger ecumenical
framework. It seems that every decade
further progress is made. That is not too
bad if we think that our previous en-
counters or absence of them were counted
in millennia.
The results of years of study, action,
mutual understanding and cooperation
among religious leaders, writers,
theologians, clergymen and lay people in
these 20 years are impressive. Yet I ask:
Have we done enough? Have we moved in
the right direction? Our efforts need to be
intensified as we seek new avenues of rap-
prochement, new ways to deepen
theological discussions in order to
enhance our respective religious
heritages, and to find new ways to
commnicate.
As children of the same God, as in-
heritors of the same biblical faith, we call
out to each other and ask, "Where are
you?" The world about us is dark.
Disaster, destruction, tyranny, brutality:
these have been and continue to be the
symptoms of our time. We need to bridge
the gap between the words we preach and
the lives that we live.-We can all be saved
as long as our dialogue with God becomes
conversation with each other.
I commend to the broader community
of Catholics and Jews these ideals of
dialogue and respect. May our pursuit of
mutual understanding and cooperation be
an inspiration to the members of every
human community.
Rabbi Jacob Luski. rabbi -* r^.
ol Congregation B'nai Israel ^r ^%
(or eight years, is an officer k Jk
of the Southeast Regional ^ V%
Rabbinical Assembly and a ^ rv
board memer of the Jewish t
Federation of Pinellas Coun- i
ty and the National Con- ^^
ference of Christians and r^^^~
Jews p *x
'Nostra Aetate' good fruits, but slow to take root
By Father Harold B. Bum pus
Special writer
The declaration on the relationship of
the Catholic Church to non-Christian
religions ("Nostra Aetate"), framed by
Vatican Council II iq October of 1965, has
served us now for 20 years. It stands as a
milestone in interfaith understanding and
activity, because it states in a formal and
permanent way the attitudes and stance
of the Catholic Church toward non-
Christian religions.
Nearly half of this document is given
over to a statement on Jewish-Christian
relations. Two thousand years of very bad
relations between Christians and Jews,
usually initiated by Christians, indicate
the necessity for this document.
The good fruits that have been reaped
from this statement are threefold:
1) A strong revulsion against bigotry,
prejudice, and hate cloaked in religious
language;
2) A better understanding of the
historical roots of Christianity in contem-
porary Judaism; and
3) The beginnings of shared prayer of
thanks and praise, and the beginning of
regular dialogue that leads to mutual
understanding, replacing the old
polemics that separated and injured all
parties. The beginning of a free discus-
sion has led to the publication of several
series of books aqd articles on Jewish-
Christian relationships, all of excellent
quality in the "Stimulus" series, and all
of them contributing insights into our
common history.
Jews and Catholics are able to meet on
stable and unshifting ground for discus-
sion and service.
On the negative side, interaction and
dialogue have taken off to a very slow
start. While historical studies and
theological reflection have much to offer,
and good joint programs such as those
sponsored by the National Conference of
The Rev Dr Harold B
Bumpus is director of
ecumenical and inter-church
affairs for the Catholic
Diocese of Si Petersburg
Florida and directs the
diocesan School of Pastoral
Studies and the Catholic Stu-
dent Center University ol
South Florida
Christians and Jews have given a
strong impetus to discussion, not enough
work has been done and not enough in-
terest and concern have been generated.
A reasonable mechanism does not yet ex-
ist for fostering continuing dialogue and
for sustaining interest. Catholic education
on the grass roots level, although distanc-
ing itself from hate and bigotry, does not
make an adequate effort to present real,
living Judaism to its learners. At the rate
we are going, Judaism is still going to be
the great unknown to the next generation.
While bigotry has diminished to a
phenomenal degree, but still lurks in dark
places, inertia is still with us and exer-
cises its crippling impact daily. Where
Christians and Jews are historically
separated, there is little interest in in-
vestigating each other. Inertia invites us
to let the unknown remain unknown.
In brief, what was achieved at Vatican
II, as monumental and inspiring as it was,
has not yet found its way into ordinary life
to anywhere near the degree it ought. We
need to build fires under ourselves and
our colleagues to inspire us so that the in-
ertia we all experience will be overcome
.and the ideals and dreams of Vatican
Council II can take fuller shape in the af-
fairs of men and women.


^uM^-
iiiiiii
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, October 18, 1985
'In-Service To Tampa'
By ELLIOTT GREENBAUM
Board Member
Tampa Jewish Family
Services
A new season has begun for the
various Jewish agencies of Tam-
pa. The volunteer board members
<>f Tampa Jewish Family Services
are busy organizing to reach out
to the community. Our president.
Sam Reiner, has established our
goals for the year, and new com-
mittee assignments have been
made. We have eight new board
members.
Unlike other agencies, the staff
of Tampa Jewish Family Services
cannot schedule its workload ac-
cording to the seasons. The needs
of our growing community and of
our individual clients continue
throughout the year. Our family
life education programs are ongo-
ing and address problems related
to preschoolers, teens and senior
citizens. Our staff of social
workers is trained and ready to
assist when crises occur, whether
due to economic setback, personal
tragedy, family life cycle events,
or dealing with the stress, strain
and upsets of daily living.
Anyone who would like to serve
on one of our committees or feels
that there are additional services
we should l>e offering, is invited to
contact our office or any Tampa
Jewish Family Service board
member.
Continuing on our board from
previous years arc: Sam Knlx-r
(president). Audrey llaubenstock
(vice president), Ronna Fox
(secretary), Jacob (Bookie)
Buchman (treasurer). Charles
Weissman (parliamentarian), Bar-
bara Alter, Jack Begelman,
Jeremy Gluckman, Elliott Creen-
baum, Kay Jacobs, Mimi Kehoe.
Gil Kushner. Blossom Leibowitz.
Lyn Meyerson, Karen Schulman.
Stephen Segall. Sheila Shaw,
(ioldie Shear, Abe Sibler and
Elaine Viders.
Newcomers to our board are:
Neil Fabricant, Lynn Kaplan.
Toby Krawitz, Kalman Pila,
Debra Roth, Allan Sterling.
Miriam Zack and Paula Zielonka.
We look forward to the par-
ticipation of our new members,
who we hope will add to the
dynamic growth and scope of the
agency as it reaches out to the
community.
At a recent dinner-dance. Sen. Paula
Hawkins received the JNF's highest tribute
the "Tree of Life" award. Over 200 guests at-
tended the gala reception. The monies received
from the function will go to plant a Parkland
of 6,000 trees in the American Independence
Park near Jerusalem. Pictured left to right
are Stewart Turley, Dinner Co-chairman,
Jack Eckerd Corp.; Col. ArieShacham, Keren
Kayemeth Leisrael Emissary; Sen. Hawkins;
Yehoshua Trigor, Consul General of Israel;
Herbert Swarzman, Dinner Co-chairman,
Gulf Coast Realty Investors, Inc.; George Kar-
pay. Dinner Co-chairman, Centex-Karpay.
Photo: Audrey Haubenstock.
Israeli Pianist To Give Benefit Recital
Pianist Issak Tavior will give a
recital on Sunday, Nov. 17 at 7:30
p.m. in the Margaret Heye Room
at Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater,
to benefit the Jewish National
Fund. In addition to the recital,
there will also be a very special
"dessert with the artist" for
friends, patrons and benefactors.
A native and resident of Israel,
Tavior received his Artists
Diploma from Tel Aviv Music
Academy and furthered his
studies in Geneva and London.
Tavior has performed extensively
in Europe and Israel and has been
met with considerable critical ;ip-
claim. Hil "extraordinary rminca!
technique" and. "outstanding vir-
tuoso talent" are frequently men-
tioned in the European press.
Tavior made his U.S. debut in Oc-
tober of 1982.
Tavior received a "personal" in-
vitation to perform when a group
of 49 Tampa Bay residents were
touring Israel last April on a
Jewish National Fund Mission.
The group heard Tavior perform
in his studio in the Galilee, and in
vited him to come to the Tampa
Bay area for a concert.
"It is an understatement to say
that we are excited that this inter-
nationally acclaimed artist has
agreed to come to our area for a
performance,," said Judy Levitt,
JNF Cultural Representative. For
ticket information, please call the
JNF office in Tampa at 988-8788.
Seating for the concert is limited
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
*?
MISS JACKIE critically-
acclaimed children's music
specialist will be presenting a
special bed-time performance
at the Jewish Community
Center on Oct. 19. A 6 p.m. per-
formance will be for preschool
families, a 7:30 performance
for grade schoolers. Attend
either or both. Tickets are $10 a
family at the door. A MUST!
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
nk Hum. w Iim< B M
NASD
18 East 48th Street
ritii New York. N.Y. 10017
securities (212)7591310
'lion Toll Free (800) 221-4838
Five Jewish theological student-seminarians are
representatives of JWB's Commission on Jewish Ckaij
the Naval Chaplain School in Newport, R j
seminarians received eight weeks of basic chaplaincy iLi
From left to right: Rabbi Barry Hewitt Greene, Short Kb!
Chairman, JWB's Chaplaincy Commission; Chaplain A j
Rimicoff, LCDR, Providence, R.I., who is Naval War College; Ensign Martin J. Pasternack, iS?1
ty, seminarian at Jewish Theological Seminar*-
Richard Baroff (Easton, Conn.), Julie S. Schwartz and S
Ballaban (Cincinnati, Ohio), all students of //,/,.
< 'nllege-JeunshInstitute of Religion; Rabbi David Lam ru
JWB Chaplaincy Commission; and Ensign Jon (i
Philadelphia, Pa., Reconstructioniit Rabbinical College ft
Julie Schwartz and Steven Ballaban are thi first /iusL.2
,r,(, seminarian team to attend the No ml < 'haplain Sdtolj
Photo.
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A tull service, fully computerized travel agency
$50 per couple discount on any
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We give special attention to you
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We are proud to announce that we ate
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Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 9
inister of Health Mordechai Gur at Cornerstone Laying Ceremony
$12 Million MDA National
Blood Services Center
[AVIV Over 500 ARMDI
es and visitors were seated
iee levelled terrace behind
nation to witness the im-
t and moving cornerstone
Ceremony of the new $12
I MDA National Blood Ser-
knter in Ramat Gan. Key
Twere invited to sign the
Lation scrolls which were
In a time capsule within the
[stone along with the
|lm of the names of the ma-
Eributors to the building of
I facility.
, ultra-modern new blood
[is especially designed to
improved and enlarged
ank collection facilities. It
lipped with the most
sophisticated technology for the
f ractionation of blood into its com-
ponents and its storage. This in-
cludes plasma, packed cells,
albumin, globulin and cryo-
precipitate, all of which will be
available to all the hospitals and
clinics throughout the country. In
addition, laboratories will serve
research projects in such fields as
hepatitis, leukemia, aids and other
blood diseases.
American Red Magen David for
Israel, which has 162 chapters in
the United States, has been re-
quested to raise the major portion
of the $12 Million required to build
and equip the new MDA National
Blood Services Center.
JA Young Leadership
Conference To Be
[Held In Washington
|th National Conference of
I Jewish Appeal will be
the Omni Hotel in
ton D.C., March 2-4.
tiers nation-wide will at-
Jolene Shor and Don
kn, local chairmen for the
{are anticipating a large
pn from Tampa and are
ging everyone to ex-
le this exciting and
program first hand.
(ling to Weinbren, the
on Conference provides
national forum on foreign
destic issues by veteran
on and Middle East
observers and allows an individual
to gain greater political savy
through in-depth discussions.
Shor, a veteran of the Washington
missions assures that it is an ex-
cellent vehicle to make Jews more
sensitive to issues of concern
whereby they become more
responsible decision makers. Shor
also concludes that the conference
is a good time to meet charismatic
leadership from across the U.S.
where generation of new ideas
flows automatically.
For further information, con-
tact Lisa Bush at the Tampa
Jewish Federation at 875-1618.
Spring Holiday In IsraeuRiee!
iselhe mediterranean,
SajlHomeIn
5-PlusSiarLuxurx
iwiihDWar^-ir*
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At the cornerstone-laying ceremony of the new
$12 million MDA National Blood Services
Center in Ramat Gan, (extreme right)
Mordechai Gur, Minister of Health, places
time capsule into the cornerstone of the new
MDA National Blood Services Center. Look-
ing on in front row from left to right are Ben-
jamin Saxe, executive vice president of
American Red Magen David for Israel; Dov
Frenkel, chairman of Magen David Adorn Ex-
ecutive Committee; Eliezer Shostak, former
Health Minister; Prof. Arieh Harell, presi-
dent of MDA; and Stuart A. Jackson, ARMDI
second vice president and treasurer. In the
back rov) from left to right are Chaim Dagan,
director of MDA Blood Collection Program,-
Jack Harris, president of Friends of MDA in
South Africa; David Ross, chairman of
Friends of MDA in Great Britain; and Prof
Dan Michaeli, director general of Israel's
Ministry of Health.


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THAI FRIES
LIKE WESSON.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, October 18, 1985
1985 OCTOBER COMMUNITY CALENDAR
FRIDAY. OCT. 18
8:00 KOL AMI HEBREW LEVEL V SERVICE-NEW MEMBER
SABBATH
SUNDAY. OCT. 20
11: SCHAARAI ZEDEK SeaZFTY MEETING
!: KOL AMI PICNIC AND OLYMPICS
7:30 RODEPH SHOLOM JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
RECEPTION
MONDAY. OCT. 21
10:00 SCHAARAI ZEDEK SISTERHOOD NEW MEMBER COFFEE
4.-00 JEWISH TOWERS BOARD MEETING
7:M KOL AMI ADULT ED
8:00 SCHAARAI ZEDEK BOARD MEETING
TUESDAY. OCT. 22
7:20 SCHAARAI ZEDEK ADULT HEBREW EDUCATION
7:45 HADASSAH AMEET MEMBER MEETING
WEDNESDAY. OCT. 23
*M NAT-L COUNCIL JEWISH WOMEN BOARD MEETING
10:00 JEWISH COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10:00 HADASSAH TAMPA PAID UP MEMBERSHIP LUNCHEON
1:00 TEMPLE DAVID SISTERHOOD GENERAL MEETING
ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE REGIONAL BOARD MEETING
7:30 'TAMPA JEWISH FAMILY SERVICES BOARD MEETING
THURSDAY. OCT. 24
4:00 'TAMPA JEWISH FED. BOARD MEETING
7:30 KOL AMI FELLOWSHIP MEETING
7:50 KOL AMI EXEC BOARD MEETING
FRIDAY. OCT. 25
4.00 SCHAARAI ZEDEK SISTERHOOD SHABBAT DINNER
8:00 RODEPH SHOLOM HIGH SCHOOL IN ISRAEL SHABBAT
SATURDAY. OCT. 20
HOO RODEPH SHOLOM TOGA PARTY FUNDRAISER
TEEN SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
SUNDAY. OCT. 27
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER POOL CLOSES FOR WINTER
:30 'JEWISH WAR VETERANS GENERAL MEETING
9:30'JEWISH WAR VETERANS AUXILIARY GENERAL
MEETING
SCHAARAI ZEDEK SISTERHOOD PATT PROGRAM
7:30 TAMPA JEWISH FED. YOUNG ADULT DIVISION
MONDAY. OCT. 28
10:30 JEWISH TOWERS BOARD MEETING
TUESDAY. OCT. 20
11:00 ORT/BAY HORIZONS CHAPTER GENERAL M
7:30 SCHAARAI ZEDEK ADULT HEBREW EDUCATlJ
WEDNESDAY. OCT. 20
9-1:00 TAMPA JEWISH FED. WOMEN'S Division .
WEDNESDAY" ""0N
1000 'JEWISH COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10:00 RODEPH SHOLOM SISTERHOOD BOARD Mil
5:30-0:00TAMPA JEWISH FED. WOMFNa
"WOMEN'S WEDNESDAY" 8
8:00 RODEPH SHOLOM EXEC. BOARD MEETING
Tone in "The Jewish Sound" WMNF 88 sfw
Sunday's 10:30 -I p.m.
Candlelighting time
October 18 6:38 p.m.
October 25 6:32 p.m.
November 1 5:46 p.m.
Congregations/Organizations Events
CONGREGATION
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Shabbat Dinner
Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood will
host a Shabbat Dinner on Friday.
Oct. 25 at 6:15 p.m. at the Temple.
Seating is limited and reserva-
tions are required by calling the
Temple office at 876-2377. The
catered dinner is $4 for adults and
$3 for children 10 years old and
under.
JEWISH
CONGREGATION
SUN CITY CENTER
Welcomes Rabbi Emeritus
Dr. Ahron Opher
The Jewish Congregation of
Sun City Center is pleased to an-
nounce that Rabbi Emeritus Dr.
Ahron Opher will conduct Sab-
bath services, Friday evening.
Oct. 25, 8 p.m. in the Gold Room
of the United Community Church,
1501 La Jolla Ave., Sun City
Center.
Dr. Opher served as rabbi at
Temple Emanu-El. Sarasota, for
11 years, and was honored recent-
ly on the 50th Anniversary of his
ordination for five decades of
distinguished service to his faith
and community.
The Jewish Congregation of
Sun City Center feels privileged
to have Dr. Opher preside as the
first of the visiting rabbis, in keep-
ing with the newly inaugurated
program of having a rabbi conduct
services one Sabbath evening
each month.
We welcome guests to attend.
Statement of Ownership Management
and Circulation (required by 39 USC
36860: 1 Title of publication: Jewish
Floridian of Tampa. Publication No.
471910. 2 Date of filing: Sept. 30.
1985. 3 Frequency of issue: Bi-Weekly.
A No. of issues published annually: 26.
B Annual subscription price: $3.95. 4
Location of known office of publica-
tion: 2808 Horatio St.. Tampa. Fla.
33609. 5 Location of headquarters of
publishers: 120 N.E. 6 Street. Miami.
Fla. 33132. 6 Publisher, editor, manag
ing editor: Fred K. Shochet. 120 N.E. 6
Street. Miami. Fla. 33132. 7 Owner.
Fred K. Shochet. 120 N.E. 6 Street.
Miami. Fla. 33132. 8 Known bon
dholders. mortgagees and other security
holders holding or owning 1 percent or
more of total amount of bonds, mor-
tgages or other securities, if any: {lone. 9
for completion by non-profit organiza-
tion None. 10 Extent and nature of
circulation, given in this order average
no. copies each issue during preceding 12
months followed by actual no. copies
single issue published nearest to filing
date; A) total no. copies printed (net
press run): 4.388. 4JM; Hi paid circula-
tion: 1 sales through dealers and ear-
ners, street vendors and counter sales. 0.
i. 2 mail subscriptions: 8.901, 4.2K'
total paid circulation: 3.901. 4.282: D)
free distribution by mail, carrier, or other
means, samples, complimentary and
other free copies. 0. 0: E) total distribu-
tion 3.901, 4.282. F) copies not
distributed: 1) office use. left over, unac-
counted for. spoiled after printing, 487.
"> 1M L'l returns from news agents: 0. 0 (i)
Total: 4.388. 4.800. I certify that
ements made by me above are cor-
r t and complete.
... r red K. Shochet. publisher
TAMPA BAY
JEWISH SINGLES
COUNCIL
Join the Tampa Bay Jewish
Singles Council on Oct. 20, from
7:30 to 12 noon at the Bombay
Bicycle Club. 2721 Gulf to Bay
(CLarwater Mall) for Dancing,
Mixirg and Mingling. The Bom-
bay Bicycle Club will be open only
for the TBJS's for the evening. A
D.J. will be provided for your
listening and dancing preasure.
Cost: $5 admission and cash bar.
For more information call: Sandy
at 797-3635 (Pinellas) or Eva at
963-7753 (Hillsborough).
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
Annual Slave Auction
Rodeph Sholom will have its
Annual Slave Auction on Satur-
day, Oct. 26 at 8 p.m. There will
be hors d'oeuvres, desserts and a
cash bar. So, get out your
designer sheets and wrap up
tight. There is a prize for the best
costume. There will be door-prizes
and a drawing for a Trip to Israel.
Each person attending will have a
chance to win one free ticket to be
put in the final drawing for the
trip to Israel. If you have a prize
or service to donate for the auc-
tion please call Bob Failla at
251-4680 or Bob Wolf at
876-8780. Special item: to be
auctioned io a No. 63 Jersey
worn by Leroy Selmon in the
Playoffs, donated by the Bncs
organization. Also, use of a condo
on Redington and Sand Key and
much much more. Be sure to
come, it should be fun.
HADASSAH
Tampa Chapter
To Form Night Group
Membership Coffee
A membership coffee will be
held on Monday evening, Oct. 28,
8 p.m. at the Diplomat Con-
dominiums, 2611 Bayshore Blvd.
Women who are interested in
becoming charter members of this
exciting night group of the Tampa
Chapter of Hadassah are welcome
to attend. Bring a friend. There's
no obligation to join. You'll find
out why Hadassah's been growing
for almost 75 years and has over
380.000 members.
If you are already a member of
Tampa Chapter but have been
unable to attend morning
meetings, you're welcome to join
us.
Please call Dorothy Skop at
839-0167 if you are interested, or
if you want to be a part of the
night group but cannot attend this
event.
Assisting Dorothy are Lil
Bregman, Esther Latnik, Judy
Tawil, Nina Bernstein, and Rebec-
ca Baron.
Paid-Up Membership
Luncheon
Harbour House of Tampa, 2401
Bayshore Blvd., will be the setting
for the paid-up membership lun-
cheon of the Tampa Chapter of
Hadassah on Wednesday, Oct. 23,
at 10 a.m.
We hope many members will
join us for what promises to be an
enjoyable program and a delicious
complimentary luncheon for
members whose dues are paid.
Dues may be sent to Freda Brod
at 530 Lucerne Ave., Tampa
33606 or paid at the door.
"The Human Factor", a
15 minute film about the
Hadassah Medical Organization,
and narrated by Liv Ullman will
be featured and a short humorous
skit will be presented.
Coordinating this luncheon are
Dorothy Skop, Lil Bregman,
Margery Stern, Harriet Glaser,
Betty Freedman, Nancy Mizrahi,
Syd Fridkin and Freda
Rosenbaum.
Please RSVP to Freda Rosen-
baum at 879-3244 or Dorothy
Skop at 839-0167 so there will be
ample seating.
Items are still being accepted
for the Rummage Sale Nov. 10.
Ameet Chapter
"Essen and Fressen"
The Ameet Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its fifth annual
"Essen and Fressen" night on
Tuesday, Oct. 22 at 7 p.m. in the
clubhouse of The Lofts. This an-
nual event is a favorite featuring
the sharing of good friends and
good food. Admission is $5 per
person and a covered dish.
Friends and husbands are warmly
welcomed. Call Judy Levitt at
962-6021 for reservations and
directions.
This Oct. 22 meeting will
highlight the Hadassah Youth Ac-
tivities project and admission col-
lected will go toward this project.
Hadassah in 1920 and for nearly
30 years co-sponsored
Judaea and its parent Ai-
Zionist Youth commission]
1968, when these
were combined into
educational youth ,
Hadassah has been its sole!
sor. At this time a new l_
chosen, Hashachar, which i
"The Dawn" to signify- itj|
awakening.
Hashachar is the largest.
Youth movement program i
United States and is taking i
portant leadership position i
American Zionist Feder.
members are divided into I
and program-level grou,
ting with grade four to
Members run their own ori
tion and begin early the I
to be the Jewish
tomorrow.
Hadassah s youth activrd
pand horizons learning, I
and loving their Judaism bi
young Judaeans experience^
meetings, camps, conventi
Israeli programs. We are|
have several young Ji
ticipating in our Oct. 22 ]
Greta Schiffman is
this meeting. She is ser
year as the Florida
Region Youth activities i
son. She will be joined by I
Kerstein, Co-ordinator
Camp Judaea Capital Fund!
paign who will present IJ
presentation of Camp
located in Hendersonvistl
All interested members
community are cordially i
Westshore Address
?c*e \ "o3 iii. ,Tii

0vrt\
forvo^^cotvtac
"'ort*.1

iOKj&
?#&
\ihi:l
o*

OFFICi: CONDOMIMI
:il"\


Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 11
llary McReynolds
ILLARY McREYNOLDS
illary Lynn McReynolds,
iighter of Ms. Sandra
eynolds, will be called to the
_i as a Bat Mitzvah Saturday,
Y 26 at 11 a.m. at Congregation
xai Zedek. Rabbi Frank Sun-
lim and Rabbi Joan Glazer
er will officiate,
he celebrant is a student in the
irai Zedek Religious School
) an 8th Grade honor student at
hanan Junior High School.
' is a serious art student and
|igned her Bat Mitzvah
ations.
Is. Sandra McReynolds will
t a Kiddush luncheon following
services in honor of the
sion.
Ipccial guests will include
ry's grandmother from San
onio, Texas, and an aunt and
He from San Francisco.
ADAM TAUB
^dam Samuel Taub, son of Mr.
I Mrs. Ted Taub, will be called
he Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
urdav. Oct. 19 at 11 a.m. at
Obituaries
PIS
Harry, 30. of Portland. Ore., died
lay, September 26. 1HB5. in a f re. He
i native of Ishpeming, Mich., and was
^r 20-year Bay area resident, having
in Portland six months. He was
byed a- a salesman, and was a member
wrregation Schaarai Zedek. He is sur-
I by his father, William Manis; step-
r, Judith Manis of Tampa; a sister,
ett Mams ('lemas of Portland, Ore.; a
|ister. Mindy Ross; and stepbrother,
I Ross, aunt and uncle. Mr. and Mrs.
I Felsenthal, Tampa; uncle, Mr. Nate
i, Pond du \ac. Wise.
ENBLUM
>". '>f ("learwater, died Tuesday.
. 24, 1985 at Largo Medical Center
lul Hi' v. as l>nrn in New York City and
there in 1969 from Fort Pierce. He was
nal psychologist and was acting direc-
I the Child Guidance Clinic of Pinellas
fj Inc, from August 1967 through
M*r 19tiy. and he was owner and
lor of the Psychological Center, Clear
?. u 1969, He had been a consultant
m State Division of Vocational
MiUtmi, since 1967. He was a World
(1 Army veteran. He was a member of
He Rnai Israel, Clearwater. Clear-
^Kiwanis Club and the Pinellas-Paaco
gnu I ounael for Alcohol, Drug Abuse
Rental Health He was also a member
American Psychological Association
inumenms regional and local
Magical associations and was past
M of th,. Mental Health Association
*m County. Survivors include his
ra I.., three sons. Alex, Robert
, all of Clearwater; two daughters.
Kosenblum, Los Angeles, and Sue
IKosenhlum. Clearwater. two brothers
KM Jordan, both of Norfolk, Va. and
[Jp include members of the Schon-
MUrtmann and Harris families. Tarn
pawns may be made to Temple B'nai
| the Mental Health Association of
~ bounty. Inc.
HOWARD
APER 4
ACKAGING
DELIVERY FLORIDA
iW 432 3704
HOWARD
APER A
ACKAGING
Adam Taub
Congregation Schaarai Zedek.
Rabbi Frank Sundheim and Rabbi
Joan Glazer Farber will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
Schaarai Zedek Religious School
and a seventh grade student at
Wilson Junior High School.
Mr. and Mrs. Taub will host the
Oneg Shabbat on Friday evening,
a Kiddush luncheon and dinner
reception on Saturday evening in
honor of the occasion.
ALISON LEWIS
Alison Anne Lewis, daughter of
Mark and Ricki Lewis, will be call-
ed to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah
on Saturday, Oct. 19, at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger and Can-
tor William Hauben will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
eighth grade at the Hillel School
where she is the Chief Justice of
Student Government and on the
Headmasters Honor Roll, Captain
of Patrols and on the Chanukah
Speakers Bureau. She is a vice
president of Kadima and a Shab-
bat Torah Reader at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom. Her hobbies
include windsurfing, quilting, dan-
cing, and modeling.
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lewis will
host a Shabbat dinner on Friday
evening prior to services. Mrs.
Bella Nemiroff will host the Oneg
Shabbat Friday night in honor of
her granddaughter. Mark and
Ricki Lewis will host a Kiddush
Luncheon on Saturday and a par-
ty Saturday night at the Lincoln
Hotel for family and out of town
guests.
Special guests include Eli and
Ina Nemiroff, Ashley and RaeAnn
Nemiroff and Brian and Alicia,
and Sherry and Sam Husney,
Great Neck, New York; Stuart
and Hilary Lewis, Jay and Craig,
Prarie Village, Kansas; Rhona
and David Byer, Arlington,
Virginia; Toby Nemiroff, Robin
Indyk and Jeffrey Indyk, New
York City; Anne and Leo Golden
and Eva Geller, Albany, New
York; Bea and Gerry Gartenberg,
Sarasota; Sylvia Mallow, Miami;
Sy and Renee Indyk, Brooklyn,
New York; and Marilyn and Alan
Daniels and family, Parsippany,
New Jersey.
MARK MORDOH
Mark Solomon Mordoh, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sol M. Mordoh will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Friday, Oct. 25 and
Saturday, Oct. 26, at Congrega-
tion Kol Ami. Rabbi David Rose
Alison Lewis
Mark Mordoh
and Cantor Samuel Izaak will
officiate.
The celebrant is a student in the
Hay Class at Kol Ami. Mark is a
honor student in the seventh
grade gifted program at Young
Junior High School.
Mark is active in Boy Scouts as
a member of Troop 9 where he has
achieved the rank of life scout and
is presently completing the last
requirements for eagle scout and
the scouting religious award of
'Ner Tamid.' Mark's hobbies in-
clude competitive swimming, com-
puters, and building and racing
radio controlled cars and
airplanes.
Mr. and Mrs. Mordoh will host
the Oneg Shabbat on Friday even-
ing and a Kiddush Luncheon
following Saturday services in
honor of the occasion.
'Women's
Wednesday'
Continued from Page 1
sional Women's Network will
feature the movie after dinner,
and participants will join this
outstanding woman of achieve-
ment as she leads a group
workshop following the film.
The community is invited to
either (or both) the morning and
the evening- sessions. Cost is $18
pre-registration, and $20 at the
door (meals included, kosher
meals can be ordered). For further
information, call the Federation
office, 875-1618.
SOME PEOPLE NEED TO BE CARED FOR.
OTHERS NEED A CHANCE TO CARE.
WE BRING THEM TOGETHER.
We employ RN'a, LPN's, homehealth aides, home-
makers, nurse assistants and companions to provide
professional health care In your home. Perhaps you
know someone who could use our service, or who might
be interested in this kind of job <*^n't* *22!
have them call us. We are the local office of one of the
nation's leading private providers of home care.
Speakers Bureau Available
Positions open for retirees (full or part-time)
+
UPJOHN
HEALTHCARE
SERVICES
en 879-6363
Tampa/Hillsborough County
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-421 r> Kahhi Samuel Mallinger Services: Friday. 8 p.m.
Saturday. 9 a.m. Daily morning and evening minyan. 7:30 a.m., 5:45 p.m.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Conservative
3919 Moran Road 962-6338 Rabbi H David Rose, Cantor Sam Isaak
Friday, 8 p.m.: Saturday. 10 am
Services:
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Conservative
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger. hazzan William
Hauben Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim. Rabbi Joan Glazer Farber.
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday. 9:30 a.m.
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Center, University of South Florida Fletcher Arms Apartments. 3620 Flet-
cher Ave.. Tampa 33620 971-6788 or 962-2375 Rabbi Yossi Dubrowski, Director,
and Rabbi Shlomo Salvilowsky, Assistant Rabbi Friday, 7 p.m. Shabbat Dinner and
Services; Sunday morning; 9 a.m. Minyan and Brunch Monday Hebrew Class 8 p.m.
Orthodox Minyan in Carrollwood area Friday night at 7 p.m. and Saturday morn-
ing 9:30 a.m. 962-2375.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida
CTR 2382 Steven J. Kaplan, PhD. Director 5014 Patricia Ct, No. 172. Tampa,
Florida 33617 (Village Square Aptt.) 988-7076 Shabbat Services 7:30 p.m. Sun-
day Bagel Brunches. 12 noon.
JEWISH CONGREGATION OF SUN CITY CENTER
634-9162, United Community Church, 1601 La Jolla Street, Sun City Center, Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
_-/ _V -n-i/., U'Lin Chain
Chapel services available in Tampa.
Jonathan A. Fuse Dedicated to serving
wner Our Jewish Community
Funeral Director
4100- 16th Street N.
8L Pisisrg. FL SS70S
247-1772
Quality Style Safety 1
a Jl
IhondaI
Mike Gersholowitz Tampa Hondaland PH. 935-8585
LEi^iiitfcon
Robert A. Levin
Andy Lewis
Robert K. Berger
L. Mark Carron
EF Hutton & Company Inc.
102 W. Whiting St., 2nd Fir.
Tampa, FL 33602
Telephone (813) 223-4946
Florida Wats Line: 1-800-282-5871
Nat'l Wats Line: 1-800-237-8610
laROPROTCTIV CORPORATION
Underwriters' Laboratories Incorporated (UL).
approved
Burglar Alarm Systems Camera Surveillance Systems
Vault and Sale Alarms Card Access Systems
Holdup Alarms Automatic and Manual
. Closed Circuit TV Systems F"e Ala,m Systems
The need lor advanced security systems has never been greater
more critical or in more immediate dirmand. than it is today
U=CTRO-PROTCTIV CORPORATION
1102 North "B" Street Tampa, Florida 33606
(813)251-0578
LOUIS ZIPKIN
QUflUTV SCURITV SRVIC6S FOR VOUR 8USINSS AND HOM


h
'i..
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, October 18, 1985
The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece
PRESCHOOL
CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED
MI
JACKIE
JACKIE WEISSMAN from
Kansas City Early Childhood
Specialist in Jewish Music -
will praaant a "Slumber
Party" for chttdran and thalr
families on Saturday,
OCTOBER 19,1985
6.-O0 pre-school
7:30-grade school
DON'T MISS
THIS DELIGHTFUL EVENING!
Come In your "jsmmies"
ready to go home and Jump
Into bad with Miss Jackie
doing the best bedtime
stories and songs you've
ever heard.
COST:
$7.50family prepaid
$10 family at door
PARENTS: Hava plans for the evening? You owe it to your children to
bring them to hear Miss Jackie first! You won't regret it.
YOUTH
FIRST SUNDAY
FUNDAY OCT. 27
An Israeli Day is being planned
at the Main Branch of the JCC for'
our first Sunday Funday on Oct.
27. Aimed at children in grades
K-6, the day will run from 1 to 3
p.m. and will cost $2 for members,
$3 for non-members. We will be.
making filafel. playing Israeli
games, doing Israeli arts and
crafts, and performing Israeli
songs and dances. Please let us.
know in advance that you will be
coming. Pick-up will be provided
for North End children, if re-
quested. Contact Leigh.
BIRTHDAY BONANZA
Be a guest at your own child's
birthday party! Have a birthday
party at the JCC with your choice
of a swim (till Oct. 27), gym, or
arts and crafts party. The package
includes: a party leader: set-up,
serve and clean-up; birthday cake,
ice cream, drinks, invitations: par-
ty favors all for only $3.75 per
child! Minimum of 10 children,
please. The Center is available for
parties on Sundays, 2-4 p.m., on a
first-cone, first-served basis. For
details and reservations, call
Leigh Zalcon at 872-4451. Reser-
vations must be made two weeks
or more in advance.
KINDERGYM
Special Physical Education ac-
tivities for Kindergarten children
begai. on Sept. 24 and will con-
tinue Tuesday afternoons,
3:15"-4:15. Lisea Leonard, our new
Physical Education Assistant, will
be leading the class. Please call
Bill for further information.
JCC TRACK AND
FIELD DAY
The JCC will be holding its first
Track and Field meet at the Kol
Ami location on Nov. 17. Sign
your child up to compete in the
following events: 60 and 100 yard
dash, mile run, high jump, long
jump, and hurdles. Ribbons will be
given to all participants. Registra-
tion must be in by Nov. 8. Fees
will be: members $3 and non-
members $4.50. Awards will be
given to winners.
NEW YOUTH
AEROBICS CLASS
Due to popular demand, we
began a Youth Aerobics Class on
Oct. 2 for grades 4-8, which will
meet on Wednesday, 5-6 p.m.
Cost is $36/12 weeks. Call Bill at
the Center for sign-up or further
information.
TWEEN/TEENS
"SATURDAY
NIGHT LIVE"
BACK-IN-TIME PARTY
Come join the fun on Saturday,
Oct. 26, 7:30-11:30 p.m., at our
Back-in-Time Party, and at the
same time help us plan for a Teen
Ski Weekend in North Carolina
over Winter Vacation. Our Back-
in-Time Party will include a
barbecue, swimming and music.
Cost: only $2 per person.
TENNIS TOURNAMENT
The JCC will be holding a
Tween and Teen Singles Tennis
Tournament beginning Sunday,
Oct. 20. Shirts will be given to all
participants, awards to winners
and runners-up. Registration cut-
off date will be Oct. 17, so register
now! The cost is $3 members,
$4.50 non-members. Dates for
tournament:
Grades 7-9 Starting Oct. 20, 5
p.m.
Grades 10-12 Starting Oct.
20, 5 p.m.
FAMILY
1985 ISRAELI
CHASSIDIC FESTIVAL
How can you experience Israel
without leaving Tampa?
Where can you go for two
hours of thoroughly enjoyable
entertainment for the entire
family?
Where can you listen and look
at music and dances from the Bi-
ble as well as Israel?
The answer to all of the above
questions is simple Israeli
Chassidic Festival.
Once again, Israel's most
popular production will perform
here in Tampa at the Tampa
Theatre on Monday, Dec. 2. Mark
your calendars now, order your
reserved seats and don't miss out
on a celebration of song, music
and dance by Israel's most
talented performers. For those of
you who have been to the
Chassidic Festival in the past
years, you know the enjoyment
received from this thoroughly
entertaining evening. For those of
you who have never been to the
Chassidic Festival, don't miss the
opportunity to hear, feel and live
the old Jewish tradition in the new
Israeli spirit. Bring the "kinds,"
the bubbas, the zaydas the
whole mushepucha everyone
will be proud to be a Jew as they
sing, clap hand and stomp their
feet as the spirited music per-
vades the theatre.
Won't you consider being an en-
dowment supporter or a patron?
Call the Center for details.
NEW YEAR'S EVE
BABYSITTING
And you thought it was too ear-
ly to be thinking about New
Year's Eve! Why should the
parents have all the fun on this
special night? The JCC is holding
a New Year's Eve "Sleep-In" for
Children on Dec. 31, 8 p.m. till
Jan. 1, 10 a.m. Bring your kids to
a New Year's Eve party of their
very own! Fees: $20, first child, $5
every child thereafter. Call the
Center for further information.
NEWSPAPER RECYCLING
v PROJECT
The JCC is recycling old
newspapers as a major fundrais-
ing project for the Senior Pro-
gram to compensate for the re-
cent loss of federal funding. The
collection bin is located on the
grass next to the garbage dump-
ster, near the DeLeon Street
parking lot. One full dumpster
nets the Senior Program
$180-$200! Please bring
newspapers only (no phone
books, magazines, computer
print-out paper, etc.), fold them,
and leave them in grocery bags at
the dumpster on Monday,
Wednesday, or Friday, between 9
a.m. and 12 noon. We are also in
need of stacking volunteers. Give
.Judy London a call at the Center if
you can help us out.
Cortez Condominium Complex.
Hors d'oeuvres and set-ups will be
served. BYOB. The object of this
is COSTUMES, don't you see?
Now should you dare to attend un-
costurned, you do so at your own
risk! I don't want to spread horror
rumors, but Variety Club can't be
held responsible for your fate.
Now is the time to let your hair
down, and hang loose! Folks, the
odometer might show we have
travelled some miles, but the gas
tank is still pretty full. Don't just
sit there while it evaporates. Keep
on travelin' til it all runs out! $10
per person, paid reservations
necessary to JCC by Monday, Oct.
21. Call Tillie Bruck at 985-8662.
ISRAELI
DANCING CLUB
Want to learn some Israeli
dances or just brush-up for the
next Bar Mitzvah? Then join us
Wednesday evenings 8-10, for our
fun-filled Israeli Dance Club. It's a
wonderful way to make new
friends and renew old friendships.
Cost is $1 members, $1.50 non-
members.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
"CENTERSTAGE" PLAYERS
PRESENT
AN ORIGINAL MUSICAL COMEDY
SATURDAY, NOVBBER 2 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3
7:30 Hors D'oauvras
8:00 Show Tim*
Dessert following show
$20.00 Patron (special seating)
$10.00 Adult
$ 5.00 Children
12:30 Lunch
1:00 Show
Sr. Citizen Discount
on Sunday $7.50
2808 Horatio Ave. 872-4451
BOOK FAIR
IN PLANNING STAGES
The second annual Book Fair
sponsored by the Jewish Com-
munity in conjunction with the
Jewish Community Center is well
into its planning process. The date
has been expanded. Instead of just
one day (Nov. 17) from 10 a.m. un-
til 4 p.m. we will also be sellng
books on Nov. 18 and 19 from 12
to 8 p.m. These evening hours will
be for people who cannot attend
on Sunday and who work. Hillel
school will come during the school
day. Sunday School children are
invited to. come as a class on
Sunday.
Also on Sunday there will be
book reviews by local Rabbis and a
cooking demonstration from a
Jewish Cook Book. There will be
story telling for young children.
There will be a story writing
contest for all children in grade
school; the topic will be My
Favorite Jewish Story
If you would like to be involved
in this activity, please call Terry
Abrahams at the JCC.
ADULTS
CLUB VARIETY'S
COSTUME PARTY
We are celebrating all October
birthdays on Saturday. Oct. 26. at
the Cortez Recreation Hall in the
"KNOW YOUR
COMMUNITY SERIES"
ADL, JNF, TJSS What are
all these initials? Come to the
Center and find-out just what the
Jewish Community Agencies are
in Tampa and the entire Bay
Area, and how they can be of use
to you and your family. More im-
portant: Find-out how you can be
of use to them! No charge for this
series. Monday evenings at 7:00.
Please register in advance for
the program, even though there is
no charge, so that we are assured
that this is of interest to the com-
munity and will be well attended.
Oct. 21 Chabad House; JCC
(Jewish Community Center)
Oct. 28 Hillel School; Hillel
Foundation
MIXED DOUBLES
TENNIS TOURNAMENT
The JCC will sponsor a mixed
doubles Tennis Tournament on
Sunday, Nov. 3 at 7 p.m., on the
JCC courts. Registration cut-off
date is Oct. 30, so sign-up now!
The cost will be $3 members (per
team) and $4.50 non-members
(per team).
SENIORS
TRAVEL CLUB
GOES SHOPPING
The Travel Club has scheduled
another fun and relaxing trip to
COMING Up|
Oct 18 Newj,
recycling
Oct 19 MiM
Slumber Party; sj
Evening Under the Sti
Oct. 20-Singles']
Bombay Bicycle
Tween/Teen T<
Tournament
MOct. 21, 23 and
Newspaper recycling
Oct. 21 Fun.
Burial Arrangement
Your Community I
Oct. 22 Yiddial
Your View of the C
Oct. 23 Strar,
Other Dangers; TravJ
Outing to Mall; Is
Club
Oct. 26 Club
Costume Party;
Night Live Party'f
Oct 27 Sunday.
(Israeli Day); Final Pa
Oct. 28 and
Newspaper recycling
Oct. 28 Love
Laughter; Know Yo
munity Series
Oct. 29 Your
Century
Oct. 30-Finali
day for Mixed Don
nament; Israeli Dance!
Nov. 1 NewJ
recycling
Nov. 2 and 3 -
Sadie"
Nov. 8 Final re
day for Track and I
Tampa Bay < enter for I
lunch and a movie on W4
Oct. 23. This is always l
activity for Travel Club l
We'll leave the JCC at I
and return at 4:30 p.m.
OCTOBER
FRIENDSHIP'
"Love Through Lau
Bob Blasser, local come
a knock-out [>erfor
you look .it things
lighter, brighter side. Aj
dish event at noon pr
p.m. performance
Oct. 28.
YIDDISH "YACl
Spend an hour in Yid
versation. This Yidd
together is designed fort
pie who enjoy the opp "
practice their Yiddish will
genial group. Coffee andr
Deserved. Oct. 22 at 7 f
$1.
FUNERAL AND Bl
ARRANGEMENTS |
A special presenUtwjjl
staff of Garden of m
Funeral Home, provida*!
mation on alternative typjM
vices, burial arrangement
options, and the impo
pre-planning. Monday.
1:30 p.m. This is part ot
ing series on Income
ment, offered by the
Program.
ipartofoaj
NEWER MEMB
Mr.mndMr.D.r|daa*
Mr. and Mrs. *>*f*Z
Dr. nd Mr* *2i l
Mr. and Mrs Krd La**" I
Irene Redrwr jfl-astl
Mr. and Mr* !ochlW*^
Janet Silverman ^
Mr and Mr* *'*?ZT
Mr. and Mr* SunC<*
Julea Lavan
Mickey Mill"
Mr-a^Mr*!*^,
Mr. and Mr* ?**&
Dr ndMr> Kofertr


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