The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00271

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
17 Number 14
Of Tampa
Tampa, Florida Friday, July 12, 1985
Fnd Shoctft
iPric* 35 Cents
Federation Board Approves
1985 Allocations

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camp at Atlit, in mrrthern Israel, Israel promises the imminent release of some
fore the release o/Shiites last week. 1*00 more, (jta/wzn News Photo)
ing Hostage Crisis
ultz Praises Peres for 'Cooperation'
The Tampa Jewish Federation
Board of Directors approved the
allocations for recipient agencies
at its June Board meeting for the
1985-86 fiscal year.
The budgeting and allocations
process began several months ago
under the leadership of its chair-
man, Herbert Swarzman. The
Budget and Allocations Commit-
tee dealt with the largest amount
ever realized in Tampa, but faced
the frustrating realism that the
dollars available for distribution
were considerably less than the
requests.
The Board of Directors
distributed $1,150,000 between
UJA, local and national agencies,
with an additional $110,000 raised
and earmarked for "Operation
Moses" (the resettlement of
Ethiopian Jews). United Jewish
Appeal received the largest
amount, $600,000, with $490,000
allocated to local and national
agencies.
Two new local allocations were
made this year to the High School
in Israel Program and the Tampa
Bay Area Singles. The High
School in Israel program started
last year with a grant from the
TOP Jewish Foundation and this
year will continue with funding
provided from campaign receipts.
The allocation to the Tampa Bay
Area Singles will aid and assist
the singles group in their pro-
Continued on Page 6-
Jy DAVID LANDAU
,EM (JTA) Premier
?s has received a letter from
State George Shultz praising
cooperation" and "solidari-
ne U.S. during the Beirut
pas not immediately made public.
said Shultz expressed America's
Israel's "strong support" while
fworked for the release of the
were freed after 17 days as cap-
loslems in Beirut.
in Warns
ACCORDING TO the sources, Shultz wrote that
the cooperation between the two countries "defied
the attempts of those who would divide us" and
"contributed greatly to the resolution of the
situation."
The Secretary of State added that the episode
was a "lesson to all nations that refusal to submit
to terrorists' threats and demands" is the best
guarantee of security.
It was not clear from Shultz's letter whether the
"cooperation" he hailed referred to Israel's
postponement of the release of the 750 Shiite
prisoners it holds for the duration of the hostage
Continued on Page 5
Reagan Praises Israel
For Strong Hostage Stand
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) President Reagan praised
"the strong position taken by the government of Israel
against surrendering to terrorism," and said, in a letter to
Premier Shimon Peres, made public on Independence Day
last week, that "the ties between Israel and the United
States have been strengthened by the ordeal" of the 39
American hostages released in Beirut June 30.
REAGAN'S LETTER THANKED Peres "for the
assistance and cooperation extended by you and your
government during the TWA hostage crisis. The safe
return of our innocent hostages ... is a signal to the na-
tions of the world that refusing to give in to terrorism and
to terrorists' demands is the best and indeed the only way
to combat and ultimately eliminate this scourge."
Reagan added, "The strong position taken by the
government of Israel against surrendering to terrorism has
earned the respect and admiration of all those ... who
prize ... freedom and justice."
orists May Strike At U.S. Again, hlkmmt Terrorist on Wal
emand 'Impossible' Concessions For Complicity in Murder
FGH ORGEL
IV (JTA) -
^mister Yitzhak
earned that the
Ite Moslem ter-
|s serious securi-
for Israel but
Jens non-Israeli
bad.
recent Shiite ter-
|non on Syria which,
is the dominant
fcon and controlled
lorganizations ^
;here. Syrian Presi-
ad has been hailed
[Administration for
rie release of 39
jes held by Shiites
days.
JKE at the opening
Conference on inter-
ism and how to
H>y the Jaffee
Bgfc Studies of
Unity. It was at-
'lemic experts
(finals from several
* ad 100 Israeli
that while the
p"tistitute Israel's
terrorist threat,
presents a new
and potentially even more serious
problem. He said that in 21 years
of dealing with terrorist activities,
he had never come across ter-
rorists prepared to die in suicide
missions. He noted that for many
Shiite terrorists, their mission
was not fulfilled unless it ended in
the suicide of the perpetrator.
If this kamikaze attitude is ex-
tended to targets abroad, it will
create an entirely new kind of
threat, Rabin said.
Rabin listed these as hijackings
and the seizure of Americans or
other non-Iraelis as hostages
whose lives would be spared only
if Israel made concession that
were unacceptable. He predicted
that terrorists would strike
abroad because security measures
taken by Israel made it difficult if
not impossible to hit Israeli
targets.
Rabin said he thought last
week's terrorist bombing in
Madrid was the work of Shiite ex-
tremists. One woman was killed.
and 27 persons were injured when
a bomb exploded outside the
British Airways office in the
Spanish capital. The same
building houses the offices of
TWA, the American air carrier
whose Flight 847 was hijacked by
Shiite extremists on June 14,
Defense Minister Rabin
leading to the hostage crisis in
Beirut.
Rabin repeated Israel's explana-
tion that it planned to free the 300
Continued on Page 5
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A
suspected leader of a
Lebanese terrorist group
was ordered to stand trial
for complicity in the murder
of Israeli diplomat Yaakov
Barsimantov who was gunn-
ed down outside his apart-
ment building in a
fashionable section of Paris
on April 3, 1982.
The order, by a French judge,
followed identification of the
murder weapon in a cache of arms
found at the hideout of "The
Lebanese Armed Revolutionary
Faction" one of whose suspected
leaders, George Ibrahim Ab-
dullah, has been in custody since
his arrest in Lyon last October.
POLICE SAID the weapon, a
Czech-made 7.65 mm. CZ-70
pistol, was the same used to
murder Lt. Col. Charles Ray,
Deputy Military Attache at the
Embassy here on January
18, 1982.
It was also used, police said, in
the attempted murders of two
other American diplomats, Am-
bassador Christian Chapman who
was not injured, and the U.S. Con-
sul General in Strasbourg, Robert
Homme, who was seriously
wounded on March 26, 1984.
Abdullah was arrested in Lyon
following the interrogation by
Italian police of two Lebanese
caught trying to smuggle ex-
plosives into Italy from
Yugoslavia.


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Alter Named Executive Vice
President By Federation Board
-H-
, ,1 ,
FVidiy.'July 12; 1&B5/I1m> Tewi&'irloSHdiaii o/ti^pa'' Pagii*
y S. Alter, who has served
# Tampa Jewish Federation as
5 Executive Director will become
je Executive Vice President as of
ply 1. In recognition of his com-
letion of seven years of service to
k Tan.pa Jewish Federation,
he Tampa Jewish Federation
i of Directors unanimously
vm to change the title of Ex-
Ltive Director to Executive
|ce President
.Mile the duties and respon-
fcilities remain the same, the title
Unge reflects a trend in profes-
Lal positions around the coun-
i and recognizes Alter's efforts
behalf of the Tampa Jewish
nmunity.
Gary Alter
Dr. Kenneth W. Stein Appears
For Jewish National Fund
enneth Stein
Recently, at a brunch in the
Margaret Heye Great Room of
Ruth Eckerd Hall, sponsored by
the Jewish National Fund's
Educational Series, Dr. Kenneth
W. Stein spoke to 150 people
about his highly regarded new
book The Land Question In
Palestine, 19171939. His presen-
tation included the political
history of Palestine, land acquisi-
tion and the Arab-Jewish conflict.
Dr. Stein is an Associate Pro-
fessor of Near Eastern History at
Emory University in Atlanta. He
also serves as the executive Direc-
tor of former President Jimmy
Carter's project for the study of
the Arab and Israeli dispute, at
the Carter Center located there.
mtre for Women to Begin 12-Week
Workshop On 'Surviving Stress'
I Since July 3 and on-going for 12
Wednesday evenings from 7 to 10
|m., Jan Brady has been presen-
\ a workshop entitled "Surviv-
Stress" at The Centre For
[omen. 305 S. Hyde Park
jvenue. Tampa. (The Centre was
Irmerly known as the Women's
p-vival Center)
Brady indicates that par-
ents may enroll in the
brkahop as it progresses
trough July and into the month
August. The course will in-
fease self-awareness and
facilitate emotional growth. Par-
ticipants will learn to identify
their personal "Stressors," and
then be trained in various techni-
ques of stress reduction, such as
muscle relaxation, deep
breathing, and biofeedback.
Instructor Brady comments,
"Each individual will learn what
works best for them. We all res-
pond differently; both to stressors
and means of relief."
A monthly $20 donation is re-
quested at the Centre.
>%im %>uA, ,'jfinti/tf His tely &*t
>i6issants
Delicious buttery flavor w every light, flaky bite
that's the special taste treat waitwo for you to enjoy
x empre kosher'8 all buter croissants. prepared from
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Ambassador to Israel Samuel Lewis and Wife,
Sallie, Honored With JNF Forest
A Jewish National Kund torest
and picnic area was dedicated in
honor of United States Am-
bassador to Israel Samuel Lewis
and his wife Sallie, who recently
completed their eight-year tour of
duty in Israel.
The dedication ceremony was
attended by Prime Minister
Peres, JNF World Chairman
Moshe Rivlin, World Zionist
Organization and Jewish Agency
Chairman Arye Dulzin. Tel Aviv
Mayor Shlomo Lahat and senior
Cabinet miisters.
The Lewis Forest of 10,000
trees in American Independence
Park near Jerusalem, is a gift
from the Ambassador's Israeli
friends including the Association
of Americans and Canadians in
Israel, which has already planted
a grove of 1,000 trees. The forest
stands near the John F. Kennedy
Memorial and the Senator Henry
M. Jackson Forest. More than a
million trees have been planted in
the Park, which was established to
honor the United States on the oc-
casion of the Bicentennial in 1976.
Prime Minister Peres told
Lewis, "You arrived at a very
stormy period in our nation's life.
Through your tact and patient
understanding of our problems,
you steered our two nations
through rough waters to the pin-
c 1006 0tnc ComoamM. Inc
United States Ambassador to Isarel Samuel Lewis (left), and his
wife Sallie, unveil a plaque at dedication of a Jewish National
Fund forest in their honor in Israel. Participating in the
ceremony is Moshe Rivlin, JNF World Chairman. The Lewis
Forest, in JNF's American Independence Park, near Jerusalem,
was presented in tribute to the couple on the eve of their retire-
ment after an unprecedented eight-year tour of duty in Israel.
nacle of mutual friendship," he
continued. "Your presence has
been deeply appreciated." JNF
Chairman Rivlin praised the Am-
bassador for his "manifold ac-
complishments and genuine
friendship for the State of Israel
and her people."
The Lewises were visibly af-
fected by the dedication, at which
a children's choir sang Israeli
pioneering songs and the
celebrated hit, "Jerusalem of
Gold." Unveiling the plaque, the
Ambassador said, "I am truly
overwhelmed," declaring that "I
could not have asked for a more
fitting gift to be remembered by
in Israel." Thanking Israelis for
their warm hospitality during the
couple's term in Israel, Lewis
said, "No one can harm the
deeply-rooted relationship bet-
ween our two peoples, for we are
like one family.
Beatrice
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Qn
a-:-.-..'-.'i'.-.'...
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, July 12, 1985
Oewish Floridian
Of Tampa
FREDK SHOCHET
Kditor and Publiah*r
Buainesa Office: 2MA Horatio Slract. Tampa. Fla 33409
Teiaphoot 872-4470
Publication Offic* 120 NE 6 St. Miami. Fla 33132
SUZANNE SHOCHET AUDREY HAUBENSTOIK
Eiecutiva Editor r- <111< .
Fnd Shochi
TW J<... Floridiaa Domi Not GaarailM Tar Ka.hrulh
Of The- Merrhandiae Advertiaed la I la < oluma*
I'ublishMt Hi Weakly by Tbr Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Sriind Class Postage Paid at Miami, r la
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
SI BSCRIPTION RATES il/xal Areal 2 Year Minimum Subscription IT 0(11 Annual *3 501
Out of Town Upon Request
The Jewish Floridian maintain* no "free list People receninji the paper who have not mbaCritwd
directly are subscribers through srrangemeni with the Jewish FMaMUM "I lampa wherebv *2 2 per year is deducted from their contributions for a subscription to the paper Anyone wishing ic.
cancel such a subscription should so notify The Jewish Floridian or Hat FattartUOfl
Friday, July 12, 1985 23 TAMUZ 5745
Volume 7 Number 14
Spotlight On...
Cece Hurwitz
By AUDREY HAUBENSTOCK
The halls of the Jewish Com-
munity Center ring with the
laughter and exuberance from
this southern woman from North
Carolina, Cece Hurwitz. Cece is
the Early Childhood Director of
the JCC Pre-School and a
graduate of the University of
South Carolina with a Bachelor's
degree in Early Childhood Educa-
tion and a Master's Degree in
Education.
"I am an early childhood person
from the word go. Most often you
will see nif covered with paint just
like children. I am always in and
out of the classrooms," said
Hurwitz.
This vivacious young woman
has a total commitment to the
young children who will attend
the preschool in the two loca-
tions. Besides the preschool there
will be Day Care, from 7:30 a.m.
until 6 p.m., and an afternoon
enrichment program at the Tam-
pa Jewish Community Center and
at Congregation Kol Ami.
Cece said. "I want this to be like
a second home and family." These
children spend much more time
with us than they do at home,
therefore this has to be a warm
loving ituation."
Judging by the fact that Hur-
witz was driven 85 miles to
Kinston North Carolina, each
Sunday b religious school means
that Jud.iT and Hebrew content
will be ai. important aspect of the
JCC Pre-School program.
In keeping with her philosophy
to develop skills along with
academics Cece will introduce the
use of more music and movement
enrichment and a total freedom in
fine art*, the discarding of lines
and boundaries. The two year olds
will ha.e a chance to enhance
their m<.' >r skills and the three
and four year olds will be able to
master their social skills and get
ready for the group setting of
kindergdr:.
There wi" be regularly schedul-
ed story tines and times for the
children to share experience, giv-
ing them a chance to use their own
resources and learn to express
themselves and interact with each
other. Hurwitz said, "It is a
delicate operation to develop and
mold behavior and social
responses."
Hurwitz h pes to involve the en-
tire family in the pre-school and is
designing a program which will be
flexible in order to best serve the
families involved. She said, "It
isn't just the mothers being in-
volved with the children anymore
and I want to involve the fathers
into taking a positive active in-
Aloni in Hospital
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Shulamit Aloni, leader of the op-
position Civil Rights Movement
(CRM), was hospitalized Saturday
for what was described as a mild
heart attack. The 55-year-old
Knesset member complained of
feeling ill after playing tennis.

^'
Cece Hurwitz
terest in the school and their
children."
Hurwitz said she is employing
certified teachers and specialists
with experience, with a ratio of a
teacher and an aide to each eigh-
teen children. She would like to af-
filiate with the University of
South Florida so that the school
would be able to use their testing
skills and speakers, and also tap
the resources of the rest of the
community.
Cece would like to see a pro-
gram initiated with the seniors,
giving the children the experience
of interacting with another
generation, something like
"Adopt a Grandparent."
During the summer new equip-
ment has arived at both the sites,
but much more is needed and Cece
is keeping a wish list available
from the teachers for future
purchases.
For more information about the
pre-school please call Cece Hur-
witz at the Jewish Community
Center, 872-4451.
ing for survival. A tal
^Te.^said^J
student, while my broth?
A Paraprofessional's View
. ,-, slow-learner." His resent*!!
Hillsborough County Suicide and Crisis Center reflected in behavior HJ
w it was agreed. Yes. ah* a>>9
By SALLY AXELROD
It's Saturday night. Red lights
blink in unrelenting unison as calls
come in to this calm and centered
haven of serenity from an outside
world filled wih the inhumanity of
fragmented and chaotic trauma.
The drama repeats itself 24 hours
a day. seven days a week. For this
is the Suicide and Crisis Center,
with telephone help-lines just a
phone call away.
A young father, working the
midnight shift: in daylight hours
caretaker of two small children
whose custody he sought in a bit-
ter divorce encounter. No sleep
for three days. We had to give him
answers. How could his wife have
abandoned him like this? He was
sobbing, and struggling with deep
and angry homicidal thoughts.
Heavy. Tour heart is breaking
along with his. When he leaves the
line, his heart is a little liehter.
Readers Write
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian,
We would like to thank
everyone involved for the
beautiful dinner given in our
honor by Hillel School. We are
very grateful to all the committee
members who worked so hard to
make the evening a success, and
the friends who attended and sup-
ported this event, as well as those
who made contributions to the
school.
Hillel School is a great asset to
this community anil we are proud
to be associated with it. This
Jewish Community needs Hillel as
much as Hillel needs each of us. In
Tampa we do not have the
cohesive Jewish neighborhoods
common in the Northeastern
cities, nor do we have extended
families and relatives nearby all
of which contribute to giving our
children a sense of identity.
Hillel School can be a substitute
for these and help to give the
youngsters of this city "roots"
and a feeling of belonging to the
larger Jewish Community. Hillel
also has a proven record of
superior academic achievement
that all of us can point to with
pride. Its graduates have rwen
sought after by all of the local
private and public schools and
have gone on to distinguished
records at many outstanding
universities.
We would like to urge the com-
munity to remember Hillel -
whether your children are too
young or too old for Hillel, please
remember to recommend Hiliel to
those new and old families that do
have children in this age group.
Hillel needs community support -
keep it in mind!
Sincerely,
Tampa
Albert and Judy Tawil

s
I I
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TRADITIONAL
PPY
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OSTES S
J.v.s.oN ( CREATIVE CATERING INC
MAKE ANY OCCASION
A MEMORABLE ONE
for & FftEEcon,ul,d.tion c.ll
PINEILAS-. 596-3580 TAMPA-.?57*85?
and so is yours.
A lonely old women. We call her
a chronic. She has been calling the
lines almost daily for several
years, just to hear another human
voice. Her story never changes. It
tells of a troubled marriage, and
many years alone in a poorly
maintained government housing
project. Her weekly visits to
Family Services are the highlight reassurance that he is realhrfl
areed- Yes, she" ,
more understanding of his
and perhaps assist him i,
studies. A later call-back
family was handling itsZ"
and would not need
resources. Another sucess
hoy:
A teen-age
chronic. Disturbed by thJ
questioned masculinity he
of a somber life filled with tor-
tuous thoughts of years gone by.
And the future? More of the same,
she says. She is filled with thanks
at the end of her allocated time,
and comforted with the feeling of
a little less pain for a brief mon-
ment in time.
A pre-teen child. She attacked
her older brother with a wrench
from the tool box, in retaliation
for a name-calling exchange of
verbal abuse. Her distraught
mother needed resouces. "A six to
eight week wait." she was told.
What could be done before then to
keep paece in a family where
mother was the head-of-household
and father was long since gone to
another state, leaving behind un-
fulfilled obligations to his wife and
children. A quasi-family struggl-
Resorces. You try to g
resorces. Perhaps the fa
doesn't care enough to fa-
through. The child is caught ]
middle, with his own needs i
ing great aniety. and con
dependent on family for ^
If he gets the support, he is c
the lucky ones.
What i8 it that once wa,.
Accepting the human con*
warts and all. This must few
they were talking about. CrisS
can be as serious as a suicidTi
tempt or ideation, or for com,
the homesick college student,
failing grades. The Suicide,
Crisis Center is there to help.-
billboard say. "When Life Ha
There s a Safe Place to
238-8821. A community servia
provided by caring volunteers i
just a phone call away.
Binnie Warshaw Coppersmith
Vice President
Travels
Unlimited
(813)87&335
Lincoln Center, Suite 131
5401 W. Kennedy Blvd.
Tampa. FL 33609
Business Card Directory'
A BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY for
Professionals and Executives is being
introduced as a regular monthly feature of
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. If It is successful,
we will continue indefinitely.
Please send your business card, with
payment of $25.76 for the first edition. Future
placement will be invoiced by mail at the
same monthly rate.
Send To:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
2808 Horatio Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Attn: Business Directory Dept.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
a a
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Friday, July 12, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 5 )
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Closed Circuit TV Systems Fl,e A'a,m Systems
The need for advanced security systems has never been greater
more critical or in more immediate domand. than it is today
lCmO-PROTCTIV CORPORATION
1102 North "B" Street Tampa, Florida 33606
(813)251-0578
LOUIS ZIPKIN
QUALITY SCURITY SRVICS FOR VOUR 8USINSS RND HOM
Merrill Lynch
Realty
VICTOR EZRA BOBO
REALTOR* -Associate
L9
Florid., Inc.
[215 East Davis Blvd.
'Tampa, FL 33606
Office: (813) 253-2444
Eves: (813) 963-0325
Cypress Travel Center
INC
$50.00 Per Couple Discount On Any One Week
Cruise Through December 31,1985
8 1 3
3502 Henderson
Richie Whitaker
President / Manager
/ 8 7 5 0 2 5 2
Suite 101
Tampa. FL 33609
LAIfiLQBE
Sal Alhadeff
Distinctive Travel, Inc.
1211 North Westshore Blvd Ste 316
Tampa. Florida 33607
(813) 875-9323
Ovr 250 irvjepandwitlv owwJ and opf-
Ud traval aganciea in North America
ra/v tsic.
PERSONALIZED CHOCOLATE ITEMS
Catering for that Special Occasion
Holiday Dinners Available
Sandwiches and Gourmet Takeouts Available
Marsha Levin* Eileen SUeg el
Ann Trotaer Corinne Scanio
4820 N. Armenia Avenue Tampa. Florida 33603
Telephone 875-8842
a
ESC
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Robert A. Levin
Andy Lewis
Robert K. Berger
L. Mark Carron
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102 W. Whiting St., 2nd Fir.
Tampa, FL 33602
Telephone (813) 223-4946
Florida Wats Line: 1-800-282 5871
Nat'l Wats Line: 1-800-237-8610
Randy M. Freedman
Merrill Lynch
One Tampa City Center
Tampa, FL 33602
813-273-8586
PLEASE TELL OUR ADVERTISERS YOU SAW IT IN THE JEWISHFLORIDIAN
Rabin
Warns
| Continued from Page 1
Shiites long before the hostage
crisis but delayed because of an in-
cident in south Lebanon involving
its ally, the South Lebanon Army,
and the hijack of TWA Flight 847
shortly afterwards.
The hijackers demanded that
Israel free all of the original 766
Shiite prisoners who were
transferred to Atlit on April 2
from the Ansar detention camp in
south Lebanon. Had Israel sur-
rendered to the hijackers'
demands, it would have laid itself
open to further terrorist ac-
tivities, hijacking and hostage-
takings, Rabin said.
1 Observers at the conference
saw in some of Rabin's remarks a
: veiled condemnation of Israel's
war in Lebanon which began in
June, 1982 under his predecessor,
then Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon.
What the invasion of Lebanon
three years ago accomplished.
Rabin said was to encourage
Shiite terrorism which became
much more dangerous than the
terrorism of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization the invasion
was supposed to root out. "If the
Shiites really set themselves
against Israel at home and
abroad, Israel will really have a
problem," the Defense Minister
said.
The three-day conference will
split into small groups for inten-
sive discussions of such subjects
as Islamic terrorism; Jewish ter-
rorism; nationalist or ideological
terrorism in Europe and the U.S.;
combating terrorism; terrorism in
I Latin America; and the Soviet
connection and Arab connection
. with terrorists.
Israel Will
Take Role
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel will probably respond
favorably to an invitation from the
United States to participate in the
Reagan Administration's
Strategic Defense Initiative, dub
bed the Star Wars proposal, ac-
cording to a Voice of Israel Radio
report.
Premier Shimon Peres's office
was the scene of a meeting bet-
ween Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and other officials on the
U.S. invitation. The discussion
evolved around recommendations
by a defense establishment
delegation which recently return
ed from a visit to the United
States where it focused on the
Star Wars issue.
Shultz
Praises
Peres
Continued from Page 1
crisis, or its commit-
ment to release them once the crisis
was over.
ISRAEL HAS consistently
echoed the Reagan Administra
'tion's assertion that no deal was
made with the terrorists. Israel
says the phased release of the Shiite
prisoners from the Atlit detention
camp was planned long before
Shiite terrorists hijacked TWA
'Flight 847 on June 14 and subse-
quently held 39 of its passengers
!and officers hostage.
Israel has already released MX) of
the Shiite detainees, and the rest
will be released in the next few
weeks, depending on the security
situation in south Lebanon.


7'.
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, July 12, 1986
%.*
% t -'
1985 Allocations
Continued from Pag* 1
gramming. A similar allocation
has been made by the Pinellas
Foundation.
According to Swarzman, "our
most difficult task is choose bet-
ween many organizations, all of
which need significant assistance.
Our job is to help maintain the
vibrancy of our Jewish community
as well aa give aid to Israel, par-
ticularly in this time of economic
crisis." Serving with Swarzman
on the Budget and Allocations
Committee were: Les Barnett,
Sam Blum, Doug Cohn, Maril
Jacobs. Bill Kalish, Blossom
Leibowitz, Michael Levine, Jolene
Shor, Lee Tobin, and Judith
Rosenkranz.
BUDGET & ALLOCATIONS
INCOME 1984-1985 1985-1986
Regular Campaign Results $1,020,000 $1,110,000
Operation Moses 110,000
Miscellaneous Income 15,000
Interest Income TOTAL INCOME 25,000
$1,020,000 $1,260,000
ALLOCATIONS 110,000
Operation Moses
$1,020,000 $1,150,000
Shrinkage (5%) 51.000 57.500
Campaign Expense 87,772 112,343
$881,228 980.157
United Jewish Appeal Local and National 440,614 490,078
$440,614 $490,079
1984-1985 1985-1986
LOCAL ALLOCATIONS BUDGET BUDGET
Jewish Community Center $102,500 $122,500
Tampa Jewish Family Services 89,500 95,000
Hillel School 50,000 58,600
State Hillel Foundation 5,000 7,000
River Garden Home for the Aged 14,000 14,000
B'nai Birth Youth Organization 250 2,000
Jewish Floridian of Tampa 14,000 14,000
Florida Legislative Consultant 3,000 3,255
Tampa Jewish Federation 116,663 118,657
Jewish Community Food Bank 950 100
High School in Israel 5,000
Bay Area Singles 500
$421,163 $467,112
1985 1986
NATIONAL ALLOCATIONS ALLOCATION ALLOCATION
J.W.B. $2,000 $2,000
American Professors for Peace 100 100
Anti-Defamation League 100 750
United HIAS Service 250 350
Jewish Telegraphic Agency 100 100
American Jewish Committee 100 100
NJCRAC 500 750
Jewish War Veterans 150 150
Joint Cultural Appeal 50 50
Jewish Children's Service
(Atlanta) 750 850
Synagogue Council of America 100
JESNA 100 100
North American
Jewish Students Appeal 50 50
American Jewish Congress 100 100
National Conference of
Soviet Jewry 100 350
National Jewish Resource Center 100
$4,450 $6,000
Council of Jewish Federations 15,000 15,980
Contingency Fund 987 $490,079
$440,613
International
Intrigue
Revolve around
the world every
Sunday. Treat yourself to
the differing cuisines of the world
each week at our Sunday Brunch
buffet. Truly an international
experience, served every Sunday
11:00 a.m. until
2:30 p.m.
Adults $12.95
Children under 12
$5.95
TAMPA AIRPORT
Harriott
Tampa International
Airport, Tampa, FL
33623,879-5151,
Ext. 6166
Mrs. Marc Steven Goldsmith
Wedding
KLEINBAUM-GOLDSMITH
Adele Bernice Kleinbaum.
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Kleinbaum, became the bride of
Marc Steven Goldsmith, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Goldsmith,
Lakeland, June 30 at Congrega-
tion Rodeph Sholom. Rabbi Ken-
neth Berger, Rabbi Theodore
Brod, and Cantor William Hauben
officiated.
The bride's attendants were
Jodie Kleinbaum, maid of honor;
Alisa Goldsmith, Lakeland,
Marica Goldsmith, Houston,
Texas, and Denise Lynn Pickens,
bridesmaids. The groom's atten-
dants were Alan Goldsmith,
Houston, Texas, best man; Barry
Kleinman, Chris Molton,
Lakeland, and Dr. Eli Rose,
ushers.
Special guests' included the
groom's grandparents and Mr.
and Mrs. Ben Dudkin, and the
bride's great-grandmother, Lilly
Wasserman. Adding to the
joyousness of the occasion were
five generations of the bride's
family in attendance.
A reception was held at the
Holiday Inn-Northeast.
Their honeymoon was spent in
the Grand Cayman Islands. They
are associated with Goldsmith's
Rare Coins and Fine Jewelry and
will live in Tampa.
Engagement
PATRONTOBIN
Mr. and Mrs. Byron Patron an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter. Ellen, to Glenn Tobin.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Julius Tobin
Ellen is a graduate of Nor-
theastern University and she is
employed as a registered nurse at
Tampa General Hospital.
Glenn is a graduate of the
University of Florida and he is
employed as general manager of
American International
Container.
A November 30 wedding is plan-
ned at Congregation Rodeph
Sholom with a reception at the
Marriott Airport Hotel.
Mildred and Harry Michelson together again.
Menorah Manor UPDATE
A FAMILY IS REUNITED
Mildred Michelson welcomeo
her husband, Harry, back to St.
Petersburg as he moved into
Menorah Manor.
More than two years ago Harry
had to leave his home and loved
ones in order to receive the care
and attention that could be
secured only in a Jewish nursing
home. Mildred, unable to take the
northern winters was forced to re-
main in St. Petersburg and con-
tent herself with traveling back
and forth as often as possible.
But, now that Menorah Manor,
"Our Home for Jewish Living" is
a reality, Mildred and Harry are
once again able to spend their
days together.
In addition to Harry Michelson,
the Menorah Manor Family has
reached out to encompass Samuel
Cohen, Jeanette Diamond, Jack
Frankel, Roserita Gordon, Lena
Grobard, and Hilna Wolper. New
Residents will be moving in on a
daily basis and they look forward
to being able to continue par-
ticipation in their Jewish obser-
vances among friends and family.
Applications are still being ac-
cepted. For information contact
Barbara Friedman, Director of
Social Services, or Edward W.
Vinocur, Executive Director at
Menorah Manor. 255 59th St
North, St. Petersburg. FL 33710
or call (813) 345-3775.
MARGER TO HEAD
NOMINATING COMMITEE
Menorah Manor President Ir-
win H. Miller annouced the ap-
pointment of Bruce Marger to
'hair the Nominating Committee
for Menorah Manor. "Our Home
for Jewish Living." Miller charted
the Committee "to develop a slate
of nominees of Officers and
Governors who will continue the
augmentation of the Manor's pro-
gram in keeping with the com-
munities' needs and to present a
full report at the Annual Meeting
which will be a part of the dedica-
tion ceremonies on Sunday,
September 8."
Marger advised that this year
the entire Board of Governors
would be re-elected with stag-
gered terms to ensure continuity
of the Board for the Future; some
Governors will serve three years
some two years and others a
single year.
Marger urged anyone in-
terested in serving on the Board,
or wishing to propose a nominee
to the Board to write to him at
Menorah Manor. 255 59th St No.,
St. Petersburg, FL 33710.
MENORAH MANOR
GOES HAWAIIAN
The Residents of Menorah
Manor joined together on Mon-
day, June 24 to share in a most
entertaining Hawaiian program.
Helen Vitt presented a wide varie-
ty of Hawaiian songs and dances
(in the traditional grass skirt) and
presented each of the residents
with a lei while singing "For You
a Lei."
This is just a sample of things
store for the Menorah
Family. The Residents had
special cook-out picnic and (,_
on July 4, planned an outing tot
movies to see "Cocoon"
with the regular exercise i
piano, sing-a-longs, trivia
crafts, bowling and many .
weekly scheduled activities.
If you would like to share i
of your talents with the Men.
Manor Family, please cod
Renee Krosner, Program 1
at 345-2776.
Quality of Life Improved
Volunteers
The involvement of a large <
tingency of men. women
youth as Volunteers in Men
Manor has meant the improvi
merit of lifestyle for the Residen
as this has made it possible
everyone to participate in the I
range of programs and activitisl
planned at the Manor. The
blem of transporting from areat|
area is solved by these Volunti
who make it feasible for F
to enjoy outings to mot
restaurants, museums and
many other community offennttj
Adele Lurie. Director
Volunteers, stressed the in
tance of Volunteers during:
times; both in assisting
needing help in eating but
important to promote
tion at the dining tables.
pointed out that the need
volunteers in all capacities H
creases in direct proportion tot
number of Residents and she t
ed additional involvement
the Community. Lurie car iM
reached at (813) 345-2775 for*]
ditional information and apf*^
tion forms.
JFS Offers
Speaker's Bureau
The Tampa Jewish Family!
vices has a Speaker's BuraJ
ready to offer informative ""
educational programs to
organization.
The staff members are av
to speak to your group on ayi
ty of topics or they will tailorsj
program to meet your p
needs. Fees are based on the|
gram requested.
This list may help you choc*j
program: The Changing Je|
Family, Dealing With Stre* J
viving Your Teenager, Mtf"
Your Marriage Richer, You
Your Aging P%Z|
tiveness and the Jewish wo"
Fathering: A New Meaning,
Do You Rate As A Mate? DtfW.1
With Divorce, Growing Old
Growing, Self-Discovery *!
Teens, Mine, Yours, Our* WJI
ried Families, Building ^H
fidence and Self-Esteem. Ho*W
Make Peace With Your P**"*
To arrange for a program j
for more information p*"*
Robin King. 251-0083


.'i'.if Tafntwi/FriUAv. iulv 12, 11
Friday, July 12, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Tampa Page 7
fc
if
*
West German Chancellor Willi Brandt and Prime
hnister Shimon Peres of Israel planting trees at the dedication
o Jewish National Fund forest in Brandt's honor near
s. "May these trees grow strong like the peace process bet-
Israel and her neighbors, "Brandt declared, "so that
gh mutual cooperation their adjoining deserts will be green-
to support productive, flourishing communities."
Obituaries
IPAY
K. Karpay. of Lute, died Monday,
i 24. A Bay area resident for 26 year*,
was a member of Temple David
Synagogue and Sisterhood, the Jewish Com-
ity Center, Hadassah and the National
oil of Jewish Women. She was also an
rican Cancer Society volunteer and a
duate of New York University. She is
ved by her husband, Irwin J.; three
j, Dr. Richard I. of Land O'Lakee, Bur
I of Potomac, Md., and Andrew of Lutt; a
er, Herbert Kavet of Waltham, Mass.;
I four grandchildren.
ELDSCHNEIDER
ur H. Keldschneider, 61. of Wesley
el. died Monday, June 24. He had lived
in the Bay area for 2% years, coming from
N.Y. He was a U.S. Postal Service employee
and was of the Jewish faith. He is survived
by his wife. Rita; a son. Joel of Haslet, N.J.;
a daughter, Ellen Levins of East Northport,
N.Y.; sad six grandchildren.
NEUW1RTH
Anna Neuwirth. 87, of 3001 DeLeon St..
Tampa, died Saturday. She had lived in the
Bay area 62 years, and was a member of
Rodeph Shalom Synagogue and Temple
David Synagogue, and was a lifetime
member of Hadassah and Cheesed Shel
Ernes. She is survived by two sons. Seymour
of Waco, Tex., and Alvin of Hollywood;
three daughters. Judy Zerolnkk, Shirley
Kleiner and Marilyn Blakley, all of Tampa; a
sister, Millie Langaam of New York City; 15
grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.
AAA
Courier Express Inc.
BONDED INSURED 24 HOUR PICK UP
Local Statewide Nationwide
Tampa 873RUSH Pinedas 441-8404
State Wide Toll Free 1 -800-621 -RUSH
WE STAND OUT FROM THE REST
24 Hrs. Per Day, 365 Days A Year
Radio Dispatched
I Low Rates
1 Full Service
Competitive Rates
Daily Pick Ups
Uniformed Couriers
Proof of Delivery
Same Day Rush U.S.A.
Annual Contracts
Large Volume Accts.
Check Our Rates for Deliveries Exceeding
1000 Lbs., up to 45,000 Lbs.
Pick Up and Delivery to Remote Areas
We Take Pride in Finding the Impossible
and Personally Hand Deliver to the Recipient
Service Second To None We Care
' Bicycle Messenger Service In
Downtown Tampa
1730 S. Sterling Ave., Suite 210 Tampa, FL 33629
"Why Pay More When The Best
Is Available For Less"
Congregations
. i .-. .
.. > <
U'-'.".'V.
# > t
izations Events
CONGREGATION
Membership Committee
Kol Ami's newly formed
Membership Committee is hard at
work planning their activities for
the summer and fall. Of primary
concern is the creation of an infor-
mation packet, scheduling of
membership coffees and contac-
ting nonaffiliated Jewish families
who may be potential members.
Membership Committee coffees
to introduce our congregation and
its services to those interested will
be held on: Monday, Aug. 12;
Tuesday, Aug. 20; Wednesday,
Aug. 28; and Thursday, Sept. 5.
For more information please
call the synagogue office
962-6338.
HADASSAH TO HOLD
MEMBERSHIP COFFEE
One Lucky Member Will Win
A Free Beach Weekend
The Tampa Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a Membership
Coffee on Wednesday, July 24, at
the home of Judy Tawil (207 S.
Sherill) at 10 a.m.
Hadassah is actively seeking
young singles, young married and
young-at-heart women to join the
Tampa Chapter of Hadassah or
begin a new interest group. Only
15 women are needed to start a
group. If you are interested in
joining, but can only attend night
meetings, please let us know.
Membership is $15 a year and in-
cludes a subscription to the mon-
thly Hadassah magazine which
contains a wide range of educa-
tional and inspirational articles.
Women desiring more informa-
tion may call Freda Rosenbaum at
879-3244 or Nancy Mizrahi at
932-4699.
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist
Organization of America is
dedicated to strengthening our
Jewish way of life here in America
with study groups, education
days, youth groups, interesting
programs, Zionist and American
Affairs Projects, and supporting
Israel through the Hadassah
Medical Organization which in-
cludes hospitals, medical schools,
and more, a high school and col-
lege, and also helping the Jewish
National Fund and Youth Aliyah
Programs.
In 1912 Henrietta Szold told her
study group of the need for basic
health care in Palestine and they
sent a nurse to help. Since then
Hadassah volunteers have held
rummage sales or bake sales,
printed ad books, held luncheons,
etc. to raise funds to improve
health care in Israel and now its
hospitals are pace setters in the
Middle East and employ over
3,700 personnel. There are also
medical research programs. The
efforts of our volunteers allows 94
cents of each $1 raised to go
directly to the American and
Israeli projects. There are
presently 450 members in the
Tampa Chapter and over 370,000
members nationally in Hadassah.
All members who have paid
dues by July 25 will have their
names entered in a drawing for a
free beach weekend. Dr. Laurie
0ROWARD
IJAPER*
[PACKAGING
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 800 432 3708
QROWARD
[JAPERa
PACKAGING
and Ruth Glickman have donated
their condominium at Indian
Snores for a weekend, for two, in
August. The names of Life
Members will be entered in the
drawing.
Serving on the committee with
Judy Tawil are Nina Bernstein,
Fran Rabinowitz, Freda Rosen-
baum, Dorothy Skop, Lil
Bregman and Nancy Mizrahi.
TEMPLE DAVID
Shabbat To Commemorate
POW/MIA
Albert Aronovitz Post No. 373
and its Auxiliary wishes to invite
the public and all of those who
have served in the armed forces of
our country, to join with them to
commemorate the POW's and the
MIA's (missing in action). This
will take place on Friday, July 19
at 8 p.m. at Temple David on
Swann Ave.
Congregation Temple David
and Rabbi Samuel Mallinger have
once again extended to the
veterans the hand of welcome,
and stand with us, shoulder to
shoulder, on such events as this,
or any other time when this
spiritual support is needed. Tem-
ple David joins with us in exten-
ding an invitation to you all.
An Oneg Shabbat will be served
by the Post Auxiliary. Please
come, give us your support and
enjoy the camaraderie.
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
What better way to beat the
summer heat than a pool party at
the home of Phil and Barbara
Leckner, 406 Deer Park Ave.,
Temple Terrace, Sunday, July 21,
starting at noon. The Couples
Group will barbecue chicken and
provide cool drinks. Cost with a
non-dairy covered dish is $3/cou-
ple, members, $6/couple, non-
members; if no covered diah is
brought, the cost will be $5/cou-
ple, members and $8/couple, non-
members. Children are welcome
but must be supervised by their
parents. You don't need to be a
member of Rodeph Sholom to join
in the fun. For more information
about the Couples Group and to
RSVP for the pool party, call June
Kraff, 962-2183, or Phil and Bar-
bara Leckner, 985-3358.
Community Calendar
Friday, July 12
Candlelighting time 8:09 p.m.
Sunday, July 14
Tune in "The Jewish Sound" WMNF 88.5-FM, 10:30 a.m.1 p.m.
Tuesday, July 16
Jewish Towers Board meeting, 4 p.m. ORT/Tampa Chapter
meeting, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Jly 17 .
JCC Lunch Bunch, 10 a.m. Kol Ami Senior Socialites, noon.
Thursday, July 18
ORT/Tampa Chapter Bowling, 9:30 a.m. Mary Walker Resi-
dent/Management meeting, 1:30 p.m. Kol Ami Board meeting,
7:30 p.m.
Friday, July 19
Candlelighting time 8:07 p.m.
Sunday, July 21
Tune in "The Jewish Sound" WMNF 88.5-FM, 10:30 a.m.-l p.m.
Monday, July 22
B'nai B'rith North Tampa Board meeting, 8 p.m.
Wednesday. July 24
Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Board meeting, 10 a.m. Kol Ami
Senior Socialites, noon.
Thursday. July 25 .
ORT/Tampa Chapter Bowling, 9:30 a.m. Jewish Towers Resi-
dent/Management meeting, 1:30 p.m.
Friday, July 26
Candlelighting time 8:04 p.m.


*r .iijui. V i i ,'.: ^,'._
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Tampa/Friday, July 12, 1985


PRESCHOOL
SOUTH END STILL
HAS OPENINGS
Have you made arrangements
yet for your pre-schooler this fall?
Believe it or not, the beginning of
the new school term is right
around the corner!
PLAYTOTS
11:15 a.m.-noon. Ages: 18
months-2 years. Tuesday and/or
Thursday (as of Sept. 1). A parent-
child class designed for our
youngest Pre-School children.
Registration, $25. Monthly Tui-
tion: JCC Members $15 once a
week, $20 twice a week; Non-
Members $22.50 once a week, $30
twice a week.
2-DAY PROGRAM
9-11 a.m. Ages: 2-3. Tuesday
and Thursday. Child must be two
by Sept. 1. Parents must work
closely with their children.
Registration, $35. Monthly Tui-
tion: Members, $50, Non-
Members, $75.
3-DAY PROGRAM
9 a.m.-noon. Ages: 2Vi-3. Mon-
day, Wednesday, Friday. Child
must be three by April 1, 1986.
Parents must volunteer in
classroom one day each month.
Registration, $45. Monthly Tui-
tion: Members, $75, Non-
Members, $112.50.
5-DAY PROGRAM
9 a.m.-noon. Ages: 3-4. Monday-
Friday. Child must be three by
Sept. 1. Early Bird Registration,
$50. Registration, $75. Monthly
Tuition: Members, $125, Non-
Members, $187.50.
DAY CARE PROGRAM
7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Ages: 2-4.
Monday-Friday. Child must be
two by Sept. 1. 12 month pro-
gramming. Registration, $75. 3
year-4 year class, Monthly Tui-
tion: Members, $225, Non-
Members. $837.60. 2 year class
additional, $25 per month for 2
year old day care class. I
NEEDED
ADMINISTRATIVE
AS8ISTANT AT
JCf PRESCHOOL
8:3$La.av-2:30 p.m. at
NorltlMl(KolAi),beri-
Ding Aag. 12 and continuing
" Jene 17, 1986. Call
Cece flip will for further in-
formation or an interview.
CAMP
MINI-CAMPS
DELIGHT OUR CAMPERS
Our special mini-camps are of-
fering exciting extra activities to
the JCC campers: a tennis ladder
tournament, diving classes,
karate, a newspaper group, cake
decorating, cooking, music, and
drama. Monday and Thursday
afternoon the campers leave their
own groups for the final hour of
camp and go to their special areas
of interest. This new addition to
our camping program is a highly
popular one. It's a nice change of
pace!
t
CAMP LUNCHES
WEEK OF JULY 15
Monday Egg salad sand-
wich, chips and apple
Tuesday Cheese ravioli,
green beans and applesauce
Wednesday Tuna salad
sandwich, carrot sticks, chips
and banana
Thursday Fried fish,
mashed potatoes, peas and
chocolate pudding
Friday Grilled cheese
sandwich, glazed carrots and
cherry cake
The Jewish Community Center
Center Piece
CAMP LUNCHES
WEEK OF JULY 22
Monday Peanut butter
and jelly sandwich, chips and
banana
Tuesday Fried fish,
macaroni and cheese, green
beans and chocolate pudding
Wednesday Cheese and
mushroom pizza, tossed salad
and cherry cake
Thursday Spaghetti with
meatless sauce, roll and
applesauce
Friday Grilled cheese
sandwich, glazed carrots and
chocolate cake
Camp lunches must be pur-
chased by the week only (not
by individual days) and cost
$7.50/week. Orders should be
placed by Thursday of
previous week.
FAMILY
NEWSPAPER RECYCLING
The JCC is recycling old
newspapers as a major fundrais-
ing project for the Senior Pro-i
gram to compensate for the re-1
cent loss of federal funding. The
collection bin is located on the
grass next to the garbage dump-
ster, near the DeLeon Street
parking lot. One full dumpster
nets the Senior Program
$180-$200! Please bring
newspapers only (no phone
books, magazines, computer
print-out paper, etc.), fold them,
and leave them in grocery bags at
the dumpster on Monday,
Wednesday, or Friday, between 9
a.m. and 12 noon. We are also in
need of stacking volunteers. Give
Judy London a call at the Center if
you can help us out.
TUESDAY NIGHT
FAMILY DINNERS
Special thanks go to Alan and
Shelly Katz for being Chief Cooks |
and Bottle Washers at our Tues-
day night family dinners! Our first
evening started slowly, but we're
picking up speed and these
home-cooked recipes are really
sensational! Please call the Center
to make reservations. We need to I
know how many people will be at-
tending in advance.
SUNDAY NIGHT SUPPER I
AT POOL
The Goldstein's, Davidson's,,
Roth's Hanan's, and Lee Tobin
will host the July pool party on
Sunday afternoon, July 28, from 41
p.m. to 6 p.m. Bring your family'
and enjoy fun, food, and
fellowship. The charge will be $1
per plate, adult or child. Please
call the Center if you would like to
host the Aug. 25 pool party. The
June 30 Pool Party was a huge
success thanks to the Coffman's,
Wuliger's, Barat's, Smith's,
Rutenberg's, and Pears.
INTRODUCING
THE 1985-86 JCC BOARD
Board of Directors
President, Lee Tobin; Vice
President Programs, Jan
Wuliger; Vice President Ways
and Means, Johanna Barat; Vice
President Membership, Alice
Rosenthal; Vice President House,
David Boggs; Treasurer, Jack
Roth; Secretary, Ralph Marcadis
Members at Large:
Leah Davidson, Ex-Officio;
Public Relations, Jerilyn
Goldsmith; Long-Range Planning,
Donald Linsky; Personnel, Susan
Schwartz
Board:
Dan Albert, Marvin Aronovitz,
Galena Belkin, Robert Berger, Sid
Bleendes, Arlene Capeluto,
Esther Carp, Louise Eatroff,
Carole Ewen, Dr. Randy
Feldman, Doris Field, Rena
Firestone, Celina Forrestor, Lt.
Col. Allan Fox, Debbie Gittomer,
Bert Green, Jackie Kalson, Barry
Karpay, Gert Laxer, Louis Mor-
ris, Dr. Cindy Levinson Novick,
Barbara Port, Dr. Bonnie Saks,
Esther Segall, Dr. Mitch Silver-
man, Neil Spector, Ellen Stern, Al
Ward and Jay Markowitz,
honorary lifetime member.
President's Message
First of all, let me tell you how
honored 1 am to be elected Presi-
dent of the JCC, and that I will
continue to work as hard as I can
to make this Center the focal
point of Jewish activity in Tampa.
As I said in my remarks at the
annual meeting, I know that there
is a challenge for myself and for
the incoming board of directors.
How to meet that challenge is a
question we will often discuss and
work toward finding the answer. I
guess there is not one solid, true
answer. But if we all direct our ef-
forts toward coming up with
several solutions, we will find the
JCC a better place.
There are several areas which I
would like to work on in my term
as President, and if we can ac-
complish some of the goals I have,
then I can feel great pride when
my term is done.
First of all, I would like to see
the membership at the JCC take
significant strides. We are work-
ing to offer programs designed for
people of all ages in Tampa, but
that is not the most important
reason to be a member ... it is the
Begin again
EVERY TUESDAY
53~700 AT THE JCC
$ 3*ADUU5 W
KIR5
tw a
<*itt
n
July 12, 15, 17, 19, 22, 24,
and 26 Newspaper Recycl-
ing Pick-ups; Swim Team
Meets
July 16 Family Dinner at
the Pool
July 18 Stress Support
Group
July 23 Family Dinner at
the Pool
July 24 Travel Club to
Country Dinner Theatre for
"Most Happy Fella"
July 25 Stress Support
Group
feeling of Community Commit-
ment. If there were not members
before I grew up in the Center,
then I would not have had the op-,
portunity to do so. The same is
true for your children today and
will be for the future of our
children. We must build now.
I would like to see more involve-
ment in our programs. We are
forever adding new programs that
you have asked us for, and we
would welcome your support for
those services.
I want to see the JCC and
Memorial Hospital work out their
plans for a "Wellness Program."
This would help generate an add-
ed area of membership, but more
importantly it would provide the
JCC with a great deal of positive
public relations in the community.
These are just some areas that I
want to see improved. Our pre-
school is one of the best in the city,
but yet the quality and quanti-
ty .. can always be improved.
Our youth and teen areas, for so
many years a struggle to set in
motion, now seem to be involving
more of our young people. And
our Senior Program, which has
taken a drastic cut in financing
due to the removal of federal
funds, needs to keep operating in
the first-class manner it has
become accustomed to in recent
years.
We can make all this work if
YOU, Center member or not,
help. If you are a Center member,
find us two friends that aren't and
get them to join. Or if you are not
a member, sign up now Help
us to use our name Jewish
Community Center to its
fullest.
I saw a slogan several months
ago that read: "Don't Watch Us
Grow Come Grow With Us."
Shalom .
LEE TOBIN
PHYS ED
SWIM TEAM
SUPPORTS SENIOR
RECYCLING EFFORT
The JCC swim team competes
in a recreational, instructional
league which is designed to im-
| prove swimming skills and in-
troduce your child to a low level of
competition. Coach Lisa Leonard
U'lls us that although practice and
meets have already begun, open-
ings on the team are still
available. All children 5-15 are
welcome! The group meets Mon-
day, Wednesday, and Friday,
8:15-9:15 a.m., ongoing through
August.
As a special summer project of
the swim team, we are supporting
the Seniors' Recycling Effort
bnnging-in our newspapers oil
week. We encourage*^
do the same thing!
oncrf
UT guitarists play Back
i/vC
The Ringmaster (Circus i
?*""
The Lion and the Tamml
cus Day)
SENIORS
TRAVEL CLUB
TO SPEND AFTERNOON
WITH
"MOST HAPPY FELLA"
The Senior Program's .
Club will be heading for the I
try Dinner Theatre on We
day, July 24, to see the New Y
Critics Award-winning muafl
"The Most Happy Fella." *
for this delightful musical |
tion, with its incredible so
citing choreography, and
ding cast! We'll leave the JCC l
10:30 a.m. and return at 4:30'
Price ($18 members, $26
members) includes admia
buffet-style luncheon, and
transportation from the Ca*
Call us for reservations.
IN MEMORIUM
RENA FLANAGAN
It is with great sadness th
announce the loss of our
friend, Rena Flanagan. Fori
years Rena was an invaluable
of our Senior Program, a to*
strength and a source of love, |
ing and helping whenever i
wherever she was needed. Ai
human being, she will be
missed.
A WARM TAMPA WLLCOl
TO SOME OF OUR
NEWEST JCC MEMBER
Mr./Mrs. Gilbert Hernand
Mr./Mrs. Mark Lewis, MrJ
Robert Livingston, Mr._
Alton White, Dr./Mrs. B*
Goldstein, llr./Mrs. e
Grossman, Mr./Mrs. Gary ?
Mr./Mrs. Mark Zewalk, MJJ
Richard Walker, George
Mr./Mrs. Josh Sussman, l*'*
Peter Bryson. Ms M^"**V
nandez, Denise and Fern"
Fernandez, Mr/Mrs. Jj
Kahn, Barbara and
Crawford.


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